WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam scanners

  1. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  2. Beam test of wire scanner beam size monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam size monitor for emittance measurement is required to have around 10μm resolution for injector linac, and to have a few tenth μm resolution for an extracted beam from a damping ring in Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A wire scanner is a one of the candidate of a beam size monitor with a high resolution. The design and development study of the wire scanning stage has been done. The beam test using Tohoku 300MeV Linac was done and the emittance was measured by this wire scanner. A detection of beam size signal was done by a scintillator gamma detector placed at downstream of the wire stage. All of the measurements are taken by the computer. The beam test results are described. (author)

  3. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R.; Noo, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each ...

  4. Electro-optic and acousto-optic laser beam scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Johannes; Bechtold, Peter; Strauß, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Electro-optical deflectors (EOD) and acousto-optical deflectors (AOD) are based on deflection of laser light within a solid state medium. As they do not contain any moving parts, they yield advantages compared to mechanical scanners which are conventionally used for laser beam deflection. Even for arbitrary scan paths high feed rates can be achieved. In this work the principles of operation and characteristic properties of EOD and AOD are presented. Additionally, a comparison to mirror based mechanical deflectors regarding deflection angles, speed and accuracy is made in terms of resolvable spots and the rate of resolvable spots. Especially, the latter one is up to one order of magnitude higher for EOD and AOD systems compared to conventional systems. Further characteristic properties such as response time, damage threshold, efficiency and beam distortions are discussed. Solid state laser beam deflectors are usually characterized by small deflection angles but high angular deflection velocities. As mechanical deflectors exhibit opposite properties an arrangement of a mechanical scanner combined with a solid state deflector provides a solution with the benefits of both systems. As ultrashort pulsed lasers with average power above 100 W and repetition rates in the MHz range have been available for several years this approach can be applied to fully exploit their capabilities. Thereby, pulse overlap can be reduced and by this means heat affected zones are prevented to provide proper processing results.

  5. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  6. A sweep plate emittance scanner for high-power CW ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweep plate scanners are preferred for emittance measurement due to their versatility, simplicity, and precision. At the Advanced Technology and Development Center of Northrop Grumman, we have routinely used these devices for characterization of injector beams with less than 20 W/cm2 average power density. To characterize higher power beams, like those required for production of tritium or for radioactive waste transmutation, the scanner pod and data collection algorithm must be redesigned due to the possibility of melting the scanner's protective front face or distorting the precision entrance knife edges. Among the methods we have used to mitigate these effects, one consists of drastically reducing the amount of time required for data collection. In this method, the emittance scanner pod traverses the beam in two passes, each requiring less than 0.5 second. In the first pass, the phase space limits of the beam are determined. In the second pass, data is collected primarily within the phase space region limits determined in the first pass. In this way, enough points are collected to assure that the precision of the measurement is high, even though the data collection time for each scan is less than 0.5 second. This paper will describe the layout of the scanner components, the data collection electronics and algorithm, and the data analysis. (author)

  7. Methods and apparatus for laser beam scanners with different actuating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-hai; Xiang, Si-hua; Wu, Xin; Dong, Shan; Xiao, Ding; Zheng, Xia-wei

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, 3 types of laser beam scanner are introduced. One is transmissive beam scanner, which is composed of convex and concave microlens arrays (MLAs). By moving the concave lens in the plane vertical to the optical axis, the incident beam can be deflected in two dimensions. Those two kinds of MLAs are fabricated by thermal reflow and replication process. A set of mechanical scanner frame is fabricated with the two MLAs assembling in it. The testing result shown that the beam deflection angles are 9.5° and 9.6°, in the 2 dimension(2D) with the scanning frequency of 2 HZ and 8 HZ, respectively. The second type of laser beam scanner is actuated by voice coil actuators (VCAs). Based on ANSOFT MAXWELL software, we have designed VCAs with small size and large force which have optimized properties. The model of VCAs is built using AutoCAD and is analyzed by Ansoft maxwell. According to the simulation results, high performance VCAs are fabricated and tested. The result is that the force of the VCAs is 6.39N/A, and the displacement is +/-2.5mm. A set up of beam scanner is fabricated and actuated by the designed VCAs. The testing result shown that the two dimensional scanning angle is 15° and 10° respectively at the frequency of 60HZ. The two dimensional scanning angle is 8.3° and 6° respectively at the frequency of 100HZ. The third type of scanner is actuated by amplified piezoelectric actuators (APAs). The scanning mirror is actuated by the piezoelectric (PZ) actuators with the scanning frequency of 700HZ, 250HZ and 87HZ respectively. The optical scanning angle is +/-0.5° at the three frequencies.

  8. Superharp: A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superharp is an upgrade CEBAF wire scanner with absolute position readout from shaft encoder. As high precision absolute beam position probe (Δx ∼ 10μm), three pairs of superharps are installed at the entrance, the mid-point, and the exit of Hall C arc beamline in beam switch yard, which will be tuned in dispersive mode as energy spectrometer performing 10-3 beam energy measurement. With dual sensor system: the direct current pickup and the bremsstrahlung detection electronics, beam profile can be obtained by superharp at wide beam current range from 1 μA to 100 μA

  9. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  10. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D-bar100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D-bar100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D-bar100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D-bar100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate

  11. Laser and electron beam diagnostics with wire scanners in the XUV-seeding experiment at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free-electron laser (FLASH) in Hamburg delivers intense femtosecond laser pulses in the extreme ultra violet and soft X-ray spectral range for many kinds of experiments, like material science and femtochemistry. To improve the FEL properties in terms of spectral stability, a direct seeding experiment (sFLASH), using a high harmonic generation source as a seed laser was installed at FLASH. The longitudinal and transversal overlap of the seed laser and electron beam is crucial for the seeding process. Among others, wire scanners are used for measuring the transverse laser and electron beam profiles, to perform the transverse overlap. Wire scanners are scanning a thin wire across the electron beam or the laser while measuring the interaction between electrons or photons with the wire. The interaction produces a flux of secondary particles, which are detected with beam loss monitors or MCP detectors.

  12. Laser and electron beam diagnostics with wire scanners in the XUV-seeding experiment at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hass, Eugen; Azima, Armin; Curbis, Francesca; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Drescher, Markus; Hipp, Ulrich; Malrezopoulos, Theopilos; Miltchev, Velizar; Mittenzwey, Manuel; Rehders, Marie; Rossbach, Joerg; Roensch-Schulenburg, Juliane; Tarkeshian, Roxana; Wieland, Marek; Boedewaldt, Joern [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Bajt, Sasa; Duesterer, Stefan; Honkavaara, Katja; Laarmann, Tim; Schlarb, Holger [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Khan, S. [DELTA, Dortmund (Germany); Ischebeck, Rasmus [PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The free-electron laser (FLASH) in Hamburg delivers intense femtosecond laser pulses in the extreme ultra violet and soft X-ray spectral range for many kinds of experiments, like material science and femtochemistry. To improve the FEL properties in terms of spectral stability, a direct seeding experiment (sFLASH), using a high harmonic generation source as a seed laser was installed at FLASH. The longitudinal and transversal overlap of the seed laser and electron beam is crucial for the seeding process. Among others, wire scanners are used for measuring the transverse laser and electron beam profiles, to perform the transverse overlap. Wire scanners are scanning a thin wire across the electron beam or the laser while measuring the interaction between electrons or photons with the wire. The interaction produces a flux of secondary particles, which are detected with beam loss monitors or MCP detectors.

  13. Optical tomographic in-air scanner for external radiation beam 3D gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Optical CT scanners are used to measure 3D radiation dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. For radiotherapy dose verification, 3D dose measurements are useful for verification of complex linear accelerator treatment planning and delivery techniques. Presently optical CTs require the use of a liquid bath to match the refractive index of the gel to minimise refraction of the light rays leading to distortion and artifacts. This work aims to develop a technique for scanning gel samples in free-air, without the requirement for a matching liquid bath. The scanner uses a He-Ne laser beam, fanned across the acrylic cylindrical gel container by a rotating mirror. The gel container was designed to produce parallel light ray paths through the gel. A pin phantom was used to quantify geometrical distortion of the reconstructed image, while uniform field exposures were used to consider noise, uniformity and artifacts. Small diameter wires provided an indication of the spatial resolution of the scanner. Pin phantom scans show geometrical distortion comparable to scanners using matching fluid baths. Noise, uniformity and artifacts were not found to be major limitations for this scanner approach. Spatial resolution was limited by laser beam spot size, typically 0.4 mm full width half maximum. A free-air optical CT scanner has been developed with the advantage of scanning without a matching fluid bath. Test results show it has potential to provide suitable quality 3D dosimetry measurements for external beam dose verification, while offering significant advantages in convenience and efficiency for routine use.

  14. Optical Beam Steering Using a 2D MEMS Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Pétremand, Yves; Clerc, Pierre-André; Epitaux, Marc; Hauffe, Ralf; Noell, Wilfried; De Rooij, N.F.

    2010-01-01

    A bi-directional MEMS-based optical beam steerer was fabricated and assembled. The assembly of the different parts of the system was carried out. A displacement of several tens of micrometers has been demonstrated and optical beamsteering was shown with a system containing all the electronic and optical components. Resonance frequency and displacements measurements agree with the simulated ones. This displacement range is suitable for opto-electronic alignment applications.

  15. Superharp — A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, C.; Adderley, P.; Barker, D.; Beaufait, J.; Capek, K.; Carlini, R.; Dahlberg, J.; Feldl, E.; Jordan, K.; Kross, B.; Oren, W.; Wojcik, R.; VanDyke, J.

    1995-02-01

    The CEBAF superharp is an upgraded beam wire scanner which provides absolute beam position readout using a shaft encoder. Superharps allow for high precision measurements of the beam's profile and position ( Δx ˜ 10 μm). The Hall C endstation at CEBAF will use three pairs of superharps to perform beam energy measurements with 10 -3 accuracy. The three pairs are installed at the beginning, the mid-point and the end of the Hall C arc beamline. Using superharps in conjunction with a dual sensor system: the direct current pick-up and the bremsstrahlung detectors, beam profile measurements can be obtained over a wide beam current range of 1 ˜ 200 μA.

  16. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study , an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance ( P < 0.05. Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections ( P = 0.299. In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners ( P < 0.001, with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners ( P < 0.001, with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants.

  17. High dynamic range diamond detector acquisition system for beam wire scanner applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERN Beam Instrumentation group has been working during the last years on the beam wire scanners upgrade to cope up with the increasing requirements of CERN experiments. These devices are used to measure the beam profile by crossing a thin wire through a circulating beam, the resulting secondary particles produced from beam/wire interaction are detected and correlated with the wire position to reconstruct the beam profile. The upgraded secondary particles acquisition electronics will use polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamond detectors for particle shower measurements, with low noise acquisitions performed on the tunnel, near the detector. The digital data is transmitted to the surface through an optical link with the GBT protocol. Two integrator ASICs (ICECAL and QIE10) are being characterized and compared for detector readout with the complete acquisition chain prototype. This contribution presents the project status, the QIE10 front-end performance and the first measurements with the complete acquisition system prototype. In addition, diamond detector signals from particle showers generated by an operational beam wire scanner are analysed and compared with an operational system

  18. Secondary particle acquisition system for the CERN beam wire scanners upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing requirements of CERN experiments make essential the upgrade of beam instrumentation in general, and high accuracy beam profile monitors in particular. The CERN Beam Instrumentation Group has been working during the last years on the Wire Scanners upgrade. These systems cross a thin wire through a circulating beam, the resulting secondary particles produced from beam/wire interaction are detected to reconstruct the beam profile. For the new secondary shower acquisition system, it is necessary to perform very low noise measurements with high dynamic range coverage. The aim is to design a system without tuneable parameters and compatible for any beam wire scanner location at the CERN complex. Polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors (pCVD) are proposed as new detectors for this application because of their radiation hardness, fast response and linearity over a high dynamic range. For the detector readout, the acquisition electronics must be designed to exploit the detector capabilities and perform bunch by bunch measurements at 40MHz. This paper describes the design challenges of such a system, analysing different acquisition possibilities from the signal integrity point of view. The proposed system architecture is shown in detail and the development status presented

  19. Fast beam steering with full polarization control using a galvanometric optical scanner and polarization controller

    CERN Document Server

    Jofre, M; Steinlechner, F; Oliverio, N; Torres, J P; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W; 10.1364/OE.20.012247

    2012-01-01

    Optical beam steering is a key element in many industrial and scientific applications like in material processing, information technologies, medical imaging and laser display. Even though galvanometer-based scanners offer flexibility, speed and accuracy at a relatively low cost, they still lack the necessary control over the polarization required for certain applications. We report on the development of a polarization steerable system assembled with a fiber polarization controller and a galvanometric scanner, both controlled by a digital signal processor board. The system implements control of the polarization decoupled from the pointing direction through a feed-forward control scheme. This enables to direct optical beams to a desired direction without affecting its initial polarization state. When considering the full working field of view, we are able to compensate polarization angle errors larger than 0.2 rad, in a temporal window of less than $\\sim 20$ ms. Given the unification of components to fully cont...

  20. Fast beam steering with full polarization control using a galvanometric optical scanner and polarization controller

    OpenAIRE

    Jofre M.; Anzolin G.; Steinlechner F.; Oliverio N.; Torres J. P.; Pruneri V.; Mitchell M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Optical beam steering is a key element in many industrial and scientific applications like in material processing, information technologies, medical imaging and laser display. Even though galvanometer-based scanners offer flexibility, speed and accuracy at a relatively low cost, they still lack the necessary control over the polarization required for certain applications. We report on the development of a polarization steerable system assembled with a fiber polarization controller and a galva...

  1. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Unite Mixte de Recherche CNRS and Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue du Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Noo, F [Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, University of Utah, 729 Arapeen Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2009-03-21

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique.

  2. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique.

  3. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R; Noo, F

    2009-03-21

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique. PMID:19242049

  4. Analytic Method Based on Identification of Ellipse Parameters for Scanner Calibration in Cone-Beam Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noo, F.; Clackdoyle, R.; Mennessier, C.; White, Timothy Andrew; Roney, Timothy Joseph

    2000-11-01

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as `point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner.

  5. Analytic method based on identification of ellipse parameters for scanner calibration in cone-beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as 'point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner. (author)

  6. Analytic method based on identification of ellipse parameters for scanner calibration in cone-beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noo, Frederic [Institut d' Electricite Montefiore, Universite de Liege (Belgium); Department of Radiology, University of Utah (United States). E-mail: noo at montefiore.ulg.ac.be; Clackdoyle, Rolf [Department of Radiology, University of Utah (United States); Mennessier, Catherine [Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble (France); White, Timothy A.; Roney, Timothy J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

    2000-11-01

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as 'point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner. (author)

  7. Analytic method based on identification of ellipse parameters for scanner calibration in cone-beam tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noo, F; Clackdoyle, R; Mennessier, C; White, T A; Roney, T J

    2000-11-01

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as 'point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner. PMID:11098919

  8. Performance of wire scanner beam profile monitors to determine the emittance and position of high power CW electron beams of the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NBS-LANL Race Track Microtron (RTM) injector produces a sub-millimeter diameter, 600 μA, 5 MeV CW electron beam. In order to steer and focus this electron beam and to measure its emittance and energy spread, a system of wire scanner beam profile monitors has been developed. Three wire scanners are mounted in a straight line with approximately one meter spacing for emittance measurements. The fourth wire scanner is positioned after a 450 bending magnet for energy spread measurements

  9. Investigation of beam steering performances in rotation Risley-prism scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anhu; Sun, Wansong; Yi, Wanli; Zuo, Qiyou

    2016-06-13

    Rotation Risley-prism scanner appears to be the most promising solution to high-accuracy beam scanning and target tracking. In the paper, some important issues crucial to the function implementation are thoroughly investigated. First the forming law of scan blind zone relative to double-prism structural parameters is explored by a quantitative analysis method. Then the nonlinear relationship between the rotation speeds of double prisms and the change rate of beam deviation angle is presented, and the beam scan singularity is indicated as an essential factor that confines the beam scan region. Finally, the high-accuracy radial scan theory is verified to illustrate the important application owing to the high reduction ratio from the rotation angles of double prisms to the deviation angles of the emergent beam. The research not only reveals the inner mechanisms of the Risley-prism beam scanning in principle, but also provide a foundation for the nonlinear control of various beam scan modes. PMID:27410303

  10. Ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotatable ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner is designed for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation. With it there can be measured parameters that are of importance for the structure of soft tissues, e.g. time as a function of the velocity distribution along a certain path of flight(the method is analogous to the transaxial X-ray tomography). Moreover it permits to perform the quantitative measurement of two-dimensional velocity distributions and may therefore be applied to serial examinations for detecting cancer of the breast. As computers digital memories as well as analog-digital-hybrid systems are suitable. (ORU)

  11. In vacuum diamond sensor scanner for beam halo measurements in the beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shan; Cornebise, Patrick; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Fuster-Martínez, Nuria; Griesmayer, Erich; Guler, Hayg; Kubytskyi, Viacheslav; Sylvia, Christophe; Toshiaki, Tauchi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Bambade, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of beam halo transverse distributions is important for the understanding of beam losses and the control of backgrounds in Future Linear Colliders (FLC). A novel in vacuum diamond sensor (DSv) scanner with four strips has been designed and developed for the investigation of the beam halo transverse distributions and also for the diagnostics of Compton recoil electrons after the interaction point (IP) of ATF2, a low energy (1.3 GeV) prototype of the final focus system for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects. Using the DSv, a dynamic range of $\\sim10^6$ has been successfully demonstrated and confirmed for the first time by simultaneous beam core ($\\sim10^9$ electrons) and beam halo ($\\sim10^3$ electrons) measurements at ATF2. This report presents the characterization, performance studies and tests of the diamond sensors using an $\\alpha$ source as well as using the electron beams at PHIL, a low energy ($< 10$ MeV) photo-injector at LAL, and at ATF2. First beam halo measurement results ...

  12. A fast wire scanner, used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring. In order to minimize blow-up of the beam through multiple Coulomb scattering, the wires are very thin (in the version shown here it is actually a twisted strand of carbon fibres with a total diameter of about 25 microns) and are swept through the beam at high speed (a linear motor, not mounted here, accelerates the wires to up to 20 m/s). One measures either the secondary emission current from the wire, or the signal from a scintillator/photomultiplier combination downstream from the wire scanner receiving the shower from nuclear reactions of beam particles with the wire nuclei. There are four such fast wire scanners in the 26 GeV PS and eight in the 1.4 GeV Booster.

  13. Neutron-induced damage evolution under Beam Raster Scanner conditions for IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and evolution of defects in materials irradiated with a homogeneous neutron source and with the Beam Raster Scanner (BRS) solution was investigated. The intensity neutron source fluctuations inherent to the BRS system were determined using the neutron transport McDeLicious code. Defects generated during irradiation were calculated using the binary collision approximation MARLOWE code, using the primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy spectrum resulting from neutron interactions with the material. In order to predict the evolution of defects during irradiation, a Rate Theory model based on ab initio parameters was developed. Our model accounts for the migration of mobile defects, the formation of clusters and their recombination. As an example, we investigated defect evolution in Fe irradiated at room temperature in both beam configurations. Simulation results clearly indicate that the defect evolution expected in the BRS configuration is nearly the same as the one expected in a homogeneous irradiation system.

  14. Cone beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry I: scanner characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L John, E-mail: tim.olding@krcc.on.c [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-05-21

    The ongoing development of easily accessible, fast optical readout tools promises to remove one of the barriers to acceptance of gel dosimetry as a viable tool in cancer clinics. This paper describes the characterization of a number of basic properties of the Vista(TM) cone beam CCD-based optical scanner, which can obtain high resolution reconstructed data in less than 20 min total imaging and reconstruction time. The suitability of a filtered back projection cone beam reconstruction algorithm is established for optically absorbing dosimeters using this scanner configuration. The system was then shown to be capable of imaging an optically absorbing media-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter to a reconstructed voxel resolution of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}. At this resolution, more than 60% of the imaged volume in the dosimeter exhibits minimal spatial distortion, a measurement accuracy of 3-4% and the mean to standard deviation signal-to-noise ratio greater than 100 over an optical absorption range of 0.06-0.18 cm{sup -1}. An inter-day scan precision of 1% was demonstrated near the upper end of this range. Absorption measurements show evidence of stray light perturbation causing artifacts in the data, which if better managed would improve the accuracy of optical readout. Cone beam optical attenuation measurements of scattering dosimeters, on the other hand, are nonlinearly affected by angled scatter stray light. Scatter perturbation leads to significant cupping artifacts and other inaccuracies that greatly limit the readout of scattering polymer gel dosimeters with cone beam optical CT.

  15. Dedicated scanner for laboratory investigations on cone-beam CT/SPECT imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design, realization and basic tests of a prototype Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography (CBBCT) scanner, combined with a SPECT head consisting of a compact pinhole gamma camera based on a photon counting CdTe hybrid pixel detector. The instrument features a 40 μm focal spot X-ray tube, a 50 μm pitch flat panel detector and a 1-mm-thick, 55 μm pitch CdTe pixel detector. Preliminary imaging tests of the separate CT and gamma-ray units are presented showing a resolution in CT of 3.2 mm-1 at a radial distance of 50 mm from the rotation axis and that the 5 and 8 mm hot masses (99mTc labeled with a 15:1 activity ratio with respect to the background) can be detected in planar gamma-ray imaging with a contrast-to-noise ratio of about 4.

  16. Radiochromic film thickness correction with convergent cone- beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cone-beam optical computed tomography (CT) scanner was modified by replacing the diffuse planar yellow light emitting diode (LED) source with violet and red LEDs and a large Fresnel lens. The narrow band sources provided transmission images of radiochromic EBT2 film at 420 and 633 nm, with air as a reference. The dose image was not detectable with the violet source. This demonstrated spectral independence of the two images. Assuming attenuation at 420 nm was dominated by absorption from yellow dye in the active film layer allowed a relative thickness image to be calculated. By scaling the 633 nm optical density image for relative thickness, non-uniformities in the recorded dose distribution due to film thickness variations, were removed

  17. Development of CCD-based optical computed tomography and comparison with single-beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports on the development of CCD-based optical computed tomography (CT) CT-s2. A commercially available 10× fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUSTM-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used for comparison. NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was used to validate the performance of CT-s2. The gamma pass rate can reach 96.00% when using a 3% dose difference and 3 mm dose-to-agreement criteria. The results of CT-s2 are as good as those of the single-beam optical-CT scanner, but the scanning time of CT-s2 is only one-tenth of that of the single-beam optical-CT scanner

  18. Beam Hardening Artifacts: Comparison between Two Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. At present, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has become a substitute for computed tomography (CT in dental procedures. The metallic materials used in dentistry can produce artifacts due to the beam hardening phenomenon. These artifacts decrease the quality of images. In the present study, the number of artifacts as a result of beam hardening in the images of dental implants was compared between two NewTom VG and Planmeca Promax 3D Max CBCT machines. Materials and methods. An implant drilling model was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Scanning procedures were carried out by two CBCT machines. The corresponding sections (coronal and axial of the implants were evaluated by two radiologists. The number of artifacts in each image was determined using the scale provided. Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons at a significance level of P<0.05. Results. There were statistically significant differences in beam hardening artifacts in axial and coronal sections between the two x-ray machines (P<0.001, with a higher quality in the images produced by the NewTom VG. Conclusion. Given the higher quality of the images produced by the NewTom VG x-ray machine, it is recommended for imaging of patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses or previous implant treatments.

  19. Analysis of film response to electron beams using a laser scanner system developed in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical scanner system, which incorporates a He-Ne laser, photodiode detectors, and a platform for placing film, was built in the laboratory. The laser system operates at the green wavelength of 543.5 nm and functions as a scanning densitometer for measurement of optical changes in a film resulting from irradiation .The central axis electron depth dose of selected electron energies 10,12 and 14 MeV were analysed using Kodak X-Omat and Kodak Extended Dose Range (EDR2) films. The Kodak X-Omat film is routinely used for high-energy electron dose distributions in radiation therapy. The electron depth-dose measured with X-Omat film was found to agree well with standard depth-dose curves in water, obtained using an ion chamber. Conversely, the recently introduced Kodak EDR2 showed an energy dependence for electron beams, the percentage depth-dose curve shifting towards the surface for 12 and 14 MeV electron beams compared to that in water

  20. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, λ = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, λ = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGETM dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to ∼40% in magnitude. The flask registration

  1. Dedicated scanner for laboratory investigations on cone-beam CT/SPECT imaging of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Russo, Paolo, E-mail: russo@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Cesarelli, Mario; Ospizio, Roberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Biomedica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Passeggio, Giuseppe; Roscilli, Lorenzo; Pontoriere, Giuseppe; Rocco, Raffaele [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-02-11

    We describe the design, realization and basic tests of a prototype Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography (CBBCT) scanner, combined with a SPECT head consisting of a compact pinhole gamma camera based on a photon counting CdTe hybrid pixel detector. The instrument features a 40 {mu}m focal spot X-ray tube, a 50 {mu}m pitch flat panel detector and a 1-mm-thick, 55 {mu}m pitch CdTe pixel detector. Preliminary imaging tests of the separate CT and gamma-ray units are presented showing a resolution in CT of 3.2 mm{sup -1} at a radial distance of 50 mm from the rotation axis and that the 5 and 8 mm hot masses ({sup 99m}Tc labeled with a 15:1 activity ratio with respect to the background) can be detected in planar gamma-ray imaging with a contrast-to-noise ratio of about 4.

  2. Task-based modeling and optimization of a cone-beam CT scanner for musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, P.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2 M9 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Carestream Health, Rochester, New York 14615 (United States); Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2 M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work applies a cascaded systems model for cone-beam CT imaging performance to the design and optimization of a system for musculoskeletal extremity imaging. The model provides a quantitative guide to the selection of system geometry, source and detector components, acquisition techniques, and reconstruction parameters. Methods: The model is based on cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS) and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) combined with factors of system geometry (magnification, focal spot size, and scatter-to-primary ratio) and anatomical background clutter. The model was extended to task-based analysis of detectability index (d') for tasks ranging in contrast and frequency content, and d' was computed as a function of system magnification, detector pixel size, focal spot size, kVp, dose, electronic noise, voxel size, and reconstruction filter to examine trade-offs and optima among such factors in multivariate analysis. The model was tested quantitatively versus the measured NPS and qualitatively in cadaver images as a function of kVp, dose, pixel size, and reconstruction filter under conditions corresponding to the proposed scanner. Results: The analysis quantified trade-offs among factors of spatial resolution, noise, and dose. System magnification (M) was a critical design parameter with strong effect on spatial resolution, dose, and x-ray scatter, and a fairly robust optimum was identified at M {approx} 1.3 for the imaging tasks considered. The results suggested kVp selection in the range of {approx}65-90 kVp, the lower end (65 kVp) maximizing subject contrast and the upper end maximizing NEQ (90 kVp). The analysis quantified fairly intuitive results--e.g., {approx}0.1-0.2 mm pixel size (and a sharp reconstruction filter) optimal for high-frequency tasks (bone detail) compared to {approx}0.4 mm pixel size (and a smooth reconstruction filter) for low-frequency (soft-tissue) tasks. This result suggests a specific

  3. High resolution polymer gel dosimetry for small beam irradiation using a 7T micro-MRI scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Xuanfeng; Olsen, John; Best, Ryan; Bennett, Marcus; McGowin, Inna; Dorand, Jennifer; Link, Kerry; Bourland, J Daniel, E-mail: dingx6@wfu.ed

    2010-11-01

    The use of small field radiation beams has greatly increased with advanced radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT, rotational IMRT, and stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this work small field 3D dose distributions have been measured with high spatial resolution using polymer gels and 7T micro-MR imaging. A MAGIC (Methacrylic and Ascorbic acid in Gelatin Initiated by Copper) polymer gel {sup [1]} phantom was used to capture the 3D dose distributions for two small field (5 x 5 mm{sup 2} and 10 x 10 mm{sup 2}) for a 6MV x-ray beam. High resolution 3D T2 maps were obtained with 7T micro-MRI (0.156mm x 0.156mm x 1mm, MSME pulse sequence). For comparison T2 maps, the gel phantom was scanned in a 3T MRI clinical scanner (0.254mm x 0.254mm x 2mm, FSE pulse sequence). Normalized 3D dose maps were calculated in Matlab. Results show that 7T micro-MRI 3D gel dosimetry measurements are much more stable, less noisy, and have higher spatial resolution than those obtained using a 3T clinical scanner for the same amount of scan time. In general, 3D gel dosimetry results also agree with simultaneously-obtained radiochromic film dosimetry. This study indicates that the MAGIC polymer gel with 7T micro-MRI for 3D dose readout could potentially be used for small radiation beams, including measurements for micro-beams (field size {approx} 100um).

  4. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Eric S., E-mail: epaulson@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 and Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  5. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  6. Mechanical scanner-less multi-beam confocal microscope with wavefront modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Yu; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Kawahito, Shoji; Terakawa, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel full-electronically controlled laser confocal microscope in which a liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator and a custom CMOS imaging sensor are synchronized for performing multi-beam confocal imaging. Adaptive wavefront modulation for functional multi-beam excitation can be achieved by displaying appropriate computer generated holograms on the spatial light modulator, in consideration of the numerical aperture of the focusing objective. We also adopted a custom CMOS imaging sensor to realize multi-beam confocal microscopy without any physical pinhole. The confocality of this microscope was verified by improvements in transverse and axial resolutions of fluorescent micro-beads.

  7. Eye-safe diode laser Doppler lidar with a MEMS beam-scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel Doppler lidar that employs a cw diode laser operating at 1.5 μm and a micro-electro-mechanical-system scanning mirror (MEMS-SM). In this work, two functionalities of the lidar system are demonstrated. Firstly, we describe the capability to effectively steer the lidar probe beam to multiple optical transceivers along separate lines-of-sight. The beam steering functionality is demonstrated using four lines-of-sight - each at an angle of 18° with respect to their symmetry axis. Secondly, we demonstrate the ability to spatially dither the beam focus to reduce the mean irradiance at the probing distance (R = 60 m) of each line-of-sight - relevant for meeting eye-safety requirements. The switching time of the MEMS-SM is measured to be in the order of a few milliseconds. Time-shared (0.25 s per line-of-sight) radial wind speed measurements at 50 Hz data rate are experimentally demonstrated. Spatial dithering of the beam focus is also implemented using a spiral scan trajectory resulting in a 16 dB reduction of beam focus mean irradiance. PMID:26906770

  8. Effects of spherical aberration on the laser beam of a bar code scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong

    1998-08-01

    The modulation transfer function of bar code scanning is a useful tool for evaluating the performance of the scanning laser beam. Understanding the behavior of the scanning laser system near the end of its depth of focus is of particular interest because it may lead to the development of techniques that could effective extend the depth of focus. In the article the MTF at focus and the two extremes of the depth of focus are presented. The presence of spherical aberration in the scanning laser beam generally reduces the depth of focus. The effects of the spherical aberration to the MTF is presented and discussed.

  9. Movement of the patient and the cone beam computed tomography scanner: objectives and possible solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzelka, T.; Dušek, J.; Ocásek, F.; Kučera, J.; Šedý, Jiří; Beneš, J.; Pavlíková, G.; Foltán, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 6 (2013), s. 769-773. ISSN 2212-4403 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cone beam computed tomography * movement artifacts * dry-run scan Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.265, year: 2013

  10. Eye-safe diode laser Doppler lidar with a MEMS beam-scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel Doppler lidar that employs a cw diode laser operating at 1.5 μm and a micro-electro-mechanical-system scanning mirror (MEMS-SM). In this work, two functionalities of the lidar system are demonstrated. Firstly, we describe the capability to effectively steer the lidar probe beam...... at the probing distance (R = 60 m) of each lineof-sight – relevant for meeting eye-safety requirements. The switching time of the MEMS-SM is measured to be in the order of a few milliseconds. Time-shared (0.25 s per line-of-sight) radial wind speed measurements at 50 Hz data rate are experimentally...

  11. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  12. Relevance of head motion in dental cone-beam CT scanner images depending on patient positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of head motion on the reconstruction image quality in relation to patient positioning in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. This study should be intended as the first step to evaluate the effect of the head movements also in more stringent conditions. Head motion was monitored using an EasyTrack-500 system in three acquisition conditions: lying down, sitting and standing. Motion was simulated on a cylinder used to calculate the modulation transfer function in order to quantify the resolution loss associated with it. In none of the three acquisition layouts, head motion could be avoided. As expected head rotation angles are found to be smaller in the lying down configuration than in the sitting and standing ones. In the latter there is a probability of 30% of cases with high excursion rotation angles which would have a clearly perceptible lower image quality. Patient positioning during CBCT scanning can significantly influence occurrence of motion. This should be taken into account when very high image resolution is required in particular in patients that for age or clinical conditions may have difficulties in staying still. (orig.)

  13. Twisting wire scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-15

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  14. Twisting wire scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  15. Analysis of the effect of cone-beam geometry and test object configuration on the measurement accuracy of a computed tomography scanner used for dimensional measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jagadeesha; Attridge, Alex; Wood, P. K. C.; Williams, Mark A.

    2011-03-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are used for non-contact dimensional measurement of small, fragile components and difficult-to-access internal features of castings and mouldings. However, the accuracy and repeatability of measurements are influenced by factors such as cone-beam system geometry, test object configuration, x-ray power, material and size of test object, detector characteristics and data analysis methods. An attempt is made in this work to understand the measurement errors of a CT scanner over the complete scan volume, taking into account only the errors in system geometry and the object configuration within the scanner. A cone-beam simulation model is developed with the radiographic image projection and reconstruction steps. A known amount of errors in geometrical parameters were introduced in the model to understand the effect of geometry of the cone-beam CT system on measurement accuracy for different positions, orientations and sizes of the test object. Simulation analysis shows that the geometrical parameters have a significant influence on the dimensional measurement at specific configurations of the test object. Finally, the importance of system alignment and estimation of correct parameters for accurate CT measurements is outlined based on the analysis.

  16. Test Measurements of a 20 ms-1 Carbon Wire Beam Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    De Freitas, J; Emery, J; Herranz Alvarez, J F; Koujili, M; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; Ait-Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper pre­sents the de­sign of the ac­tu­a­tor for the fast and high ac­cu­ra­cy Wire Scan­ner sys­tem. The ac­tu­a­tor con­sists of a ro­tary brushless syn­chronous motor with the per­ma­nent mag­net rotor in­stalled in­side the vac­u­um cham­ber and the sta­tor in­stalled out­side. The fork, per­ma­nent mag­net rotor and two an­gu­lar po­si­tion sen­sors are mount­ed on the same axis and lo­cat­ed in­side the beam vac­u­um cham­ber. The system has to re­sist a bake-out tem­per­a­ture of 200 C and ion­iz­ing radi­a­tion up to tenths of kGy/year. Max­i­mum wire trav­el­ling speed of 20 m/s and a po­si­tion mea­sure­ment ac­cu­ra­cy of 4 um is re­quired. Therefore, the sys­tem must avoid gen­er­at­ing vi­bra­tion and electromagnet­ic in­ter­fer­ence. A dig­i­tal feed­back con­troller will allow max­i­mum flex­i­bil­i­ty for the loop pa­ram­e­ters and feeds the 3-phase lin­ear power driv­er. The per­for­mance of the pr...

  17. A comparative study for image quality and radiation dose of a cone beam computed tomography scanner and a multislice computed tomography scanner for paranasal sinus imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cock, Jens de; Canning, John [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Zanca, Federica; Hermans, Robert [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben [KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of a state of the art cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) system in patients with sinonasal poliposis. In this retrospective study two radiologists evaluated 57 patients with sinonasal poliposis who underwent a CBCT or MSCT sinus examination, along with a control group of 90 patients with normal radiological findings. Tissue doses were measured using a phantom model with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Overall image quality in CBCT was scored significantly higher than in MSCT in patients with normal radiologic findings (p-value: 0.00001). In patients with sinonasal poliposis, MSCT scored significantly higher than CBCT (p-value: 0.00001). The average effective dose for MSCT was 42 % higher compared to CBCT (108 μSv vs 63 μSv). CBCT and MSCT are both suited for the evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important structures of the paranasal sinuses can be better delineated with MSCT, whereas in patients without sinonasal poliposis, CBCT turns out to define the important structures of the sinonasal region better. However, given the lower radiation dose, CBCT can be considered for the evaluation of the sinonasal structures in patients with sinonasal poliposis. (orig.)

  18. Laser Wire Scanner Compton Scattering Techniques for the Measurement of the Transverse Beam Size of Particle Beams at Future Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Agapov, I; Blair, G A; Bosser, J; Braun, H H; Bravin, E; Boorman, G; Boogert, S T; Carter, J; D'amico, E; Delerue, N; Howell, D F; Doebert, S; Driouichi, C; Frisch, J; Hutchins, K Honkavaaram S; Kamps, T; Lefevre, T; Lewin, H; Paris, T; Poirier, F; Price, M T; Maccaferi, R; Malton, S; Penn, G; Ross, I N; Ross, M; Schlarb, H; Schmueser, P; Schreiber, S; Sertore, D; Walker, N; Wendt, M; Wittenburg, K

    2014-01-01

    This archive summarizes a working paper and conference proceedings related to laser wire scanner development for the Future Linear Collider (FLC) in the years 2001 to 2006. In particular the design, setup and data taking for the laser wire experiments at PETRA II and CT2 are described. The material is focused on the activities undertaken by Royal Holloway University of London (RHUL).

  19. Proton scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scanner is based on the nuclear scattering of high energy protons by the nucleons (protons and neutrons) included in the atomic nuclei. Because of the wide scattering angle, three coordinates in space of the interaction point can be computed, giving directly three dimensional radiographs. Volumic resolution is of about a few cubic-millimeters. Because the base interaction is the strong nuclear force, the atomic dependence of the information obtained is different from that of the X-ray scanner, for which the base interaction is electro-magnetic force. (orig./VJ)

  20. Computed tomography in the urological field by means of scanner of fan beam x-ray rotationary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve cases of urological patients were observed by computed tomography (Ohio-nuclear's Delta-scan 2020). 5 cases of them were as follows: 1) A 25-year-old female of chronic renal failure, in which both kidneys showed multiple cystic structure, what is called ''acquired cyst of the kidney''. 2) A 28-year-old male of chronic renal failure, in which round calcificated shadow was revealed at the left kidney. It was very difficult to demonstrate the round shadow on KUB. Renal carcinoma was suspected by selective renal arteriography, and the nephrectomy specimen revealed renal cell carcinoma. 3) A 39-year-old male of left renal carcinoma, in which CT of lung showed manifest metastatis, and abdominal slice showed large tumor embolus of left renal vein. 4) A 67-year-old male of bladder tumor at the left lateral wall, in which stalk was not clearly confirmed by a cystoscopic examination. By CT of supine or prone position, the tumor mass inclined downward. This suggested the existence of stalk. Extravesical outline seemed smooth, and so the tumor was suspected to be of low stage. 5) A 71-year-old male of prostatic cancer, in which by RI bone scanning and x-ray examination, the left scapula, ribs, 2nd lumbar vertebra were shown to have metastases. CT of 2nd vertebra revealed patchy high density area. By this scanner, only two seconds per one slice are required. So the artifacts, such as so-called streaking by respiration, movement of intestinal gas, are almost dissoluted. And this fact is very important and useful for many clinical fields, such as alimentary organs and urogenital organs. (author)

  1. Scanner sipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 4th routine inspection of Biblis A and B, the new method of 'scanner sipping' - a modified 'wet sipping' technique - has been applied for the first time. The curve of activity release from a fuel element into the water of the sipping box is continuously recorded as a function of temperature. Information on the leaktightness of the fuel element is obtained from the increase with temperature of the activity concentration of selected nuclides. The method gives more accurate information than the common method within a shorter period of time; it helps to distinguish between defects and contamination and, with a 30% shorter time required for the measurements, it helps to save personnel costs. (orig./HP)

  2. Modeling and design of a cone-beam CT head scanner using task-based imaging performance optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is important for diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, postoperative bleeding, and other head and neck injuries. This paper details the design and development of a cone-beam CT (CBCT) system developed specifically for the detection of low-contrast ICH in a form suitable for application at the point of care. Recognizing such a low-contrast imaging task to be a major challenge in CBCT, the system design began with a rigorous analysis of task-based detectability including critical aspects of system geometry, hardware configuration, and artifact correction. The imaging performance model described the three-dimensional (3D) noise-equivalent quanta using a cascaded systems model that included the effects of scatter, scatter correction, hardware considerations of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs), and digitization bit depth. The performance was analyzed with respect to a low-contrast (40-80 HU), medium-frequency task representing acute ICH detection. The task-based detectability index was computed using a non-prewhitening observer model. The optimization was performed with respect to four major design considerations: (1) system geometry (including source-to-detector distance (SDD) and source-to-axis distance (SAD)); (2) factors related to the x-ray source (including focal spot size, kVp, dose, and tube power); (3) scatter correction and selection of an antiscatter grid; and (4) x-ray detector configuration (including pixel size, additive electronics noise, field of view (FOV), and frame rate, including both CMOS and a-Si:H FPDs). Optimal design choices were also considered with respect to practical constraints and available hardware components. The model was verified in comparison to measurements on a CBCT imaging bench as a function of the numerous design parameters mentioned above. An extended geometry (SAD  =  750 mm, SDD  =  1100

  3. Modeling and design of a cone-beam CT head scanner using task-based imaging performance optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Wang, X; Foos, D H; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V E; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is important for diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, postoperative bleeding, and other head and neck injuries. This paper details the design and development of a cone-beam CT (CBCT) system developed specifically for the detection of low-contrast ICH in a form suitable for application at the point of care. Recognizing such a low-contrast imaging task to be a major challenge in CBCT, the system design began with a rigorous analysis of task-based detectability including critical aspects of system geometry, hardware configuration, and artifact correction. The imaging performance model described the three-dimensional (3D) noise-equivalent quanta using a cascaded systems model that included the effects of scatter, scatter correction, hardware considerations of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs), and digitization bit depth. The performance was analyzed with respect to a low-contrast (40-80 HU), medium-frequency task representing acute ICH detection. The task-based detectability index was computed using a non-prewhitening observer model. The optimization was performed with respect to four major design considerations: (1) system geometry (including source-to-detector distance (SDD) and source-to-axis distance (SAD)); (2) factors related to the x-ray source (including focal spot size, kVp, dose, and tube power); (3) scatter correction and selection of an antiscatter grid; and (4) x-ray detector configuration (including pixel size, additive electronics noise, field of view (FOV), and frame rate, including both CMOS and a-Si:H FPDs). Optimal design choices were also considered with respect to practical constraints and available hardware components. The model was verified in comparison to measurements on a CBCT imaging bench as a function of the numerous design parameters mentioned above. An extended geometry (SAD  =  750 mm, SDD  =  1100

  4. Network Security Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    G. MURALI; M.Pranavi; Y.Navateja; K. Bhargavi

    2011-01-01

    Network Security Scanner (NSS) is a tool that allows auditing and monitoring remote network computers for possible vulnerabilities, checks your network for all potential methods that a hacker might use to attack it. Network Security Scanner is a complete networking utilities package that includes a wide range of tools for network security auditing, vulnerability Auditing, scanning, monitoring and more. Network Security Scanner (NSS) is an easy to use, intuitive network security scanner that c...

  5. Cognition for robot scanner based remote welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombansen, U.; Ungers, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The effort for reduced cycle times in manufacturing has supported the development of remote welding systems which use a combination of scanners for beam delivery and robots for scanner positioning. Herein, close coupling of both motions requires a precise command of the robot trajectory and the scanner positioning to end up with a combined beam delivery. Especially the path precision of the robot plays a vital role in this kinematic chain. In this paper, a sensor system is being presented which allows tracking the motion of the laser beam against the work piece. It is based on a camera system which is coaxially connected to the scanner thus observing the relative motion of the laser beam relative to the work piece. The acquired images are processed with computer vision algorithms from the field of motion detection. The suitability of the algorithms is being demonstrated with a motion tracking tool which visualizes the homogeneity of the tracking result. The reported solution adds cognitive capabilities to manufacturing systems for robot scanner based materials processing. It allows evaluation of the relative motion between work piece and the laser beam. Moreover, the system can be used to adapt system programming during set-up of a manufacturing task or to evaluate the functionality of a manufacturing system during production. The presented sensor system will assist in optimizing manufacturing processes.

  6. Use of an optical digital reader for establishing criterion of quality control in clinical beams; Uso de un lector optico digital (scanner) para establecer criterios de control de calidad en haces clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genis S, R. [Unidad de Radioterapia, Hospital Medica Sur, S.A. Pte. de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    The goal of this work is to present a procedure for realizing the control of the clinical radiation fields through typical radiographic film of verification in radiotherapy and showing the results of the analysis carried out in the expositions of reference fields for photons and electrons using an optical digital reader of high resolution (600 x 1200 dpi) named scanner and a computer program for images edition. It was possible to obtain the quantification of the following parameters: alinement of the radiation beam with the luminous beam, homogeneity or levelling of the radiation field, and self symmetry with respect to the center of the luminous field. With the purpose to compare the results versus an usual method it was realized measurements of the same images with a luminous photo densitometer with 1 mm collimation window. (Author)

  7. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  8. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  9. Experimental assessment of the influence of beam hardening filters on image quality and patient dose in volumetric 64-slice X-ray CT scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, Mohammad Reza; Mehranian, Abolfazi; Maleki, Asghar; Ghadiri, Hossien; Ghafarian, Pardis; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Beam hardening filters have long been employed in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to preferentially absorb soft and low-energy X-rays having no or little contribution to image formation, thus allowing the reduction of patient dose and beam hardening artefacts. In this work, we studied the influence o

  10. Scanner matching optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupers, Michiel; Klingbeil, Patrick; Tschischgale, Joerg; Buhl, Stefan; Hempel, Fritjof

    2009-03-01

    Cost of ownership of scanners for the manufacturing of front end layers is becoming increasingly expensive. The ability to quickly switch the production of a layer to another scanner in case it is down is important. This paper presents a method to match the scanner grids in the most optimal manner so that use of front end scanners in effect becomes interchangeable. A breakdown of the various components of overlay is given and we discuss methods to optimize the matching strategy in the fab. A concern here is how to separate the scanner and process induced effects. We look at the relative contributions of intrafield and interfield errors caused by the scanner and the process. Experimental results of a method to control the scanner grid are presented and discussed. We compare the overlay results before and after optimizing the scanner grids and show that the matching penalty is reduced by 20%. We conclude with some thoughts on the need to correct the remaining matching errors.

  11. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography (www.ugct.ugent.be) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kVmax) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  12. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierick, Manuel, E-mail: Manuel.Dierick@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Loo, Denis, E-mail: info@XRE.be [XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Masschaele, Bert [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van den Bulcke, Jan [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Acker, Joris, E-mail: Joris.VanAcker@UGent.be [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle, E-mail: Veerle.Cnudde@UGent.be [UGCT-SGIG, Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc, E-mail: Luc.VanHoorebeke@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV{sub max}) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  13. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kVmax) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results

  14. Colorimetric Scanner Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Y. Hardeberg

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methods for the colorimetric characterisation of colour scanners are proposed and evaluated. These methods apply equally to other colour image input devices such as digital cameras. The goal of our characterisation is to establish the relationship between the device-dependent colour space of the scanner and the device-independent CIELAB colour space. The scanner characterisation is based on polynomial regression techniques. Several regression schemes have been tested. The retained method consists in applying a non-linear correction to the scanner RGB values followed by a 3rd order 3D polynomial regression function directly to CIELAB space. This method gives very good results in terms of residual colour differences. This is partly due to the fact that the RMS error that is minimised in the regression corresponds to ΔE*ab which is well correlated to visual colour differences.

  15. Measuring PET scanner sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity parameters derived from a plot of a scanner's true coincidence count (TCC) rates as a function of activity in a 20 cm cylindrical phantom have no direct link to image quality. Noise equivalent count (NEC) rate curves, which incorporate the noise effects of subtracting the randoms and scatter count components provide a direct link between image signal-to-noise ratios and the scatter, randoms and trues coincidence count rates. The authors have measured TCC and NEC curves with a standardized 20 cm diameter nylon cylinder for five different PET scanners with several scanner-collimator combinations. In addition, the authors have compared TCC and NEC curves on one scanner with those from an Alderson brain phantom

  16. A simple scanner for Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Castellano, A

    2002-01-01

    A first generation CT-scanner was designed and constructed to carry out Compton images. This CT-scanner is composed of a 80 kV, 5 mA X-ray tube and a NaI(Tl) X-ray detector; the tube is strongly collimated, generating a X-ray beam of 2 mm diameter, whilst the detector is not collimated to collect Compton photons from the whole irradiated cylinder. The performances of the equipment were tested contemporaneous transmission and Compton images.

  17. The PS Booster Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, S; Priestnall, K; Raich, U

    2003-01-01

    The very tight emittance budget for LHC type beams makes precise emittance measurements in the injector complex a necessity. The PS machine uses 2 fast wire scanners per transverse plane for emittance measurement of the circulating beams. In order to ease comparison the same type of wire scanners have been newly installed in the upstream machine, the PS Booster, where each of the 4 rings is equipped with 2 wire scanners measuring the horizontal and vertical profiles. Those wire scanners use new and more modern control and readout electronics featuring dedicated intelligent motor movement controllers, which relieves the very stringent real time constraints due to the very high speed of 20m/s. In order to be able to measure primary beams at the very low injection energy of the Booster (50MeV) secondary emission currents from the wire can be measured as well as secondary particle flows at higher primary particle energies during and after acceleration. The solution adopted for the control of the devices is descri...

  18. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  19. Use of a wire scanner for monitoring residual gas ionization in Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility 20 keV/u proton/deuteron low energy beam transport beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion source end of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility accelerator consists of a proton/deuteron ECR ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) beam line. An observed reduction of the radio frequency quadrupole transmission with increase of the LEBT current prompted additional study of the LEBT beam properties. Numerous measurements have been made with the LEBT bream profiler wire biased by a variable voltage. Current-voltage characteristics in presence of the proton beam were measured even when the wire was far out of the beam. The current-voltage characteristic in this case strongly resembles an asymmetric diodelike characteristic, which is typical of Langmuir probes monitoring plasma. The measurement of biased wire currents, outside the beam, enables us to estimate the effective charge density in vacuum.

  20. Use of a wire scanner for monitoring residual gas ionization in Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility 20 keV∕u proton∕deuteron low energy beam transport beam line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainas, B; Eliyahu, I; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D

    2012-02-01

    The ion source end of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility accelerator consists of a proton∕deuteron ECR ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) beam line. An observed reduction of the radio frequency quadrupole transmission with increase of the LEBT current prompted additional study of the LEBT beam properties. Numerous measurements have been made with the LEBT bream profiler wire biased by a variable voltage. Current-voltage characteristics in presence of the proton beam were measured even when the wire was far out of the beam. The current-voltage characteristic in this case strongly resembles an asymmetric diodelike characteristic, which is typical of Langmuir probes monitoring plasma. The measurement of biased wire currents, outside the beam, enables us to estimate the effective charge density in vacuum. PMID:22380317

  1. Laser Scanner For Automatic Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando D.; Correia, Bento A.; Rebordao, Jose M.; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-01-01

    The automated magazines are beeing used at industry more and more. One of the problems related with the automation of a Store House is the identification of the products envolved. Already used for stock management, the Bar Codes allows an easy way to identify one product. Applied to automated magazines, the bar codes allows a great variety of items in a small code. In order to be used by the national producers of automated magazines, a devoted laser scanner has been develloped. The Prototype uses an He-Ne laser whose beam scans a field angle of 75 degrees at 16 Hz. The scene reflectivity is transduced by a photodiode into an electrical signal, which is then binarized. This digital signal is the input of the decodifying program. The machine is able to see barcodes and to decode the information. A parallel interface allows the comunication with the central unit, which is responsible for the management of automated magazine.

  2. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  3. Network Security Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murali

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Network Security Scanner (NSS is a tool that allows auditing and monitoring remote network computers for possible vulnerabilities, checks your network for all potential methods that a hacker might use to attack it. Network Security Scanner is a complete networking utilities package that includes a wide range of tools for network security auditing, vulnerability Auditing, scanning, monitoring and more. Network Security Scanner (NSS is an easy to use, intuitive network security scanner that can quickly scan and audit your network computers for vulnerabilities, exploits, and information enumerations. Vulnerability management is an on-going process that protects your valuable data and it is a key component of an effective information security strategy, which provides comprehensive, preemptive protection against threats to your enterprise security. N.S.S is built on an architecture that allows for high reliability and scalability that caters for both medium and large sized networks. NSS consists of six modules. They are Host Scanning, Port Scanning, Pinging, NSLookup, Vulnerability Auditing and Trace route. NSS also performs live host detection, operating system identification, SNMP Auditing. Finds rouge services and open TCP and UDP ports. The ability varies to perform scanning over the network identifying the live hosts and guess the operating system of the remote hosts and installed programs into the remote hosts. Apart identifying the live hosts we could map the ports and list the services which are running in the host.

  4. Assessment of CT numbers in limited and medium field-of-view scans taken using Accuitomo 170 and Veraviewepocs 3De cone-beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the influence of anatomic location on the relationship between computed tomography (CT) number and X-ray attenuation in limited and medium field-of-view (FOV) scans. Tubes containing solutions with different concentrations of K2HPO4 were placed in the tooth sockets of a human head phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired, and CT numbers of the K2HPO4 solutions were measured. The relationship between CT number and K2HPO4 concentration was examined by linear regression analyses. Then, the variation in CT number according to anatomic location was examined. The relationship between K2HPO4 concentration and CT number was strongly linear. The slopes of the linear regressions for the limited FOVs were almost 2-fold lower than those for the medium FOVs. The absolute CT number differed between imaging protocols and anatomic locations. There is a strong linear relationship between X-ray attenuation and CT number. The specific imaging protocol and anatomic location of the object strongly influence this relationship.

  5. Assessment of CT numbers in limited and medium field-of-view scans taken using Accuitomo 170 and Veraviewepocs 3De cone-beam computed tomography scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Matheus L. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Tosoni, Guilherme M. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Araraquara (Brazil); Lindsey, David H.; Mendoza, Kristopher; Tetradis, Sotirios; Mallya, Sanjay M. [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the influence of anatomic location on the relationship between computed tomography (CT) number and X-ray attenuation in limited and medium field-of-view (FOV) scans. Tubes containing solutions with different concentrations of K2HPO4 were placed in the tooth sockets of a human head phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired, and CT numbers of the K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solutions were measured. The relationship between CT number and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration was examined by linear regression analyses. Then, the variation in CT number according to anatomic location was examined. The relationship between K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration and CT number was strongly linear. The slopes of the linear regressions for the limited FOVs were almost 2-fold lower than those for the medium FOVs. The absolute CT number differed between imaging protocols and anatomic locations. There is a strong linear relationship between X-ray attenuation and CT number. The specific imaging protocol and anatomic location of the object strongly influence this relationship.

  6. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  7. Microarray Scanner for Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel pseudo confocal microarray scanner is introduced, in which one dimension scanning is performed by a galvanometer optical scanner and a telecentric objective, another dimension scanning is performed by a stepping motor.

  8. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam. PMID:18364951

  9. Architectural survey of Monserrate Palace - laser scanner survey

    OpenAIRE

    Luísa Cortesão

    2012-01-01

    In order to obtain a complete set of measured drawings (plans, sections and elevations) for developing infrastructure projects in the Palace of Monserrate, a laser scanning survey was conducted. This technology is based on the principle of measuring distances by resorting to a laser beam, issued by an active sensor known as a laser scanner. This scanner is combined with a camera using a color sensor.

  10. Alignment and resolution studies of the MARS CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a procedure of alignment of the MARS CT scanner with cone-beam geometry. The position of the x-ray source relative to the detector, the tilt of the detector are measured during alignment. The mechanical precision of gantry movement is determined. Significant improvement in the quality of image reconstruction has been achieved as a result of the calibration. Spatial resolution (PTF) of the scanner is confirmed to be about 30 μm

  11. System analysis of bar code laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianpu; Chen, Zhaofeng; Lu, Zukang

    1996-10-01

    This paper focuses on realizing the three important aspects of bar code scanner: generating a high quality scanning light beam, acquiring a fairly even distribution characteristic of light collection, achieving a low signal dynamic range over a large depth of field. To do this, we analyze the spatial distribution and propagation characteristics of scanning laser beam, the vignetting characteristic of optical collection system and their respective optimal design; propose a novel optical automatic gain control method to attain a constant collection over a large working depth.

  12. Torsional MEMS scanner design for high-resolution scanning display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan

    2002-06-01

    In scanning display systems, high horizontal and vertical resolution, and high refresh rate requirements translate into large mirror-size scan-angle product and high scanner-frequency requirements. A comparison between published scan-angle mirror-size product values for MEMS scanners and a steel mechanical scanner is presented. Current performance levels of steel mechanical scanners are better; however, Silicon MEMS scanners have good material properties and should be able to reach and exceed the performance levels of conventional mechanical scanners. The resolution limitations of mechanical and MEMS scanners are established using dynamic mirror deformation, flexure stress, and other oscillation mode frequencies. Analytical formulas for torsional, vertical deflection mode, lateral deflection mode, and rocking mode natural frequencies are derived using mechanical beam deflection theory.

  13. Fast laser optical CT scanner with rotating mirror and Fresnel lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J.; Deshpande, R.; Battista, J.; Jordan, K.

    2006-12-01

    Single laser beam and detector computed tomography (CT) scanner geometries provide excellent stray light rejection and these systems likely provide the largest dynamic range for optical CT scanning of gel dosimeters. In this work a rotating mirror, lens pair, laser scanner has been developed for a 10 x 15 cm2 field of view demonstrating a fast 3D single ray-detector optical CT scanner.

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of a 320 detector row CT scanner unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologic improvements in Multislice scanners include the increment in the X-ray beam width. Some new CT scanners are equipped with a 320 detector row which allows a longitudinal coverage of 160 mm and a total of 640 slices for a single rotation. When such parameters are used the length of the traditional pencil chamber (10 cm) is no more appropriate to measure the standard weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) value. Dosimetric measurements were performed on a 640 slices Toshiba Aquilion One CT scanner using common instrumentation available in Medical Physics Departments. For the measurements in air, two different ionization chambers were completely exposed to the beam. Dosimeters showed an acceptable agreement in the measurements. To evaluate the actual shape of the dose profile strips of Gafchromic XRQA film were used. Films were previously calibrated on site. From the graphic response of the scanned film it is possible to evaluate the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the dose profile which represent the actual beam width. Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) and Dose Length Product (DLP) need to be changed when the beam width of the CT scanner is over 100 mm. To perform dose evaluation with the conventional instrumentation, two parameters should be considered: the average absorbed dose and the actual beam width. To measure the average absorbed dose, the conventional ionization chamber can be used. For the measurement of the width of the dose profile, Gafchromic XRQA film seemed to be suitable

  15. Laser Wire Scanner Basic Process and Perspectives for the CTF's and CLIC Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T

    2002-01-01

    In a laser wire scanner, the basic idea is to replace the solid wire classically used in a standard wire scanner by a narrow laser beam. The basic process involved is the Thomson-Compton scattering process, where photons are scattered from the laser beam by the incoming electrons. By counting the number of scattered photons or degraded electrons as a function of laser position the bunch profile can be reconstructed. In this note the Compton scattering mechanism is first presented. In the framework of the CLIC project, a laser wire scanner (LWS) could be used as a non-interfering beam profile measurement both on the Drive Beam for a high current electron beam and on the Main Beam for very small electron beam sizes. A design for a LWS on the CTF2 and CTF3 machines is proposed and some considerations for the use of a LWS on the CLIC main beam are also mentioned.

  16. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  17. A high speed X-ray computed tomography scanner for multipurpose flow visualization and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a high-speed X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner has been performed in this study. The object of interest is in a transient or unsettled state, which makes the conventional CT scanner inappropriate. This X-ray CT system uses the concept of electronic switching of electron beams for X-ray generation to increase scanning speed. A continuous operation X-ray CT scanner sampling at about 4 milliseconds scanning rate has already been developed and applied for air-water two-phase flow measurement. The feasibility and the excellent performance of this CT scanner system are demonstrated and confirmed. (author)

  18. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  19. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated. PMID:14503693

  20. Industrial CT scanner, TOSCANER-3000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the combined use of techniques of medical CT scanner and industrial X ray, development was made of a novel industrial CT scanner first in Japan, with plastics, ceramics, rubber, aluminium etc. for the subject. Being able to produce fine tomograms in a short time, to memorize and reserve test data, and to analyze the tomograms by means of rich functions of image processing, it can be widely utilized for quality control and inspection of products. (author)

  1. Nogle muligheder i scanner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn

    2000-01-01

    I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data......I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data...

  2. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively. PMID:12224780

  3. Densitometry of autoradiographs by scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the advantages of the autoradiography technique is the possibility of obtaining the distribution of the chemical elements over the whole surface samples. A method for transformation of the autoradiography image into an electronic format with the use of the digital document scanners of different types has been developed for computer analysis purposes. It is shown that the technique developed allows us to obtain the two-dimensional distribution of optical density of autoradiograms, replacing one-dimensional densitometry with the using of a microphotometer. A comparison with conventional densitometry is presented. In our work we examined both Small Office Home Office (SOHO) and drum type scanners. Drum scanners give a linear response within a wide range of optical density (up to 2.5), whereas SOHO-scanners possess a linear dependence characteristics up to 0.5. We have demonstrated that the response of SOHO-scanners can be approximated reasonably well by an exponential dependence permitting the optical density measurement to be extended to 2. The effects of the driver as well as of other parameters (gamma, contrast, brightness, filters and etc.) on the final image were studied. The digital scanners were used as tools for 2-D densitometry to investigate the distribution of Co, Fe, Pt and Ir bearing phases in geological samples

  4. Flying spot scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved flying spot x-ray scanning equipment is described which includes a grid controlled x-ray tube and associated collimators for producing a pencil beam of x-rays. It is possible to control the position of the scan field relative to the patient, to control the width of the scan field and also to independently achieve an arbitary variation in the longitudinal dimension of the scan field. (U.K.)

  5. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper

  6. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  7. Description of a transmission X-ray computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new prototype X-ray computed tomography scanner has been designed, constructed and tested locally. The major system employs an X-ray tube, a semiconductor detector, data logger and a three-dimensional sample position controller driven by three stepping motors, which allow two linear translations in addition to the rotational motion. The image resolution is determined by the step size and the diameter of the X-ray beam, which is controlled by the pinhole collimator. The scanner is designed to reconstruct two- and three-dimensional images mapping the internal structures of the object with the aid of the computer. This system, due to the semiconductor detector used, presents the novelty of being potentially able to acquire both in CT (transmission) mode and in SPECT (emission) mode. The imaging system performance is inspected for different phantoms, and some typical reconstructed images are presented. - Highlights: → A prototype X-ray transmission CT scanner system was designed and constructed successfully at the X-ray Laboratory in the University of Jordan. → X-ray CT scanner demonstrated its capability as a non-destructive tool for evaluating the internal atomic details of material objects. → Some general problems of X-ray CT scanning and image reconstruction are discussed and some suggested solutions are presented. → Scanner is designed to reconstruct two- and three-dimensional images mapping the internal structures of the object with the aid of the computer. → Internal geometrical structure can be determined from CT images.

  8. Thermo-mechanical design of a CW sweep plate emittance scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sweep plate emittance scanner for use with high power, continuous wave (CW) beams has been designed, fabricated and commissioned at Northrop Grumman. The design is capable of scanning beams of up to 20 kW beam power with a spot diameter as small as 2 cm. The scanner pod is mounted on a ball screw driven linear bearing table that is driven through the beam by a stepper motor at velocities up to 30 cm/sec. This paper presents the thermo-mechanical analysis of the pod moving through a gaussian beam and the details of the mechanical design of the pod and motion system. Analyses to determine scanner cooling schemes and structural materials are presented. (author)

  9. Aircraft Scanners = NASA Digital Aerial Scanners (TMS, TIMS, NS001): Pre 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Aircraft Scanners data set contains digital imagery acquired from several multispectral scanners including NS-001 Mutispectral scanner, Daedalus thematic mapper...

  10. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Kaloshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  11. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5-10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  12. Measurement of MRI scanner noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes a simple method for the analysis of MRI scanner noise. Besides the heating of body tissue by strong RF radiation and the formation of circular currents in the body induced bey switching field gradients, a noise level of more than 100 dB(A) during the measurement belongs to the potential risks of MRI [1,2]. This risk is of particular concern for staff and accompanying persons who remain close to the scanner for different reasons (e.g., monitoring of anesthetized patients, reassuring of children). For this reason, and given the scanty information on noise provided in the manuals of the scanners, it is useful to quantify the noise level more exactly. This applies also to the evaluation of different sound-reducing methods for the patient. This presents the results of noise level measurements in the tomograph and in its surrounding, with and without noise reduction by headphones. (orig.)

  13. Thermal analysis for wire scanners in the CSNS Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Fu, Shinian; Xu, Taoguang; Xu, Zhihong; Meng, Ming; Qiu, Ruiyang; Tian, Jianmin; Zeng, Lei; Li, Peng; Li, Fang; Wang, Biao

    2014-10-01

    3 MeV H- beam from the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) will be accelerated to 80 MeV in the CSNS (China Spallation Neutron Source) linear accelerator (Linac). The wire scanner is used to measure the transverse beam profile and the emittance, and the carbon or tungsten wire is considered to use. Thermal analysis of the wire scanners in the Linac is presented in this paper. The maximum temperature (Tm) of the wire decreases as the beam energy increases, and we also calculate the influence of all possible parameters on Tm. Tm of carbon wire is significantly lower than tungsten wire if both the beam parameters and wire geometric parameters are set to the same, which can be attributed to its higher heat capacity and radiant emissivity. In addition, we present the results of sublimation rate of the wire, which show that tungsten wire has a much lower evaporation rate than carbon wire in the same temperature, which can be attributed to the different vapor pressures of the two materials. To limit the thermionic emission, the maximum beam frequency approximately has an exponential relationship with beam rms size at a certain beam pulse width.

  14. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold;

    2011-01-01

    is a structured light scanner placed just above the patient tunnel on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, Siemens). It continuously registers point clouds of a part of the patient's face. The relative motion is estimated as the rigid transformation between frames. A geometric calibration...

  15. An improved image algorithm for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common artifact in CT head-section images is a cupping or broad ''whitening'' effect near the skull which is due at least in part to the polychromaticity of the x-ray beam. In this paper, a general method is presented for removing this artifact empirically by a combination of two approaches. The gross cupping is removed by modifying the raw transmission data prior to reconstruction. The residual whitening near the bone is removed by conveniently modifying the reconstruction-filter function. Examples of the modifications are shown using the ASE CT scanner. The method convolves or deconvolves the CT image with an appropriate point spread function. Since the filter-function modifications conceptually done in real space rather than in frequency space, the details of the modifications are more easily understood

  16. A prototype quantitative film scanner for radiochromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a high resolution, quantitative, two-dimensional optical film scanner for use with a commercial high sensitivity radiochromic film (RCF) for measuring single fraction external-beam radiotherapy dose distributions. The film scanner was designed to eliminate artifacts commonly observed in RCF dosimetry. The scanner employed a stationary light source and detector with a moving antireflective glass film platen attached to a high precision computerized X-Y translation stage. An ultrabright red light emitting diode (LED) with a peak output at 633 nm and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 16 nm was selected as the scanner light source to match the RCF absorption peak. A dual detector system was created using two silicon photodiode detectors to simultaneously measure incident and transmitted light. The LED light output was focused to a submillimeter (FWHM 0.67 mm) spot size, which was determined from a scanning knife-edge technique for measuring Gaussian optical beams. Data acquisition was performed with a 16-bit A/D card in conjunction with commercial software. The linearity of the measured densities on the scanner was tested using a calibrated neutral-density step filter. Sensitometric curves and three IMRT field scans were acquired with a spatial resolution of 1 mm for both radiographic film and RCF. The results were compared with measurements taken with a commercial diode array under identical delivery conditions. The RCF was rotated by 90 deg. and rescanned to study orientation effects. Comparison between the RCF and the diode array measurements using percent dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria produced average passing rates of 99.0% using 3%/3 mm criteria and 96.7% using 2%/2 mm criteria. The same comparison between the radiographic film and diode array measurements resulted in average passing rates 96.6% and 91.6% for the above two criteria, respectively. No measurable light-scatter or interference scanner artifacts were observed

  17. A tomographic gamma-ray scanner for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental computerised tomographic (CT) gamma-ray scanner is being developed for the non-destructive testing of industrial objects. A micro-computer controlled traversing system steps the test object across a collimated gamma-ray beam the transmitted intensity of which is measured by a NaI(Tl) detector for a large number of beam paths both through the object and the surrounding air. These data are used to reconstruct an image of the scanned section in terms of a two-dimensional distribution of linear attenuation coefficients at the gamma-ray energy used. A 100 mCi 241AM source of 59.6 keV gamma-rays has been used initially in order to compare the performance with medical CT X-ray scanners. (orig.)

  18. Barcode scanner for ring dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A barcode scanner for circular bar codes was developed as an additional module for a dosimeter-reader manufactured in the USA. The new scanner had to fulfill all existing interface specifications (power supply, serial interface) to be integrated seamlessly into the existing instrument. The size of the barcode reader had to be compact enough to fit into the instrument without the need for additional external components. The barcode scanner has been realized using image processing technology. The system is designed in a way to fulfill all the functions of the 'old' laser barcode scanner (decoding of linear codes) plus the additional function of decoding circular barcodes in parallel. The system consists of CCD (charge coupled device) camera, infrared illumination, image processing hardware (frame grabber) and computer. The computer runs an image processing software developed in C. The result of the development effort is a fully functional prototype that is to be adapted for serial production (with minor modifications) by the US-manufacturer. (author)

  19. A virtual spectral CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Spectral computed tomography (sCT) brings a promise of improved tissue discrimination when compared to conventional CT. At the heart of this new technology are energy selective photon counting detectors (PCD) combined with theorics on how to select optimal energy bins for discriminating two or more materials. Several theories have been published on how to select these energy bins, but so far the diagnostic utility of optimised sCT has not been fully exploited. This work presents a first step towards a virtual sCT scanner based on the well bench marked BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code and the computer power of the University of Canterbury BlueFern supe computer. A computational model of a recently developed sCT scanner (MARS-CT) has been developed to produce virtual X-ray projection data through an imaging object. The energy and position of all transmitted photons impinging on the detector plane can be extracted without the additional complications introduced by non ideal behaviour (such as charge-sharing) of current detectors. The photons are grouped into selective energy bins to produce energy selective projection images of the imaging object (see Fig. I). This enables the comparison of conventional CT with optimised spectral CT. Furthermore, the virtual sCT scanner is an ideal tool to compare and evaluate the different theoretical models (which optimise different metrics) in terms of relevant clinical parameters such as image contrast. In further work we are planning to include the physical limitations of the detector so the virtual sCT scanner closely resembles the MARS CT scanner.

  20. Improvements to Existing Jefferson Lab Wire Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaughan, Michael D. [JLAB; Tiefenback, Michael G. [JLAB; Turner, Dennis L. [JLAB

    2013-06-01

    This poster will detail the augmentation of selected existing CEBAF wire scanners with commercially available hardware, PMTs, and self created software in order to improve the scanners both in function and utility.

  1. EVALUATING PARAMETERS AFFECTING THE GEOREFERENCING ACCURACY OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Today laser scanning is used as a powerful technology in measuring various simple and complex objects in cultural heritage applications. Depending on the size and the complexity of the objects, these measurements are usually made from several stations. Similar to all other surveying techniques, the coordinate systems of such measurements need to be registered. For this, a number of retro-reflective targets visible from different stations are used. In practice, the target centres are entered in the computations. The accuracy of the target centres, therefore, need to be high or the final object coordinates might not be of sufficient accuracy. A number of factors including the distance between a target and the laser scanner, the direction of the target surface with respect to the laser scanner beams, the intensity and the number of reflected laser beams affect the accuracy of target centres. In this paper, various tests are carried out to examine the effect of such factors on the accuracy of coordinates obtained for the target centres. The results show that the distance to the laser scanner and the angle between a target surface and the corresponding laser beams have considerable effects on the locational accuracy of the targets.

  2. Method for calibration of an axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of calibrating an axial tomographic scanner including frame means having an opening therein in which an object to be examined is to be placed, source and detector means mounted on the frame means for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector means, and means to rotate the scanner including the source and detector means about the object whereby a plurality of sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption by the object of a plurality of beams of penetrating radiation are collected; the calibration method comprising mounting calibration means supporting an adjustable centering member onto the frame means, positioning the adjustable centering member at approximately the center of rotation of the scanner, placing position-sensitive indicator means adjacent the approximately centered member, rotating the scanner and the calibration means mounted thereon at least one time and, if necessary, adjusting the positioning of the centering member until the centering member is coincident with the center of rotation of the scanner as determined by minimum deflection of the position-sensitive indicator means, rotating and translating the source and detector means and determining for each angular orientation of the frame means supporting the source and detector means the central position of each translational scan relative to the centered member and/or if a plurality of detectors are utilized with the detector means for each planar slice of the object being examined, the central position of each translational scan for each detector relative to the centered member

  3. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification. A fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by...

  4. Application of a laser scanner to three dimensional visual sensing tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Arthur M.

    1992-01-01

    The issues are described which are associated with using a laser scanner for visual sensing and the methods developed by the author to address them. A laser scanner is a device that controls the direction of a laser beam by deflecting it through a pair of orthogonal mirrors, the orientations of which are specified by a computer. If a calibrated laser scanner is combined with a calibrated camera, it is possible to perform three dimensional sensing by directing the laser at objects within the field of view of the camera. There are several issues associated with using a laser scanner for three dimensional visual sensing that must be addressed in order to use the laser scanner effectively. First, methods are needed to calibrate the laser scanner and estimate three dimensional points. Second, methods to estimate three dimensional points using a calibrated camera and laser scanner are required. Third, methods are required for locating the laser spot in a cluttered image. Fourth, mathematical models that predict the laser scanner's performance and provide structure for three dimensional data points are necessary. Several methods were developed to address each of these and has evaluated them to determine how and when they should be applied. The theoretical development, implementation, and results when used in a dual arm eighteen degree of freedom robotic system for space assembly is described.

  5. A New Proton CT Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Coutrakon, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rykalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Naimuddin, M

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction, and preliminary testing of a second generation proton CT scanner is presented. All current treatment planning systems at proton therapy centers use X-ray CT as the primary imaging modality for treatment planning to calculate doses to tumor and healthy tissues. One of the limitations of X-ray CT is in the conversion of X-ray attenuation coefficients to relative (proton) stopping powers, or RSP. This results in more proton range uncertainty, larger target volumes and therefore, more dose to healthy tissues. To help improve this, we present a novel scanner capable of high dose rates, up to 2~MHz, and large area coverage, 20~x~24~cm$^2$, for imaging an adult head phantom and reconstructing more accurate RSP values.

  6. Fast and High Accuracy Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Koujili, M; Koopman, J; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; De Freitas, J; Ait Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2009-01-01

    Scanning of a high intensity particle beam imposes challenging requirements on a Wire Scanner system. It is expected to reach a scanning speed of 20 m.s-1 with a position accuracy of the order of 1 μm. In addition a timing accuracy better than 1 millisecond is needed. The adopted solution consists of a fork holding a wire rotating by a maximum of 200°. Fork, rotor and angular position sensor are mounted on the same axis and located in a chamber connected to the beam vacuum. The requirements imply the design of a system with extremely low vibration, vacuum compatibility, radiation and temperature tolerance. The adopted solution consists of a rotary brushless synchronous motor with the permanent magnet rotor installed inside of the vacuum chamber and the stator installed outside. The accurate position sensor will be mounted on the rotary shaft inside of the vacuum chamber, has to resist a bake-out temperature of 200°C and ionizing radiation up to a dozen of kGy/year. A digital feedback controller allows maxi...

  7. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  8. Use of Radioactive Ion Beams for Biomedical Research 2. in-vivo dosimetry using positron emitting rare earth isotopes with the rotating prototype PET scanner at the Geneva Cantonal Hospital

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS331 \\\\ \\\\ The use of radioactive metal ions (such as $^{90}$Y, $^{153}$Sm or $^{186}$Re) in cancer therapy has made some progress, but has been hampered by factors that could be addressed at CERN with a greater likelihood of success than at any other installation in the world. The present proposal seeks to use the unique advantage of CERN ISOLDE to get round these problems together with the PET scanners at the Cantonal Hospital Geneva (PET~=~positron emission tomography). Radioisotope production by spallation at ISOLDE makes available a complete range of isotopes having as complete a diversity of types and energy of radiation, of half-life, and of ionic properties as one would wish. Among these isotopes several positron-emitters having clinical relevance are available.\\\\ \\\\Some free rare earth chelatas are used presently in palliation of painful bone metastases. Curative effects are not able for the moment with this kind of radiopharmaceuticals. More and better data on the biokinetics and bio-distribution...

  9. Optical position feedback for electrostatically driven MOEMS scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortschanoff, A.; Baumgart, M.; Frank, A.; Wildenhain, M.; Sandner, T.; Schenk, H.; Kenda, A.

    2012-03-01

    For MOEMS devices which do not have intrinsic on-chip feedback, position information can be provided with optical methods, most simply by using a reflection from the backside of a MOEMS scanner. Measurement of timing signals using fast differential photodiodes can be used for resonant scanner mirrors performing sinusoidal motion with large amplitude. While this approach provides excellent accuracy it cannot be directly extended to arbitrary trajectories or static deflection angles. Another approach is based on the measurement of the position of the reflected laser beam with a quadrant diode. In this work, we present position sensing devices based on either principle and compare both approaches showing first experimental results from the implemented devices

  10. Gamma scanner conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will include several stations for the nondestructive examination of irradiated fuels. One of these stations will be the gamma scanner which will be employed to detect gamma radiation from the irradiated fuel pins. The conceptual design of the gamma scan station is described. The gamma scanner will use a Standard Exam Stage (SES) as a positioner and transport mechanism for the fuel pins which it will obtain from a magazine. A pin guide mechanism mounted on the face of the collimator will assure that the fuel pins remain in front of the collimator during scanning. The collimator has remotely adjustable tungsten slits and can be manually rotated to align the slit at various angles. A shielded detector cart located in the operating corridor holds an intrinsic germanium detector and associated sodium-iodide anticoincidence detector. The electronics associated with the counting system consist of standard NIM modules to process the detector signals and a stand-alone multichannel analyzer (MCA) for counting data accumulation. Data from the MCA are bussed to the station computer for analysis and storage on magnetic tape. The station computer controls the collimator, the MCA, a source positioner and the SES through CAMAC-based interface hardware. Most of the electronic hardware is commercially available but some interfaces will require development. Conceptual drawings are included for mechanical hardware that must be designed and fabricated

  11. Design of a multisensor optical surface scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gulab H.; Smith, Kirk E.; Commean, Paul K.; Whitestone, Jennifer J.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-10-01

    A reconfigurable, optical, 3D scanning system with sub-second acquisition of human body surface data was designed and simulated. Sensor elements (digital cameras/light beam projectors) that meet resolution, accuracy, and speed requirements are included in the system design. The sensors are interfaced to video frame grabber(s) under computer control resulting in a modular, low cost system. System operation and data processing are performed using a desktop graphics workstation. Surface data collected with this system can be oversampled to improve resolution and accuracy (viewed by overlapping camera/projector pairs). Multi- resolution data can be collected for different surfaces simultaneously or separately. Modeling and calibration of this reconfigurable system are achieved via a robust optimal estimation technique. Reconstruction software that allows seamless merging of a range data from multiple sensors has been implemented. Laser scanners that acquire body surface range data using one or two sensors require several seconds for data collection. Surface digitization of inaminate objects is feasible with such devices, but their use in human surface metrology is limited due to motion artifacts and occluded surfaces. Use of multiple, independent active sensors providing rapid collection and multi-resolution data enable sampling of complex human surface morphology not otherwise practical. 3D facial surface data has provided accurate measurements used in facial/craniofacial plastic surgery and modern personal protective equipment systems. Whole body data obtained with this new system is applicable to human factors research, medical diagnosis/treatment, and industrial design.

  12. Tuning of MEBT-Chopper by using wire scanner monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In J-PARC, a macro pulse with several hundred micro seconds is shaped into a pulse with medium bunch structure of about one MHz, by a RF chopper at MEBT section. The comb-like structured pulse is injected into the following DTL section. The remaining fraction of the beam in the bottom of the comb-like structure, is measured by a wire scanner monitor (with preamplifier) located in the downstream. The remaining fraction (compared to the nominal signal) is of the order of 0.1%. (author)

  13. Minimisation of the wire position uncertainties of the new CERN vacuum wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069346; Barjau Condomines, A

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new fast wire scanner is foreseen to measure small emittance beams throughout the LHC injector chain, which demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 ms-1 and position measurement accuracy of the order of a few microns. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system, and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire, were identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations is a high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This document presents the work performed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in one of the existing wire scanner and the new proposed design.

  14. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syryamkin, V. I., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru; Klestov, S. A., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  15. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  16. Discriminant analyses of Bendix scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Leamer, R. W.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Torline, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Flights over Weslaco, Texas are discussed, using the 9-channel Bendix scanner, providing calibrated data in the 380 to 1000 nm wavelength interval. These flights were at 2000 ft. These data gave seasonal coverage from the time signals, representing mainly the soil background. The ground truth data are provided; signature processing studies relating scanner data to ground truth were also carried out.

  17. Sewer Scanner and Evaluation Technology (SSET)

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The investment in sanitary sewer collection system represent a major component of $20 trillion of U.S. investment in civil infrastructure systems. Sewer Scanner and Evaluation Technology (SSET) will overcome weaknesses of the closed circuit television and provide the engineer with more and higher quality information for rehabilitation decision making process by utilizing optical scanner and gyroscope technology.

  18. Vacuum Actuator and Controller Design for a Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Herranz Alvarez, J; Koujili, M; Sirvent Blasco, J L

    2012-01-01

    To cope with increasing requirements in terms of accuracy and beam intensity limits a beam wire scanner (BWS) design is under development for the CERN accelerators complex. The main parameters have been determined; the wire speed should be 20 m·s -1 when interacting with the beam and a beam width determination accuracy of 2µm under the harsh radioactive environment should be reached. To meet this goal, the proposed solution locates all moveable parts of the actuator and the angular sensors in the beam vacuum pipe in order to reduce the friction and to allow a direct position measurement. One absolute positioning sensor will be used for the brushless motor feedback and one custom, high precision incremental design will target the beam size determination. The laboratory tests set up for the actuator and the incremental sensor will be presented along with the motor control feedback loops developed with the DSpace environment using Simulink and MatLab tools. Finally, the development of the digital...

  19. Interpretation of Wire-Scanner asymmetric profiles in a Low-Energy ring

    CERN Document Server

    Cieslak-Kowalska, Magdalena Anna

    2016-01-01

    In the CERN PS Booster, wire-scanner profile measurements performed at injection energy are affected by a strong asymmetry. The shape was reproduced with the code PyORBIT, assuming that the effect is due to the beam evolution during the scans, under the influence of space-charge forces and Multiple Coulomb Scattering at the wire itself. Reproducing the transverse profiles during beam evolution allows to use them reliably as input for simulation benchmarking.

  20. Coronary calcium scoring: modelling, predicting and correcting for the effect of CT scanner spatial resolution on Agatston and volume scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of spatial resolution on coronary calcium scoring by x-ray CT, to assess the scoring performance of different CT scanners as they are operated in the field and to correct for the effects of CT scanner spatial resolution on coronary calcium scoring. A phantom consisting of five aluminium wires of known diameter in water was used to measure spatial resolution and to assess scoring performance. Fourteen CT scanners (three helical, two dual, two electron-beam and seven multi-detector) from four manufacturers were evaluated, some under different operating conditions. One scanner was monitored over a 3 month period and again 6 months later. Both spatial resolution and image pixel size significantly affect calcium scoring results. Spatial resolution can be measured with a precision of about 2%. Scanner spatial resolution ranged from 1 to 1.7 mm full-width-half-maximum (FWHM), and pixel size from 0.25 to 0.86 mm. Spatial resolution differences introduce systematic scoring differences that range from 38% to 1100% depending on wire size. Significant temporal variations in spatial resolution were observed in the monitored scanner. By correcting all the scanners to the same target spatial resolution, the standard deviation of individual scanners with respect to a mean value (the spread) can be reduced by 25-70% for different wires. In conclusion, scanner spatial resolution significantly affects calcium scoring and should be controlled for. Scanner performance can change over time. Under ideal conditions, CT scanners should be operated with a standard spatial resolution for calcium scoring. When this is not possible, post-processing correction is a viable alternative

  1. Utilization of low-field MR scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evident advantage of high-field MR (magnetic resonance) scanners is their higher signal-to-noise ratio, which results in improved imaging. While no reliable efficacy studies exist that compare the diagnostic capabilities of low-versus high-field scanners, the adoption and acceptance of low-field MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is subject to biases. On the other hand, the cost savings associated with low-field MRI hardware are obvious. The running costs of a non-superconductive low-field scanner show even greater differences in favor of low-field scanners. Patient anxiety and safety issues also reflect the advantages of low-field scanners. Recent technological developments in the realm of low-field MR scanners will lead to higher image quality, shorter scan times, and refined imaging protocols. Interventional and intraoperative use also supports the installation of low-field MR scanners. Utilization of low-field systems has the potential to enhance overall cost reductions with little or no loss of diagnostic performance. (author)

  2. Optical design for POS hologram scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kozo; Ichikawa, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Takefumi

    1986-08-01

    This paper presents newly developed optical design techniques for a shallow-type POS hologram scanner. POS scanner optical design involves design of the scan pattern to read the bar code and design of the detection system. For scan pattern design, we have developed a "readability map" method and a "scanning diagram" method. Detection system design took into account laser safety standards, and we used a technique for estimating the power of the detected signal. We have realized a shallow-type POS hologram scanner which is only 16cm high and can be operated from a sitting position.

  3. Recording Scan Data in Photographic Colour During Live Time. I. From the Conventional Scanner. II. From a Ten Detector Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have developed instruments for scan recording in colour, combining the speed, versatility and silence of the cathode-ray tube, the contrast and latitude of a photographic process, and the rapid development of Polaroid colour film. I. The electron beam of a modified cathode-ray oscilloscope is made to track the motion of the scanner detector. The beam is normally off but is flashed on at each impulse from the scanner analyser. The screen is photographed in colour during a time exposure through a train of colour filters driven back and forth through the lens system of the camera by a servo mechanism controlled by the ratemeter circuit of the scanner. The instrument is calibrated so that the maximum intensity photographs in red. As count- rates decrease, other filters are driven into place to photograph the screen in continuously varying saturated hues of orange, yellow, green, blue and violet. Examples are shown from scans of models and from our 17 000 clinical colour scan library, demonstrating enhanced contrast, extended dynamic range, and quantitative information at a glance. II. More recently, the authors have designed an instrument for recording scan data in colour from a ten detector moving scanner system. As usually employed, the Dynapix presents scan data on the screen of a cathode-ray tube as flashes of varying intensity appearing sequentially in rows and columns at a repetition frequency up to 200/sec, and too rapid for our system previously described. In the new colour version of the instrument, colour filters mounted in a wheel between the lens elements of the camera are driven at a continuous 9 400 rev/min. The electron beam is pulsed by intensity modulated time delay so that an input signal of maximum amplitude delays the flash until red filter is traversing the lens opening. Signals of lesser amplitude are converted to decreasing time delays, resulting in flashes photographing as corresponding hues of orange, through violet. The recording

  4. A Cross-Platform Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten; Petersen, Michael Kai; Hansen, Lars Kai

    We describe a smartphone brain scanner with a low-costwireless 14-channel Emotiv EEG neuroheadset interfacingwith multiple mobile devices. This personal informaticssystem enables minimally invasive and continuouscapturing of brain imaging data in natural settings. Thesystem applies an inverse...

  5. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2012-01-01

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus delivery, data acquisition, logging, brain state decoding, and 3D visualization of the cortical EEG sources. Implementation of the smartphone brain scanner is based on the Qt framework and benefits from t...

  6. Feasibility studies on the direct wire readout on wire scanners in electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bachelor thesis deals essentially with the signal processing of a so-called wire scanner, a special monitor, which comes to application in the beam diagnostics of particle accelerators. In this direct wire readout the voltage signal, which is induced by the particle beam in the measurement wire of the wire scanner, shall be directly read out. The aim of this thesis is to show fundamental considerations and perform studies, which study, whether and how in the future by means of a suited data transmission as well as readout electronics conclusion on the most important parameters of the beam, like position and profile, are possible. The measurement system presented here is divided in three main components: Signal measurement, signal preparation, and signal stretching. A suited test facility was developed and is presented in detail, in which then all components, like for instance the transmission cables, the wire-scanner fork, and the developed measurement circuit, are studied, which are of importance for a faultless signal transmission and presentation. Extensive measurements on the single components, as well as calculations for the signal transmission on and in the wire scanner were performed, whereby a good agreement could be found. Thereafter a comparison and a selection of the component used in this project were made. Furthermore improvement proposals, new constructions, and outlooks are presented, which could be of importance in further works.

  7. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  8. Diffraction analysis of beams for barcode scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jay M.; Quinn, Anna M.

    1991-02-01

    Laser based bar code scanners utilize large f/# beams to attain a large depth of focus. The intensity cross-section of the laser beam is generally not uniform but is frequently approximated by a Gaussian intensity profile. In the case of laser diodes the beam cross-section is a two dimensional distribution. It is well known that the focusing properties of large f/# Gaussian beams differ from the predictions of ray tracing techniques. Consequently analytic modeling of laser based bar code scanning systems requires techniques based on diffraction rather than on ray tracing in order to obtain agreement between theory and practice. The line spread function of the focused laser beam is generally the parameter of interest due to the one-dimensional nature of the bar code symbol. Some bar code scanners utilize an anamorphic optical system to produce a beam that that maintains an elliptical cross-section over an extended depth of focus. This elliptical beam shape is used to average over voids and other printing defects that occur in real world symbols. Since the scanner must operate over the maximum possible depth of field the beam emergent from the scanner must be analyzed in both its near field and far field regions in order to properly model the performance of the scanner.

  9. Determination of the weighted CT dose index in modern multi-detector CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to (a) evaluate the underestimation in the value of the free-in-air (CTDIair) and the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) determined with the standard 100 mm pencil chamber, i.e. the CTDI100 concept, for the whole range of nominal radiation beam collimations selectable in a modern multi-slice CT scanner (b) estimate the optimum length of the pencil-chamber and phantoms for accurate CTDIw measurements and (c) provide CTDIw values normalized to free-in-air CTDI for different tube-voltage, nominal radiation beam collimations and beam filtration values. The underestimation in the determination of CTDIair and CTDIw using the CTDI100 concept was determined from measurements obtained with standard polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms and arrays of thermoluminescence dosimeters. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to simulate standard CTDI measurements on a 16-slice CT scanner. The optimum pencil-chamber length for accurate determination of CTDIw was estimated as the minimum chamber length for which a further increase in length does not alter the value of the CTDI. CTDIw/CTDIair ratios were determined using Monte Carlo simulation and the optimum detector length for all selectable tube-voltage values and for three different values of beam filtration. To verify the Monte Carlo results, measured values of CTDIw/CTDIair ratios using the standard 100 mm pencil ionization chamber were compared with corresponding values calculated with Monte Carlo experiments. The underestimation in the determination of CTDIair using the 100 mm pencil chamber was less than 1% for all beam collimations. The underestimation in CTDIw was 15% and 27% for head and body phantoms, respectively. The optimum detector length for accurate CTDIw measurements was found to be 50 cm for the beam collimations commonly employed in modern multi-detector (MD) CT scanners. The ratio of CTDIw/CTDIair determined using the optimum detector length was found to be independent

  10. Optimization of detector sampling for mutlislice CT scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jiang

    1999-05-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the elapsed time of a complete organ coverage is an important parameter for many clinical applications. This requirement has let to the development of both sub-second and multi-slice CT scanners. Examples of the multi-slice scanners include twin beam CT and quad CT (QCT). Although they are different in terms of number of detector rows employed in the design, they share the common property that the spacing between adjacent detector rows is essentially identical to the detector cell size, and the spacing remains constant regardless of the scanning conditions. This restriction has led to a sub-optimal sampling along the patient axis. In this paper, we present an optimized detector sampling scheme. In the proposed scheme, the detector spacing is dynamically adjusted based on the helical pitch. This allows an improved sampling pattern along the patient axis. In conjunction with the proposed sampling scheme, an helical interpolation reconstruction algorithm is proposed. Detailed analysis and computer simulations are performed to validate our approach.

  11. Beam instrumentation performance overview

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 run has proven that LHC can operate safely and stably with higher bunch intensity and smaller transverse emittance than foreseen in the Technical Design Report. In this presentation the performance of the Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system is discussed. The improvements to the system, those made during the last year and those expected to be done for 2012 run are presented. The status of the three types of devices measuring the transverse beam emittance, wire scanners (BWS), synchrotron radiation monitors (BSRT) and beam gas ionization monitors (BGI), are shown. The control room applications are reviewed and a set of improvements proposed by the operation team is presented.

  12. Energy discrimination type photon counting radiation line sensor (X-ray color scanner)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray color scanner that can distinguish between photon energies has been developed using X-ray line sensors. This scanner consists of a 64-channel cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation detection array, a 64-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), and a signal processing circuit that controls both the ASIC and data communication. An X-ray or gamma ray photon absorbed by the CdTe detector is converted into an electric charge proportional to the energy of the incident photon and amplified to an electric pulse with an amplitude proportional to the photon energy. The pulse height is then analyzed by the ASIC using 5 different threshold voltages. The X-ray color scanner has the ability to count up to approximately 2 million photons per CdTe element per second. When used as a photon counting system, the X-ray color sensor has a very high signal to noise ratio, since it removes electric noise in the low energy spectrum during the analysis process. When appropriately selected energy thresholds are used, X-ray color scanners, used for X-ray imaging or X-ray CT, were shown to remove the effects of beam-scattering noise and beam-hardening. (author)

  13. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, Bruce R., E-mail: whitingbrucer@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Dohatcu, Andreea C. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Politte, David G. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ∼6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (∼$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners.

  14. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ∼6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (∼$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners

  15. Task force report on computerized tomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    Computerized axial tomography (CAT) scanning was the focus of a task force established by the Bergen-Passaic Health Systems Agency in New Jersey. The task force reviewed the literature on CAT technology and its applications, surveyed four northeastern hospitals with operating CAT scanning installations, and created three working subcommittees which produced written reports. It was agreed by task force members that certain criteria should be used when evaluating applications for CAT scanners, e.g., service area, staff resources, emergency room activity, radiotherapy, 24-hour scanner coverage, the medically indigent, and cost. Overall, it was determined that CAT is a proven diagnostic tool of significant value and that it should be available to residents of the Bergen-Passaic health service area. Since the CAT field is rapidly evolving and changing, however, it was not possible to define quantitatively the long-term need for and supply of CAT scanners in the region. Appendixes present supporting data on the task force findings.

  16. Functional Extensions To High Performance Document Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W. B.; Chansky, L. M.; Land, R. A.; Van den Heuvel, R. C.; Kraemer, E. J.; Steele, L. W.; Sherrill, C. J.

    1989-07-01

    Document processing systems based on electronic imaging technology are evolving rapidly, motivated by technology advances in optical storage, image scanners, image compression, high speed digital communications, and high resolution displays. These evolving systems require high speed reliable image scanning systems to create the digital image data base that is at the heart of the applications addressed by these evolving systems. High speed production document scanners must provide the capability of converting a wide variety of input material into high quality digital imagery. The required capabilities include: (i) the ability to scan varying sizes and weights of paper, (ii) image enhancement techniques adequate to produce quality imagery from a document material that may depart significantly from standard high contrast black and white office correspondence, (iii) standard compression options, and (iv) a standard interface to a host or control processor providing full control of all scanner operations and all image processing options. As electronic document processing systems proliferate, additional capabilities will be required to support automated or semi-automated document indexing and selective capture of document content. Capabilities now present on microfilming systems will be required as options or features on document capture systems. These capabilities will include: endorsers, bar code readers, and optical character recognition (OCR) capability. Bar code and OCR capabilities will be required to support automated indexing of scanned material, and OCR capability within specific areas of scanned document material will be required to support indexing and specific application needs. These features will also be supported and controlled through a standard host interface. This paper describes the architecture of the TDC DocuScan Digital Image Scanner. The scanner is a double-sided scanner that produces compressed imagery of both sides of a scanned page in under two

  17. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  18. Vibration measurements of a wire scanner - Experimental setup and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Juan; Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new performance demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 m s-1 and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire have been identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations has been given high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This article presents a new strategy to measure the wire vibrations based on the piezoresistive effect of the wire itself. An electronic readout system based on a Wheatstone bridge is used to measure the variation of the carbon wire resistance, which is directly proportional to the wire elongation caused by the oscillations.

  19. High speed hydraulic scanner for deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From their research and development in hard x-ray lithography, the authors have found that the conventional leadscrew driven scanner stages do not provide adequate scan speed or travel. These considerations have led the authors to develop a scanning system based on a long stroke hydraulic drive with 635 mm of travel and closed loop feedback to position the stage to better than 100 micrometers. The control of the device is through a PC with a custom LabView interface coupled to simple x-ray beam diagnostics. This configuration allows one to set a variety of scan parameters, including target dose, scan range, scan rates, and dose rate. Results from the prototype system at beamline X-27B are described as well as progress on a production version for the X-14B beamline

  20. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  1. Industrial X-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New inspection needs are being posed as a result of recent development of new materials and new technology. Introduced is a newly developed industrial X-ray CT Scanner including application examples, which will answer to some of the new needs

  2. Characterization of color scanners based on SVR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Yi-xin

    2012-01-01

    By researching the principle of colorimetric characterization method and Support Vector Regression (SVR), we analyze the feasibility of nonlinear transformation from scanner RGB color space to CIELAB color space based on SVR and built a new characterization model. Then we use the MATLABR2009a software to make a data simulation experiment to verify the accuracy of this model and figure out the color differences by CIEDE2000 color difference formula. Based on CIEDE2000 color difference formula, the average, the maximum and the minimum color differences of the training set are 1.2376, 2.5593 and 0.2182, the average, the maximum and the minimum color differences of the text set are 1.9318, 4.1421 and 0.4228. From the experimental results, we can make a conclusion that SVR can realize the nonlinear transformation from scanner RGB color space to CIELAB color space and the model satisfies the accuracy of scanner characterization. Therefore, SVR can be used into the color scanner characterization management.

  3. Ultrasonic Scanner Control and Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    2002-01-01

    The research accomplishments under this grant were very extensive in the areas of ULTRASONIC SCANNER CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION. Rather than try to summarize all this research I have enclosed research papers and reports which were completed with the hnding provided by the grant. These papers and reports are listed below:

  4. Design of an optical position detection unit for fast 2D-MOEMS scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Tortschanoff, A.; Sandner, Thilo; Kenda, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have developed compact modules comprising optical position sensing, and driver electronics, with closed loop control, which can measure the trajectory of resonantly driven 2D-micro-scanner mirrors. In this contribution we present the optical design of the position sensing unit and highlight various critical aspects. Basically position encoding is obtained using trigger signals generated when a fast photodiode is hit by a laser beam reflected from the backside of the mirror. This ...

  5. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  6. Applications of Optical Scanners in an Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Carol; Tannenbaum, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes optical scanners, including how the technology works; applications in data management and research; development of instructional materials; and providing community services. Discussion includes the three basic types of optical scanners: optical character recognition (OCR), optical mark readers (OMR), and graphic scanners. A sidebar…

  7. Uniform irradiation system using beam scanning method for cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI AVF-cyclotron is equipped with an ion beam scanner for large area irradiation. The two-dimensional fluence distribution of ion beam obtained using cellulose triacetate film dosimeter was not uniform. This is resulted from the distortion of excitation current for electromagnet of the scanner. So, the beam scanning condition, i.e., the relation between the ion species, the beam profile and the scanning width, was extremely limited to make a good uniformity. We have developed a beam scanning simulator to get fluence distributions by calculation and then compared the simulated distributions with the measured ones. It was revealed that the both of them are in good agreement and the beam scanning condition to get good uniformity was led by using this simulator. On the basis of these results, the power supply of scanner was improved. A good uniformity of beam distribution was available. (author)

  8. Beam-Beam Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  9. Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  10. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia.A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  11. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  12. Development of high pressure pipe scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an automatic ultrasonic scanning system for pressure pipe welds, which was developed in this project using recent advanced technologies on mobile robot and computer. The system consists of two modules: a robot scanner module which navigates and manipulates scanning devices, and a data acquisition module which generates ultrasonic signal and processes the data from the scanner. The robot has 4 magnetic wheels and 2 -axis manipulator on which ultrasonic transducer attached. The wheeled robot can navigate curved surface such as outer wall of circular pipes. Magnetic wheels were optimally designed through magnetic field analysis. Free surface sensing and line tracking control algorithm were developed and implemented, and the control devices and software can be used in practical inspection works. We expect our system can contribute to reduction of inspection time, performance enhancement, and effective management of inspection results

  13. 2D MEMS scanner integrating a position feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30μrad (around 13bits in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  14. Inferring Consideration Set from Scanner Data

    OpenAIRE

    Wirawan Dony Dahana; Nozomi Nakajima

    2011-01-01

    Consideration set has been one of main research topics in marketing field for a long time. Using interview data, many studies have been conducted to investigate the nature of its content. However, only few studies tried to do so by using consumer purchase history. By modeling the process of consideration and choice set formation, in this research we try to elicit consumer consideration set from scanner data. Some managerial implications for marketing decisions derived from the information of ...

  15. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai;

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus deli......) that are based on Linux operating systems. Thus our system runs on multiple platforms, including Maemo/MeeGo based smartphones, Android-based smartphones and tablet devices....

  16. Determining Block Detector Positions for PET Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We present an algorithm for accurate localization of block detectors in a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Accurate reconstruction of PET images requires precise knowledge of the physical position and orientation of the detectors. However, in some systems, block detector positioning and orientation can have relatively large tolerances, leading to implicit errors in the coincidence line-of-response (LOR) positioning. To compensate we utilize a rotating point source phantom where the...

  17. Improvement in measurement accuracy for hybrid scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability to provide dense three-dimensional (3D) data (point clouds) at high speed and at high accuracy has made terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) widely used for many purposes especially for documentation, management and analysis. However, similar to other 3D sensors, proper understanding regarding the error sources is necessary to ensure high quality data. A procedure known as calibration is employed to evaluate these errors. This process is crucial for TLS in order to make it suitable for accurate 3D applications (e.g. industrial measurement, reverse engineering and monitoring). Two calibration procedures available for TLS: 1) component, and 2) system calibration. The requirements of special laboratories and tools which are not affordable by most TLS users have become principle drawback for component calibration. In contrast, system calibration only requires a room with appropriate targets. By employing optimal network configuration, this study has performed system calibration through self-calibration for Leica ScanStation C10 scanner. A laboratory with dimensions of 15.5 m × 9 m × 3 m and 138 well-distributed planar targets were used to derive four calibration parameters. Statistical analysis (e.g. t-test) has shown that only two calculated parameters, the constant rangefinder offset error (0.7 mm) and the vertical circle index error (−45.4) were significant for the calibrated scanner. Photogrammetric technique was utilised to calibrate the 3D test points at the calibration field. By using the test points, the residual pattern of raw data and self-calibration results were plotted into the graph to visually demonstrate the improvement in accuracy for Leica ScanStation C10 scanner

  18. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  19. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H- source test facility Allison scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C D; Stockli, M P; Gorlov, T V; Han, B; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R

    2010-02-01

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H(-) ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis. PMID:20192462

  20. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H- source test facility Allison scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H- ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  1. Precise radiochromic film dosimetry using a flat-bed document scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a measurement protocol is presented that improves the precision of dose measurements using a flat-bed document scanner in conjunction with two new GafChromic registered film models, HS and Prototype A EBT exposed to 6 MV photon beams. We established two sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by measurement and calibration curve fit parameters contributions. We have quantitatively assessed the influence of different steps in the protocol on the overall dose measurement uncertainty. Applying the protocol described in this paper on the Agfa Arcus II flat-bed document scanner, the overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty for an uniform field amounts to 2% or less for doses above around 0.4 Gy in the case of the EBT (Prototype A), and for doses above 5 Gy in the case of the HS model GafChromic registered film using a region of interest 2x2 mm2 in size

  2. Precise radiochromic film dosimetry using a flat-bed document scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Seuntjens, Jan; Sham, Edwin; Podgorsak, Ervin B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Kirov, Assen S; Soares, Christopher G

    2005-07-01

    In this study, a measurement protocol is presented that improves the precision of dose measurements using a flat-bed document scanner in conjunction with two new GafChromic film models, HS and Prototype A EBT exposed to 6 MV photon beams. We established two sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by measurement and calibration curve fit parameters contributions. We have quantitatively assessed the influence of different steps in the protocol on the overall dose measurement uncertainty. Applying the protocol described in this paper on the Agfa Arcus II flat-bed document scanner, the overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty for an uniform field amounts to 2% or less for doses above around 0.4 Gy in the case of the EBT (Prototype A), and for doses above 5 Gy in the case of the HS model GafChromic film using a region of interest 2 X 2 mm2 in size. PMID:16121579

  3. A combined micro-PET/CT scanner for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-PET/CT system was developed by combination of an in-house micro-CT and a microPET[reg] R4 scanner. The cone-beam micro-CT consists of a rotational gantry that fits an X-ray tube, a CCD-based X-ray detector, and motor-driven linear stages. The gantry was designed to be coaxial with the scanner of microPET'' (registered) R4. It can be moved for the convenience of mounting the Ge-68 point-source holder for PET's calibration. The image volumes obtained from two modalities is registered by a pre-determined, inherent spatial transformation function. This hardware-approach fusion, which provides accurate and no labor-intensive alignment, is suitable for mass scanning. The micro-PET/CT system has been operated successfully. Merging the anatomical and functional images benefit studies of the small animal imaging

  4. Characterization of radiochromic films EBT3 by means of the scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red and Epson 10000-XL use; Caracterizacion de films radiocromicos EBT3 mediante el uso de scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red y Epson 10000-XL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Adrada, A.; Filipuzzi, M., E-mail: fisicamedina11@gmail.com [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The Radiochromic film have become an attractive tool for verification of dose distributions in IMRT because these have high spatial resolution film, are near water equivalent and not require revealed, A critical aspect of the use of these film is used for digitizing scanner The purpose of this paper is to characterize EBT3 using two types of scanner. Were employed The Radiochromic film EBT3, was used photon beam 6 MV generated by a linear accelerator Siemens Primus, he films were irradiated at a dose range between 0 Gy a 9 Gy. The stabilization time after irradiation was 24 hours. The films were digitized with a scanner Epson 10000-XL y el VIDAR Dosimetry Pro Red. We used the software for construction of the calibration curve. The resolution of each dosimetry system was analyzed through the results of the spatial response function by analyzing a step pattern. The Epson scanner is most sensitive to the red channel. This is less than that obtained with the Vidar. The Vidar scanner spatial response profiles disturbs not opposed to Epson analyzed. The calibration curves for both dosimetry systems can be employed. However, the sensitivity and repeatability of the system is better than Red Vidar Epson 10000-XL. (author)

  5. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  6. Biomedical Imaging and Sensing using Flatbed Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600–700 cm2) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features o...

  7. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature...... step gauge produced using a polymer replica material (Item 3). The items circulated among six participants in Denmark and Germany. The circulation took place between March 2011 and June 2011. The items were measured according to a given protocol....

  8. Calibrations for analyzing industrial samples on medical CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this paper are calibrations for obtaining meaningful CT data for industrial samples using medical scanners. Calibrations were made using a second generation, dual slice Technicare Deltascan 100 scanner with a tungsten source, seven BGO detectors (three per slice plus one reference), a DEC PDP 11/04 computer system, and a set scan circle size of 11.4 inches. The unit operates at a tube current and voltage of 120 KV and 25 mA, respectively. While some calibrations are specific to the Deltascan 100, others can be applied to most medical instruments. Two types of calibrations are presented: (1) those that involve changes only to the sample; and (2) those that involve changes to the scanner and scanner software. The first type is necessary for cases in which a leased or rented scanner that cannot be modified is being used. Both types are useful for cases in which scanner modification is possible

  9. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Meier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  10. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    OpenAIRE

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning in dimensional metrology. Influence of workpiece orientation, magnification, source-object-detector distances and surface extraction method on metrological performances of a CT scanner was evaluated. Resu...

  11. Was the Scanner Calibration Slide used for its intended purpose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yaping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, Scanner calibration revisited, BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:361, Dr. Pozhitkov used the Scanner Calibration Slide, a key product of Full Moon BioSystems to generate data in his study of microarray scanner PMT response and proposed a mathematic model for PMT response 1. In the end, the author concluded that "Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration," and recommended "against using these slides." We found these conclusions are seriously flawed and misleading, and his recommendation against using the Scanner Calibration Slide was not properly supported.

  12. High-picture quality industrial CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial X-ray-CT-scanners, which provide cross-sectional images of a tested sample without destroying it, are attracting attention as a new nondestructive inspection device. In 1982, Toshiba commenced the development of industrial CT scanners, and introduced the 'TOSCANER' -3000 and-4000 series. Now, the state of the art 'TOSCANER'-20000 series of CT systems has been developed incorporating the latest computer tomography and image processing technology, such as the T9506 image processor. One of the advantages of this system is its applicability to a wide range of X-ray energy . The 'TOSCANER'-20000 series can be utilized for inspecting castings and other materials with relatively low-transparency to X-rays, as well as ceramics, composite materials and other materials with high X-ray transparency. A further feature of the new system is its high-picture quality, with a high-spatial resolution resulting from a pixel size of 0.2x0.2(mm). (author)

  13. Quest for an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertora, Franco; Borceto, Alice; Viale, Andrea; Sandini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A study of the motor cortex during the programming, execution and mental representation of voluntary movement is of great relevance; its evaluation in conditions close to reality is necessary, given the close integration of the visuomotor, sensory feedback and proprioceptive systems, as of yet, a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner allowing a human subject to maintain erect stance, observe the surroundings and conserve limb freedom is still a dream. The need for high field suggests a solenoid magnet geometry that forces an unnatural posture that affects the results, particularly when the motor cortex is investigated. In contrast in a motor functional study, the scanner should allow the subject to sit or stand, with unobstructed sight and unimpeded movement. Two approaches are presented here to solve this problem. In the first approach, an increased field intensity in an open magnet is obtained lining the "back wall" of the cavity with a sheet of current: this boosts the field intensity at the cost of the introduction of a gradient, which has to be canceled by the introduction of an opposite gradient; The second approach is an adaptation of the "double doughnut" architecture, in which the cavity widens at the center to provide additional room for the subject. The detailed design of this kind of structure has proven the feasibility of the solution. PMID:25227008

  14. A hybrid scanner for positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid scanner has been built, which is specially designed for total body metabolic studies with short-lived labelled compounds. The scanner consists of two parallel detectors, 40-cm long, one above and one below the patient, which move along the body. The positions of scintillations along the detectors are detected by photomultipliers at the ends of the crystals, and the positions of scintillations along the patient's body are derived from the position of the mechanism carrying the detectors. Both single photon and coincidence modes are possible. The collimation was optimized for semi-dynamic total-body metabolic studies. The sensitivity of the instrument to a point source is about 400 counts/μCi per minute in the single photon mode and 60 counts/μCi per minute in the coincidence mode with positron energy. The resolution is 28 mm versus 22 mm (FWHM), and the maximal count rates with 25% loss are 22 000 versus 1700 counts/s. The scanning speed can be varied from 0.5 to 20 cm/s and the instrument is designed to scan five times per minute over one metre of the body. This makes relatively accurate measurements possible on phenomena that occur over 2 to 20 minutes. As preliminary applications the accumulation of 18F in a rabbit and a study of ethanol metabolism in a human subject are described. (author)

  15. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  16. Scanner OPC signatures: automatic vendor-to-vendor OPE matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Stephen P.

    2009-03-01

    As 193nm lithography continues to be stretched and the k1 factor decreases, optical proximity correction (OPC) has become a vital part of the lithographer's tool kit. Unfortunately, as is now well known, the design variations of lithographic scanners from different vendors cause them to have slightly different optical-proximity effect (OPE) behavior, meaning that they print features through pitch in distinct ways. This in turn means that their response to OPC is not the same, and that an OPC solution designed for a scanner from Company 1 may or may not work properly on a scanner from Company 2. Since OPC is not inexpensive, that causes trouble for chipmakers using more than one brand of scanner. Clearly a scanner-matching procedure is needed to meet this challenge. Previously, automatic matching has only been reported for scanners of different tool generations from the same manufacturer. In contrast, scanners from different companies have been matched using expert tuning and adjustment techniques, frequently requiring laborious test exposures. Automatic matching between scanners from Company 1 and Company 2 has remained an unsettled problem. We have recently solved this problem and introduce a novel method to perform the automatic matching. The success in meeting this challenge required three enabling factors. First, we recognized the strongest drivers of OPE mismatch and are thereby able to reduce the information needed about a tool from another supplier to that information readily available from all modern scanners. Second, we developed a means of reliably identifying the scanners' optical signatures, minimizing dependence on process parameters that can cloud the issue. Third, we carefully employed standard statistical techniques, checking for robustness of the algorithms used and maximizing efficiency. The result is an automatic software system that can predict an OPC matching solution for scanners from different suppliers without requiring expert intervention.

  17. Robotic aircraft scanner for neutron radiographic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A robotic positioner and manipulator, a key component of a mobile neutron radiography system (MNRS) for aircraft inspection, is described. The MNRS is designed to inspect military aircraft for hidden corrosion in aluminum structures. The MNRS is comprised of an accelerator-based (Kaman A-711 sealed tube neutron generator using the deuterium-tritium reaction) thermal neutron source, electronic neutron imaging system, robotic positioner and manipulator for the source/imager, control trailer housing system control electronics and digital image processing system, mobile dark room for film processing, self-contained electrical power source, and radiation safety system. For in situ aircraft inspection, the robotic scanner is programmed (in a teach/learn mode) to scan a region of the components (e.g., wings, stabilizers, etc.) using a control pendant

  18. Temporal analysis of multispectral scanner data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Torline, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multispectral scanner reflectance data were sampled for bare soil, cotton, sorghum, corn, and citrus at four dates during a growing season (April, May, June, and July 1969) to develop a time-dependent signature for crop and soil discrimination. Discrimination tests were conducted for single-date and multidate formats using training and test data sets. For classifications containing several crops, the multidate or temporal approach improved discrimination compared with the single-date approach. The multidate approach also preserved recognition accuracy better in going from training fields to test fields than the single-date analysis. The spectral distinctiveness of bare soil versus vegetation resulted in essentially equal discrimination using single-date versus multidate data for those two categories.

  19. Radiation dosimetry of computed tomography x-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the development and application of the methods employed in National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) surveys of computed tomography x-ray scanners (CT scanners). It includes descriptions of the phantoms and equipment used, discussion of the various dose parameters measured, the principles of the various dosimetry systems employed and some indication of the doses to occupationally exposed personnel

  20. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner....

  1. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner....

  2. Thermionic scanner pinpoints work function of emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    In the electron tube testing, a thermionic scanner makes accurate spatial resolution measurements of the metallic surface work functions of emitters. The scanner determines the emitter function and its local departures from the mean value on a point-by-point basis for display on an oscilloscope.

  3. Vision Assisted Laser Scanner Navigation for Autonomous Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a navigation method based on road detection using both a laser scanner and a vision sensor. The method is to classify the surface in front of the robot into traversable segments (road) and obstacles using the laser scanner, this classifies the area just in front of the robot (2...

  4. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S.; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning in d...

  5. Moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner based on polarization resolved in-finger scattered light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Seon-Woo; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Geun-Sik

    2016-08-22

    A moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner (FPS) that is based on polarization resolved in-finger light is proposed and realized. Incident visible light, which is selectively fed to a fingerprint sample via a polarization beam splitter (PBS), is deemed to be partially scattered backward by tissues associated with the skin of the finger. The backscattered light is mostly index-guided in the ridge comprising the fingerprint, which has a higher refractive index, and is drastically dispersed in the valley, which is typically filled with water or air and so has a lower index. However, when light reflects directly off the surface of the finger skin, it fundamentally prevents the scanned image from being determined. The proposed FPS produces bright and dark intensity patterns that are alternately created on the surface of the PBS and correspond to the ridges and valleys, respectively. Thus, this method can especially distinguish between a fake synthetic fingerprint and a genuine fingerprint due to its use of in-finger scattered light. The scanner has been rigorously designed by carrying out ray-optic simulations depending on the wavelength, with tissue-induced scattering taken into account. The device was constructed by incorporating a wire-grid type PBS in conjunction with visible LED sources, including blue, green and red. The scanner adopting a blue LED, which exhibits the strongest light scattering, resulted in the best fingerprint image, enabling enhanced fidelity under the wet and dry situations. Finally, a fake synthetic fingerprint could be successfully discriminated. PMID:27557199

  6. Analysis of a low-aberration holographic scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, T; Iwaoka, H

    1988-05-15

    Low-aberration holographic scanners that eliminate the need tor lenses or mirrors promise to greatly reduce the cost of laser printers and image scanners. This paper describes how the spot profile of such a scanner can be predicted using the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral, and the diffraction efficiency of the scanner can be predicted using Kogelnik's coupled-wave theory. Experimental results verity the accuracy of these design methods. For a prototype scanner used in a high-resolution He-Ne laser printer, the measured linearity error was under +/- 100 microm, and the spot size (half-intensity beamwidth) was under 60 microm for a span (scan width) of 280 mm. PMID:20531695

  7. Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using a real-time dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, Bruce R., E-mail: whitingbrucer@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Dohatcu, Andreea C. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Politte, David G. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Several areas of computed tomography (CT) research require knowledge about the intensity profile of the x-ray fan beam that is introduced by a bow tie filter. This information is considered proprietary by CT manufacturers, so noninvasive measurement methods are required. One method using real-time dosimeters has been proposed in the literature. A commercially available dosimeter was used to apply that method, and analysis techniques were developed to extract fan beam profiles from measurements. Methods: A real-time ion chamber was placed near the periphery of an empty CT gantry and the dose rate versus time waveform was recorded as the x-ray source rotated about the isocenter. In contrast to previously proposed analysis methods that assumed a pointlike detector, the finite-size ion chamber received varying amounts of coverage by the collimated x-ray beam during rotation, precluding a simple relationship between the source intensity as a function of fan beam angle and measured intensity. A two-parameter model for measurement intensity was developed that included both effective collimation width and source-to-detector distance, which then was iteratively solved to minimize the error between duplicate measurements at corresponding fan beam angles, allowing determination of the fan beam profile from measured dose-rate waveforms. Measurements were performed on five different scanner systems while varying parameters such as collimation, kVp, and bow tie filters. On one system, direct measurements of the bow tie profile were collected for comparison with the real-time dosimeter technique. Results: The data analysis method for a finite-size detector was found to produce a fan beam profile estimate with a relative error between duplicate measurement intensities of <5%. It was robust over a wide range of collimation widths (e.g., 1–40 mm), producing fan beam profiles that agreed with a relative error of 1%–5%. Comparison with a direct measurement technique on

  8. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data types, such as B-mode, M-mode, pulsed Doppler, and color flow imaging, the machine provides users with full control over imaging parameters such as transmit level, excitation waveform, beam angle, and focal depth. Beamformed RF data can be acquired from regions of interest throughout the image plane and stored to a file with a simple button press. For clinical trials and investigational purposes, when an identical image plane is desired for both an experimental and a reference data set, interleaved data can be captured. This form of data acquisition allows switching between multiple setups while maintaining identical transducer, scanner, region of interest, and recording time. Data acquisition is controlled through a graphical user interface running on the PC. This program implements an interface for third-party software to interact with the application. A software development toolkit is developed to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement their customized solutions for different applications. Three examples of system use are presented in this paper: evaluation of synthetic aperture sequential beamformation, transverse

  9. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  10. Application of optical fiber beam loss monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEK is an accelerator complex consisting of an electron-positron injector linac and various types of circular accelerators. In order to protect instruments from radiation damage, discrete beam loss monitors have been installed inside the linac and rings. Although beam losses can be detected using the beam loss monitors (BLMs) or beam position monitors (BPMs), it is difficult to identify the exact position of the loss. The electrons, which strike the duct, lose a fraction of their beam energy, which produces a shower at the location and emits many electrons out of the duct. If an optical fiber is placed inside the beam duct, many of these electrons will pass through the optical fiber where the beam loss is generated. BLMs employing an optical fiber based on Cherenkov radiation are currently being developed and applied to our system. An optical fiber placed into the duct also can be used as a detector for a wire scanner system. Existing wire scanner detectors are set at a fixed position, and detect signals of different beam energies that correspond to the different injection modes. However, the fixed position is not always optimal. Conversely, owing to the optical fiber's distributing nature, optical fiber detector systems containing PMTs enables the effective detection of all signals from various beam modes. We can successfully obtain the clear wire scanner signal by employing this optical fiber system. The measurement of the beam loss at the incidence part of the circular accelerator is also described. The beam loss location as well as the turn-by-turn beam loss can be measured. (author)

  11. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    OpenAIRE

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Nosratieh, Anita; Gelskey, Dale; Yang, Kai; Huang, Shin-ying; Chen, Lin; Boone, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or “bow tie” (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam’s profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibili...

  12. Uniform irradiation of high-energy intense ion beams to large area by two-dimensional beam scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI AVF cyclotron is equipped with ion beam scanners for large area irradiation. The cyclotron beam is two-dimensionally scanned by using a pair of laminated electromagnets. Cellulose triacetate (CTA) film dosimeter has been successfully applied as an integral method to measurement of the two-dimensional relative fluence distributions of the scanned ion beams, proton, He, C, Ar and Kr. The measured result showed that the fluence was not uniform within the scanned area. We have developed a beam scanning simulator to evaluate fluence distribution by calculation, and the simulation result was compared with the measured distribution. The un-uniformity was found to result from the distortion of the current wave form of the scanner. On the basis of this result, the power supply of the scanner was improved. A good uniformity of fluence distribution was available within ±4%. (author)

  13. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  14. Confocal scanner for vertical particle tracks in the nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A confocal scanner for selective observation of the vertical particle tracks in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. The particle track being searched for is imaging at an angle of 45 deg with respect to the optical axis of the system. The confocal scanner is provided with a new optical element, an 'image orthogonalizator', by means of which the extended image of the inclined vertical particle track is rotated over an angle of 90 deg. The stereoscopic version of the confocal scanner is presented as well. The described systems will be used in the experiments for investigation of the neutrino oscillations in the accelerators experiments

  15. CT scanner for diagnosis of three most common diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) scanners generate cross-sectional images of the human body and render three-dimensional images of organs. However the scanning of moving organs such as the heart and lung was unsuitable. Recently, however, multislice helical CT scanners have appeared with dramatically improved performance and functions, including the capability to render three-dimensional images of moving organs. Accordingly, the functions of the latest CT scanners for diagnosing the three most common diseases (cancer, cardiac disease, and cerebrovascular disease) are changing. (author)

  16. Scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There is a growing worldwide need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. CSIRO has been working with Australian Customs Service to develop an innovative and cost-effective solution capable of directly scanning air freight containers in 1-2 minutes without unpacking. A new scanner has been developed that combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner will be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  17. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with 18F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a 22Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at ...

  18. Enhanced Algorithms for Estimating Tree Trunk Diameter Using 2D Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Ringdahl

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate vehicle localization in forest environments is still an unresolved problem. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS have well known limitations in dense forest, and have to be combined with for instance laser based SLAM algorithms to provide satisfying accuracy. Such algorithms typically require accurate detection of trees, and estimation of tree center locations in laser data. Both these operations depend on accurate estimations of tree trunk diameter. Diameter estimations are important also for several other forestry automation and remote sensing applications. This paper evaluates several existing algorithms for diameter estimation using 2D laser scanner data. Enhanced algorithms, compensating for beam width and using multiple scans, were also developed and evaluated. The best existing algorithms overestimated tree trunk diameter by ca. 40%. Our enhanced algorithms, compensating for laser beam width, reduced this error to less than 12%.

  19. Density distribution measurement for powder compacts using an X-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method of density measurement using an X-ray CT scanner was investigated particularly for powder compacts. Since X-ray absorption characteristics are different in various materials, densities are able to be known from CT values, which are functions of X-ray absorption coefficients of the materials. High energy X-rays around 200-300keV realized high correlation between the CT values and material densities. The values, however, were influenced by the size of samples and varied within the same sample even that is uniform in density. These phenomena were caused by beam hardening characteristics in white X-ray of the CT scanner and by the problem of accuracy in CT computation. In spite of the condition, very high correlation was obtained between densities and CT values in aluminum powder compacts. A density distribution in the compact, which was converted from the measured CT value distribution, exhibited a typical distribution in powder compact. Because of the beam hardening and the problem in computation accuracy, CT values in a wrought aluminum sample distributed within about 2.5% of the mean density. Almost the same error should be considered in CT value distributions in powder compacts. (author)

  20. High-beamforming power-code-multiplexed optical scanner for three-dimensional displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Muzammil A.; Riza, Nabeel A.

    2003-11-01

    Three dimensional (3-D) displays play an important role in the field of entertainment. Today, research is being conducted to produce 3-D displays to meet the complex needs of high-functionality full motion 3D displays at reasonable cost, but without glasses, complicated viewing arrangements or restricted fields of view. Other applications for 3-D displays include but are not limited to CAD/Design simulation, advanced data representation, displaying complex 3-D information for automotive design, medical imaging, advanced navigation displays, scientific visualization, and advertising. The key element in all these applications is an optical beam scanner that can display 3-D images for large viewing angles. Our proposed Code Multiplexed Optical Scanner (C-MOS) can fulfill all these requirements with its high beamforming power capabilities. Our proposed experiment demonstrates three dimensional (3-D) beam scanning with large angles (e.g., > 160°), large centimeter size aperture, and scanning speed of <300 μsec. The robust construction and simple operation of the C-MOS makes it very useful and attractive for deployment in the field of entertainment, defense and medical imaging. Here we report the application of the C-MOS for three dimensional (3-D) displays.

  1. Inverse solutions for a Risley prism scanner with iterative refinement by a forward solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anhu; Gao, Xinjian; Sun, Wansong; Yi, Wanli; Bian, Yongming; Liu, Hongzhan; Liu, Liren

    2015-11-20

    Risley prism scanners are increasingly used for laser beam steering due to their wide angular scanning range and high resolution. However, the inverse problem, which focuses on obtaining the required prisms' orientations for a given target position, has not been perfectly solved so far. The existing inverse solutions are not accurate or efficient enough for high-accuracy and real-time tracking. An iterative method that combines an approximate inverse solution with an iterative refinement by the forward solution is set forth in this paper. Two case studies indicate that the rotation motions of Risley prism pairs controlled by iterative solutions can slew the beam to create the desired tracking pattern quickly and accurately. Based on this method, a Risley prism scanner developed as a standard trajectory generator is implemented for the error measurement of a robotic manipulator in our experiments. The simulation and experimental results show that the inverse solution for one target point can be obtained within nine iterations for a prescribed tracking error threshold. PMID:26836567

  2. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Thomas; Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio; Bravin, Enrico; Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O.; Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H- beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H- beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H0/e- pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H0 particles are separated from the unstripped H- ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H- beam, the transverse emittance of the H- beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  3. Agricultural Applications and Requirements for Thermal Infrared Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the applications of thermal scanner data in agriculture are presented along with illustrations of some of the factors affecting the temperature of plants, soil, and water. Examples of thermal imagery are included.

  4. Landsat 1-5 Multispectral Scanner V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) was a sensor onboard Landsats 1 through 5 and acquired images of the Earth nearly continuously from July 1972 to...

  5. Data scanner system of the BELLE silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunaga, C. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Korhonen, T. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Research Inst. of High Energy Physics; Tanaka, M.; Ikeda, H. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1996-02-01

    A data scanner system, which is a part of the front-end data acquisition system of the BELLE silicon vertex detector, makes an analog-to-digital conversion of preamplified signals from the detector and stores digitized data into local memory. The sequence control and buffer managing are performed by a software process of an on-board CPU. With this data scanner system, the authors can achieve data taking with less than 10% dead time up to 800 Hz trigger rate.

  6. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configuration of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  7. Feasibility studies on the direct wire readout on wire scanners in electron accelerators; Durchfuehrbarkeitsstudien zur direkten Drahtauslese an Wirescannern in Elektronen-Beschleunigern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Michael

    2010-10-15

    This bachelor thesis deals essentially with the signal processing of a so-called wire scanner, a special monitor, which comes to application in the beam diagnostics of particle accelerators. In this direct wire readout the voltage signal, which is induced by the particle beam in the measurement wire of the wire scanner, shall be directly read out. The aim of this thesis is to show fundamental considerations and perform studies, which study, whether and how in the future by means of a suited data transmission as well as readout electronics conclusion on the most important parameters of the beam, like position and profile, are possible. The measurement system presented here is divided in three main components: Signal measurement, signal preparation, and signal stretching. A suited test facility was developed and is presented in detail, in which then all components, like for instance the transmission cables, the wire-scanner fork, and the developed measurement circuit, are studied, which are of importance for a faultless signal transmission and presentation. Extensive measurements on the single components, as well as calculations for the signal transmission on and in the wire scanner were performed, whereby a good agreement could be found. Thereafter a comparison and a selection of the component used in this project were made. Furthermore improvement proposals, new constructions, and outlooks are presented, which could be of importance in further works.

  8. Laboratory and field portable system for calibrating airborne multispectral scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manufacturers of airborne multispectral scanners suggest procedures for calibration and alignment that are usually awkward and even questionable. For example, the procedures may require: separating the scanner from calibration and alignment sources by 100 feet or more, employing folding mirrors, tampering with the detectors after the procedures are finished, etc. Under the best of conditions such procedures require about three hours yielding questionable confidence in the results; under many conditions, however, procedures commonly take six to eight hours, yielding no satisfactory results. EG and G, Inc. has designed and built a calibration and alignment system for airborne scanners which solves those problems, permitting the procedures to be carried out in about two to three hours. This equipment can be quickly disassembled, transported with the scanner in all but the smallest single engine aircraft, and reassembled in a few hours. The subsystems of this equipment are commonly available from manufacturers of optical and electronic equipment. The other components are easily purchased, or fabricated. The scanner discussed is the Model DS-1260 digital line scanner manufactured by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. It is a dual-sensor system which is operated in one of two combination of sensors: one spectrometer head (which provides simultaneous coverage in ten visible channels) and one thermal infrared detector, or simply two thermal infrared detectors

  9. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or ''bow tie'' (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam's profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibility of the COBRA theory is further validated experimentally through the employment of a prototype real-time radiation meter and a known BT filter. Methods: The COBRA method consisted of four basic steps: (1) The probe was placed at the edge of a scanner's field of view; (2) a real-time signal train was collected as the scanner's gantry rotated with the x-ray beam on; (3) the signal train, without a BT filter, was modeled using peak values measured in the signal train of step 2; and (4) the relative attenuation of the BT filter was estimated from filtered and unfiltered data sets. The prototype probe was first verified to have an isotropic and linear response to incident x-rays. The COBRA method was then tested on a dedicated breast CT scanner with a custom-designed BT filter and compared to the conventional step-and-shoot characterization of the BT filter. Using basis decomposition of dual energy signal data, the thickness of the filter was estimated and compared to the BT filter's manufacturing specifications. The COBRA method was also demonstrated with a clinical whole body CT scanner using the body BT filter. The relative attenuation was calculated at four discrete x-ray tube potentials and used to estimate the thickness of the BT filter. Results: The prototype probe was found to have a linear and isotropic response to x-rays. The relative attenuation produced from the COBRA method fell within the error of the relative attenuation measured with the step-and-shoot method

  10. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Nosratieh, Anita; Gelskey, Dale; Yang Kai; Huang Shinying; Chen Lin; Boone, John M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Rm. 0505, ACC Ellison Bldg., 4860 Y St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Rm. 2303, GBSF, 451 E. Health Science Dr., Davis, California 95616 (United States); Diagnostic Imaging Specialists Corporation (DISC), 163 St. Malo Street, St. Malo, Manitoba R0A 1T0 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Rm. 0505, ACC Ellison Bldg., 4860 Y St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Rm. 0505, ACC Ellison Bldg., 4860 Y St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Rm. 2303, GBSF, 451 E. Health Science Dr., Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or ''bow tie'' (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam's profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibility of the COBRA theory is further validated experimentally through the employment of a prototype real-time radiation meter and a known BT filter. Methods: The COBRA method consisted of four basic steps: (1) The probe was placed at the edge of a scanner's field of view; (2) a real-time signal train was collected as the scanner's gantry rotated with the x-ray beam on; (3) the signal train, without a BT filter, was modeled using peak values measured in the signal train of step 2; and (4) the relative attenuation of the BT filter was estimated from filtered and unfiltered data sets. The prototype probe was first verified to have an isotropic and linear response to incident x-rays. The COBRA method was then tested on a dedicated breast CT scanner with a custom-designed BT filter and compared to the conventional step-and-shoot characterization of the BT filter. Using basis decomposition of dual energy signal data, the thickness of the filter was estimated and compared to the BT filter's manufacturing specifications. The COBRA method was also demonstrated with a clinical whole body CT scanner using the body BT filter. The relative attenuation was calculated at four discrete x-ray tube potentials and used to estimate the thickness of the BT filter. Results: The prototype probe was found to have a linear and isotropic response to x-rays. The relative attenuation produced from the COBRA method fell within the error of the relative attenuation

  11. Beam emittance measurements in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenski,A.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, t.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-05-04

    The RHIC proton polarimeters can operate in scanning mode, giving polarization profiles and transverse beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. The polarimeters function as wire scanners, providing a very good signal/noise ratio and high counting rate. This allows accurate bunch-by-bunch emittance measurements during fast target sweeps (<1 s) through the beam. Very thin carbon strip targets make these measurements practically non-destructive. Bunch by bunch emittance measurements are a powerful tool for machine set-up; in RHIC, individual proton beam transverse emittances can only be measured by CNI polarimeter scans. We discuss the consistency of these measurements with Ionization Profile Monitors (IPMs) and vernier scan luminosity measurements. Absolute accuracy limitations and cross-calibration of different techniques are also discussed.

  12. Beam-based optical tuning of the final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the SLAC 46.6 GeV beam to submicron sizes, the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) must meet tight tolerances on many aberrations. These aberrations include: mismatch and coupling of the incoming beam; dispersion; chromaticity; lattice errors in the chromatic correction sections; lattice coupling; and residual sextupole content in the quadrupoles. In order to address these aberrations, the authors have developed a procedure which combines trajectory analysis, use of intermediate wire scanners, and a pair of novel beam size monitors at the IP. This procedure allows the FFTB IP spot to be reduced to sizes under 100 nanometers

  13. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  14. SU-E-E-12: Validation of the Implementation of Different CT Scanners in Proton Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, C Llina; Geismer, D; Christiaens, M; Vermeren, X [West German Proton therapy center, Essen, North Rhine Westphalia (Germany); Ding, X [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of the relationship of CT number and Relative Stopping Power (RSP) among different CT-scanners in the evaluation of dose distribution, for different tumor sites and proton therapy modalities like Pencil Beam and Uniform Scanning. Methods: The same tissue characterization phantom was used to analyze the difference in the X-rays energy spectra of 2 CT scanners of the same vendor. One CT is for planning and the other for treatment verification. The Hounsfield unit (HU) variations and associated dosimetric uncertainty were investigated in uniform scanning and pencil beam treatment plans of different sites. At the same time comparisons of the CT calibration curve were done using the same acquisition protocols. The phantom was imaged on a 16 multi-row CT scanner, with energies of 120 and 140 kVp,currents of 263 and 245 mA and slice thickness of 2 and 3mm respectively. The dosimetric uncertainty of the plans was evaluated in a homogeneus phantom comparing DVHs, gamma index criteria 3% 3mm, and range between them. Results: The variation of HU was within the standard deviation of the average for each tissue substitute. The curves fitted with a bilinear interpolation show a maximum deviation in high density materials like cortical bone and solid water, where the HU values deviated more than 0,6% for the 120kVp protocol. For the others curves the deviation was more than 2% for low densities materials. The gamma index uncertainty criteria passed in all the cases. Conclusion: The HU variations for the different scanners were ≤3%. Lower than the 3,5% uncertainties considered in our treatment planning system. The dosimetric analysis shows that the X-ray spectrum has a small effect on the HU-RSP curve, allowing the use of a single tissue characterization curve in our proton treatment planning system for plans verifications.

  15. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners. PMID:22755630

  16. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  17. Characterization of a Large, Low-Cost 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imagery-based 3D scanning can be performed by scanners with multiple form factors, ranging from small and inexpensive scanners requiring manual movement around a stationary object to large freestanding (nearly instantaneous units. Small mobile units are problematic for use in scanning living creatures, which may be unwilling or unable to (or for the very young and animals, unaware of the need to hold a fixed position for an extended period of time. Alternately, very high cost scanners that can capture a complete scan within a few seconds are available, but they are cost prohibitive for some applications. This paper seeks to assess the performance of a large, low-cost 3D scanner, presented in prior work, which is able to concurrently capture imagery from all around an object. It provides the capabilities of the large, freestanding units at a price point akin to the smaller, mobile ones. This allows access to 3D scanning technology (particularly for applications requiring instantaneous imaging at a lower cost. Problematically, prior analysis of the scanner’s performance was extremely limited. This paper characterizes the efficacy of the scanner for scanning both inanimate objects and humans. Given the importance of lighting to visible light scanning systems, the scanner’s performance under multiple lighting configurations is evaluated, characterizing its sensitivity to lighting design.

  18. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, and NewTom 3G) and compared to the dose levels for corresponding image acquisition protocols for 3 MSCT scanners (Somatom VolumeZoom 4, Somatom Sensation 16 and Mx8000 IDT). The effective dose was calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), placed in a Rando Alderson phantom, and expressed according to the ICRP 103 (2007) guidelines (including a separate tissue weighting factor for the salivary glands, as opposed to former ICRP guidelines). Results: Effective dose values ranged from 13 to 82 μSv for CBCT and from 474 to 1160 μSv for MSCT. CBCT dose levels were the lowest for the Accuitomo 3D, and highest for the i-CAT. Conclusions: Dose levels for CBCT imaging remained far below those of clinical MSCT protocols, even when a mandibular protocol was applied for the latter, resulting in a smaller field of view compared to various CBCT protocols. Considering this wide dose span, it is of outmost importance to justify the selection of each of the aforementioned techniques, and to optimise the radiation dose while achieving a sufficient image quality. When comparing these results to previous dosimetric studies, a conversion needs to be made using the latest ICRP recommendations.

  19. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubele, M. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Miet.Loubele@uzleuven.be; Bogaerts, R. [Department of Experimental Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Ria.Bogaerts@med.kuleuven.be; Van Dijck, E. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, R. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: ruben.pauwels@med.kuleuven.be; Vanheusden, S. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Suetens, P. [ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Paul.Suetens@esat.kuleuven.be; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Guy.Marchal@uzleuven.be (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, and NewTom 3G) and compared to the dose levels for corresponding image acquisition protocols for 3 MSCT scanners (Somatom VolumeZoom 4, Somatom Sensation 16 and Mx8000 IDT). The effective dose was calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), placed in a Rando Alderson phantom, and expressed according to the ICRP 103 (2007) guidelines (including a separate tissue weighting factor for the salivary glands, as opposed to former ICRP guidelines). Results: Effective dose values ranged from 13 to 82 {mu}Sv for CBCT and from 474 to 1160 {mu}Sv for MSCT. CBCT dose levels were the lowest for the Accuitomo 3D, and highest for the i-CAT. Conclusions: Dose levels for CBCT imaging remained far below those of clinical MSCT protocols, even when a mandibular protocol was applied for the latter, resulting in a smaller field of view compared to various CBCT protocols. Considering this wide dose span, it is of outmost importance to justify the selection of each of the aforementioned techniques, and to optimise the radiation dose while achieving a sufficient image quality. When comparing these results to previous dosimetric studies, a conversion needs to be made using the latest ICRP recommendations.

  20. Efficient object scatter correction algorithm for third and fourth generation CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnesorge, B.; Flohr, T.; Klingenbeck-Regn, K. [Siemens Medical Engineering, Dept. CTC 2, Forchheim (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    X-ray photons which are scattered inside the object slice and reach the detector array increase the detected signal and produce image artifacts as ``cupping`` effects in large objects and dark bands between regions of high attenuation. The artifact amplitudes increase with scanned volume or slice width. Object scatter can be reduced in third generation computed tomography (CT) geometry by collimating the detector elements. However, a correction can still improve image quality. For fourth generation CT geometry, only poor anti-scatter collimation is possible and a numeric correction is necessary. This paper presents a correction algorithm which can be parameterized for third and fourth generation CT geometry. The method requires low computational effort and allows flexible application to different body regions by simple parameter adjustments. The object scatter intensity which is subtracted from the measured signal is calculated with convolution of the weighted and windowed projection data with a spatially invariant ``scatter convolution function``. The scatter convolution function is approximated for the desired scanner geometry from pencil beam simulations and measurements using coherent and incoherent differential scatter cross section data. Several examples of phantom and medical objects scanned with third and fourth generation CT systems are discussed. In third generation scanners, scatter artifacts are effectively corrected. For fourth generation geometry with poor anti-scatter collimation, object scatter artifacts are strongly reduced. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs.

  1. Effects of stick-slip motions on Besocke-style scanners in scanning probe microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2012-01-01

    In Besocke-style scanners, a theoretical model with stick-slip sliding boundary conditions is presented by Timoshenko beam theory combined with the harmonic-balance method. The flexural vibration characteristics of the piezo-tubes induced by the stick-slip motions of the ball on the rail are investigated. The results show that the flexural vibrations essentially depend on the ratio of the ball-rail lateral friction threshold to the product of the ball-rail lateral contact stiffness and the vibration amplitude of the ball. When the ratio changes from zero to one, the lateral friction applied to the ball induces complex flexural vibrations. The vibrations can be regulated by adjusting an input electric signal to change the vibration amplitude of the ball, or using an external electro-magnetic force to change the preload of the ball-rail interaction, or changing the radius of the ball. Thus, the adverse vibrations of Besocke-style scanner can be eliminated to improve the spatial resolution of the atomic structure in scanning probe microscopes.

  2. Design and performance of HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new PET scanner for brain imaging (and animals) has been designed with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The design is an evolution of the PENN-PET scanner, which uses large position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, with Anger-type positioning logic, and which allows 3-D volume imaging, without septa. The new design is built with a single annular crystal coupled to 180 photomultiplier tubes, and uses local triggering electronics to subdivide the detector into small zones and to determine coincident events within the detector. The axial acceptance angle of ± 27 deg, with a field-of-view of 25.6 cm, is larger than any currently operating PET scanner. Performance measurements are presented

  3. Gigapixel inline digital holographic microscopy using a consumer scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Oikawa, Minoru; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a gigapixel inline digital holographic microscopy using a consumer scanner. The consumer scanner can maximally scan an A4 size image (297mm x 210mm) with 4800 dpi (= 5.29 um), theoretically achieving a resolution of 56,144 x 39,698 = 2.22 gigapixels. The system using a consumer scanner has a simple structure, compared with synthetic aperture digital holography using a camera mounted on a two-dimensional moving stage. In this demonstration, we captured an inline hologram with 23,602 x 18,023 pixels (= 0.43 gigapixels). In addition, to accelerate the reconstruction time of the gigapixel hologram and decrease the amount of memory for the reconstruction, we applied the band-limited double-step Fresnel diffraction to the reconstruction.

  4. Novel scanner characterization method for color measurement and diagnostics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong-Sun; Bala, Raja; Sharma, Gaurav

    2006-02-01

    We propose a novel scanner characterization approach for applications requiring color measurement of hardcopy output in printer calibration, characterization, and diagnostic applications. It is assumed that a typical printed medium comprises the three basic colorants C, M, Y. The proposed method is particularly advantageous when additional colorants are used in the print (e.g. black (K)). A family of scanner characterization targets is constructed, each varying in C, M, Y and at a fixed level of K. A corresponding family of 3-D scanner characterizations is derived, one for each level of K. Each characterization maps scanner RGB to a colorimetric representation such as CIELAB, using standard characterization techniques. These are then combined into a single 4-D characterization mapping RGBK to CIELAB. A refinement of the technique improves performance significantly by using a function of the scanned values for K (e.g. the scanner's green channel response to printed K) instead of the digital K value directly. This makes this new approach more robust with respect to variations in printed K over time. Secondly it enables, with a single scanner characterization, accurate color measurement of prints from different printers within the same family. Results show that the 4-D characterization technique can significantly outperform standard 3-D approaches especially in cases where the image being scanned is a patch target made up of unconstrained CMYK combinations. Thus the algorithm finds particular use in printer characterization and diagnostic applications. The method readily generalizes to printed media containing other (e.g "hi-fi") colorants, and also to other image capture devices such as digital cameras.

  5. Scanner baseliner monitoring and control in high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Pavan; Chung, Woong Jae; Aung, Nyan; Subramany, Lokesh; Gao, Haiyong; Gomez, Juan-Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze performance of different customized models on baseliner overlay data and demonstrate the reduction in overlay residuals by ~10%. Smart Sampling sets were assessed and compared with the full wafer measurements. We found that performance of the grid can still be maintained by going to one-third of total sampling points, while reducing metrology time by 60%. We also demonstrate the feasibility of achieving time to time matching using scanner fleet manager and thus identify the tool drifts even when the tool monitoring controls are within spec limits. We also explore the scanner feedback constant variation with illumination sources.

  6. D Super-Resolution Approach for Sparse Laser Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinyalamdary, S.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Laser scanner point cloud has been emerging in Photogrammetry and computer vision to achieve high level tasks such as object tracking, object recognition and scene understanding. However, low cost laser scanners are noisy, sparse and prone to systematic errors. This paper proposes a novel 3D super resolution approach to reconstruct surface of the objects in the scene. This method works on sparse, unorganized point clouds and has superior performance over other surface recovery approaches. Since the proposed approach uses anisotropic diffusion equation, it does not deteriorate the object boundaries and it preserves topology of the object.

  7. Pulmonary emphysema diagnosis using a preclinical small-animal X-ray dark-field scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary emphysema is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide that is difficult to detect using conventional x-ray radiographic methods. For emphysematous lungs with enlarged distal airspaces, x-ray scattering decreases and transmission increases, as has been demonstrated by the proof-of-principle experiments with brilliant x-rays from a synchrotron source. Therefore, combination of the transmission and dark-field signals leads to a novel diagnostic approach for pulmonary emphysema. In this study, images of excised murine lungs with pulmonary emphysema and control lungs were acquired using a compact phase- and dark-field scanner with a polychromatic source and a cone-beam geometry. The data analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups in the per-pixel scatter plot. The main difference was observed in the angle of the distribution to the vertical. The presented study reveals the high potential of the approach for the pulmonary emphysema diagnosis.

  8. Pulmonary emphysema diagnosis using a preclinical small-animal X-ray dark-field scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Meinel, Felix; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Muenchen (Germany); Bohla, Alexander; Yildirim, Ali Oender; Eickelberg, Oliver [Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide that is difficult to detect using conventional x-ray radiographic methods. For emphysematous lungs with enlarged distal airspaces, x-ray scattering decreases and transmission increases, as has been demonstrated by the proof-of-principle experiments with brilliant x-rays from a synchrotron source. Therefore, combination of the transmission and dark-field signals leads to a novel diagnostic approach for pulmonary emphysema. In this study, images of excised murine lungs with pulmonary emphysema and control lungs were acquired using a compact phase- and dark-field scanner with a polychromatic source and a cone-beam geometry. The data analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups in the per-pixel scatter plot. The main difference was observed in the angle of the distribution to the vertical. The presented study reveals the high potential of the approach for the pulmonary emphysema diagnosis.

  9. Parameterization of X-ray spectra appropriate for microCT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-filtered X-ray spectra from three tubes (Oxford Instruments Ultrabright microfocus W anode, Apogee Series 5000 with W and Mo anodes) appropriate for microCT scanners have been measured using a CdTe solid-state detector. The normalized and efficiency-corrected spectra have been parameterized using Boone et al. third-order polynomial expression, obtaining good agreement with the data (typical mean ratio between parameterization and measurement equals 1.02, with standard deviation 0.10). Attenuation of the computed spectra by external filters was analytically simulated, obtaining results that agree well with direct measurements. The air kerma angular distribution of the X-ray beams was measured and the magnitude of the heel effect was evaluated. Tungsten collimators provided by the detector manufacturer had to be used to reduce dead time and it was found that their apertures do not necessarily agree with the nominal values.

  10. An Assessment of Errors and Their Reduction in Terrestrial Laser Scanner Measurements in Marmorean Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernandez, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The need for accurate documentation for the preservation of cultural heritage has prompted the use of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) in this discipline. Its study in the heritage context has been focused on opaque surfaces with lambertian reflectance, while translucent and anisotropic materials remain a major challenge. The use of TLS for the mentioned materials is subject to significant distortion in measure due to the optical properties under the laser stimulation. The distortion makes the measurement by range not suitable for digital modelling in a wide range of cases. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and discuss the deficiencies and their resulting errors in marmorean surfaces documentation using TLS based on time-of-flight and phase-shift. Also proposed in this paper is the reduction of error in depth measurement by adjustment of the incidence laser beam. The analysis is conducted by controlled experiments.

  11. Performance evaluation of a LYSO-based PET scanner for monitoring of dose delivery in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiani, E.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Panetta, D.; Sportelli, G.; Rosso, V.

    2015-12-01

    The DoPET scanner is a compact positron emission tomography (PET) device. It has been developed for monitoring the range of charged particles during therapy with hadron beams. Previous works have focused on the development and upgrade of the device and on data analysis. In this paper, a full performance characterization of the DoPET system in terms of the energy resolution, spatial resolution, sensitivity, uniformity, and noise equivalent count rate is reported. All measurements refer to an adapted version of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4 - 2008 protocol, which was written originally for small animal PET systems. Since DoPET is a dual head planar system, it requires a modified characterisation procedure with respect to those described for ring geometries as in the NEMA NU 4 - 2008 protocol. The presented procedure may be of interest for any other PET system with a similar geometry as DoPET.

  12. Estimating Single Tree Stem Volume of Pinus sylvestris Using Airborne Laser Scanner and Multispectral Line Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available So far, only a few studies have been carried out in central European forests to estimate individual tree stem volume of pine trees from high resolution remote sensing data. In this article information derived from airborne laser scanner and multispectral line scanner data were tested to predict the stem volume of 178 pines (Pinus sylvestris in a study site in the south-west of Germany. First, tree crowns were automatically delineated using both multispectral and laser scanner data. Next, tree height, crown diameter and crown volume were derived for each crown segment. All combinations of the derived tree features were used as explanatory variables in allometric models to predict the stem volume. A model with tree height and crown diameter had the best performance with respect to the prediction accuracy determined by a leave-one-out cross-validation: Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 24.02% and Bias = 1.36%.

  13. 2D MEMS electrostatic cantilever waveguide scanner for potential image display application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the current status of our micro-fabricated SU-8 2D electrostatic cantilever waveguide scanner. The current design utilizes a monolithically integrated electrostatic push-pull actuator. A 4.0 μm SU-8 rib waveguide design allows a relatively large core cross section (4μm in height and 20 μm in width to couple with existing optical fiber and a broad band single mode operation (λ= 0.7μm to 1.3μm with minimal transmission loss (85% to 87% output transmission efficiency with Gaussian beam profile input. A 2D scanning motion has been successfully demonstrated with two fundamental resonances found at 202 and 536 Hz in vertical and horizontal directions. A 130 μm and 19 μm, corresponding displacement and 0.062 and 0.009 rad field of view were observed at a +150V input. Beam divergence from the waveguide was corrected by a focusing GRIN lens and a 5μm beam diameter is observed at the focal plane. The transmission efficiency is low (~10% and cantilever is slightly under tensile residual stress due to inherent imperfection in the process and tooling in fabrication. However, 2D light scanning pattern was successfully demonstrated using 1-D push-pull actuation.

  14. Advanced high speed X-ray CT scanner for measurement and visualization of multi-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of an ultra-fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner has been performed. The object of interest is in a transient or unsettled state, which makes the conventional CT scanner inappropriate. A concept of electrical switching of electron beam of X-ray generation unit is adopted to reduce the scanning time instead of a mechanical motion adopted by a conventional CT scanner. The mechanical motion is a major obstacle to improve the scanning speed. A prototype system with a scanning time of 3.6 milliseconds was developed at first. And, the feasibility was confirmed to measure the dynamic events of two-phase flow. However, faster scanning speed is generally required for the practical use in the thermalhydraulics research field. Therefore, the development of advanced type has been performed. This advanced type can operate under the scanning time of 0.5 milliseconds and is applicable for the measurement of the multi-phase flow with velocity up to 4-5 m/s. (author)

  15. Nonlinear beam-beam resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head-on collisions of bunched beams are considered, assuming the two colliding beams have opposite charges. A few experimental observations are described. The single resonance analysis is developed that is applicable to the strong-weak case of the beam-beam interaction. In this case, the strong beam is unperturbed by the beam-beam interaction; motions of the weak beam particles are then analyzed in the presence of the nonlinear electromagnetic force produced by the strong beam at the collision points. The coherent motions of the two coupled strong beams are shown to exhibit distinct nonlinear resonance behavior. 16 refs., 22 figs

  16. Laser-based satellite communication systems stabilized by non-mechanical electro-optic scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael; Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Gann, Derek; Luey, Benjamin; Gamble, Joseph D.; Anderson, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Laser communications systems provide numerous advantages for establishing satellite-to-ground data links. As a carrier for information, lasers are characterized by high bandwidth and directionality, allowing for fast and secure transfer of data. These systems are also highly resistant to RF influences since they operate in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, far from radio bands. In this paper we will discuss an entirely non-mechanical electro-optic (EO) laser beam steering technology, with no moving parts, which we have used to form robust 400 Mbps optical data connections through air. This technology will enable low cost, compact, and rugged free space optical (FSO) communication modules for small satellite applications. The EO beam-steerer at the heart of this system is used to maintain beam pointing as the satellite orbits. It is characterized by extremely low values for size, weight and power consumption (SWaP) - approximately 300 cm3, 300 g, and 5 W respectively, which represents a marked improvement compared to heavy, and power-consuming gimbal mechanisms. It is capable of steering a 500 mW, 1 mm short wave infrared (SWIR) beam over a field of view (FOV) of up to 50° x 15°, a range which can be increased by adding polarization gratings, which provide a coarse adjust stage at the EO beam scanner output. We have integrated this device into a communication system and demonstrated the capability to lock on and transmit a high quality data stream by modulation of SWIR power.

  17. LANSCE wire scanner AFE: analysis, design, and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the design LANSCE-R Wire-Scanner Analog Front-end Electronics is to develop a high-performance, dual-axis wire-scanner analog front-end system implemented in a single cRIO module. This new design accommodates macropulse widths as wide as 700 μs at a maximum pulse rate of 120Hz. A lossey integrator is utilized as the integration element to eliminate the requirement for providing gating signals to each wire scanner. The long macropulse and the high repetition rate present conflicting requirements for the design of the integrator. The long macropulse requires a long integration time constant to assure minimum integrator droop for accurate charge integration, and the high repetition rate requires a short time constant to assure adequate integrator reset between macropulses. Also, grounding is a serious concern due to the small signal levels. This paper reviews the basic Wire Scanner AFE system design implemented in the cRIO-module form factor to capture the charge information from the wire sensors and the grounding topology to assure minimum noise contamination of the wire signals.

  18. OCR Scanners Facilitate WP Training in Business Schools and Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Business Affairs, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Optical Character Recognition Scanners (OCR) scan typed text and feed it directly into word processing systems, saving input time. OCRs are valuable in word processing training programs because they allow more students access to classes and more time for skill training. (MD)

  19. Scanners, optical character readers, Cyrillic alphabet and Russian translations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    1995-01-01

    The writing of code for capture, in a uniform format, of bit maps of words and characters from scanner PICT files is presented. The coding of Dynamic Pattern Matched for the identification of the characters, words and sentences in preparation for translation is discussed.

  20. Hologram Scanner Design And Fabrication In Dichromated Gelatin (DCG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallison, Richard; Lowe, Rick

    1983-07-01

    Two major applications of holographic scanners are considered, the first is the code reader scanner now in use in supermarkets and soon to be used in automated warehousing. The second is the multipurpose line scanner currently used in line printers and soon to be included in automated inspection systems. Code reader facets perform multiple functions, each one deflects and focuses laser light at a unique angle and scans a short arc, the return light from a bar code is collimated by the same facet and is subsequently focused through a small aperture. Ambient light is diffracted at other angles and focused at points all around the aperture giving a high signal to noise ratio and the large high efficiency facets gather sufficient return light so that photo diodes and low power lasers can be used in the system. Line scanners can be made in a large variety of sizes and configurations inexpensively and with perfect fidelity, each one being a holographic replica of a master hologram. Focused arcs as well as parallel straight lines and even arbitrary computer generated scans are possible. The limitations and considerations of such devices are discussed along with design criteria related to fabrication problems and actual production line results.

  1. Benchmarking Advanced Control Algorithms for a Laser Scanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Ordys, A.W.; Smillie, I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes tests performed on the laser scanner system toassess feasibility of modern control techniques in achieving a requiredperformance in the trajectory following problem. The two methods tested areQTR H-infinity and Predictive Control. The results are ilustated ona simulation example....

  2. COMPUTER PROCESSING OF MULTISPECTRAL SCANNER DATA OVER COAL STRIP MINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is little doubt that remote sensing techniques can be effectively applied to the task of monitoring coal strip mine progress and reclamation work. Aircraft multispectral scanner data acquired over six coal strip mines in the states of Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Arizona...

  3. FMRI scanner noise interaction with affective neural processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Skouras

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was the investigation of interaction effects between functional MRI scanner noise and affective neural processes. Stimuli comprised of psychoacoustically balanced musical pieces, expressing three different emotions (fear, neutral, joy. Participants (N=34, 19 female were split into two groups, one subjected to continuous scanning and another subjected to sparse temporal scanning that features decreased scanner noise. Tests for interaction effects between scanning group (sparse/quieter vs continuous/noisier and emotion (fear, neutral, joy were performed. Results revealed interactions between the affective expression of stimuli and scanning group localized in bilateral auditory cortex, insula and visual cortex (calcarine sulcus. Post-hoc comparisons revealed that during sparse scanning, but not during continuous scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for fear, as well as stronger for fear than for neutral in bilateral auditory cortex. During continuous scanning, but not during sparse scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for neutral in the left auditory cortex and for joy than for fear in the calcarine sulcus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show a statistical interaction effect between scanner noise and affective processes and extends evidence suggesting scanner noise to be an important factor in functional MRI research that can affect and distort affective brain processes.

  4. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  5. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  6. Computer simulations to estimate organ doses from clinically validated cardiac, neuro, and pediatric protocols for multiple detector computed tomography scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghita, Monica

    . Results were compared against organ dose measurements previously obtained at Shands UF. Important dose reductions were assessed for the broad beam volumetric acquisition of this new scanner when compared to the standard 64-slice helical protocols.

  7. A COST EFFECTIVE MULTI-SPECTRAL SCANNER FOR NATURAL GAS DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan

    2004-10-25

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at En'Urga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind DoE study at RMOTC. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind DoE study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, a rugged prototype scanner will be developed and evaluated, both at En'Urga Inc. and any potential field sites.

  8. Performance comparison of a state-of-the-art neuro-SPET scanner and a dedicated neuro-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical performances of two current state-of-the-art scanners dedicated to functional imaging of the brain, one a SPET scanner and the other a PET scanner, have been compared under identical conditions. The aim of the study was to compare the capabilities of the devices under conditions resembling the routine clinical environment, as well as to consider other issues such as radiation burden for some common investigations. Both systems have slightly less than 11-cm axial fields of view. The PET system can be operated in a septa-less (3D) mode as well as conventionally with septa (2D). The spatial resolution of both devices was less than 8 mm in all dimensions in scattering media. On average, the PET scanner's resolution was approximately 10%-15% better than the SPET system. Energy resolution on the SPET system was superior due the scinitillator use [NaI(Tl)]. Sensitivity in air with a line source on the PET system was found to be ∝150 times greater in 3D and ∝25 times greater in 2D than with the SPET system. A normal subject was studied on each system in an attempt to obtain the highest quality data possible for a subjective comparison. It is clear that, while PET retains the advantages of more desirable radiopharmaceuticals and higher sensitivity, the quality obtainable from SPET devices has improved markedly. SPET may prove a useful for many clinical investigations. (orig.)

  9. Radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed scanners: A fast and accurate method for dose calibration and uniformity correction with single film exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Film dosimetry is an attractive tool for dose distribution verification in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). A critical aspect of radiochromic film dosimetry is the scanner used for the readout of the film: the output needs to be calibrated in dose response and corrected for pixel value and spatial dependent nonuniformity caused by light scattering; these procedures can take a long time. A method for a fast and accurate calibration and uniformity correction for radiochromic film dosimetry is presented: a single film exposure is used to do both calibration and correction. Gafchromic EBT films were read with two flatbed charge coupled device scanners (Epson V750 and 1680Pro). The accuracy of the method is investigated with specific dose patterns and an IMRT beam. The comparisons with a two-dimensional array of ionization chambers using a 18x18 cm2 open field and an inverse pyramid dose pattern show an increment in the percentage of points which pass the gamma analysis (tolerance parameters of 3% and 3 mm), passing from 55% and 64% for the 1680Pro and V750 scanners, respectively, to 94% for both scanners for the 18x18 open field, and from 76% and 75% to 91% for the inverse pyramid pattern. Application to an IMRT beam also shows better gamma index results, passing from 88% and 86% for the two scanners, respectively, to 94% for both. The number of points and dose range considered for correction and calibration appears to be appropriate for use in IMRT verification. The method showed to be fast and to correct properly the nonuniformity and has been adopted for routine clinical IMRT dose verification

  10. Raising the Barcode Scanner: Technology and Productivity in the Retail Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Emek Basker

    2011-01-01

    Barcodes and barcode scanners transformed the grocery industry in the 1970s. I use store-level data from the 1972, 1977, and 1982 Census of Retail Trade, matched to data on store scanner installations, to estimate scanners' effect on labor productivity. I find that scanners increased a store's labor productivity, on average, by approximately 4.5 percent in the first few years. The effect was larger in stores carrying more packaged products, consistent with the presence of network externalitie...

  11. Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

  12. A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

  13. A new generation of PET scanners for small animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Research on small animal PET scanners has been a hot topic in recent years. These devices are used in the preclinical phases of drug tests and during the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. They also provide a cost efficient way to test new materials, new design concepts and new technologies that later can be used to build more efficient human medical imaging devices. The development of a PET scanner requires expertise on different fields, therefore a consortium was formed that brought together Hungarian academic and industrial partners: the Nuclear Research Institute (which has experience in the development of nuclear detectors and data acquisition systems), the PET Center of the University of Debrecen (which has clinical experience in the application of nuclear imaging devices and background in image processing software), Mediso Ltd. (which has been developing, manufacturing, selling and servicing medical imaging devices since 1990) and other academic partners. This consortium has been working together since 2003: the knowledge base acquired during the development of our small animal PET scanners (miniPET-I and miniPET-II) is now being utilized to build a commercial multimodal human PET scanner. The operation of a PET scanner is based on the simultaneous detection ('coincidence') of two gamma photons originating from a positron annihilation. In traditional PET scanners coincidence is detected by a central unit during the measurement. In our system there is no such central module: all detected single gamma events are recorded (list mode data acquisition), and the list of events are processed using a computer cluster (built from PCs). The usage of independent detector modules and commercial components reduce both development and maintenance costs. Also, this mode of data acquisition is more suitable for development purposes, since once the data is collected and stored it can be used many times to test different signal

  14. Emittance Measurements for Beams Extracted from LECR3 Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoYun; ZhaoHongwei; MaLei; ZhangZimin

    2003-01-01

    High quality ion beams are required by IMP cyclotron and atomic physics research, so it is important to research and measure beam emitt ance of ECR ion source. Intense beams extracted from ECR ion source usually have low energy, so it is suitable to use Electric-Sweep Scanner to measure the emittance. This kind of measurement is popularly used at ECR ion source, and it has some prominent merits such as high accuracy, very short time of data processing and easy expressing of the emittance pattern. So we designed and built this emittance scanner to measure emittance of the ion beams produced by LECR3 ion source. The structure of the ESS is shown in Fig.l, and the photo of the ESS is shown in Fig.2.

  15. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  16. Collimator design for single beam gamma ray industrial tomography and fan beam geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Daniel A.A. de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Nuclear Energy; Melo, Silvio B., E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br, E-mail: sbm@cin.ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Informatic Center; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos H., E-mail: mmhamada@usp.br, E-mail: chmesqui@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Valdemir A. dos, E-mail: vas@unicap.com [Department of Chemistry. Catholic University of Pernambuco. UNICAP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the design of a setup for industrial tomography, it is important to aim for high space and temporal resolution along with a high efficiency for detection. The present study evaluates theoretical and experimental aspects of two experimental setups having stainless steel and Plexiglas riser tubes and using a single parallel beam and a fan beam with three apertures. The topography's resolution parameters as density, spatial and temporal are quantified according to parallel collimators design. An irradiation geometry of source-tube-detector with a 5.6.10{sup 11} Bq {sup 137}Cs radioactive source, a stainless cylinder and a NaI(Tl) 2'' x 2'' scintillation detector has been studied. Stainless steel experimental riser tube of 16.8 cm diameter and of 0.7 cm wall thickness has a high absorption fraction of energy, which is eventually converted into scatter radiation that can reach detector as noise and result in an undesirably low signal/noise ratio. The collimator compromise efficiency versus resolution is calculated and compared to spectrum quality. Fan beam scanner can improve temporal resolution and the spatial resolution is due to the number of detectors and geometry. Experimental measurements of the fan beam trajectories were carried out in order to compare with parallel gamma ray trajectories. It brings out the necessary information for the design of an adaptive scanner to obtain comparable object data as that achieved in parallel beam tomography. Such design allows a limited number of three detectors for a riser column. The scanner should operate to measure flux inside the riser column scanner while maintaining the temporal resolution gain. (author)

  17. Performance of a volumetric CT scanner based upon a flat-panel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Drake, Douglas G.

    1999-05-01

    To characterize the performance of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system based upon an indirect- detection, amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI). Tomographic images obtained using the FPI are presented, and the signal and noise characteristics of reconstructed images are quantified. Specifically, the spatial uniformity, CT linearity, contrast performance, noise characteristics, spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visualization are examined. Finally, the performance of the FPI-based CT system is discussed in relation to existing clinical technologies. A table-top measurements system was constructed to allow investigation of FPI performance in CBCT within a precisely controlled and reproducible geometry. The FPI incorporates a 512 X 512 active matrix array of a-Si:H thin-film transistors and photodiodes in combination with an overlying (133 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb) phosphor. The commercially available prototype FPI has a pixel pitch of 400 micrometer, a fill factor of approximately 80%, can be read at a maximum frame rate of 5 fps, and provides 16 bit digitization. Mounted upon an optical bench are the x-ray tube (in a rigid support frame), the object to be imaged (upon a precision rotation/translation table), and the FPI (mounted upon a precision translation table). The entire setup is directed under computer control, and volumetric imaging is accomplished by rotating the object incrementally over 360 degrees, delivering a radiographic x-ray pulse (e.g., 100 - 130 kVp, approximately 0.1 - 10 mAs), and acquiring a projection image at each increment. Prior to reconstruction, dark and flood- field corrections are applied to account for stationary nonuniformities in detector response and dark current. Tomographic images are reconstructed from the projections using the Feldkamp filtered back-projection algorithm for CBCT. The linearity of the CBCT system was compared to that of a commercial scanner (Philips SR-7000) using materials ranging in CT number from

  18. Implementation of virtual simulation with a wide-bore multislice helcalct scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    relative to the laser plane. 4) Offsets in the CT and isocentre coordinates occur during the transfer to Pinnacle, however the anatomical locations of the beams are transferred correctly. Plan names and identifiers are not imported into Pinnacle making plan identification problematic. Scanning should wherever possible be performed within the 50 cm diameter fully sampled region due to inferior quality and large variation in CT number. The isocentre defined in CT coordinates within the patient during virtual simulation is ∼4 mm above the tattoos marked using the external lasers without patient sag, therefore couch-height set-up must be used for virtual simulation patients. The GE scanner and ASim software export the DICOM standard patient-specific coordinate system, while the Pinnacle RTFS currently does not. It is advisable to print hard-copies of plan details and isocentre location as transfer of the correct plan to Pinnacle is otherwise difficult to verify. No major problems resulting from the lack of a conventional simulator within the department have arisen to date. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  19. Whole-body CT scanner, TCT-60A/60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As whole-body CT scanners, TCT-60A (high class), TCT-80A (popular type) and TCT-70A (for medium-scale hospitals) had already been seriated. Now TCT-60A/60 has made its advent to answer the demand in the market of high-class units. This third-generation CT scanner, utilizing pulsed X-rays, and employing the highest pulse rate in the world (200 pulses per second), obtains high-quality images at high speed. As for the resolution, this unit, making the most of Toshiba's close-up technique, employing small focus X-ray tube, has practicalized 0.5-mm resolution. In addition, it utilizes 34 fan-shaped X-rays and a low patient couch. (author)

  20. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object

  1. A development of super computed tomography scanner for industrial column investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanner is a desired devices on create images of internal structure of unrecognized object. The formation of a CT images is a distinct three phase process. The scanning phase produces data, but not an image. Then, reconstruction phase processes the acquired data and forms a digital image. The visible and displayed analog image is produced by the digital to analog conversation phase. In this case, there are adjustable factors associated with each of these phases that can have an effect on the characteristics and quantity of the image. In term on this project of column scanning, during the scanning phase a fan-shaped gamma ray beam is scanned around the column. The amount of gamma radiation that penetrates the column along each individual ray (pathway) through the column is measured by the detectors that intercept the gamma ray beam after it passes through the column.This project of Super Computed Tomography (CT) is develop to reconstruct and redesign the mechanical parts and equipment to suits the purpose of the industrial column investigation in the region. (Author)

  2. Accuracy of the CT numbers of simulated lung nodules imaged with multi-detector CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    retrospectively from the multi-detector helical CT projection data of the standard NLST protocol yield CT numbers for the 4.8 mm diameter nodules that are more accurate and reproducible than those of the standard NLST technique. In general, the CT numbers of the nodules were found to be lower at positions near the centers of the lungs and near the spine, which is probably due to increased beam hardening in those regions. Also, larger nodules were found to have higher CT numbers than smaller nodules, consistent with results obtained on early single slice GE CT scanners. Until manufacturers develop quantitative CT scanners with improved x-ray beam hardening and scatter corrections, it is recommended that reference phantoms be employed to more accurately assess the calcium contents of patient lung nodules in screening and tissue characterization studies and in eventual computer-aided detection and diagnosis applications

  3. Inferring Evoked and Consideration Set from Scanner Data

    OpenAIRE

    Wirawan Dony Dahana; Nozomi Nakajima

    2011-01-01

    Evoked and consideration set have been one of main research topics in marketing field for a long time. Using interview data, many studies have been conducted to investigate the nature of its content. However, only few studies tried to do so by using consumer purchase history. By modeling the process of evoked and consideration set formation, in this research we try to elicit consumer evoked set from scanner data. Some managerial implications for marketing decisions derived from the informatio...

  4. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, R.; Carriço, B.; Ferreira, C. S.; Frade, M.; Ferreira, M.; Moura, R.; Ortigão, C.; Pinheiro, J. F.; Rodrigues, P.; Rolo, I.; Silva, J. C.; Trindade, A.; Varela, J.

    2009-10-01

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 × 2 × 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean CDOI-1 is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  5. Optimal grouping for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scanner

    OpenAIRE

    VANDAELE, Nico; VAN NIEUWENHUYSE, Inneke; CUPERS, Sascha

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Scanner can be managed more efficiently, simultaneously improving patient comfort (in terms of total time spent in the system) and increasing availability in case of emergency calls. By means of a superposition approach, all relevant data on the arrival and service process of different patient types are transformed into a general single server, single class queueing model. The objective function consists of the weighted average patient...

  6. Scanner tags, comic book piracy and participatory culture

    OpenAIRE

    Delwiche, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    To learn more about the motivations of individuals who scan and distribute comic books, this study reports findings from a content analysis of 389 scanner tags extracted from comic books posted on the torrent network Pirate Bay. Coded according to four categories linked to the literature on comic fandom and participatory culture, tags were analyzed in terms of recognition, aesthetic style, textual signifiers, and visual signifiers. Though comic book pirates seek recognition from their peers, ...

  7. An innovative optical and chemical drill core scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöqvist, A. S. L.; M. Arthursson; A. Lundström; Calderón Estrada, E.; Inerfeldt, A.; Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new innovative drill core scanner that semi-automatedly analyses drill cores directly in drill core trays with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the need for much sample preparation or operator intervention. The instrument is fed with entire core trays, which are photographed at high resolution and scanned by a 3-D profiling laser. Algorithms recognise the geometry of the core tray, number of slots, location of the drill cores, calculate the optimal scanning path, and exe...

  8. Determination of cerebral blood flow with the EMI CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) determinations were made in seven baboons and two patients with the EMI CT dedicated head scanner. The method for determining the CBF was tested and measurements were made during physiological states elicited by changes in pCO2 and depth of anaesthesia. The method has a number of advantages, particularly for assessing CBF responses to pCO2 changes. (author)

  9. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-01-01

    Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D) scanner as an alternative to curren...

  10. Automatic inventory of components by laser 3D scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the existing needs in nuclear decommissioning projects is to provide an inventory of components to be dismantled, which is available from its spatial location and elements that exist in your environment. The Laser scanner technology is a system of data acquisition that allows 3D models composed of millions of points, it's models with pinpoint accuracy and are available in a very short space of time. (Author)

  11. Optimization and characterization of PET scanners for Medical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cucciati,

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an imaging technique that appeared to be a valid instrument for cancers detection and neuro-imaging studies. Since first models built during 1960s, an incredible effort has been done by researchers to develop scanners more and more advanced with higher specificity and efficiency. Monte Carlo simulations have shown to be a very important tool during design phase of PET prototypes thanks to their ability to simulate systems with many coupled degrees of freedom, a...

  12. Bessel Beams

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kirk T

    2000-01-01

    Scalar Bessel beams are derived both via the wave equation and via diffraction theory. While such beams have a group velocity that exceeds the speed of light, this is a manifestation of the "scissors paradox" of special relativty. The signal velocity of a modulated Bessel beam is less than the speed of light. Forms of Bessel beams that satisfy Maxwell's equations are also given.

  13. Assessment of aec system response in ge 16 slices scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography scanners equipped with system for Automatic Exposure Control ( AEC ) have been recently installed into clinical practice in Macedonia. Assessment of their AEC settings and performances is important task from patient doses and images quality point of view . This study was done by analyzing of CT examinations in patients in the City Hospital ' 8 September' in Skopje. The examinations were carried out by GE Bright Speed 16 slices scanner equipped with AEC system . In all patients were applied the same protocol with constant acquisition parameters was applied , and images were reconstructed by standard mode . Patient dimensions and image noise were measured from the scouts and axial images. From DICOM header the information related to dose, TCM and slice position were extracted . It was found that scanner automatic exposure system adjusts exposure mainly according to maximal patient lateral dimension (LR) and applying the same Noise Index (NI) value in patients with different size does not provides necessarily the same image noise level. In patients which LR dimension was less than 30 cm it was found that AEC adjusts tube current at the minimum of m A interval with no modulation throughout different body parts. (Author)

  14. Image reconstruction using a first generation CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique that has been used in medical diagnosis since 1971. For many years the CT technique has also been applied to material characterisation and the detection of defects and flaws in industrial components associated with the nuclear, aerospace and missile industries. This paper reports on the construction of a first generation CT scanner built to demonstrate some applications of CT in the field of non-destructive testing and characterisation of materials. The scanner uses a mono-energetic 667 keV Cs-137 gamma radiation source and sodium iodide detector. The analogue output of the detector is connected to a Minekin rate meter. The object is placed on a specimen stage with the movement controlled by stepper motors through a GPIB interface. The projection data is acquired by placing the object at various angles with respect to the incident radiation and scanning the object laterally through a fixed source and detector assembly. The attenuation data is then processed on a Pentium computer using the summation filtered back-projection image reconstruction method. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured for aluminium, stainless steel, brass and lead and the results compared favourably with published data. The CT scanner will be improved to study various other applications in materials science and be used to establish a modern computed tomographic scanning facility. (author)

  15. Using Laser Scanners to Augment the Systematic Error Pointing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    The antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) rely on precise pointing algorithms to communicate with spacecraft that are billions of miles away. Although the existing systematic error pointing model is effective at reducing blind pointing errors due to static misalignments, several of its terms have a strong dependence on seasonal and even daily thermal variation and are thus not easily modeled. Changes in the thermal state of the structure create a separation from the model and introduce a varying pointing offset. Compensating for this varying offset is possible by augmenting the pointing model with laser scanners. In this approach, laser scanners mounted to the alidade measure structural displacements while a series of transformations generate correction angles. Two sets of experiments were conducted in August 2015 using commercially available laser scanners. When compared with historical monopulse corrections under similar conditions, the computed corrections are within 3 mdeg of the mean. However, although the results show promise, several key challenges relating to the sensitivity of the optical equipment to sunlight render an implementation of this approach impractical. Other measurement devices such as inclinometers may be implementable at a significantly lower cost.

  16. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D scanner as an alternative to current methods. For this study, the surfaces of ten samples oftuff were digitized by means of a 3D scanner, and the results were compared with the corresponding Rock JointCoefficient (JRC values. Up until now such 3D scanner have been mostly used in the automotive industry, whereastheir use for comparison with obtained JRC coefficient values in rock mechanics is presented here for the first time.The proposed new method is a faster, more precise and more accurate than other existing test methods, and is apromising technique for use in this area of study in the future.

  17. The Edinburgh Pipe Phantom: characterising ultrasound scanners beyond 50 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, C M [Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Ellis, W; Janeczko, A; Pye, S D [Medical Physics Department, NHS Lothian University Hospitals Division, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Bell, D, E-mail: carmel.moran@ed.ac.uk [Precision Acoustics Ltd, Hampton Farm Business Park, Dorset, DT2 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    The ability to measure the imaging performance of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound scanners is important but difficult to achieve objectively. The Edinburgh Pipe Phantom was originally developed to assess the technical performance of clinical scanners up to 15MHz. It comprises a series of anechoic cylinders with diameters 0.4 - 8mm embedded in agar-based tissue mimic. This design enables measurement of the characteristics (Resolution Integral R, Depth of Field L{sub R}, Characteristic Resolution D{sub R}) of grey-scale images with transducer centre frequencies from about 2.5 to 15MHz. We describe further development of the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom as a tool for characterising ultrasound scanners with centre frequencies up to at least 50MHz. This was achieved by moulding a series of anechoic pipe structures (diameters 0.045 - 1.5mm) into a block of agar-based tissue mimic. We report measurements of R, L{sub R} and D{sub R} for a series of 10 transducers (5 single element and 5 array transducers) designed for pre-clinical scanning, with centre frequencies in the range 15-55 MHz. Values of R ranged from 18-72 for single element transducers and 49-58 for linear array transducers. In conclusion, the pre-clinical pipe phantom was able to successfully determine the imaging characteristics of ultrasound probes up to 55MHz.

  18. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE™ dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans. (note)

  19. Design and Development of a Megavoltage CT Scanner for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are (i) to provide 2- and 3-dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, (ii) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images and (iii) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a 'third generation' CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion are performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm is employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement ((DBLTURN).75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy.

  20. Design and development of a megavoltage CT scanner for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are 1) to provide 2- and 3- dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, 2) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images, and 3) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a third generation CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion were performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm was employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement (approx. =.75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy

  1. Beam diagnostics measurements at 3 MeV of the LINAC4 H- beam at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Zocca, F; Duraffourg, M; Focker, G J; Gerard, D; Kolad, B; Lenardon, F; Ludwig, M; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F; Sordet, M; Tan, J; Tassan-Viol, J; Vuitton, C; Feshenko, A

    2014-01-01

    As part of the CERN LHC injector chain upgrade, LINAC4 [1, 2] will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV, replacing the old 50 MeV proton linac. The ion source, the Low Energy Beam Transfer (LEBT) line, the 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole and the Medium Energy Beam Transfer (MEBT) line hosting a chopper, have been commissioned in the LINAC4 tunnel. Diagnostic devices are installed in the LEBT and MEBT line and in a movable diagnostics test bench which is temporarily added to the MEBT exit. The paper gives an overview of all the instruments used, including beam current transformers, beam position monitors, wire scanners and wire grids for transverse profile measurements, a longitudinal bunch shape monitor and a slit-and-grid emittance meter. The instrumentation performance is discussed and the measurement results that allowed characterizing the 3 MeV beam in the LINAC4 tunnel are summarized.

  2. Beam Instrumentation of the PXIE LEBT Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Arcy, R. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, v. [Fermilab; Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The PXIE accelerator [1] is the front-end test stand of the proposed Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) [2] initiative: a CW-compatible pulsed H- superconducting RF linac upgrade to Fermilab’s injection system. The PXIE Ion Source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section are designed to create and transfer a 1-10 mA $H^{-}$ beam, in either pulsed (0.001–16 ms) or DC mode, from the ion source through to the injection point of the RFQ. This paper discusses the range of diagnostic tools – Allison-type Emittance Scanner, Faraday Cup, Toroid, DCCT, electrically isolated diaphragms – involved in the commissioning of the beam line and preparation of the beam for injection into the RFQ.

  3. LASER-BASED PROFILE MONITOR FOR ELECTRON BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High performance TeV energy electron / positron colliders (LC) are the first machines to require online, non-invasive beam size monitors for micron and sub-micron for beam phase space optimization. Typical beam densities in the LC are well beyond the threshold density for single pulse melting and vaporization of any material, making conventional wire scanners ineffective. Using a finely focused, diffraction limited high power laser, it is possible to devise a sampling profile monitor that, in operation, resembles a wire scanner. Very high resolution laser-based profile monitors have been developed and tested, first at FFTB (SLAC) and later at SLC and ATF. The monitor has broad applicability and we review here the technology, application and status of ongoing research programs

  4. A high-speed 12-layer two-dimensional bar code detection system with wideband photodetection amplifier and balanced raster scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakaumi, Hiroo; Ajiki, Hiroshi

    1998-12-01

    A high-speed 12-layer 2D bar-code detection system (BCDS) consisting of a photodetection amplifier with an amplification-type current-voltage converter and a balanced raster scanner combined with the complementary light emission drive method for laser diodes, has been developed in order to provide both a high effective scanning speed and multi-layer bar-code detection. This BCDS performs 1,250 scan/s, which is two and a half times the scanning speed of a conventional bar-code detection system. A new theoretical modulation model that gives an accurate model for laser scanning beam traces obtained by the balanced raster scanner is proposed. This model allows an optimum BCDS to be designed easily.

  5. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  6. VEGETATION CHARACTERISTICS USING MULTI-RETURN TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pirotti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Distinguishing vegetation characteristics in a terrestrial laser scanner dataset is an interesting issue for environmental assessment. Methods for filtering vegetation points to distinguish them from ground class have been widely studied mostly on datasets derived from airborne laser scanner, less so for terrestrial laser scanners (TLS. Recent developments in terrestrial laser sensors – further ranges, faster acquisition and multiple return echoes for some models – has risen interest for surface modelling applications. The downside of TLS is that a typical dataset has a very dense cloud, with obvious side-effects on post-processing time. Here we use a scan from a sensor which provides evaluation of multiple target echoes providing with more than 70 million points on our study area. The area presents a complex set of features ranging from dense vegetation undergrowth to very steep and uneven terrain. The method consists on a first step which subsets the original points to define ground candidates by taking into account the ordinal return number and the amplitude. Next a custom progressive morphological filter (closing operation is applied on ground candidate points using multidimensional (varying resolutions grids and a structure element to determine cell values. Vegetation density mapping over the area is then estimated using a weighted ration of point counts in the tri-dimensional space over each cell. The overall result is a pipeline for processing TLS points clouds with minimal user interaction, producing a Digital Terrain Model (DTM, a Digital Surface Model (DSM a vegetation density map and a derived canopy height model (CHM. Results on DTM show an accuracy (RMSE of 0.307 m with a mean error of 0.0573 m compared to a control DTM extracted from Terrascan's progressive triangulation procedure. The derived CHM was tested over 30 tree heights resulting in 27 trees having an absolute error value below 0.2 m (three were just below 0.7 m.

  7. Applicability of optical scanner method for fine root dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tomonori; Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Khoon Kho, Lip; Katayama, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Fine root dynamics is one of the important components in forest carbon cycling, as ~60 % of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to root growth and metabolic activities. Various techniques have been developed for monitoring fine root biomass, production, mortality in order to understand carbon pools and fluxes resulting from fine roots dynamics. The minirhizotron method is now a widely used technique, in which a transparent tube is inserted into the soil and researchers count an increase and decrease of roots along the tube using images taken by a minirhizotron camera or minirhizotron video camera inside the tube. This method allows us to observe root behavior directly without destruction, but has several weaknesses; e.g., the difficulty of scaling up the results to stand level because of the small observation windows. Also, most of the image analysis are performed manually, which may yield insufficient quantitative and objective data. Recently, scanner method has been proposed, which can produce much bigger-size images (A4-size) with lower cost than those of the minirhizotron methods. However, laborious and time-consuming image analysis still limits the applicability of this method. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a new protocol for scanner image analysis to extract root behavior in soil. We evaluated applicability of this method in two ways; 1) the impact of different observers including root-study professionals, semi- and non-professionals on the detected results of root dynamics such as abundance, growth, and decomposition, and 2) the impact of window size on the results using a random sampling basis exercise. We applied our new protocol to analyze temporal changes of root behavior from sequential scanner images derived from a Bornean tropical forests. The results detected by the six observers showed considerable concordance in temporal changes in the abundance and the growth of fine roots but less in the decomposition. We also examined

  8. Feature-space transformation improves supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Achterberg, Hakim C.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Image-segmentation techniques based on supervised classification generally perform well on the condition that training and test samples have the same feature distribution. However, if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, their feature distributions...... results showed that our feature space transformation improved the Dice overlap of segmentations obtained with an SVM classifier from 0.36 to 0.85 when only 10 atlases were used and from 0.79 to 0.85 when around 100 atlases were used....

  9. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  10. Computed tomography scanner applied to soil compaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil compaction problem was studied using a first generation computed tomography scanner (CT). This apparatus gets images of soil cross sections samples, with resolution of a few millimeters. We performed the following laboratory and field experiments: basic experiments of equipment calibrations and resolutions studies; measurements of compacted soil thin layers; measurements of soil compaction caused by agricultural tools; stress-strain modelling in confined soil sample, with several moisture degree; characterizations of soil bulk density profile with samples collected in a hole (trench), comparing with a cone penetrometer technique. (author)

  11. Automated nondestructive weld testing based on a line scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major advantages of radiography using line scanners are the enhanced contrast due to stray radiation collimation, and the possibility to optimize the ray incidence for detection of crack-type inhomogeneities. A modified photodiode line camera of Bio-Imaging Research was used for the experimental system. The Gd2O2S luminescent screen is used for converting the incident X-ray quanta into photons. Thus the camera can scan a surface of 100 mm. The effective pixel resolution is 50 μm. The system therefore also enables application of the computerized laminography. (orig./CB)

  12. Inspection of Samples using a fast Millimetre Wave Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millimeterwaves and terahertz sensors can cover a broad field of applications ranging from production control to security scanners. The outstanding features are the transparency of many materials like textiles, paper and plastics in this frequency region, the good contrast of any humid or dense dielectric material and the capability to employ miniaturized RF systems and small antenna apertures or dielectric probes. A stand-alone-millimetre-wave-imager, SAMMY, was developed and built, to demonstrate the outstanding features of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum for material inspection.

  13. Inspection of Samples using a fast Millimetre Wave Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, A.; Nüssler, D.; Warok, P.; Krebs, C.; Heinen, S.; Essen, H.

    2011-08-01

    Millimeterwaves and terahertz sensors can cover a broad field of applications ranging from production control to security scanners. The outstanding features are the transparency of many materials like textiles, paper and plastics in this frequency region, the good contrast of any humid or dense dielectric material and the capability to employ miniaturized RF systems and small antenna apertures or dielectric probes. A stand-alone-millimetre-wave-imager, SAMMY, was developed and built, to demonstrate the outstanding features of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum for material inspection.

  14. Scatter fraction of the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, P; Raczyński, L; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, J; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammad, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    A novel Positron Emission Tomography system, based on plastic scintillators, is being developed by the J-PET collaboration. In this article we present the simulation results of the scatter fraction, representing one of the parameters crucial for background studies defined in the NEMA-NU-2-2012 norm. We elaborate an event selection methods allowing to suppress events in which gamma quanta were scattered in the phantom or underwent the multiple scattering in the detector. The estimated scatter fraction for the single-layer J-PET scanner varies from 37% to 53% depending on the applied energy threshold.

  15. Final task report on Fort St. Vrain temperature scanner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Fort St. Vrain temperature scanner system was designed. Its primary use is to display in graphic format the thermal distribution of the helium, the feedwater, and the steam temperatures on the 12 steam generators during rise-to-power testing at the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. The graphic information allows an operator to immediately access hot spots, thermal imbalance, and any thermal information that indicates impending trouble. The system, including the software written for it, is described. (auth)

  16. Comparative evaluation of ultrasound scanner accuracy in distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, F. P.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop and compare two different automatic methods for accuracy evaluation in ultrasound phantom measurements on B-mode images: both of them give as a result the relative error e between measured distances, performed by 14 brand new ultrasound medical scanners, and nominal distances, among nylon wires embedded in a reference test object. The first method is based on a least squares estimation, while the second one applies the mean value of the same distance evaluated at different locations in ultrasound image (same distance method). Results for both of them are proposed and explained.

  17. Deriving debris-flow characteristics from vertical laser profile scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemart, Mylène; Felix, Morsdorf; Graf, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Two well-known debris-flow channels in the Swiss Alps, the Dorfbach, in the community of Randa, canton of Valais and the Spreitgraben (community of Guttannen, BE) were fitted with a setup of two laser profile scanners each. Since 2011 (Randa site) and 2012 (Spreitgraben site), these devices have been scanning the passing debris flows at rates of 50 Hz or 75 Hz, recording several million across bed profiles with point densities of roughly 20 points per meter during debris-flow events. In order to comprehend the vast possibilities this extraordinary data set offers, a preliminary evaluation has been undertaken, writing code that allows for a semi-automatic extraction of the main debris-flow characteristics maximum flow height, peak discharge, total discharge as well as spatially distributed flow velocity. The analysis of 13 events, of which 12 took place at the Dorfbach site, and one took place at the Spreitgraben site, revealed that a large-scale Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) approach can be used to derive flow velocities, and these in turn can be used to compute discharge curves for all of the recorded events. Total automation has proven to be unrealistic, because the choice of the bed geometry greatly influences discharge results. Also, excluding outlying velocity values is necessary, in order to find reliable peak discharge values. Nevertheless, we find that the laser scanners offer distinct advantages over the 'established' setup consisting of geophones and a radar gauge because the scanners catch the debris flow as it changes its flow path and offer much higher resolution in terms of distributed flow height measurements. Furthermore, the single profiles of the recorded debris flows were analyzed with regard to their surface geometry by fitting fourth order polynomials to find the points of inflection along the profiles. From this, we have been able to estimate the amount of flow height that debris flows gain by building their well-known convex fronts, and

  18. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper

  19. An automated geometric correction system for airborne multispectral scanner imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) maintains a Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to support nuclear related programs of the US Government. The mission of the organization includes both emergency response and more routine environmental assessments of nuclear facilities. The USDOE RSL maintains a small fleet of specially equipped aircraft that are used as platforms for remote sensor systems. The aircraft include helicopters, light aircraft, and a business jet suitable for high altitude acquisitions. Multispectral scanners flown on these platforms are subject to geometric distortions related to variations in aircraft orientation (pitch, roll, and yaw), position, and velocity during data acquistions

  20. Analysis framework for the J-PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Gruntowski, A; Stola, K; Trybek, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2015-01-01

    J-PET analysis framework is a flexible, lightweight, ROOT-based software package which provides the tools to develop reconstruction and calibration procedures for PET tomography. In this article we present the implementation of the full data-processing chain in the J-PET framework which is used for the data analysis of the J-PET tomography scanner. The Framework incorporates automated handling of PET setup parameters' database as well as high level tools for building data reconstruction procedures. Each of these components is briefly discussed.

  1. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Cristian C; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with (18)F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a (22)Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at different offsets from the center of the field of view (FOV), as well as at different energy and coincidence windows. The noise equivalent count rates (NECR) and the system scatter fraction were measured using rat-like (Phi = 60, L = 150 mm) and mouse-like (Phi = 25 mm, L = 70 mm) cylindrical phantoms. Line sources filled with high activity (18)F (>250 MBq) were inserted parallel to the axes of the phantoms (13.5 and 10 mm offset). For each phantom, list-mode data were collected over 24 h at 350-650 keV and 250-750 keV energy windows and 3.4 ns coincidence window. System scatter fraction was measured when the random event rates were below 1%. Performance phantoms consisting of cylinders with hot rod inserts filled with (18)F were imaged. In addition, we performed imaging studies that show the suitability of the Inveon scanner for imaging small structures such as those in mice with a variety of tracers. The radial, tangential and axial resolutions at the center of FOV were 1.46 mm, 1.49 and 1.15 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 2 cm, the FWHM values were 1.73, 2.20 and 1.47 mm, respectively. At a coincidence window of 3.4 ns, the sensitivity was 5.75% for EW = 350-650 keV and 7.4% for EW = 250-750 keV. For an energy window of 350-650 keV, the peak NECR was 538 kcps at 131.4 MBq for the rat-like phantom, and 1734 kcps at 147.4 MBq for the mouse-like phantom. The system scatter fraction values were 0.22 for the rat phantom and 0.06 for the mouse phantom. The Inveon

  2. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with 18F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a 22Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at different offsets from the center of the field of view (FOV), as well as at different energy and coincidence windows. The noise equivalent count rates (NECR) and the system scatter fraction were measured using rat-like (Φ = 60, L = 150 mm) and mouse-like (Φ = 25 mm, L = 70 mm) cylindrical phantoms. Line sources filled with high activity 18F (>250 MBq) were inserted parallel to the axes of the phantoms (13.5 and 10 mm offset). For each phantom, list-mode data were collected over 24 h at 350-650 keV and 250-750 keV energy windows and 3.4 ns coincidence window. System scatter fraction was measured when the random event rates were below 1%. Performance phantoms consisting of cylinders with hot rod inserts filled with 18F were imaged. In addition, we performed imaging studies that show the suitability of the Inveon scanner for imaging small structures such as those in mice with a variety of tracers. The radial, tangential and axial resolutions at the center of FOV were 1.46 mm, 1.49 and 1.15 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 2 cm, the FWHM values were 1.73, 2.20 and 1.47 mm, respectively. At a coincidence window of 3.4 ns, the sensitivity was 5.75% for EW = 350-650 keV and 7.4% for EW = 250-750 keV. For an energy window of 350-650 keV, the peak NECR was 538 kcps at 131.4 MBq for the rat-like phantom, and 1734 kcps at 147.4 MBq for the mouse-like phantom. The system scatter fraction values were 0.22 for the rat phantom and 0.06 for the mouse phantom. The Inveon system

  3. Pilot study for compact microbeam radiation therapy using a carbon nanotube field emission micro-CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadsell, Mike, E-mail: mhadsell@stanford.edu; Cao, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Burk, Laurel; Schreiber, Torsten; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is defined as the use of parallel, microplanar x-ray beams with an energy spectrum between 50 and 300 keV for cancer treatment and brain radiosurgery. Up until now, the possibilities of MRT have mainly been studied using synchrotron sources due to their high flux (100s Gy/s) and approximately parallel x-ray paths. The authors have proposed a compact x-ray based MRT system capable of delivering MRT dose distributions at a high dose rate. This system would employ carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission technology to create an x-ray source array that surrounds the target of irradiation. Using such a geometry, multiple collimators would shape the irradiation from this array into multiple microbeams that would then overlap or interlace in the target region. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of attaining a high dose rate and parallel microbeam beams using such a system. Methods: The microbeam dose distribution was generated by our CNT micro-CT scanner (100μm focal spot) and a custom-made microbeam collimator. An alignment assembly was fabricated and attached to the scanner in order to collimate and superimpose beams coming from different gantry positions. The MRT dose distribution was measured using two orthogonal radiochromic films embedded inside a cylindrical phantom. This target was irradiated with microbeams incident from 44 different gantry angles to simulate an array of x-ray sources as in the proposed compact CNT-based MRT system. Finally, phantom translation in a direction perpendicular to the microplanar beams was used to simulate the use of multiple parallel microbeams. Results: Microbeams delivered from 44 gantry angles were superimposed to form a single microbeam dose distribution in the phantom with a FWHM of 300μm (calculated value was 290 μm). Also, during the multiple beam simulation, a peak to valley dose ratio of ∼10 was found when the phantom translation distance was roughly 4x the beam width

  4. 3D dosimetry for complex stereotactic radiosurgery using a tomographic optical density scanner and BANG polymer gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation sensitive tissue equivalent BANG polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Guilford, CT) have been developed for three dimensional verification of complex radiotherapy treatment plans. This study evaluated the performance of a prototype optical density scanner in verification of a complex radiosurgery treatment plan using linear accelerator based radiosurgery and BANG polymer gel dosimeters. Materials and Methods: BANG polymer gel dosimeters were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using 6MV photons to single isocenters and to a 3 isocenter radiosurgery plan. Appropriate controls for evaluating the linearity of dose response were irradiated using a water bath and 6MV photons. Two separate methods for imaging the radiation-induced polymerization in the gel were used. The first method, MRI imaging, used the spatial distribution of the NMR transverse relaxation rates (R2) of the water protons in the gel to create a 3D dose map. In the second, a prototype optical density scanner was used to reconstruct a 3D dose distribution from multiple planar images of the gel which were generated using a filtered back-projection algorithm and measurements of optical transmission. Results: Data obtained from MRI imaging and the images generated by the optical scanner were compared with the plan with excellent results. Very close agreement between all three data sets was demonstrated. The BANG polymer gels demonstrated an excellent linearity of response and a very large (∼20 Gray) dynamic range. Conclusion: The ability to permanently record (and interrogate at a later time) integrated 3D dose distributions will be valuable in assessing complex external beam treatment plans such as radiosurgical treatment plans as well as in commissioning and periodic checking of dynamic wedges, multileaf collimators, etc. used for conventionally fractionated conformal radiotherapy. The linearity of response and wide dynamic range are important in the evaluation of radiosurgical

  5. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver [Department of Physics, Queen' s University (United Kingdom); Schreiner, L John [Medical Physics Department, Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tim.Olding@krcc.on.ca

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data

  8. Use of scanner data to analyze the table wine demand in the Italian major retailing trade

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Torrisi; Gianluca Stefani; Chiara Seghieri

    2006-01-01

    While the utilization of scanner data for food demand analyses has become increasingly popular in the United States, few food demand studies, and in particular none on table wine, have been conducted using scanner data in Italy. This paper presents a first attempt to estimate a demand system for selected brands of red tetra-packaged, plastic packaged, and bag-in-box table wine using scanner data providing new and useful insights into the marketing of Italian wine. Price and expenditure elasti...

  9. Changes in views on digital intraoral scanners among dental hygienists after training in digital impression taking

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hye-Ran; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Lee, Kkot-Nim; Kim, Minji

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Despite the rapid development of digital dentistry, the use of digital intraoral scanners remains limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in views on intraoral scanners among dental hygienists after training. Methods Thirty-four dental hygienists with >3 years of clinical experience participated and were divided into 2 groups : iTero and Trios groups. Participants of each group practiced the usage of both intraoral scanners, for total 12 times over 4 sessions, Q...

  10. Irradiation in helical scanner: doses estimation, parameters choice; Irradiation en scanner helicoidal: estimation des doses, choix des parametres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Boyer, B.; Jouan, E.; Beauvais, H

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of helical scanners improves the diagnosis abilities and the service done to the patients. The rational use allows to give the patients a ratio benefit/risk far better than the almost medical examinations. It is particularly true for over sixty years old aged people, that have a null genetic risk and a practically null carcinogen risk; However, for young adults and children, it is necessary to banish any useless irradiation and limit exposure to the strict necessary for the diagnosis. It is necessary to develop a radiation protection culture, possible by the radiation doses index display and doses benchmarks knowledge. (N.C.)

  11. Fast neutron radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been working with Australian Customs Service to develop a scanner capable of directly scanning airfreight containers in 1-2 minutes without unpacking. The scanner combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner is due to be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005

  12. Development of a linac CT scanner for defect imaging in steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on the development of a linac CT scanner for pipe inspection. The scanner is equipped with a small sized 0.95 MeV linac as a highly penetrable x-ray source, and 30 channel compact solid-state detector units (CdWO4 scintillator + photodiode). A precise scanning system is realized on the basis of a new scanning method, scanner rotating sector scan. This system can be easily disassembled for setting the scanner itself onto fixed piping. A tomogram of steel piping up to 300A Sch40 can be reconstructed within an hour. A 0.1 mm wide slit was clearly visualized

  13. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; SUGIHARA, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm × 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm × 16 or 0.5 mm × 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images fr...

  14. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Ryutaro Kakinuma; Noriyuki Moriyama; Yukio Muramatsu; Shiho Gomi; Masahiro Suzuki; Hirobumi Nagasawa; Masahiko Kusumoto; Tomohiko Aso; Yoshihisa Muramatsu; Takaaki Tsuchida; Koji Tsuta; Akiko Miyagi Maeshima; Naobumi Tochigi; Shun-Ichi Watanabe; Naoki Sugihara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from...

  15. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  16. Calibrated and geocoded clutter from an airborne multispectral scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Markus; Bruehlmann, Ralph; John, Marc-Andre; Schmid, Konrad J.; Hueppi, Rudolph; Koenig, Reto

    1999-07-01

    Robustness of automatic target recognition (ATR) to varying observation conditions and countermeasures is substantially increased by use of multispectral sensors. Assessment of such ATR systems is performed by captive flight tests and simulations (HWIL or complete modeling). Although the clutter components of a scene can be generated with specified statistics, clutter maps directly obtained from measurement are required for validation of a simulation. In addition, urban scenes have non-stationary characteristics and are difficult to simulate. The present paper describes a scanner, data acquisition and processing system used for the generation of realistic clutter maps incorporating infrared, passive and active millimeter wave channels. The sensors are mounted on a helicopter with coincident line-of-sight, enabling us to measure consistent clutter signatures under varying observation conditions. Position and attitude data from GPS and an inertial measurement unit, respectively, are used to geometrically correct the raw scanner data. After sensor calibration the original voltage signals are converted to physical units, i.e. temperatures and reflectivities, describing the clutter independently of the scanning sensor, thus allowing us the use of the clutter maps in tests of a priori unknown multispectral sensors. The data correction procedures are described and results are presented.

  17. Initial clinical test of a breast-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this initial clinical study was to test a new positron emission/tomography imager and biopsy system (PEM/PET) in a small group of selected subjects to assess its clinical imaging capabilities. Specifically, the main task of this study is to determine whether the new system can successfully be used to produce images of known breast cancer and compare them to those acquired by standard techniques. The PEM/PET system consists of two pairs of rotating radiation detectors located beneath a patient table. The scanner has a spatial resolution of ∼2 mm in all three dimensions. The subjects consisted of five patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer ranging in age from 40 to 55 years old scheduled for pre-treatment, conventional whole body PET imaging with F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The primary lesions were at least 2 cm in diameter. The images from the PEM/PET system demonstrated that this system is capable of identifying some lesions not visible in standard mammograms. Furthermore, while the relatively large lesions imaged in this study where all visualised by a standard whole body PET/CT scanner, some of the morphology of the tumours (ductal infiltration, for example) was better defined with the PEM/PET system. Significantly, these images were obtained immediately following a standard whole body PET scan. The initial testing of the new PEM/PET system demonstrated that the new system is capable of producing good quality breast-PET images compared standard methods.

  18. An automated breast ultrasound scanner with integrated photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Corey J.; Moradi, Hamid; Salcudean, Septimiu E.

    2016-03-01

    We have integrated photo-acoustic imaging into an automated breast ultrasound scanner (ABUS) with the goal of simultaneously performing ultrasound (US) and multi-spectral photo-acoustic tomography (PAT). This was accomplished with minimal change to the existing automated scanner by coupling laser light into an optical fiber for flexible and robust light delivery. We present preliminary tomography data acquired with this setup, including a simple resolution-testing geometry and a tissue phantom. Integrating PAT into the ABUS such that breast imaging is possible will require illumination from below the transducer dome. To that end, we are moving towards a fiber-based, localized illumination geometry which is fixed relative to the transducer. By illuminating locally (only near the current acquisition slice), this approach reduces overall light exposure at the tissue surface, allowing higher light intensity per acquisition (which translates to higher absorber contrast), while remaining below safe exposure thresholds. We present time-domain simulations of photo-acoustic imaging under non-uniform illumination conditions, and test one potential weighting scheme which can be used to extract absorber locations.

  19. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Sotiriadis, Paul P; Bottomley, Paul A; Atalar, Ergin

    2006-11-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C-40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  20. Quality control in computed tomography X-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practical methods of estimating computed tomography X-ray scanner imaging performance treat the scanner as a black box, the measurements usually being non-invasive. The performance of individual components or groups of components within the system is not usually measured. The digital nature of the imaging process allows direct numerical assessment of the actual imaging parameters. This approach is used for type and acceptance testing as well as quality control, the type and acceptance tests providing the baseline for subsequent quality control measurements. The usual X-ray imaging parameters of noise, resolution and dose can all be used for quality control purposes, but the relative emphasis between these parameters will differ when compared with type or acceptance testing. Other simple measurements may be of equal use. All manufacturers suggest quality control protocols of varying complexity using a wide range of phantom designs. Where quality control is undertaken routinely, it is usually the manufacturer's protocols that are followed. It is pertinent to ask whether the quality control measurements currently suggested are necessary and/or sufficient. (author)

  1. Evaluation of track detectors by scanner; application in field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of track etch detectors is mostly carried out either visually or using specialized image analyzing SW systems. In both cases additional equipment is necessary, involving quality microscope, digital camera and other HW components. In some cases, especially when a method of electrochemical etching is used to reveal tracks, it is possible to use a high resolution scanner and to avoid both tedious visual counting and construction or purchase of complicated and expensive image analyser. In our study we have used the model Epson Perfection 4990 Photo, with resolution 4800 dpi. Irradiated and etched detectors of variable size (typically 15x15 mm, 35x60 mm and 30x120 mm) were evaluated by standard visual method at first and then scanned. Their binary pictures can be easily treated by freely available programs, e.g. Image J. This program offers possibilities to edit the binary picture, e.g. to choose easily surface of interest, determinate precisely its area, erase material defects or scratches, reduce the track overlapping using function watershed etc. Track densities obtained by both method were compared in the range 10 - 5x103 tr/cm2 and very good agreement has been found for track densities within 10 - 3x103. According to our experience it is possible to evaluate ∼ 80% of total amount of detectors using a scanner. It improves situation especially in some routine measurements, e.g. radon studies

  2. Design of a small animal MR compatible PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, the authors have designed a small animal MR compatible PET (McPET) scanner for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of mice and rats in vivo. The scanner consists of one ring of 480 LSO crystals arranged in 3 layers with 160 crystals per layer. The crystal dimensions are 2 x 3 x 7.5 mm3. This was based on a target resolution of 2.5 mm and simulations showing that a depth of 7.5 mm avoided significant depth of interaction effects across the desired field of view. The system diameter of 11.2 cm is large enough to accommodate the animal positioned inside a stereotactic frame. Each crystal will be coupled through 2 mm diameter optical fibers to multi-channel PMT's which reside outside the main magnetic field. Through 50 cm of optical fiber, a photopeak is clearly seen and the measured energy resolution is 25%. Prototype optical fiber connectors have been tested to increase the flexibility of the system and result in a light loss of only 6%. The proposed system will have adequate resolution and sensitivity for a number of applications in small animals and will be the first practical device for simultaneous in vivo imaging with PET and MR

  3. Improving CT scan capabilities with a new trauma workflow concept: Simulation of hospital logistics using different CT scanner scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung Kon Jin, P.H.P., E-mail: p.fungkonjin@amc.uva.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dijkgraaf, M.G.W., E-mail: m.dijkgraaf@amc.uva.nl [Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alons, C.L., E-mail: clalons@few.vu.nl [Department of Mathematics, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijk, C. van, E-mail: c.vankuijk@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.beenen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koole, G.M., E-mail: koole@few.vu.nl [Department of Mathematics, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.uva.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Introduction: The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow (ATW) concept includes a sliding gantry CT scanner serving two mirrored (trauma) rooms. In this study, several predefined scenarios with a varying number of CT scanners and CT locations are analyzed to identify the best performing patient flow management strategy from an institutional perspective on process quality. Materials and methods: A total of six clinically relevant scenarios with variables that included the number of CT scanners, CT scanner location, and different patient categories (regular, urgent, and trauma patients) were evaluated using computer simulation. Each scenario was simulated using institutional data and was assessed for patient waiting times, idle time of CT scanners, and overtime due to scheduling. The best 2- and 3-scanner scenarios were additionally evaluated with the ATW-concept. Results: Based on institutional data, the best 2-scanner scenario distributes all 3 patient categories over both scanners and plans 4 urgent patients per hour while locating both scanners outside of the trauma room. The best 3-scanner scenario distributes urgent and regular patients over all 3 scanners and trauma patients on only 1 scanner and locates all CT scanners outside of the trauma room. The ATW concept reduces waiting times and overtime, while increasing idle time. Conclusion: Choosing the optimal planning and distribution strategies depends on the number and location of available CT scanners, along with number of trauma, urgent and regular patients. The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow concept could provide institutions with the ability of early CT scanning in trauma patients without influencing regular and urgent CT scanning.

  4. Improving CT scan capabilities with a new trauma workflow concept: Simulation of hospital logistics using different CT scanner scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow (ATW) concept includes a sliding gantry CT scanner serving two mirrored (trauma) rooms. In this study, several predefined scenarios with a varying number of CT scanners and CT locations are analyzed to identify the best performing patient flow management strategy from an institutional perspective on process quality. Materials and methods: A total of six clinically relevant scenarios with variables that included the number of CT scanners, CT scanner location, and different patient categories (regular, urgent, and trauma patients) were evaluated using computer simulation. Each scenario was simulated using institutional data and was assessed for patient waiting times, idle time of CT scanners, and overtime due to scheduling. The best 2- and 3-scanner scenarios were additionally evaluated with the ATW-concept. Results: Based on institutional data, the best 2-scanner scenario distributes all 3 patient categories over both scanners and plans 4 urgent patients per hour while locating both scanners outside of the trauma room. The best 3-scanner scenario distributes urgent and regular patients over all 3 scanners and trauma patients on only 1 scanner and locates all CT scanners outside of the trauma room. The ATW concept reduces waiting times and overtime, while increasing idle time. Conclusion: Choosing the optimal planning and distribution strategies depends on the number and location of available CT scanners, along with number of trauma, urgent and regular patients. The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow concept could provide institutions with the ability of early CT scanning in trauma patients without influencing regular and urgent CT scanning.

  5. Beam Studies Made with the SPS Ionization Profile Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Ferioli, G; Koopman, J; Roncarolo, F

    2003-01-01

    During the last two years of SPS operation, investigations were pursued on the ability of the SPS ionization profile monitor prototype to fulfill different tasks. It is now established that the instrument can be used for injection matching tuning, by turn to turn recording of the beam size after the injection. Other applications concern beam size measurements on beams ranging from an individual bunch to a nominal SPS batch foreseen for injection into the LHC (288 bunches). By continuously tracking throughout the SPS acceleration cycle from 26 GeV to 450 GeV the evolution of parameters associated to the beam size, it is possible to explain certain beam behaviour. Comparisons are also made at different beam currents and monitor gains with measurements made with the wire scanners. Data are presented and discussed, and the possible implementation of new features is suggested in order to further improve the consistency of the measurements.

  6. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this paper we report on tests of a single detection module built out from the BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5×19×300 mm3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50 ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80 ps (σ) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93 cm (σ) for the annihilation quanta. The fractional energy resolution for the energy E deposited by the annihilation quanta via the Compton scattering amounts to σ(E)/E≈0.044/√(E(MeV)) and corresponds to the σ(E)/E of 7.5% at the Compton edge

  7. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Bednarski, T; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kubicz, E; Moskal, I; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N; Białas, P; Gajos, A; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W

    2014-01-01

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta...

  8. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  9. Voxel-based classification of FDG PET in dementia using inter-scanner normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Frank; Young, Stewart; Buchert, Ralph; Wenzel, Fabian

    2013-08-15

    Statistical mapping of FDG PET brain images has become a common tool in differential diagnosis of patients with dementia. We present a voxel-based classification system of neurodegenerative dementias based on partial least squares (PLS). Such a classifier relies on image databases of normal controls and dementia cases as training data. Variations in PET image characteristics can be expected between databases, for example due to differences in instrumentation, patient preparation, and image reconstruction. This study evaluates (i) the impact of databases from different scanners on classification accuracy and (ii) a method to improve inter-scanner classification. Brain FDG PET databases from three scanners (A, B, C) at two clinical sites were evaluated. Diagnostic categories included normal controls (NC, nA=26, nB=20, nC=24 for each scanner respectively), Alzheimer's disease (AD, nA=44, nB=11, nC=16), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD, nA=13, nB=13, nC=5). Spatially normalized images were classified as NC, AD, or FTD using partial least squares. Supervised learning was employed to determine classifier parameters, whereby available data is sub-divided into training and test sets. Four different database setups were evaluated: (i) "in-scanner": training and test data from the same scanner, (ii) "x-scanner": training and test data from different scanners, (iii) "train other": train on both x-scanners, and (iv) "train all": train on all scanners. In order to moderate the impact of inter-scanner variations on image evaluation, voxel-by-voxel scaling was applied based on "ratio images". Good classification accuracy of on average 94% was achieved for the in-scanner setups. Accuracy deteriorated for setups with mismatched scanners (79-91%). Ratio-image normalization improved all results with mismatched scanners (85-92%). In conclusion, automatic classification of individual FDG PET in differential diagnosis of dementia is feasible. Accuracy can vary with respect to scanner or

  10. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Kakinuma

    Full Text Available The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT scanners.This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner.The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU] was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001. The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001 for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures.Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners.

  11. Frozen Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    In general, the temperature of a charged particle beam traveling in an accelerator is very high. Seen from the rest frame of the beam, individual particles randomly oscillate about the reference orbit at high speed. This internal kinetic energy can, however, be removed by introducing dissipative interactions into the system. As a dissipative process advances, the beam becomes denser in phase space or, in other words, the emittance is more diminished. Ideally, it is possible to reach a "zero-emittance" state where the beam is Coulomb crystallized. The space-charge repulsion of a crystalline beam just balances the external restoring force provided by artificial electromagnetic elements. In this talk, general discussion is made of coasting and bunched crystalline beams circulating in a storage ring. Results of molecular dynamics simulations are presented to demonstrate the dynamic nature of various crystalline states. A possible method to approach such an ultimate state of matter is also discussed.

  12. Evaluation of the health risk of body backscatter x ray scanners; Evaluation du risque sanitaire des scanners corporels a rayons X backscatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Following the attempted attack between Amsterdam and Detroit on the 25 december 2009, the council of interior safety decided a quick display of equipment using more efficient imaging techniques than metals detectors usually in place in French airports. Two technologies of devices are susceptible to be implemented on the airports: scanners using non ionizing radiation, (called millimetric waves) or scanners using ionizing radiation (x radiation, measurement by backscattering called backscatter). This report evaluates the dosimetric impact and the sanitary risk of backscatter x ray scanners and formulates recommendations to authorities to allow them to rule on the type of technology to use. Then, this report gives leads to conceive elements of information to communicate to travelers susceptible to be controlled by a such scanner in a foreign airport. (N.C.)

  13. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10C, 11C, and 15O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  14. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  15. Jefferson Lab IR demo FEL photocathode quantum efficiency scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubeli, J.; Evans, R.; Grippo, A.; Jordan, K.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.

    2001-12-01

    Jefferson Laboratory's Free Electron Laser (FEL) incorporates a cesiated gallium arsenide (GaAs) DC photocathode gun as its electron source. By using a set of scanning mirrors, the surface of the GaAs wafer is illuminated with a 543.5nm helium-neon laser. Measuring the current flow across the biased photocathode generates a quantum efficiency (QE) map of the 1-in. diameter wafer surface. The resulting QE map provides a very detailed picture of the efficiency of the wafer surface. By generating a QE map in a matter of minutes, the photocathode scanner has proven to be an exceptional tool in quickly determining sensitivity and availability of the photocathode for operation.

  16. Applications of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner in oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Research activity has continued to be focused on the applications of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery in oceanography. A number of regional studies were completed including investigations of temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton populations in the South Atlantic Bight, Northwest Spain, Weddell Sea, Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and in tropical Atlantic Ocean. In addition to the regional studies, much work was dedicated to developing ancillary global scale meteorological and hydrographic data sets to complement the global CZCS processing products. To accomplish this, SEAPAK's image analysis capability was complemented with an interface to GEMPAK (Severe Storm Branch's meteorological analysis software package) for the analysis and graphical display of gridded data fields. Plans are being made to develop a similar interface to SEAPAK for hydrographic data using EPIC (a hydrographic data analysis package developed by NOAA/PMEL).

  17. Direct mineral identification with Geoscan Mk II Advanced Multispectral Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Ronald J. P.; Honey, Frank R.

    1990-09-01

    Analysis of the Geoscan Mk II scanner imagery obtained over the past twelve months in Australia and in the USA has shown that this advanced system can effect direct mineral identification (DM1) with only a minimum of processing and in an operational commercial mode of use. This paper attempts to show some of these results with imagery flown over goldmineralizaon (Leonora W. Australia) porphyry-copper mineralization and associated higher-level advanced argiffic alteration (Yerington NV--Ann Mason and Buckskin Ra. ) and a copper-gold skarn nearby (Ludwig NV). In all cases simple banddifferencing is all the processing that is required and this can be effected minutes after landing from a flight using a proprietary image-display system (GIPSy) which accepts the optical disks directly. [3 1.

  18. ARIES segmented gamma-ray scanner user manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The segmented gamma-ray scatter (SGS) designated as Win SGS at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility has been installed and is intended for use in quantifying the radioisotope content of DOE-STD-3013-96 equivalent containers. The SGS features new software written in C and a new user interface that runs under Microsoft Windows trademark. The operation of the ARIES Segmented Gamma-ray Scanner is documented in this manual. It covers user instructions as well as hardware and software details. Additional information is found in the documentation for the commercially available components and modules that compose the SGS. The objective of the ARIES project is to demonstrate technology to dismantle plutonium pits from excess nuclear weapons, convert the plutonium to a metal ingot or an oxide powder, package the metal or oxide, and verify the contents of the package by nondestructive assay

  19. Characterisation of the PXIE Allison-type emittance scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    D`Arcy, R.; Alvarez, M.; Gaynier, J.; Prost, L.; Scarpine, V.; Shemyakin, A.

    2016-04-01

    An Allison-type emittance scanner has been designed for PXIE at FNAL with the goal of providing fast and accurate phase space reconstruction. The device has been modified from previous LBNL/SNS designs to operate in both pulsed and DC modes with the addition of water-cooled front slits. Extensive calibration techniques and error analysis allowed confinement of uncertainty to the < 5 % level (with known caveats). With a 16-bit, 1 MHz electronics scheme the device is able to analyse a pulse with a resolution of 1 μs, allowing for analysis of neutralisation effects. This paper describes a detailed breakdown of the R&D, as well as post-run analysis techniques.

  20. NOAA-NASA Coastal Zone Color Scanner Reanalysis Effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satellite observations of global ocean chlorophyll span more than two decades. However, incompatibilities between processing algorithms prevent us from quantifying natural variability. We applied a comprehensive reanalysis to the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) archive, called the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA-NASA) CZCS reanalysis (NCR) effort. NCR consisted of (1) algorithm improvement (AI), where CZCS processing algorithms were improved with modernized atmospheric correction and bio-optical algorithms and (2) blending where in situ data were incorporated into the CZCS AI to minimize residual errors. Global spatial and seasonal patterns of NCR chlorophyll indicated remarkable correspondence with modern sensors, suggesting compatibility. The NCR permits quantitative analyses of interannual and interdecadal trends in global ocean chlorophyll

  1. Low cost flatbed scanner label-free biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Ugur; Avci, Oguzhan; Seymour, Elif; Sevenler, Derin D.; Urey, Hakan; Ünlü, M. Selim; Ozkumur, Ayca Yalcin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate utilization of a commercial flatbed document scanner as a label-free biosensor for highthroughput imaging of DNA and protein microarrays. We implemented an interferometric sensing technique through use of a silicon/oxide layered substrate, and easy to implement hardware modifications such as re-aligning moving parts and inserting a custom made sample plate. With a cost as low as 100USD, powered by a USB cable, and scan speed of 30 seconds for a 4mm x 4 mm area with ~10μm lateral resolution, the presented system offers a super low cost, easy to use alternative to commercially available label-free systems.

  2. Development of radioactive source scanner based on PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive radial uniformity of 68Ge line radioactive sources is a critical quality parameter. The radioactive source scanner with linear scanning function is developed by making use of high-speed pulse counters, high-speed pulse output ports, and the powerful instruction system of Siemens S7-200 series programmable logic controller (PLC). A computer used as a host computer of the instrument communicate with. the PLC by point to point interface (PPI) protocol, The instrument with functions of data collection, transmission, displaying, saving, motion control and instrument parameter settings, can be used to measure the radioactive radial uniformity and total activity of line radioactive source. The advantages of Using the PLC to develop nuclear instrumentation are development speed, strong anti-interference ability, and low-cost. This paper mainly describes the control system implementation and feature of the instrument. (authors)

  3. Detector characterization for an inline PET scanner in hadrontherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group at the 'Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon' (IPNL) is working on physics and detectors for medical imaging. We are presently developing a small animal Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) scanner prototype with an innovative slow control and data acquisition features, for a demonstration purpose and within the crystal clear international collaboration. We also investigate a feasibility study of an online PET dedicated for inline and in situ dose deposition control in hadrontherapy. Here, we present the characterization setup and method we used to calibrate the detector heads of our PET prototype. Each of these heads consists of a single block continuous scintillating LySO crystal coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier equipped with its proper acquisition readout chain

  4. Two-dimensional optical scanner with monolithically integrated glass microlens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sunghyun; Jin, Joo-Young; Ha, Joon-Geun; Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2014-05-01

    A miniaturized two-dimensional forward optical scanner with a monolithically integrated glass microlens was developed for microendoscopic imaging applications. The fabricated device measures 2.26 × 1.97 × 0.62 mm3 in size and a through-silicon microlens with a diameter of 400 µm and numerical aperture of 0.37 has been successfully integrated within the silicon layer. An XY stage structure with lens shuttle and comb actuators was designed, and proprietary glass isolation blocks were utilized in mechanical and electric isolation of X- and Y-axis actuators. Resonant frequencies of the stage in X and Y directions were 3.238 and 2.198 kHz and quality factors were 168 and 69.1, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. Optical scanning test has been performed and scan angles of ±4.7° and ±4.9° were achieved for X and Y directions, respectively.

  5. Electromagnetic biaxial vector scanner using radial magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Aleum; Cho, Ah Ran; Ju, Suna; Ahn, Si-Hong; Bu, Jong-Uk; Ji, Chang-Hyeon

    2016-07-11

    We present an electromagnetic biaxial vector-graphic scanning micromirror. In contrast to conventional electromagnetic actuators using linear magnetic field, proposed device utilizes a radial magnetic field and uniquely designed current paths to enable the 2 degree-of-freedom scanning motion. As the radial field is generated by concentrically assembled magnets placed under the scanner die, large driving torque can be generated without the aid of hermetic packaging and relatively small device volume can be achieved. Mechanical half scan angle of 6.43° and 4.20° have been achieved at DC current of 250mA and 350mA for horizontal and vertical scans, respectively. Forced actuation along both scan axes has been realized by feedback control. PMID:27410851

  6. Attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Rutao; Liow, JeihSan; Seidel, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated two methods of attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner: 1) a CT-based method that derives 511 keV attenuation coefficients (mu) by extrapolation from spatially registered CT images; and 2) an analytic method based on the body outline of emission images and an empirical mu. A specially fabricated attenuation calibration phantom with cylindrical inserts that mimic different body tissues was used to derive the relationship to convert CT values to (I for PET. The methods were applied to three test data sets: 1) a uniform cylinder phantom, 2) the attenuation calibration phantom, and 3) a mouse injected with left bracket **1**8F right bracket FDG. The CT-based attenuation correction factors were larger in non-uniform regions of the imaging subject, e.g. mouse head, than the analytic method. The two methods had similar correction factors for regions with uniform density and detectable emission source distributions.

  7. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  8. Modeling of estuarne chlorophyll a from an airborne scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, Siamak; Catts, Glenn P.; Cloern, James E.; Knight, Allen W.

    1987-01-01

    Near simultaneous collection of 34 surface water samples and airborne multispectral scanner data provided input for regression models developed to predict surface concentrations of estuarine chlorophyll a. Two wavelength ratios were employed in model development. The ratios werechosen to capitalize on the spectral characteristics of chlorophyll a, while minimizing atmospheric influences. Models were then applied to data previously acquired over the study area thre years earlier. Results are in the form of color-coded displays of predicted chlorophyll a concentrations and comparisons of the agreement among measured surface samples and predictions basedon coincident remotely sensed data. The influence of large variations in fresh-water inflow to the estuary are clearly apparent in the results. The synoptic view provided by remote sensing is another method of examining important estuarine dynamics difficult to observe from in situ sampling alone.

  9. Absolute dosimetric characterization of Gafchromic EBT3 and HDv2 films using commercial flat-bed scanners and evaluation of the scanner response function variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Bazalova-Carter, M.; Bolanos, S.; Glenzer, S.; Riquier, R.; Revet, G.; Antici, P.; Morabito, A.; Propp, A.; Starodubtsev, M.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-07-01

    Radiochromic films (RCF) are commonly used in dosimetry for a wide range of radiation sources (electrons, protons, and photons) for medical, industrial, and scientific applications. They are multi-layered, which includes plastic substrate layers and sensitive layers that incorporate a radiation-sensitive dye. Quantitative dose can be retrieved by digitizing the film, provided that a prior calibration exists. Here, to calibrate the newly developed EBT3 and HDv2 RCFs from Gafchromic™, we used the Stanford Medical LINAC to deposit in the films various doses of 10 MeV photons, and by scanning the films using three independent EPSON Precision 2450 scanners, three independent EPSON V750 scanners, and two independent EPSON 11000XL scanners. The films were scanned in separate RGB channels, as well as in black and white, and film orientation was varied. We found that the green channel of the RGB scan and the grayscale channel are in fact quite consistent over the different models of the scanner, although this comes at the cost of a reduction in sensitivity (by a factor ˜2.5 compared to the red channel). To allow any user to extend the absolute calibration reported here to any other scanner, we furthermore provide a calibration curve of the EPSON 2450 scanner based on absolutely calibrated, commercially available, optical density filters.

  10. Development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at NIU

    CERN Document Server

    Uzunyan, S A; Boi, S; Coutrakon, G; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Gearhart, A; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Zutshi, V; Ford, R; Fitzpatrick, T; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Lalwani, K; Naimuddin, M

    2013-01-01

    We describe the development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at Northern Illinois University (NIU) in collaboration with Fermilab and Delhi University. This paper provides an overview of major components of the scanner and a detailed description of the data acquisition system (DAQ).

  11. Scanner Uniformity improvements for radiochromic film analysis with matt reflectance backing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A simple and reproducible method for increasing desktop scanner uniformity for the analysis of radiochromic films is presented. Scanner uniformity, especially in the non-scan direction, for transmission scanning is well known to be problematic for radiochromic film analysis and normally corrections need to be applied. These corrections are dependant on scanner coordinates and dose level applied which complicates dosimetry procedures. This study has highlighted that using reflectance scanning in combination with a matt, white backing material instead of the conventional gloss scanner finish, substantial increases in the scanner uniformity can be achieved within 90% of the scanning area. Uniformity within ±I% over the scanning area for our epsonV700 scanner tested was found. This is compared to within ±3% for reflection scanning with the gloss backing material and within ±4% for transmission scanning. The matt backing material used was simply 5 layers of standard quality white printing paper (80 g/m It was found that 5 layers was the optimal result for backing material however most of the improvements were seen with a minimum of 3 layers. Above 5 layers, no extra benefit was seen. This may eliminate the need to perform scanner corrections for position on the desktop scanners for radiochromic film dosimetry. (author)

  12. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  13. Calibration between a Laser Range Scanner and an Industrial Robot Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for findingthe transformation between a laser scanner and a robotmanipulator. We present the design of a flat calibration targetthat can easily fit between a laser scanner and a conveyor belt,making the method easily implementable in a manufacturingline.We prove ...

  14. A high-speed MEMS grating laser scanner with a backside thinned grating platform fabricated using a single mask delay etching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology-based grating laser scanner with a backside thinned grating platform has been successfully developed for high-speed laser scanning applications. The grating platform is thinned by a round cavity and reinforced by a circular frame, which are fabricated using a single mask delay etching (SMDE) technique. The SMDE technique, which utilizes the well-know loading effects of the deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process, is a simple and low-cost methodology to regulate the etching rate of a prescribed area. It can be used in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) micromachining process to form multilevel structures in a silicon device layer through a multi-step DRIE process from a wafer's backside. This paper presents the design, simulation, fabrication process and characterization of the high-speed MEMS grating scanner as well as the principle and applications of the SMDE technique. When illuminated with a 635 nm wavelength incident laser beam, the prototype scanner with a 1 mm diameter diffraction grating is capable of scanning at 50.192 kHz with an optical scan angle of 14.1°

  15. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  16. A z gain nonuniformity correction for multislice volumetric CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, G; Hu, H; Xie, M; He, D; Seidenschnur, G; Bromberg, N

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a calibration and correction method for detector cell gain variations. A key functionality of current CT scanners is to offer variable slice thickness to the user. To provide this capability in multislice volumetric scanners, while minimizing costs, it is necessary to combine the signals of several detector cells in z, when the desired slice thickness is larger than the minimum provided by a single cell. These combined signals are then pre-amplified, digitized, and transmitted to the system for further processing. The process of combining the output of several detector cells with nonuniform gains can introduce numerical errors when the impinging x-ray signal presents a variation along z over the range of combined cells. These numerical errors, which by nature are scan dependent, can lead to artifacts in the reconstructed images, particularly when the numerical errors vary from channel-to-channel (as the filtered-backprojection filter includes a high-pass filtering along the channel direction, within a given slice). A projection data correction algorithm has been developed to subtract the associated numerical errors. It relies on the ability of calibrating the individual cell gains. For effectiveness and data flow reasons, the algorithm works on a single slice basis, without slice-to-slice exchange of information. An initial error vector is calculated by applying a high-pass filter to the projection data. The essence of the algorithm is to correlate that initial error vector, with a calibration vector obtained by applying the same high-pass filter to various z combinations of the cell gains (each combination representing a basis function for a z expansion). The solution of the least-square problem, obtained via singular value decomposition, gives the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the signal z slope and curvature. From this information, and given the cell gains, the final error vector is calculated and subtracted from the projection

  17. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  18. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle

  19. A COST EFFECTIVE MULTI-SPECTRAL SCANNER FOR NATURAL GAS DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first six months of the project, the design for a laboratory version of the multispectral scanner was completed. The optical, mechanical, and electronic design for the scanner was completed. The optical design was analyzed using Zeemax Optical Design software and found to provide sufficiently resolved performance for the scanner. The electronic design was evaluated using a bread board and very high signal to noise ratios were obtained. Fabrication of a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner is currently in progress. A technology status report and a research management plan was also completed during the same period.

  20. Beam Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2014-01-01

    When a beam propagates in an accelerator, it interacts with both the external fields and the self-generated electromagnetic fields. If the latter are strong enough, the interplay between them and a perturbation in the beam distribution function can lead to an enhancement of the initial perturbation, resulting in what we call a beam instability. This unstable motion can be controlled with a feedback system, if available, or it grows, causing beam degradation and loss. Beam instabilities in particle accelerators have been studied and analysed in detail since the late 1950s. The subject owes its relevance to the fact that the onset of instabilities usually determines the performance of an accelerator. Understanding and suppressing the underlying sources and mechanisms is therefore the key to overcoming intensity limitations, thereby pushing forward the performance reach of a machine.

  1. Evaluation of wedge-shaped phantoms for assessment of scanner display as a part of quality control of scanner performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image manipulation in modern rectilinear scanners comprises background subtraction and contrast enhancement facilities. It has been the aim of this investigation to develop simple quality assurance methods suitable for checking the function of these features on a routine basis. Several types of phantoms have been investigated: an absorption step wedge, an emission step wedge and an emission continuous wedge. The absorption step wedge when used with a usual gamma-camera checking source gave the least satisfactory results. The emission step wedge is best suited for test procedures for background subtraction of the colour printer display and for contrast enhancement of the photo display, whereas the emission continuous wedge gave best results in testing the contrast enhancement of the colour printer display. An evaluation of the relative merits of the phantoms indicates that the emission step wedge is best suited for quality assurance tests. (author)

  2. Novel multi-beam radiometers for accurate ocean surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.;

    2014-01-01

    Novel antenna architectures for real aperture multi-beam radiometers providing high resolution and high sensitivity for accurate sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean vector wind (OVW) measurements are investigated. On the basis of the radiometer requirements set for future SST/OVW missions, co......, conical scanners and push-broom antennas are compared. The comparison will cover reflector optics and focal plane array configuration....

  3. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  4. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  5. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems

  6. Beam optimization of helium injector for coupled RFQ–SFRFQ linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupled RFQ–SFRFQ (CRS) cavity designed in Peking University is a new type linac that coupled radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) structure into a single cavity. An upgraded helium injector for the CRS cavity consisting of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source and a 1.16 m low energy beam transport (LEBT) has been constructed and tested. The beam conditions of the injector were carefully optimized to satisfy the requirements of the CRS linac, the corresponding control system and a two-dimension scanner code CRSv1.0 were developed for optimizing the beam transmission from LEBT section to the entrance of the CRS cavity. The beam transmission efficiency has reached to approximately 87.5% as well as the optimized operating parameters were obtained by means of the scanner code

  7. Optimisation of the source firing pattern for real time cone-beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RTT system is a fast cone-beam CT scanner which uses a fixed ring of multiple sources and fixed rings of detectors in an offset geometry. We present a new theoretical model for this geometry which leads to optimisation of the source firing pattern. Numerical results are presented. (orig.)

  8. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  9. Application of industrial high energy x-ray CT scanner to zirconia refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computerized tomography was publicized in 1973, and has been used widely for medical treatment. Industrial CT scanners are the latest nondestructive inspection equipment, which were developed by being stimulated owing to the rapid spread, speed increase and performance heightening in medical field, and they can analyze internal structure three-dimensionally. In Japan, the development of industrial x-ray CT scanners was started in 1980, and the No.1 equipment of medium energy type was completed in 1983, which was to be used for rubber, plastics, ceramics and so on, through which x-ray easily transmits. In 1984, the high energy x-ray CT scanners for iron and steel materials were developed. This time, the authors applied a high energy CT scanner to the refractories containing zirconia, and its applicability was examined. The specimens put to the measurement this time were a zirconia-graphite two-layer structure of an immersed nozzle used for the continuous casting of steel and a tundish nozzle made of zirconia. The high energy CT scanner used was an experimental scanner using 420 kV continuous x-ray and the data acquisition system of first generation. It was found that the high energy scanner was applicable. (Kako, I.)

  10. Comparison of working efficiency of terrestrial laser scanner in day and night conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, A. E.; Kalkan, K.

    2013-10-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning is a popular and widely used technique to scan existing objects, document historical sites and items, and remodel them if and when needed. Their ability to collect thousands of point data per second makes them an invaluable tool in many areas from engineering to historical reconstruction. There are many scanners in the market with different technical specifications. One main technical specification of laser scanners is range and illumination. In this study, it is tested to be determined the optimal working times of a laser scanner and the scanners consistency with its specifications sheet. In order to conduct this work, series of GNSS measurements in Istanbul Technical University have been carried out, connected to the national reference network, to determine precise positions of target points and the scanner, which makes possible to define a precise distance between the scanner and targets. Those ground surveys has been used for calibration and registration purposes. Two different scan campaigns conducted at 12 am and 11 pm to compare working efficiency of laser scanner in different illumination conditions and targets are measured with a handheld spectro-radiometer in order to determine their reflective characteristics. The obtained results are compared and their accuracies have been analysed.

  11. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context. (author)

  12. Initial results of the quality control in 11 computed tomography scanners at Curitiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 11 scanners installed in public and private centers of Curitiba, Brazil. This sample represents 30% of the CT scanners in the city so far. The ACR CT accreditation phantom was used to verify the accomplishment of the scanners performance to the international quality requirements. The results indicate that efforts should be concentrated in the maintenance of the equipments and specific training of the technicians. Most of the scanners have showed some non-conformity. In 27,5% of the sample the positioning requirement wasn't accomplished. The CT number accuracy evaluation showed that in 72,3 % of the scanners the CT numbers were out of the tolerance range, reaching values 35% greater than the limit. The low contrast resolution criteria weren't accomplished in 9% of the scanners. The main concern is that there isn't a specific program to evaluate the image quality of the CT scanners neither to estimate the CT doses in the procedures. (author)

  13. Generation of arbitrary order Bessel beams via 3D printed axicons at the terahertz frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xuli; Liu, Changming; Niu, Liting; Zhang, Zhongqi; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang; Liu, Jinsong

    2015-12-20

    We present the generation of arbitrary order Bessel beams at 0.3 THz through the implementation of suitably designed axicons based on 3D printing technology. The helical axicons, which possess thickness gradients in both radial and azimuthal directions, can convert the incident Gaussian beam into a high-order Bessel beam with spiral phase structure. The evolution of the generated Bessel beams are characterized experimentally with a three-dimensional field scanner. Moreover, the topological charges carried by the high-order Bessel beams are determined by the fork-like interferograms. This 3D-printing-based Bessel beam generation technique is useful not only for THz imaging systems with zero-order Bessel beams but also for future orbital-angular-momentum-based THz free-space communication with higher-order Bessel beams. PMID:26837031

  14. TH-C-19A-08: PDD Discrepancies at Opposite Biases From Very Small Volume Ion Chambers When Using Water Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As more so-called micro ion chambers become commercially available, medical physicists may be inclined to use them during the linear accelerator commissioning process, in an attempt to better characterize the beam in steep dose gradient areas. The purpose of this work is to inform the medical physics community of a non-trivial, anomalous behavior observed when very small chambers are used in certain beam scanning configurations. Methods: A total of six ion chambers (0.007cc to 0.6cc) were used to scan PDDs from a 10×10cm2 field at both +300V and −300V biases. PDDs were scanned using three different water tank scanning systems to determine whether different scanners exhibit the same abnormality. Finally, PDDs were sampled using an external electrometer to bypass the internal electrometer of the scanner to determine the potential contributions of the scanner electronics to the abnormality observed. Results: We observed a reproducible, significant difference (over-response with depth) in PDDs acquired when using very small ion chambers with certain bias and watertank combinations, on the order of 3–5% at a depth of 25 cm in water. This difference was not observed when the PDDs were sampled using the ion chambers in conjunction with an external electrometer. This suggests a contribution of interference produced by the controller box and scanning system, which becomes significant for the very small signals collected by very small ion chambers, especially at depth, as the signal level is reduced even further. Conclusion: Based on the results observed here, if currently available very small ion chambers are used with specific bias and scanning water-tank combinations, erroneous PDD data may be collected. If this data is used as input to the Treatment Planning System, systematic errors on the order of 3%–5% may be introduced into the treatment planning process

  15. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Unidad PET/CT-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)], E-mail: avilarod@uwalumni.com; Wilson, J.S.; McQuarrie, S.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8 MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired.

  16. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Wilson, J S; McQuarrie, S A

    2009-11-01

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired. PMID:19054679

  17. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  18. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-01-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum and...... scanner using TXTV to the GE Advance scanner images and found high quantitative correspondence. TXTV has been used to reconstruct more than 4000 HRRT scans at seven different sites with no reports of biases. Conclusion: TXTV-based reconstruction is recommended for human brain scans on the HRRT....

  19. Land use classification utilizing remote multispectral scanner data and computer analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, P. N.; Johannsen, C. J.; Yanner, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    An airborne multispectral scanner was used to collect the visible and reflective infrared data. A small subdivision near Lafayette, Indiana was selected as the test site for the urban land use study. Multispectral scanner data were collected over the subdivision on May 1, 1970 from an altitude of 915 meters. The data were collected in twelve wavelength bands from 0.40 to 1.00 micrometers by the scanner. The results indicated that computer analysis of multispectral data can be very accurate in classifying and estimating the natural and man-made materials that characterize land uses in an urban scene.

  20. Performance evaluation of a micro-CT x-ray scanner using Kanpur theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Bajpai, Prabhat Munshi, Phalguni Gupta, Valeriy Titarenko, Philip J Withers

    2011-01-01

    The present work focuses on the performance evaluation of the new Micro-CT scanner installed at University of Manchester. A graphite core object has been scanned through MicroCT scanner. The system has 2k x 2k size detector array. An experiment has been carried out with this scanner to scan the object cross section for 3796 data rays and 3600 views. The projection data obtained has been used for the reconstruction using CBP algorithm for the central plane of the object. Hamming class of filte...

  1. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    OpenAIRE

    Meer, van der, D; Andriessen, F.S.; Wismeijer, D.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona), the iTero (Cadent) and the Lava COS (3M). In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation b...

  2. Application of Intra-Oral Dental Scanners in the Digital Workflow of Implantology

    OpenAIRE

    Wicher J van der Meer; Frank S Andriessen; Daniel Wismeijer; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona), the iTero (Cadent) and the Lava COS (3M). In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation b...

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of pneumoconiosis abnormalities extracted from chest radiographs scanned with a CCD scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis for pneumoconiosis radiographs obtained with a common charge-coupled devices (CCD) scanner. Since the current computer-aided diagnosis systems of pneumoconiosis are not practical for medical doctors due to high costs of usage for a special scanner, we propose a novel system which measures abnormalities of pneumoconiosis from lung images obtained with a common CCD scanner. Experimental results of discriminations between normal and abnormal cases for 56 right-lung images including 6 standard pneumoconiosis images have shown that the proposed abnormalities are well extracted according to the standards of pneumoconiosis categories. (author)

  4. Scanner color management model based on improved back-propagation neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwu Li

    2008-01-01

    Scanner color management is one of the key techniques for color reproduction in information optics.A new scanner color management model is presented based on analyzing rendering principle of scanning objects.In this model,a standard color target is taken as experimental sample.Color blocks in color shade area are used to substitute complete color space to solve the difficulties in selecting experimental color blocks.Immune genetic algorithm is used to correct back-propagation neural network(BPNN)to speed up the convergence of the model.Experimental results show that the model can improve the accuracy of scanner color management.

  5. High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

    1995-01-01

    High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

  6. Fast Automatic Precision Tree Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Disney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for constructing quickly and automatically precision tree models from point clouds of the trunk and branches obtained by terrestrial laser scanning. The input of the method is a point cloud of a single tree scanned from multiple positions. The surface of the visible parts of the tree is robustly reconstructed by making a flexible cylinder model of the tree. The thorough quantitative model records also the topological branching structure. In this paper, every major step of the whole model reconstruction process, from the input to the finished model, is presented in detail. The model is constructed by a local approach in which the point cloud is covered with small sets corresponding to connected surface patches in the tree surface. The neighbor-relations and geometrical properties of these cover sets are used to reconstruct the details of the tree and, step by step, the whole tree. The point cloud and the sets are segmented into branches, after which the branches are modeled as collections of cylinders. From the model, the branching structure and size properties, such as volume and branch size distributions, for the whole tree or some of its parts, can be approximated. The approach is validated using both measured and modeled terrestrial laser scanner data from real trees and detailed 3D models. The results show that the method allows an easy extraction of various tree attributes from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning point clouds.

  7. Design of a portable CAT scanner for utility pole inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work is under way at the University of Missouri, Columbia (UMC) to design, build, and test a portable computerized axial tomography (CAT) device for the nondestructive, field imaging of wooden utility poles. CAT is a well-established medical technology that has recently been applied to a number of industrial applications. Wooden utility poles are prone to rot and decay at ground level; current techniques to assess this loss of strength are relatively primitive, i.e., tapping the pole (hitting the pole with a hammer) or boring into the pole for samples and then testing inside the bore hole with an electrical pulse device. The accuracy in identifying poles needing replacement using these techniques is ∼ 70%. Since the cost of replacing a pole ranges from hundreds to thousands of dollars, an accurate, nondestructive method is needed. CAT can accurately image a wooden utility pole (since the size, density, and atomic elements of a pole are similar to the human head to torso), as was confirmed by imaging poles using the UMC nuclear engineering EMI-1010 medical scanner. Detailed images have been produced showing the ring structure of the wood and voids due to rot or decay. Images approaching this quality have also been produced on living trees using semiportable systems by other researchers

  8. Development of a mechanized ultrasonic scanner for turbine disc inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotor shafts for high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines in US power plants are made with material that meets the requirements of ASTM 470 and 471. Because of their physical size, the rotor shafts for modern low-pressure turbines are often forged with a series of diameters along the length, and separately forged discs are thermally shrunk-on the shaft. They are shrunk-on in sequence; keyways are drilled common to the shaft step and inner bore of the disc and a metal pin is inserted in the keyway. These keyways are used to ensure that the disc will not rotate on the rotor shaft in the event of an overspeed incident. Service-induced cracks in keyways and the bore have been found in many low-pressure turbines with shrunk-on discs. Repair of these discs is extremely costly in terms of loss of plant availability. At present, there are ultrasound procedures for detecting these cracks, but not for dimensioning them (depth and breadth). The purpose of this project is to design and fabricate a production prototype mechanized scanner and controller that can be integrated with computer-controlled ultrasonic inspection systems for turbine discs based both on technology already existing in EPRI-funded projects and on technology from other sources

  9. a Light-Weight Laser Scanner for Uav Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Torres, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP) as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  10. Two-dimensional optical scanner with monolithically integrated glass microlens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A miniaturized two-dimensional forward optical scanner with a monolithically integrated glass microlens was developed for microendoscopic imaging applications. The fabricated device measures 2.26 × 1.97 × 0.62 mm3 in size and a through-silicon microlens with a diameter of 400 µm and numerical aperture of 0.37 has been successfully integrated within the silicon layer. An XY stage structure with lens shuttle and comb actuators was designed, and proprietary glass isolation blocks were utilized in mechanical and electric isolation of X- and Y-axis actuators. Resonant frequencies of the stage in X and Y directions were 3.238 and 2.198 kHz and quality factors were 168 and 69.1, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. Optical scanning test has been performed and scan angles of ±4.7° and ±4.9° were achieved for X and Y directions, respectively. (paper)

  11. Clinical applications of the imatron fast CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing three imaging modes, Cine CT has proven satisfactory in the assessment of left ventricular mass and function including ejection fractions and abnormalities of wall motion. It is helpful in documenting pericardial constrictions, as well as in assessing intracavitary tumors and thrombi. In the lungs, it is used to document AV fistulae and to evaluate the vascularity of mediastinal masses and to exclude invasion or major thoracic vessels. It can be used, as in the conventional scanner, for needle directed lung and chest well biopsies. It is frequently used in a airway studies to differentiate fixed from physiologic constrictions and to assess tracheomalacia and bronchopulmonary dysplasias. It can be used to plan radiation ports in the treatment of breast carcinoma. In the abdomen, successful applications include its use in the assessment of renal blood flow and the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as in screening of possible aortic aneurysms. In orthopedics, Cine CT is used to evaluate patellofermoral tracking in subluxations of the patella and used to evaluate subluxations and dislocations of the radio-ulnar joint. Cine CT by virtue of its speed and satisfactory spatial resolution is a significant imaging modality for evaluating the beating heart. Other applications include the evaluation of aortic aneurysms and dissections, para-aortic mass lesions, airway obstructions and patellar tracking and forearm subluxations

  12. Inland wetland change detection using aircraft MSS [multispectral scanner] data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nontidal wetlands in a portion of the Savannah River swamp forest affected by reactor cooling water discharges were mapped using March 31, 1981 and April 29, 1985 high-resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Due to the inherent distortion in the aircraft MSS data and the complex spectral characteristics of the wetland vegetation, it was necessary to implement multiple techniques in the registration and classification of the MSS imagery of the Pen Branch Delta on each date. In particular, it was necessary to use a piecewise-linear registration process over relatively small regions to perform image-to-image registration. When performing unsupervised classification, an iterative ''cluster busting'' technique was used, which simplified the cluster labeling process. These procedures allowed important wetland vegetation categories to be identified on each date. The multiple-date classification maps were then evaluated using a post-classification comparison technique yielding change classes that were of value in determining the extent of inland wetland change in this region

  13. Measurements of computed tomography dose index for axial and spiral CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy deposited in the patient by the rotating x-ray beam in computed tomography produces more uniform absorbed dose values within the section of imaged tissue than those produced in conventional radiological procedures. The dose values within a specific section are determined by factors such as voltage, current, scan field, rotation angle, filtration, collimation, and section thickness and spacing. This study is a part of extensive project, aiming to investigate practice of computed tomography at various hospitals and to implement a Reference Dose Levels (RDLs) to routine CT examinations in Egypt. The dosimetric quantities proposed in the European Guidelines (EG) for CT are weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) for a single slice and dose-length product (DLP) for a complete examination. Patient-related data as well as technical parameters for head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations were collected for seven CT scanners in public and private hospitals.Dose measurements were performed for both axial and spiral models for a range of CT examinations using CT dosimetry head and body phantoms, and ion chamber designed for CT dosimetry. The determined CTDIw and DLP values were compared with the European Commission reference dose levels (ECRDLs) and also with some international survey results. Mean values of CTDIw had a range of 36-69 m Gy with average 55 m Gy for head, and 11-35 mGy with average 23 mGy for chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations. The current reference CTDIw values are 60 m Gy for adult head and 25 m Gy for adult Abdomen

  14. Development of a versatile XRF scanner for the elemental imaging of paintworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravaud, E.; Pichon, L.; Laval, E.; Eveno, M. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); Gonzalez, V.; Calligaro, T. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche Chimie Paris, UMR8247, Paris (France)

    2016-01-15

    Scanning XRF is a powerful elemental imaging technique introduced at the synchrotron that has recently been transposed to laboratory. The growing interest in this technique stems from its ability to collect images reflecting pigment distribution within large areas on artworks by means of their elemental signature. In that sense, scanning XRF appears highly complementary to standard imaging techniques (Visible, UV, IR photography and X-ray radiography). The versatile XRF scanner presented here has been designed and built at the C2RMF in response to specific constraints: transportability, cost-effectiveness and ability to scan large areas within a single working day. The instrument is based on a standard X-ray generator with sub-millimetre collimated beam and a SDD-based spectrometer to collected X-ray spectra. The instrument head is scanned in front of the painting by means of motorised movements to cover an area up to 300 x 300 mm{sup 2} with a resolution of 0.5 mm (600 x 600 pixels). The 15-kg head is mounted on a stable photo stand for rapid positioning on paintworks and maintains a free side-access for safety; it can also be attached to a lighter tripod for field measurements. Alignment is achieved with a laser pointer and a micro-camera. With a scanning speed of 5 mm/s and 0.1 s/point, elemental maps are collected in 10 h, i.e. a working day. The X-ray spectra of all pixels are rapidly processed using an open source program to derive elemental maps. To illustrate the capabilities of this instrument, this contribution presents the results obtained on the Belle Ferronniere painted by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Musee du Louvre, prior to its restoration at the C2RMF. (orig.)

  15. Development of a versatile XRF scanner for the elemental imaging of paintworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning XRF is a powerful elemental imaging technique introduced at the synchrotron that has recently been transposed to laboratory. The growing interest in this technique stems from its ability to collect images reflecting pigment distribution within large areas on artworks by means of their elemental signature. In that sense, scanning XRF appears highly complementary to standard imaging techniques (Visible, UV, IR photography and X-ray radiography). The versatile XRF scanner presented here has been designed and built at the C2RMF in response to specific constraints: transportability, cost-effectiveness and ability to scan large areas within a single working day. The instrument is based on a standard X-ray generator with sub-millimetre collimated beam and a SDD-based spectrometer to collected X-ray spectra. The instrument head is scanned in front of the painting by means of motorised movements to cover an area up to 300 x 300 mm2 with a resolution of 0.5 mm (600 x 600 pixels). The 15-kg head is mounted on a stable photo stand for rapid positioning on paintworks and maintains a free side-access for safety; it can also be attached to a lighter tripod for field measurements. Alignment is achieved with a laser pointer and a micro-camera. With a scanning speed of 5 mm/s and 0.1 s/point, elemental maps are collected in 10 h, i.e. a working day. The X-ray spectra of all pixels are rapidly processed using an open source program to derive elemental maps. To illustrate the capabilities of this instrument, this contribution presents the results obtained on the Belle Ferronniere painted by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Musee du Louvre, prior to its restoration at the C2RMF. (orig.)

  16. Development of a versatile XRF scanner for the elemental imaging of paintworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaud, E.; Pichon, L.; Laval, E.; Gonzalez, V.; Eveno, M.; Calligaro, T.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning XRF is a powerful elemental imaging technique introduced at the synchrotron that has recently been transposed to laboratory. The growing interest in this technique stems from its ability to collect images reflecting pigment distribution within large areas on artworks by means of their elemental signature. In that sense, scanning XRF appears highly complementary to standard imaging techniques (Visible, UV, IR photography and X-ray radiography). The versatile XRF scanner presented here has been designed and built at the C2RMF in response to specific constraints: transportability, cost-effectiveness and ability to scan large areas within a single working day. The instrument is based on a standard X-ray generator with sub-millimetre collimated beam and a SDD-based spectrometer to collected X-ray spectra. The instrument head is scanned in front of the painting by means of motorised movements to cover an area up to 300 × 300 mm2 with a resolution of 0.5 mm (600 × 600 pixels). The 15-kg head is mounted on a stable photo stand for rapid positioning on paintworks and maintains a free side-access for safety; it can also be attached to a lighter tripod for field measurements. Alignment is achieved with a laser pointer and a micro-camera. With a scanning speed of 5 mm/s and 0.1 s/point, elemental maps are collected in 10 h, i.e. a working day. The X-ray spectra of all pixels are rapidly processed using an open source program to derive elemental maps. To illustrate the capabilities of this instrument, this contribution presents the results obtained on the Belle Ferronnière painted by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Musée du Louvre, prior to its restoration at the C2RMF.

  17. Measurement-based model of a wide-bore CT scanner for Monte Carlo dosimetric calculations with GMCTdospp software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzyński, Witold

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to create a model of a wide-bore Siemens Somatom Sensation Open CT scanner for use with GMCTdospp, which is an EGSnrc-based software tool dedicated for Monte Carlo calculations of dose in CT examinations. The method was based on matching spectrum and filtration to half value layer and dose profile, and thus was similar to the method of Turner et al. (Med. Phys. 36, pp. 2154-2164). Input data on unfiltered beam spectra were taken from two sources: the TASMIP model and IPEM Report 78. Two sources of HVL data were also used, namely measurements and documentation. Dose profile along the fan-beam was measured with Gafchromic RTQA-1010 (QA+) film. Two-component model of filtration was assumed: bow-tie filter made of aluminum with 0.5 mm thickness on central axis, and flat filter made of one of four materials: aluminum, graphite, lead, or titanium. Good agreement between calculations and measurements was obtained for models based on the measured values of HVL. Doses calculated with GMCTdospp differed from the doses measured with pencil ion chamber placed in PMMA phantom by less than 5%, and root mean square difference for four tube potentials and three positions in the phantom did not exceed 2.5%. The differences for models based on HVL values from documentation exceeded 10%. Models based on TASMIP spectra and IPEM78 spectra performed equally well. PMID:25028213

  18. Beam emittance and beam disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam disruption during the collision of intense relativistic bunches has been studied by R. Hollebeek. In the case of oppositely charged bunches, focussing effects occur causing a decrease in the effective bunch cross section, and thereby an increase of luminosity by an enhancement factor H. The term disruption derives from the fact that the beam emittance changes markedly during the collision. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization

  20. Characterization of a high-resolution hybrid DOI detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, Felipe; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Yang, Yongfeng; Farrell, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to design and test a new high-resolution hybrid depth of interaction (DOI) detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. Two detectors have been designed and built. The completed detectors are based on a 14 × 14 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 20 mm(3) unpolished lutetium orthosilicate scintillation crystals, with each element coated in a 50 μm layer of reflective material. The detector is read out from both ends using a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) and a large active area (20 × 20 mm(2)) avalanche photodiode (APD) to enable acquisition of DOI information. Nuclear instrumentation modules were used to characterize the detectors' performances in terms of timing, intrinsic spatial resolution (ISR) and energy resolution, as well as DOI resolution with a dual-ended readout configuration. Measurements with the APD were performed at a temperature of 10 °C. All crystals were identified at all depths, even though the signal amplitude from the PSPMT decreases with depth away from it. We measured a timing resolution of 2.4 ns, and an average energy resolution of 19%. The mean ISR was measured to be 1.2 mm for crystals in the central row of the array for detectors in the face-to-face position. Two off-center positions were measured corresponding to 26° and 51° oblique photon incidence, and the mean ISR at these positions was 1.5 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The average DOI resolution across all crystals and depths was measured to be 2.9 mm (including the beam width of 0.6 mm). This detector design shows good promise as a high-resolution detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. PMID:22581109

  1. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  2. Discrimination between marls and limestones using intensity data from terrestrial laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Marco; Teza, Giordano; Preto, Nereo; Pesci, Arianna; Galgaro, Antonio; Girardi, Stefano

    Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) is an active instrument widely used for physical surface acquisition and data modeling. TLS provides both the geometry and the intensity information of scanned objects depending on their physical and chemical properties. The intensity data can be used to discriminate different materials, since intensity is proportional, among other parameters, to the reflectance of the target at the specific wavelength of the laser beam. This article focuses on the TLS-based recognition of rocks in simple sedimentary successions mainly constituted by limestones and marls. In particular, a series of experiments with an Optech ILRIS 3D TLS was carried out to verify the feasibility of this application, as well as to solve problems in data acquisition protocol and data processing. Results indicate that a TLS intensity-based discrimination can provide reliable information about the clay content of rocks in clean outcrop conditions if the geometrical aspects of the acquisition (i.e. distance) are taken into account. Reflectance values of limestones, marls and clays show, both in controlled conditions and in the field, clear differences due to the interaction of the laser beam (having a 1535 nm wavelength) with H 2O-bearing minerals and materials. Information about lithology can be therefore obtained also from real outcrops, at least if simple alternation of limestones and marls are considered. Comparison between reflectance values derived from TLS acquisition of an outcrop and the clay abundance curves obtained by gas chromatography on rock samples taken from the same stratigraphic section shows that reflectance is linked by an inverse linear relationship (correlation coefficient r=-0.85) to the abundance of clay minerals in the rocks. Reflectance series obtained from TLS data are proposed as a tool to evaluate the variation of clay content along a stratigraphic section. The possibility of linking reflectance values to lithological parameters (i.e. clay

  3. Microprocessor based scanner for scanning of reactor shields (Paper No. 034)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microprocessor based scanner was developed to help the experimental physicists move either a gamma or neutron detector along the shielding surface which is in the inaccessible shielding corner at APSARA. (author). 4 figs

  4. SLAC Scanner Processor: a FASTBUS module for data collection and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, general purpose, programmable FASTBUS module, the SLAC Scanner Processor (SSP), is introduced. Both hardware and software elements of SSP operation are discussed. The role of the SSP within the upgraded Mark II Detector at SLAC is described

  5. Evaluation of the health risk of body backscatter x ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the attempted attack between Amsterdam and Detroit on the 25 december 2009, the council of interior safety decided a quick display of equipment using more efficient imaging techniques than metals detectors usually in place in French airports. Two technologies of devices are susceptible to be implemented on the airports: scanners using non ionizing radiation, (called millimetric waves) or scanners using ionizing radiation (x radiation, measurement by backscattering called backscatter). This report evaluates the dosimetric impact and the sanitary risk of backscatter x ray scanners and formulates recommendations to authorities to allow them to rule on the type of technology to use. Then, this report gives leads to conceive elements of information to communicate to travelers susceptible to be controlled by a such scanner in a foreign airport. (N.C.)

  6. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vescent Photonics propose to design and build revolutionary non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  7. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this phase II SBIR is to design and build new non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  8. Selecting a CT scanner for cardiac imaging: the heart of the matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Maria A; Pascoal, Ana; Keevil, Stephen F; Lewis, Cornelius A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary angiography to assess the presence and degree of arterial stenosis is an examination now routinely performed on CT scanners. Although developments in CT technology over recent years have made great strides in improving the diagnostic accuracy of this technique, patients with certain characteristics can still be "difficult to image". The various groups will benefit from different technological enhancements depending on the type of challenge they present. Good temporal and spatial resolution, wide longitudinal (z-axis) detector coverage and high X-ray output are the key requirements of a successful CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scan. The requirement for optimal patient dose is a given. The different scanner models recommended for CTCA all excel in different aspects. The specification data presented here for these scanners and the explanation of the impact of the different features should help in making a more informed decision when selecting a scanner for CTCA. PMID:27302494

  9. Measuring light-emitting diodes with a scanner for radiant flux and colour characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the performance requirements of displays and lighting applications, there is a great need to measure the radiant flux and colour of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) simultaneously in a high throughput format. We evaluate the feasibility of obtaining reliable colour and radiant flux values of LEDs with a low-cost office flatbed document scanner under factory settings versus conventional measurements. Colour purity was evaluated against a spectrometer and a digital camera, while radiant flux was evaluated against photodiodes. Scanner colour rendition of red, green and yellow LEDs was of variable quality. The scanner showed better correlation to conventional radiant flux measurements, with linear least-squares agreement between 0.934 and 0.985. A scanner represents a low cost and high throughput means of evaluating LEDs with simultaneous measures of both electroluminescent flux and emission colour with operational time. (paper)

  10. Mobile network architecture of the long-range WindScanner system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Hansen, Per;

    In this report we have presented the network architecture of the long-range WindScanner system that allows utilization of mobile network connections without the use of static public IP addresses. The architecture mitigates the issues of additional fees and contractual obligations that are linked...... to the acquisition of the mobile network connections with static public IP addresses. The architecture consists of a hardware VPN solution based on the network appliances Z1 and MX60 from Cisco Meraki with additional 3G or 4G dongles. With the presented network architecture and appropriate configuration, we fulfill...... the requirements of running the long-range WindScanner system using a mobile network such as 3G. This architecture allows us to have the WindScanners and the master computer in different geographical locations, and in general facilitates deployments of the long-range WindScanner system....

  11. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values

  12. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, JP (Japan); UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  13. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system toge...

  14. Rot detection of wood poles by means of a portable x-ray computed tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable X-ray computed tomographic (CT) scanner has been applied to rot detection of wood poles for electric power distribution. CT reconstructions clearly drew a rotted part and they well agreed with crosssections of wood poles which were actually cut off after the measurement. The result shows that the CT scanner offers a very useful means for rot detection of utility poles, building columns, statues, etc. (author)

  15. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  16. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs

  17. 3D SUPER-RESOLUTION APPROACH FOR SPARSE LASER SCANNER DATA

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hosseinyalamdary; Yilmaz, A

    2015-01-01

    Laser scanner point cloud has been emerging in Photogrammetry and computer vision to achieve high level tasks such as object tracking, object recognition and scene understanding. However, low cost laser scanners are noisy, sparse and prone to systematic errors. This paper proposes a novel 3D super resolution approach to reconstruct surface of the objects in the scene. This method works on sparse, unorganized point clouds and has superior performance over other surface recovery approa...

  18. AN AUTOMATIC PROCEDURE FOR COMBINING DIGITAL IMAGES AND LASER SCANNER DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, W.; Abdel-Wahab, M.; D. Fritsch

    2012-01-01

    Besides improving both the geometry and the visual quality of the model, the integration of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning techniques directs at filling gaps in laser scanner point clouds to avoid modeling errors, reconstructing more details in higher resolution and recovering simple structures with less geometric details. Thus, within this paper a flexible approach for the automatic combination of digital images and laser scanner data is presented. Our approach com...

  19. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. LANDSLIDE MONITORING USING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER: GEOREFERENCING AND CANOPY FILTERING ISSUES IN A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    M. Barbarella; M. Fiani

    2012-01-01

    In order to define a methodology that faces the major critical issues, we used a Terrestrial Laser Scanner to monitor a large landslide that caused significant disruptions both to an important state road and to a major railway line in Italy. To survey the landslide we used three different models of Terrestrial Laser Scanners, including a "full wave form" one, potentially useful for filtering vegetation from the data. The output of each measurement campaign is a Digital Surface Model ...

  1. Imaging scanners for the analysis of radiolabeled TLC and other biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since their introduction several years ago, Imaging Scanners have become important quantitative tools for the analysis of radioisotopes on TLC, gels, and paper chromatograms. In addition, there is growing interest in applications of this instrumentation in new areas of biotechnology. Imaging Scanners have recently been demonstrated to provide rapid quantitation of tritiated molecular probes for viral DNA and human IgG factor. 5 refs.; 4 figs

  2. Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.

  3. Usefulness of computed tomography scanner in renal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computed tomography scanner (CT) findings, plans for treatment, and the clinical progresses were evaluated and examined on the 92 patients (93 lesions), who suffered from the renal injury caused by blunt trauma here in the hospital from April, 1986 to June, 1997. The data was retrospectively analyzed according to the classification of the Japanese Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Of the 93 lesions, 35 (37.6%) had a subcapsular injury (type I), 16 (17.2%) had a superficial injury (type II), 29 (31.2%) had a deep injury (type III), and 13 (14.0%) had a pedicle injury (type IV). Associated injuries were present in 68 patients (73.9%) of all cases. This result confirmed the importance of the whole body inspections by the CT to observe the existence of associated injuries in other organs. As to the treatment plans, all cases which were diagnosed as type I and type II without any underlying renal disease at the initial CT scan exams, were treated conservatively, and no further follow up with CT scan exams would be necessary for them. In cases of the renal injury with an underlying cystic renal disease, a long term clinical management including follow up with CT scan exams was recommended because of the possibility of delayed and continuous intracystic hemorrhage. In cases of type III undertaken conservative management, the development of enlarged hematoma within 24 hours from the injury, which was found with CT scan exams, might help to determine the later treatment plans. When the contralateral pararenal type or central type of hematoma (H3) was identified, avulsion or disruption of renal pedicle vasculature (type IVb) should be considered even if the extravasation in renal hilum could not be confirmed by CT scan exams, and the emergency angiography should be performed immediately in order to ascertain the negation. (author)

  4. Sodium removal from sodium wetted under sodium ultra sonic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Sodium wetted USUSS was subjected to sodium cleaning by water vapour–CO2 process. ► Hydrogen released during the process was monitored and regulated in safe limit. ► The temperature of USUSS was maintained below 80 °C to prevent caustic corrosion. ► The experiment revealed intricacies involved in the cleaning operation. ► The operational parameters for safe cleaning were optimised. - Abstract: Sodium is used as a coolant in primary and secondary heat transport systems of Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). The Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is in advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India. Under Sodium Ultra Sonic Scanner (USUSS) is used to image the components dipped in sodium and more specifically the gap between Sub Assembly (SA) heads and the control plug. This is essential to confirm that no SA is protruding from its position. USUSS has to be qualified in sodium before its use in the reactor. After sodium testing, sodium adhering to the USUSS needs to be removed to prevent reaction with oxygen and moisture present in air when it is taken out. The sodium removal process is based on the use of moist carbon-di-oxide (CO2) at a temperature of about 353 K. The reaction rate is controlled by varying the ratio of CO2 to moisture. Hydrogen released during the reaction of sodium with moisture is continuously monitored to ensure safe limits of hydrogen concentration. This paper describes the details of the experimental setup used in a cleaning pit for the removal of sodium adhering on USUSS and the technical details of the cleaning process.

  5. Forest attributes estimation using aerial laser scanner and TM data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shataee, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat- TM data. Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany. Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples. Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1 and 0.48, respectively) compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1) but unbiased (0.03) compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1 but slightly biased (-1.04). Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data. (Author)

  6. Forest Attributes Estimation Using Aerial Laser Scanner and TM Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shataee Joibary

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat-TM data.Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany.Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples.Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m3 ha–1 and 0.48, respectively compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m3 ha–1 but unbiased (0.03 compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m3 ha–1 but slightly biased (–1.04.Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data.Key words: forest attributes estimation; ALS; TM; non-parametric algorithms.

  7. A rural CT scanner: evaluating the effect on local health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first small rural hospital in Ontario to propose a computed tomography (CT) scanner was in Walkerton, a town 160 km north of London. The Ontario Ministry of Health approved the proposal as a pilot project to evaluate the effect on local health care of a rural scanner. This evaluation study had 3 parts: a survey of physicians, a survey of patients, and an analysis of population CT scanning rates. The physicians in the area served by the scanner were asked about its impact on their care of their patients in a mailed questionnaire and in semistructured interviews. Scanner outpatients were given a questionnaire in which they rated the importance of its advantages. The analysis of scanning rates--the ratio of number of scans to estimated population--compared rates in the area with other Ontario rates before and after the scanner was introduced. The physicians reported that local CT allowed them to diagnose and treat patients sooner, closer to home, and with greater confidence. On average, 75% of the patients ranked faster and closer access as very important. Scanning rates in the area rose, although they did not match urban rates. The study confirms that the rural scanner changed the area's health care in significant ways and that it helped to narrow the gap between rural and urban service levels. We recommend that CT be expanded to other rural regions. (author)

  8. POINT-BASED VERSUS PLANE-BASED SELF-CALIBRATION OF STATIC TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. K. Chow

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Systematic trends are apparent when studying the self-calibration residuals of many modern static terrestrial laser scanners. Since the operation of terrestrial laser scanners is comparable to an efficient robotic total station, the sensor modelling parameters are developed in the spherical coordinate system where the raw observables of the scanner are range, horizontal angle, and vertical angle. Sensor calibration parameters are already well established for both hybrid and panoramic type laser scanners through the signalized target-based self-calibration method. In this paper, a less labour-intensive and more efficient planar-feature based terrestrial laser scanner self-calibration method, which is more suitable for in-situ self-calibration, is presented. Through simulation it will be demonstrated that the point-based self-calibration and plane-based self-calibration shares many common characteristics. Plane-based self-calibration results from real data captured with the panoramic type Leica HDS6100 and hybrid type Trimble GS200 scanner are also presented to show the practicality of the proposed method and as a comparison to the point-based self-calibration.

  9. A PDMS-Based 2-Axis Waterproof Scanner for Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM is an imaging tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. To achieve a small size, fast imaging speed, wide scan range, and high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs in a water environment, we introduce a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-based 2-axis scanner for a flexible and waterproof structure. The design, theoretical background, fabrication process and performance of the scanner are explained in details. The designed and fabricated scanner has dimensions of 15 × 15 × 15 mm along the X, Y and Z axes, respectively. The characteristics of the scanner are tested under DC and AC conditions. By pairing with electromagnetic forces, the maximum scanning angles in air and water are 18° and 13° along the X and Y axes, respectively. The measured resonance frequencies in air and water are 60 and 45 Hz along the X axis and 45 and 30 Hz along the Y axis, respectively. Finally, OR-PAM with high SNRs is demonstrated using the fabricated scanner, and the PA images of micro-patterned samples and microvasculatures of a mouse ear are successfully obtained with high-resolution and wide-field of view. OR-PAM equipped with the 2-axis PDMS based waterproof scanner has lateral and axial resolutions of 3.6 μm and 26 μm, respectively. This compact OR-PAM system could potentially and widely be used in preclinical and clinical applications.

  10. A multispectral scanner survey of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and surrounding area, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerial multispectral scanner imagery was collected of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado, on June 3, 5, 6, and 7, 1994, using a Daedalus AADS1268 multispectral scanner and coincident aerial color and color infrared photography. Flight altitudes were 4,500 feet (1372 meters) above ground level to match prior 1989 survey data; 2,000 feet (609 meters) above ground level for sitewide vegetation mapping; and 1,000 feet (304 meters) above ground level for selected areas of special interest. A multispectral survey was initiated to improve the existing vegetation classification map, to identify seeps and springs, and to generate ARC/INFO Geographic Information System compatible coverages of the vegetation and wetlands for the entire site including the buffer zone. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of vegetation and wetlands. The multispectral scanner data were processed digitally while the color and color infrared photography were manually photo-interpreted to define vegetation and wetlands. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the multispectral scanner data to assist image interpretation. A seep enhancement was applied and a color composite consisting of multispectral scanner channels 11, 7, and 5 (thermal infrared, mid-infrared, and red bands, respectively) proved most useful for detecting seeps, seep zones, and springs. The predawn thermal infrared data were also useful in identifying and locating seeps. The remote sensing data, mapped wetlands, and ancillary Geographic Information System compatible data sets were spatially analyzed for seeps

  11. The separated-sector cyclotron: beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic components that were ordered for the rest of the proposed beamlines at the NAC have been delivered. Design and manufacture of a special harp for the beam swinger has commenced. The Faraday cups and slits in the transfer beamline were replaced by water-cooled versions, owing to the decision to transport beams of higher intensity than initially specified. A prototype water-cooled slit for use in the low-energy beamline emittance measurement system has been installed, replacing the previous uncooled slit, to meet the requirement to measure the emittance of high-intensity beams. Software to automate the emittance measurement procedure is being developed. The method of calibration and alignment of the beamline scanners has been improved resulting in a more accurate measurement of the beam position. Software is being developed to regulate the beam current on the neutron therapy target. Current measurement from the target is used as feedback to regulate the aperture of a slit-system in the low-energy transfer beamline. This procedure will be implemented as soon as final tests have been carried out during the next scheduled shutdown. 3 figs

  12. Measurement of vertebral bone mineral by CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Value of exp (-rho2l).107 was calculated from the averaged density rho (evaluated from averaged CT value) and mean radius l of the soft tissue surrounding the vertabral body. This value was found to well describe the beam hardening effect on the CT value of the vertebral body. We defined the exp (-rho2l).107 as ''Beam Hardening Index (for abbreviation, BHI)''. BHI's of patients were ranged from 10 to 1000, and the medium was about 100. Calibration curve for BHI of 100 can be satisfactorily used for almost all of the patients. Therefore, it becomes unnecessary to evaluate BHI for individual patient. For a patient whose bone mineral is extremely decreased, it is necessary to measure his BHI for selecting the most adequate calibration curve. (author)

  13. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Thibaut; /CERN; Bravin, Enrico; /CERN; Burtin, Gerard; /CERN; Guerrero, Ana; /CERN; Jeff, Adam; /CERN; Rabiller, Aurelie; /CERN; Roncarolo, Federico; /CERN; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  14. Mathematical simulation of precision scanning by a H- beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and a computer program are developed for computing the dynamics of precision beams. The numerical method used for integrating differential equations is conservative. Within a paraxial approximation, the method ensures strict conservation of the phase volume at every step of calculations. Geometrical aberrations up to the third order are included and the space charge is taken into consideration within the paraxial approximation. The method is valid for relativistic beams. Controlling fields can have arbitrary longitudinal distributions. An accompanying frame of reference with a moving base is used where a trajectory of one of the particles is chosen to be a curvilinear axis. If a beam axis does not coincide with that of the device through which the beam travels, or if the angle of the beam axis deviation from that of the device (e.g. a scanner) considerably exceeds the angular divergence, within the given accuracy the method allows to be restricted with calculations of aberrations of lower order than in the case of a fixed frame of reference with a rectilinear axis. The method ensures simultaneous calculations of dynamics of any number of particles. For the case when a set consists of a large number of particles, a gain in the calculation time is obtained in comparison with times for calculation of the dynamics of all the individual particles. Dynamics of a broad H- beam having a small angular divergence at the inlet is studied in the scanner field. In order to keep the angular divergence at a small level at the outlet either distortion of the angular divergence of the beam should not be allowed or appearing angular distortions should be incessantly suppressed. Distributions of fields acting upon the beam while scanning are found when a small angular divergence at the outlet is provided

  15. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  16. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  17. Interventional and intraoperative MRI at low field scanner - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a cutting edge imaging modality in detecting diseases and pathologic tissue. The superior soft tissue contrast in MRI allows better definition of the pathology. MRI is increasingly used for guiding, monitoring and controlling percutaneous procedures and surgery. The rapid development of interventional techniques in radiology has led to integration of imaging with computers, new therapy devices and operating room like conditions. This has projected as faster and more accurate imaging and hence more demanding procedures have been applied to the repertoire of the interventional radiologist. In combining features of various other imaging modalities and adding some more into them, interventional MRI (IMRI) has potential to take further the interventional radiology techniques, minimally invasive therapies and surgery. The term 'Interventional MRI' consists in short all those procedures, which are performed under MRI guidance. These procedures can be either percutaneous or open surgical of nature. One of the limiting factors in implementing MRI as guidance modality for interventional procedures has been the fact, that most widely used magnet design, a cylindrical magnet, is not ideal for guiding procedures as it does not allow direct access to the patient. Open, low field scanners usually operating around 0.2 T, offer this feature. Clumsy hardware, bad patient access, slow image update frequency and strong magnetic fields have been other limiting factors for interventional MRI. However, the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality have been so obvious that considerable development has taken place in the 20-year history of MRI. The image quality has become better, ever faster software, new innovative sequences, better MRI hardware and increased computing power have accelerated imaging speed and image quality to a totally new level. Perhaps the most important feature in the recent development has been the introduction of open

  18. Measurement of H- beam emittance in axial injection channel of DC-72 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of measuring the ion beam transversal emittance in the axial injection channel of DC-72 cyclotron is given. It is based on the gradient method using the standard rotating wire scanner for measurement of the transversal ion beam dimensions. This method was worked out for ion beam currents up to 1000 μA and allows one to reconstruct emittance with an accuracy about 30%. The method takes into account the ion beam self-charge, which is essential. It is not always a success to obtain an axial-symmetric ion beam in experiments. Therefore, a new experimental data processing method of measuring the transversal emittance for a non-axial-symmetric ion beam was suggested. The formulae for determination of the RMS dispersions of the ion beam dimensions in the rotation coordinate system by signals from the scanner wire are given. The measurements of the RMS emittances εx,y were carried out in the test stand of the injection channel of DC-72 cyclotron with the H- ion beam current of 180 μA and kinetic energy of ions of 16.82 keV. The results of the experimental data processing are adduced

  19. Fast and compact optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a water-proofing two-axis MEMS scanner, and a step forward to clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel microscopic tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. Conventional OR-PAM systems are typically slow and bulky because of the linear scanning stages with stepping motors. For practical purposes, however, fast imaging speed and small footprint are crucial. To address these issues, we have developed a real-time compact OR-PAM system equipped with a waterproof two-axis MEMS scanner. The OR-PAM system consists of key components such as an ultrasonic transducer with a bandwidth of 50 MHz, an opto-acoustic beam combiner (BC), and an MEMS scanner. These are all installed inside a small water tank, with dimensions of 30 mm × 90 mm × 30 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. A pulsed laser with a repetition rate of 50 kHz is confocally aligned with the photoacoustic (PA) waves in the BC to maximize the SNRs. The fast scanning ability of the MEMS scanner fully utilizes the A-scan speed of 50 kHz. For instance, the B- and C-scan imaging speeds are 125 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively, when the acquired PA maximum amplitude projection image has 200 × 200 pixels along the x- and y-axes, respectively. The measured lateral resolution of 3.6 μm and axial resolution of 27 μm are sufficient to resolve the small capillaries. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of iris microvasculatures in mice. This real-time and compact OR-PAM system is optimized to examine small animals in clinical studies.

  20. Development of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three sets of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Units (HIBEMUs) are being developed at Peking University. They are HIBEMU-2 (slit-wire type, one direction), HIBEMU-3 (Allison scanner type, one direction) and HIBEMU-4 (slit-wire type, two directions). For HIBEMU-2 and HIBEMU-3, more recent work has been done on software redesign in order to measure beam emittance and to draw phase diagram more efficiently and precisely. Software for control and data processing of them were developed in Labveiw environment, trying to improve calculation rationality and to offer user-friendly interface. Mechanical modification was also done for HIBEMU-3, mainly concentrating on the protection of Faraday cups from being overheated by the high intensity beam and also from interference of secondary electrons. This paper will also cover the mechanical structure as well as the software development of HIBEMU-4, which is a two-direction emittance scanner newly designed and manufactured for the high energy beam transport (HEBT) of Peking University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY (PKUNIFTY). At the end of this paper, comparison and analysis of the three HIBEMUs are given to draw forth better design of the future emittance measurement facility.

  1. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  2. Microelectromagnetic actuator based on a 3D printing process for fiber scanner application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel electromagnetic-actuated fiber scanner has been proposed for ultra-thin scanning fiber endoscope application. A free-fixed optical fiber cantilever with a cylindrical magnet can be driven and vibrated by a tilted coil on a tube surface under electromagnetic force. The tiny coil with a large tilt angle as the actuator is fabricated by a new three-dimensional (3D) printing technology and handmade hybrid process. It is an efficient and low-cost method for fabricating tiny 3D tilted coils compared with the complicated micromachining process. A 2.0 mm outer diameter tilted coil has been successfully developed. The line pitch, tilt angle, resistance and turns of this fabricated coil are 75 µm, 60°, 20 Ω and 100 turns, respectively. The scanning motion of the assembled scanner utilizing the fabricated 3D coil, fiber and a small magnet has been measured by a high-speed camera. The scanner consists of a 9 mm-length optical fiber, a 2 mm outer diameter cylindrical magnet, a jig and a fabricated tilted coil.The displacement of the fiber tip in the scanner is observed and measured when the alternative current-driven voltage was applied to the tilted coil, and 126.8 µm maximum displacement has been obtained. The present fiber scanner with 3D tilted coil has promise for use as an important inspecting device for biomedical endoscope application. (paper)

  3. Development of a mixed pixel filter for improved dimension estimation using AMCW laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Sohn, Hoon; Cheng, Jack C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate dimension estimation is desired in many fields, but the traditional dimension estimation methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In the recent decades, 3D laser scanners have become popular for dimension estimation due to their high measurement speed and accuracy. Nonetheless, scan data obtained by amplitude-modulated continuous-wave (AMCW) laser scanners suffer from erroneous data called mixed pixels, which can influence the accuracy of dimension estimation. This study develops a mixed pixel filter for improved dimension estimation using AMCW laser scanners. The distance measurement of mixed pixels is firstly formulated based on the working principle of laser scanners. Then, a mixed pixel filter that can minimize the classification errors between valid points and mixed pixels is developed. Validation experiments were conducted to verify the formulation of the distance measurement of mixed pixels and to examine the performance of the proposed mixed pixel filter. Experimental results show that, for a specimen with dimensions of 840 mm × 300 mm, the overall errors of the dimensions estimated after applying the proposed filter are 1.9 mm and 1.0 mm for two different scanning resolutions, respectively. These errors are much smaller than the errors (4.8 mm and 3.5 mm) obtained by the scanner's built-in filter.

  4. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  5. Temporal Stability of the Velodyne HDL-64E S2 Scanner for High Accuracy Scanning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Glennie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The temporal stability and static calibration and analysis of the Velodyne HDL‑64E S2 scanning LiDAR system is discussed and analyzed. The mathematical model for measurements for the HDL-64E S2 scanner is updated to include misalignments between the angular encoder and scanner axis of rotation, which are found to be a marginally significant source of error. It is reported that the horizontal and vertical laser offsets cannot reliably be obtained with the current calibration model due to their high correlation with the horizontal and vertical offsets. By analyzing observations from two separate HDL-64E S2 scanners it was found that the temporal stability of the horizontal angle offset is near the quantization level of the encoder, but the vertical angular offset, distance offset and distance scale are slightly larger than expected. This is felt to be due to long term variations in the scanner range, whose root cause is as of yet unidentified. Nevertheless, a temporally averaged calibration dataset for each of the scanners resulted in a 25% improvement in the 3D planar misclosure residual RMSE over the standard factory calibration model.

  6. Application of x-ray CT scanner to two-phase flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent advance of the thermo-hydraulic analysis codes for LWRs is conspicuous, and regarding the momentum, heat and mass transfer between steam/water two phases, more detailed information has been obtained. For this purpose, many researches have been carried out for visually grasping the aspect of two-phase flow. Also in the field of two-phase flow study, the X-ray CT scanners which can visualize the state of flow without disturbing it and also can quantify it can be regarded as very attractive measuring instrument. A number of the examples of the application of X-ray CT scanners to two-phase flow measurement have been published. In this report, the principle of the measurement using X-ray CT scanners is briefly explained, and the application of X-ray CT scanners to the two-phase flow measurement in a horizontal pipe and in a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor is outlined. For the experiment, an industrial X-ray CT scanner TOSCANER 3200 made by Toshiba Corp. was used mainly for the measurement of the distribution of void fraction. It may be considered that this technology of void fraction measurement has been established. In the case of the measurement at higher temperature and pressure, more studies are necessary. (Kako, I.)

  7. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method. (paper)

  8. Analysis of the Performance of a Laser Scanner for Predictive Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisler, J.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we evaluate the use of a laser scanner for future advanced driver assistance systems. We focus on the important task of predicting the target vehicle for longitudinal ego vehicle control. Our motivation is to decrease the reaction time of existing systems during cut-in maneuvers of other traffic participants. A state-of-the-art laser scanner, the Ibeo Scala B2 R , is presented, providing its sensing characteristics and the subsequent high level object data output. We evaluate the performance of the scanner towards object tracking with the help of a GPS real time kinematics system on a test track. Two designed scenarios show phases with constant distance and velocity as well as dynamic motion of the vehicles. We provide the results for the error in position and velocity of the scanner and furthermore, review our algorithm for target vehicle prediction. Finally we show the potential of the laser scanner with the estimated error, that leads to a decrease of up to 40% in reaction time with best conditions.

  9. Phantom studies as useful method for optimization of CT procedures with single-slice scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimization of X-ray diagnostic procedures requires a selection of exposure parameters adequately for the patient anatomical structure and clinical needs, meanwhile use of the ready software protocols is a daily routine. The paper presents the methods and the results based on phantom studies aimed to optimize the exposure parameters for the examined object in examinations performed using single-slice CT scanners. The studies were concerned with the significance of particular exposure parameters for image quality and patient doses in routine head procedures. Image quality was evaluated using a Catphan 424 phantom. Dosimetric measures of exposure were evaluated by computed tomography dose index (CTDI), and dose-length-product (DLP) was measured using a Nomex dosimeter. Two single-slice CT scanners were investigated in details: a fourth generation one (Picker PQ-2000) and a third generation one (Siemens Somatom Balance). The dependence of image quality factors on high voltage, anode current, scan time, slice thickness were described and CTDI was evaluated. For both the CT scanners tested, the combinations of exposure parameters were found for which low dose value was accompanied by good image quality. Moreover, the high-contrast resolution was not practically changed with dose reduction, in opposite to low-contrast resolution being related to exposure parameters and the type of CT scanner. Dose reduction possible for the fourth generation scanner is deeper. (author)

  10. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, E.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method.

  11. Application of high-energy x-ray CT scanner for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT scanners can serve effectively for various non-destructive tests. The report describes some high-energy x-ray CT scanners recently developed by Toshiba Corporation. The scanners consist of a fixed anode x-ray tube and eight solid state detectors mounted opposite to the tube. The sample stage is situated between them. First, the sample stage makes a full clockwise turn to allow the detectors to make eight measurements. Then it makes a counterclockwise turn after moving along the arc of a circle centering on the x-ray tube through a slight angle (1 - 128 of the detector-to-detector angle) to provide another eight measurements. This operation is repeated 128 times to produce a set of data equivalent to one which would be obtained with 1,024 (8 x 128) detectors. This data collection operation is completed in 50 minutes. Then the data are sent to a computer after being subjected to pre-processing (logarithmic conversion, offset correction, reference correction, etc.). The algorithm used for in the computer consists of convolution and back-projection. The construction of images is completed in 30 minutes. Two high-energy x-ray CT scanners, one for testing of tires and the other for testing of large-size components, are described in detail. The high defect-detection performance of these scanners is demonstrated by citing actual observations. Some test results made with them are also cited. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Characterization of radiation beam filtration in computerized tomography equipments. Dosimetric influence; Caracterizacion de la filtracion del haz de radiacion en equipos de tomografia computarizada. Influencia dosimetrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Tortosa, M.; Echevarne, M. [Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Spain); Calzado Cantera, A. [Universidad Complutense (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The basic dosimetric quantities used in CT to assess doses to patient are the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) which can be determined either from measurements free-in-air or in standard head or body phantoms. CTDI values measured for different type of scanners can present high differences (up to a factor two). These differences are mainly due to differences in quality of the X ray beam as a consequence of differences in physical filtration. The filters used varied widely according to the manufacturer and model of scanner. Some scanners use a single fixed absorber, while others utilize two or more absorbers devoted specifically to anatomical areas (body or head) or different kind of examinations (pediatric,.). A good knowledge of the features of these absorbers (equivalent thickness and shape) is very useful in order to compare dose and to optimize the procedures for clinical use. however, such information is not always available and the assessment of the total filtration after installation of the scanners is seldom tackled. Dose measurements have been performed in order to determine the beam filtration and its influence on dose for a sample of seven third generation CT scanners. Measurements were conducted according to the ImPACT protocol, prepared specifically for the CT Scanner Dose Survey, in which we were participating. The investigated parameters were the half value layer and CT dose indexes (measured free-in-air and within phantoms), and an operational description of the shaping filters after selectable FOV values, as well. (Author) 32 refs.

  13. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, K; de Ruiter, N J A; Chernoglazov, A I; Panta, R K; Butler, A P H; Butler, P H; Bell, S T; Anderson, N G; Woodfield, T B F; Tredinnick, S J; Healy, J L; Bateman, C J; Aamir, R; Doesburg, R M N; Renaud, P F; Gieseg, S P; Smithies, D J; Mohr, J L; Mandalika, V B H; Opie, A M T; Cook, N J; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J; Atharifard, A; Clyne, M; Bones, P J; Bartneck, C; Grasset, R; Schleich, N; Billinghurst, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D reconstruction software and volume visualisation using a custom volume rendering software. Narrow high energy acquisition using the photon-processing detector revealed substantial reduction in beam hardening effects and metal artefacts.

  14. Performance and reliability of beam-delivery unit for advanced lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jason; Viatella, John; Das, Palash P.; Yamasaki, Yasushi

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of advanced 193 nm systems processing 300 mm wafers, the production lithography cell is about to undergo a technology shift. This is because processing 300 mm wafers requires introduction of several new technologies. These include technologies that enable increasing light source power at 193 nm - the NA of the projection lens and the speed of scanner stages. Coupled with the need to maintaining high wafer throughput, the scanners must also deliver very tight CD control to within few nm, (typically less than 3 nm). Cymer, Inc. believes that certain key technologies - traditionally ignored at 248 nm for 200 mm wafers - must be revisited. This paper pertains to one such technology: the mechanism to deliver stable light from the light source to the input of the scanner. We refer to this as the Beam Delivery Unit (BDU). To support these changes, Cymer has developed a BDU that will guarantee a stable beam at the scanner entrance, during exposure. There are three aspects to beam stability: 1. Optical transmission, 2. Beam positioning and, 3. Beam angle. Position stability impacts dose stability (energy per pulse integrated over several pulses) at the wafer and pointing instability adversely affects the illumination uniformity at the reticle. To the lithography process engineers, the effects of beam stability are not new; both result in loss of CD control. At 130 nm node, the loss of CD control due to beam instability was insignificant, therefore ignored. However, below that node, we will show that unless the beam exiting the BDU is stabilized in position and pointing, the loss in CD control is of the order or 1 nm, which is a significant portion of the total CD control budget. For example, for MPU gate node of 65 nm, the ITRS roadmap allocates CD control of 3.7 nm. Thus, the 1 nm loss of CD control due to aforementioned instability alone is considered to be very significant. To address this critical loss in CD control, Cymer has implemented a novel beam

  15. Characterization of the proton ion source beam for the high intensity neutrino source at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Wai-Ming

    Fermilab is considering an 8 GeV superconducting H-- linac with the primary mission of enabling 2MW beam power from the 120 GeV Fermilab Main Injector for a neutrino program. The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D program is underway to demonstrate the technical feasibility in a 30MeV prototype linac. The HINS Linac Front-end is composed of an ion source, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), a medium energy beam transport and 16 room temperature Crossbar H-type cavities that accelerate the beam to 10 MeV. The cavities are separated by superconducting solenoids enclosed in individual cryostats. Beyond 10 MeV, the design uses superconducting spoke resonators. Recently, the HINS proton ion source has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec pulsed beam with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5 Hz. The beam is transported to the RFQ by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. All beam studies are based on data taken using the wire scanner. We start with interpreting the signal measured by the wire scanner. Then, we performed a beam-calibration to the steering dipole magnets. We then study transverse motion coupling due to solenoidal field by measuring beam rotation through solenoid. Analysis to these measurements is accompanied with beam physics modeling and particle tracking simulation. Also, transverse emittance was measured using two different methods and results are compared. Finally, a bunch shape monitor will be introduced. It is a high bandwidth instrumentation device that measures the longitudinal profile of a bunched proton/H- beam. HINS will use it for its 2.5MeV beam. Operational principle

  16. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  17. Design and Function of a Brain Scanner for Clinical Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the human brain is bilaterally symmetrical and possesses unusual resistance to many substances in the blood stream, it has been suggested that radioactive scanning for this region may be best performed with an instrument made especially for the purpose. A scanner is described which was designed to be used as a screening device for brain-tumour suspects, so that high sensitivity, simplicity of patient preparation and ease of reading and interpretation were primary requirements. Brownell's equation relating radioactivity concentration to diameter of resolution indicates that the required radioactivity per unit volume is inversely related to the sixth power of the resolution diameter. Accordingly, a maximum permissible diameter of resolution was chosen consistent with satisfactory localization of areas of increased radioactivity. Precise delineation was not required. Since the number of detected disintegrations per unit time is an inverse function of the square of distance, two detectors each with a short ''focus'' are used rather than one detector which must be made optimal for the mid-sagittal plane. The 2-in-diam. crystal and photomultiplier assemblies are mounted opposite one another on a rigid scanning frame, each fitted with a seven-hole (hexagonal) focusing collimator designed for a 1.5-cm resolution diameter and a focus 8 cm from the collimator face. The frame scans rectilinearly in the sagittal plane. The scan record is presented as an asymmetrogammagram and as separate left and right photographic two-dimensional displays. Pulses from each detector are fed to an amplifier-discriminator circuit and thence to a difference circuit which prints a left or right marker to indicate a predominance of left or right radioactivity. Pulses from each amplifier-discriminator circuit also go to count-rate meters which in turn activate lamps mounted in a light-tight housing. The two lamps, the light intensity of which is a function of activity measured by the

  18. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Pfeiffer, Norman [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany); Herrmann, Lutz [Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is described. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts. (orig.)

  19. Development of a prototype of time-over-threshold based small animal PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazoe, K., E-mail: shimazoe@it-club.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kumagai, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kataoka, J. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, S.; Sato, H.; Usuki, Y. [Furukawa Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A time-over-threshold (ToT)-based positron emission tomography (TODPET) scanner was designed and fabricated. The PET scanner consisted of eight block detectors, each of which is composed of a 12×12 array of 2×2×10 mm{sup 3} Pr:LuAG crystals individually coupled with a 12×12 UV-enhanced avalanche photodiode (APD) array. The APDs were individually read out using a custom-designed time-over-threshold application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) readout system. The PET scanner has an energy resolution of 10% and a time resolution of 4.2 ns. A spatial resolution of 1.17 mm (FWHM) was demonstrated in the initial results.

  20. Measurement of MRI scanner noise; Schalldruckpegelmessungen an einer MRT-Anlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoergen, M.; Spielmann, R.P.; Melkus, G. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Klinikum der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Haberland, E.J. [Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Klinikum der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The present paper describes a simple method for the analysis of MRI scanner noise. Besides the heating of body tissue by strong RF radiation and the formation of circular currents in the body induced bey switching field gradients, a noise level of more than 100 dB(A) during the measurement belongs to the potential risks of MRI [1,2]. This risk is of particular concern for staff and accompanying persons who remain close to the scanner for different reasons (e.g., monitoring of anesthetized patients, reassuring of children). For this reason, and given the scanty information on noise provided in the manuals of the scanners, it is useful to quantify the noise level more exactly. This applies also to the evaluation of different sound-reducing methods for the patient. This presents the results of noise level measurements in the tomograph and in its surrounding, with and without noise reduction by headphones. (orig.)

  1. Development of a prototype of time-over-threshold based small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-over-threshold (ToT)-based positron emission tomography (TODPET) scanner was designed and fabricated. The PET scanner consisted of eight block detectors, each of which is composed of a 12×12 array of 2×2×10 mm3 Pr:LuAG crystals individually coupled with a 12×12 UV-enhanced avalanche photodiode (APD) array. The APDs were individually read out using a custom-designed time-over-threshold application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) readout system. The PET scanner has an energy resolution of 10% and a time resolution of 4.2 ns. A spatial resolution of 1.17 mm (FWHM) was demonstrated in the initial results

  2. MCPT: A Monte Carlo code for simulation of photon transport in tomographic scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCPT is a special-purpose Monte Carlo code designed to simulate photon transport in tomographic scanners. Variance reduction schemes and sampling games present in MCPT were selected to characterize features common to most tomographic scanners. Combined splitting and biasing (CSB) games are used to systematically sample important detection pathways. An efficient splitting game is used to tally particle energy deposition in detection zones. The pulse height distribution of each detector can be found by convolving the calculated energy deposition distribution with the detector's resolution function. A general geometric modelling package, HERMETOR, is used to describe the geometry of the tomographic scanners and provide MCPT information needed for particle tracking. MCPT's modelling capabilites are described and preliminary experimental validation is presented. (orig.)

  3. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently. PMID:22494369

  4. Modeling And Simulation Of Bar Code Scanners Using Computer Aided Design Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellekson, Ron; Campbell, Scott

    1988-06-01

    Many optical systems have demanding requirements to package the system in a small 3 dimensional space. The use of computer graphic tools can be a tremendous aid to the designer in analyzing the optical problems created by smaller and less costly systems. The Spectra Physics grocery store bar code scanner employs an especially complex 3 dimensional scan pattern to read bar code labels. By using a specially written program which interfaces with a computer aided design system, we have simulated many of the functions of this complex optical system. In this paper we will illustrate how a recent version of the scanner has been designed. We will discuss the use of computer graphics in the design process including interactive tweaking of the scan pattern, analysis of collected light, analysis of the scan pattern density, and analysis of the manufacturing tolerances used to build the scanner.

  5. Inter-laboratory comparison of medical computed tomography (CT) scanners for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Bager; Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch

    2013-01-01

    Using computed tomography (CT) in the calibration of online grading equipment has been demonstrated to be beneficial over the last years by several institutions using medical CT scanners. The difference in makes and models calls for a standardized (and calibrated) method to be able to quantify...... differences in CT performance. The presented Round Robin scheme has demonstrated its potential as such a method. The benefit of the phantom set is that it provides a convenient way of comparing volume determination between different CT scanners. The suggested phantoms are mimicking important carcass features......, conventionally recognized to be challenging to medical CT scanners. The web based classification software PigClassWeb has been demonstrated to be a convenient way of handling and comparing CT data in a transparent way, across regions and over time. The phantom set may be used to compare regional differences in...

  6. Performance evaluation of the HAMAMATSU SHR22000 whole-body PET scanner using the IEC standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHR22000 is a whole-body PET scanner developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. The scanner has a 600 mm patient aperture and a 225 mm axial FOV, which can cover the whole human head and large portion of the body so that a common whole-body scan can be accomplished within 5 bed position with a 3.2 mm average transverse resolution at 10 mm from the axis of FOV. The paper gives a system performance evaluation of this scanner using GB/T 18988.1-2003/IEC 61675-1:1998 standard, which includes the spatial resolution, tomographic sensitivity, count rate characteristic, scatter fraction and recovery coefficient. At last a human body scanning result is given as an imaging example. (authors)

  7. Static and mobile DXA scanner in-vivo cross-calibration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-vitro cross-calibration of DXA scanning equipment, with a phantom device, has been recommended for assessing agreement between devices co-located within DXA scanning services. This study evaluated in-vivo and in-vitro cross-calibration of a static and a mobile DXA scanner within the same service in their individual clinical settings. 50 individuals from a volunteer group were recruited to take part in this study and had DXA measurements made on two GE Lunar Prodigy Advance (GE Lunar, Bedford, UK) scanners. Results in this study showed that the scanners agreed, with no clinically significant differences in BMD measurements made at the same site on the individual devices used in this study. The in-vivo cross-calibration of the instruments was a useful experience, which demonstrated closely calibrated systems and raised the profile of the bone densitometry service within the hospital.

  8. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is described. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts. (orig.)

  9. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller;

    2012-01-01

    to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement......This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy...... to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data...

  10. Detection of analyte binding to microarrays using gold nanoparticle labels and a desktop scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Dufva, Martin; Belleville, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    on gold nanoparticle labeled antibodies visualized by a commercial, office desktop flatbed scanner. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the signal from the flatbed scanner was proportional to the surface density of the bound antibody-gold conjugates, and that the flatbed scanner could...... detect six attomoles of antibody-gold conjugates. This detection system was used in a competitive immunoassay to measure the concentration of the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in water samples. The results showed that the gold labeled antibodies functioned comparably with a fluorescent...... based immunoassay for detecting BAM in water. A qualitative immunoassay based on gold-labeled antibodies could determineif a water sample contained BAM above and below 60-70 ng L(-1), which is below the maximum allowed BAM concentration for drinking water (100 ng L(-1)) according to European Union...

  11. A multispectral scanner survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An airborne multispectral scanner survey of selected sites on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation was performed in mid-November 1993. Aerial multispectral scanner and photography data were acquired coincidentally with the Big O experiment at both locations. To illustrate two potential applications, the multispectral scanner data were digitally enhanced to facilitate the detection of soil disturbance and evidence of surface water transport. The main conclusion of this study was that multispectral data acquired under these conditions can be useful for soil disturbance detection. The imagery did not prove as useful, however, for direct indications of surface water transport. It was possible to infer some water transport patterns from dry water beds, but only if surface indications were present

  12. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13–74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans. - Highlights: • Noise reduction with AIDR3D in VS-ATCM is 13–74%. • We provide mAs prediction in VS-ATCM for all sizes. • We observe the effect of overbeaming and overlapping

  13. CloudProxy: A NAPT Proxy for Vulnerability Scanners based on Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Security-as-a-service (SaaS is an outsourcing model for security management in cloud computing. Vulnerability scanners based on cloud computing is becoming one of the killer applications in SaaS due to the pay-per-use manner and powerful scanning capability. When performing vulnerability scanning through network, the scanner needs to establish a large number of TCP connections with the target host. To deal with the problem of IPv4 address shortening and to protect the hosts within the organization, the target hosts are almost always deployed behind a NAPT(Network Address and Port Translation device, TCP packets sent by the scanner outside the network isolated by the NAPT device will be blocked, thus unable to complete the vulnerability scanning task when the scanners are deployed in the cloud. While there exists NAPT traversal methods, they support TCP poorly and therefore is not ready for the vulnerability scanning scenario where a large number of TCP connections needs to be established. In this paper we proposed a NAPT proxy named CloudProxy for adopting vulnerability scanners in cloud computing by combining the TURN extension protocol and the Socks5 protocol. We integrated function of Socks5 into the TURN client, so that the destination port of all scanning packets will be aggregated before passing through the TURN server, lessen the burden of the TURN server. The experimental results show that CloudProxy can relay packets for the vulnerability scanner based on cloud computing in a transparent way and its scalability is sufficient for practical use.

  14. An automated dosimetry system for CT scanners using silicon P-i-n diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revolution in diagnostic radiology was started in 1967 when Hounsfield developed a new x-ray transmission system - the computed axial tomography scanner (CT scanner). This device uses an x-ray source that scans (axially) through a section of the patient's body. Transmitted photons proportional to the density of the material they must traverse are detected and computer reconstructed to produce an image of the tomographic plane of the patient (slice). Only limited dosimetric studies have been performed on CT scanners. Many factors may influence the dose given to patients during a diagnostic study including the scan width, the scan time, the number of slices taken, and the voltage and current settings of the x-ray tube on a particular unit. Adequate health care planning and delivery requires that detailed dosimetric studies be conducted on CT scanners during their infancy. If this can be done, possible questions and criticisms as to the usefulness of this type of diagnostic procedure can be largely eliminated. The study proposed involves the design and construction of a portable radiation dosimetry phantom for CT scanner operations. At the present, there is no efficient method of obtaining accurate X-Y as well as Z-axis dose information from a scanner. Silicon P-i-n diodes, used as the radiation sensors, are arranged inside a phantom to provide reproducible positional and directional dosimetric measurements. Data acquisition circuitry is used to convert the unprocessed signals into a form that is microcomputer compatible. Data storage operations, the application of correction factors, and other manipulations are provided by the microcomputer before transfer to an output display device. The final form of the data consists of absorbed dose values corresponding to the radiation received by the semiconductor detectors. (author)

  15. Inter-site and inter-scanner diffusion MRI data harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaalian, H; Ning, L; Savadjiev, P; Pasternak, O; Bouix, S; Michailovich, O; Grant, G; Marx, C E; Morey, R A; Flashman, L A; George, M S; McAllister, T W; Andaluz, N; Shutter, L; Coimbra, R; Zafonte, R D; Coleman, M J; Kubicki, M; Westin, C F; Stein, M B; Shenton, M E; Rathi, Y

    2016-07-15

    We propose a novel method to harmonize diffusion MRI data acquired from multiple sites and scanners, which is imperative for joint analysis of the data to significantly increase sample size and statistical power of neuroimaging studies. Our method incorporates the following main novelties: i) we take into account the scanner-dependent spatial variability of the diffusion signal in different parts of the brain; ii) our method is independent of compartmental modeling of diffusion (e.g., tensor, and intra/extra cellular compartments) and the acquired signal itself is corrected for scanner related differences; and iii) inter-subject variability as measured by the coefficient of variation is maintained at each site. We represent the signal in a basis of spherical harmonics and compute several rotation invariant spherical harmonic features to estimate a region and tissue specific linear mapping between the signal from different sites (and scanners). We validate our method on diffusion data acquired from seven different sites (including two GE, three Philips, and two Siemens scanners) on a group of age-matched healthy subjects. Since the extracted rotation invariant spherical harmonic features depend on the accuracy of the brain parcellation provided by Freesurfer, we propose a feature based refinement of the original parcellation such that it better characterizes the anatomy and provides robust linear mappings to harmonize the dMRI data. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method by statistically comparing diffusion measures such as fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity and generalized fractional anisotropy across multiple sites before and after data harmonization. We also show results using tract-based spatial statistics before and after harmonization for independent validation of the proposed methodology. Our experimental results demonstrate that, for nearly identical acquisition protocol across sites, scanner-specific differences can be accurately removed using the

  16. Beam quality measure for vector beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndagano, Bienvenu; Sroor, Hend; McLaren, Melanie; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Vector beams have found a myriad of applications, from laser materials processing to microscopy, and are now easily produced in the laboratory. They are usually differentiated from scalar beams by qualitative measures, for example, visual inspection of beam profiles after a rotating polarizer. Here we introduce a quantitative beam quality measure for vector beams and demonstrate it on cylindrical vector vortex beams. We show how a single measure can be defined for the vector quality, from 0 (purely scalar) to 1 (purely vector). Our measure is derived from a quantum toolkit, which we show applies to classical vector beams. PMID:27472580

  17. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  18. The 3D laser scanner: a useful technique in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 3-dimensional laser scanner allows the visualization of all the structures and equipment visible in a nuclear unit even contaminated. This device can be introduced in any place where its dimensions 60 cm * 20 cm (laser + tripod) permit it. The rotation of the head gives a field of view of 360 degrees in the horizontal plane and of 300 degrees in the vertical plane. The exposition time of the staff is reduced to the intervention times required to position the laser scanner and to recover it which reduces the personnel radiation dose. (A.C.)

  19. Application of the "scanner + MIDAS" complex for processing astrometric photographic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoreltsev, Yu.; Babenko, Yu.; Vertypolokh, Yu.

    Researches of an opportunity of use in the astrometric purposes of the photographic plates digital images received by the scanner ScanMaker-4 manufactured by Microtec were carried out by the authors. Photographic plates with the images of star fields received with different telescopes were used for researches. The processing of digital images of photoplates was made with the ESO-MIDAS and with the programs developed by one of the authors. The researches have shown, that this technology provides results with acceptable quality level. That makes possible use of the given scanner for mass processing of the stored photographic material.

  20. Sensitivity of linear CCD array based film scanners used for film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Film dosimetry is commonly performed by using linear CCD array transmission optical densitometers. However, these devices suffer from a variation in response along the detector array. If not properly corrected for, this nonuniformity may lead to significant overestimations of the measured dose as one approaches regions close to the edges of the scanning region. In this note, we present measurements of the spatial response of an AGFA Arcus II document scanner used for radiochromic film dosimetry. Results and methods presented in this work can be generalized to other CCD based transmission scanners used for film dosimetry employing either radiochromic or radiographic films