WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam scanners

  1. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  2. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  3. A Cartographic Electron Beam Scanner Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    0132 UNCLASSIFIED 6005 ETL-0257 NLEhmnnnnnununu lllhllIIhhlh EIIIIIIIIuuh hhhhhhhw-: o~"c ETL OVDFR U-C0EESE25SR7TINULIiE U..ARMYCOPSOFENINER ENINE ...17 2.3.4.4 Data Retrieval Process . . . . 2-21 2.3.5 Software .. ........... ... 2-25 2.4 Details of Scanner Experiments. 2-26 2.4.1 General...point processor and suitable interfaces were installed in the experimental Cartographic EBR System to provide complete compatibility with the software

  4. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-12-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging using an 8-beam Fabry-Perot scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nam; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The planar Fabry Perot (FP) photoacoustic scanner has been shown to provide exquisite high resolution 3D images of soft tissue structures in vivo to depths up to approximately 10mm. However a significant limitation of current embodiments of the concept is low image acquisition speed. To increase acquisition speed, a novel multi-beam scanner architecture has been developed. This enables a line of equally spaced 8 interrogation beams to be scanned simultaneously across the FP sensor and the photoacoustic signals detected in parallel. In addition, an excitation laser operating at 200Hz was used. The combination of parallelising the detection and the high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the excitation laser has enabled dramatic reductions in image acquisition time to be achieved. A 3D image can now be acquired in 10 seconds and 2D images at video rates are now possible.

  6. Secondary particle acquisition system for the CERN beam wire scanners upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sirvent, J L; Emery, J; Diéguez, A

    2015-01-01

    The increasing requirements of CERN experiments make essential the upgrade of beam instrumentation in general, and high accuracy beam profile monitors in particular. The CERN Beam Instrumentation Group has been working during the last years on the Wire Scanners upgrade. These systems cross a thin wire through a circulating beam, the resulting secondary particles produced from beam/wire interaction are detected to reconstruct the beam profile. For the new secondary shower acquisition system, it is necessary to perform very low noise measurements with high dynamic range coverage. The aim is to design a system without tuneable parameters and compatible for any beam wire scanner location at the CERN complex. Polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors (pCVD) are proposed as new detectors for this application because of their radiation hardness, fast response and linearity over a high dynamic range. For the detector readout, the acquisition electronics must be designed to exploit the detector capa...

  7. Determining phase-space properties of the IHEP RFQ output beam using the RMS beam widths from wire-scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Jun; Liu, Hua-Chang; Jiang, Hong-Ping; Li, Peng; Li, Fang; Li, Jian; Liu, Mei-Fei; Mu, Zhen-Cheng; Meng, Cai; Meng, Ming; Ouyang, Hua-Fu; Rong, Lin-Yan; Tian, Jian-Min; Wang, Biao; Wang, Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Xu, Xin-An; Yao, Yuan; Xin, Wen-Qu; Zhao, Fu-Xiang; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Wen-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    A beam line is built after the IHEP RFQ for halo study. To determine transverse emittance and ellipse parameters of the RFQ output beam, beam size data obtained from the first two of 14 wire scanners are employed. By using the transfer matrix method and the least square method, a set of linear equations were set up and solved. The solutions were then applied as initial beam parameters in multi-particle simulations to check the method of calculation. It is shown that difference between the simulated RMS beam size and the measured one at the measurement location is less than 7%, which is acceptable in our experiments.

  8. Emittance Scanner Optimization for Low Energy Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Stockli, Martin P

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam emittances are normally measured as two-dimensional distributions of the beam current fraction within a window dx centered at position coordinate x and a window dx' centered at trajectory angle x'. Unthresholded rms emittances evaluated from experimental data are very sensitive to noise, bias, and other undesired signals. Undesired signals occur when particles from outside the measured window dx*dx' contribute to the signal from the particles within the measured window. Increasing the window size increases the desired signal while most undesired contributions remain unchanged. However, the decreasing resolution causes an error in the emittance results, especially in the rms emittance. Using theoretical distributions we will present the tradeoff between resolution and accuracy.

  9. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study , an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance ( P < 0.05. Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections ( P = 0.299. In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners ( P < 0.001, with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners ( P < 0.001, with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants.

  10. Fast beam steering with full polarization control using a galvanometric optical scanner and polarization controller

    CERN Document Server

    Jofre, M; Steinlechner, F; Oliverio, N; Torres, J P; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W; 10.1364/OE.20.012247

    2012-01-01

    Optical beam steering is a key element in many industrial and scientific applications like in material processing, information technologies, medical imaging and laser display. Even though galvanometer-based scanners offer flexibility, speed and accuracy at a relatively low cost, they still lack the necessary control over the polarization required for certain applications. We report on the development of a polarization steerable system assembled with a fiber polarization controller and a galvanometric scanner, both controlled by a digital signal processor board. The system implements control of the polarization decoupled from the pointing direction through a feed-forward control scheme. This enables to direct optical beams to a desired direction without affecting its initial polarization state. When considering the full working field of view, we are able to compensate polarization angle errors larger than 0.2 rad, in a temporal window of less than $\\sim 20$ ms. Given the unification of components to fully cont...

  11. In vacuum diamond sensor scanner for beam halo measurements in the beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Bogard, F.; Cornebise, P.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Fuster-Martínez, N.; Griesmayer, E.; Guler, H.; Kubytskyi, V.; Sylvia, C.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Bambade, P.

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of beam halo transverse distributions is important for the understanding of beam losses and the control of backgrounds in Future Linear Colliders (FLC). A novel in vacuum diamond sensor (DSv) scanner with four strips has been designed and developed for the investigation of the beam halo transverse distributions and also for the diagnostics of Compton recoil electrons after the interaction point (IP) of ATF2, a low energy (1.3 GeV) prototype of the final focus system for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects. Using the DSv, a dynamic range of ∼106 has been successfully demonstrated and confirmed for the first time in simultaneous beam core (∼109 electrons) and beam halo (∼103 electrons) measurements at ATF2. This report presents the characterization, performance studies and tests of diamond sensors using an α source, as well as using the electron beams at PHIL, a low energy < 5 MeV photo-injector at LAL, and at ATF2. First beam halo measurement results using the DSv at ATF2 with different beam intensities and vacuum levels are also presented. Such measurements not only allow one to evaluate the different sources of beam halo generation but also to define the requirements for a suitable collimation system to be installed at ATF2, as well as to optimize its performance during future operation.

  12. Energy constancy checking for electron beams using a wedge-shaped solid phantom combined with a beam profile scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenow, U.F.; Islam, M.K.; Gaballa, H.; Rashid, H. (Univ. of Goettingen (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-01-01

    An energy constancy checking method is presented which involves a specially designed wedge-shaped solid phantom in combination with a multiple channel ionization chamber array known as the Thebes device. Once the phantom/beam scanner combination is set up, measurements for all electron energies can be made and evaluated without re-entering the treatment room. This is also valid for the readjustment of beam energies which are found to deviate from required settings. The immediate presentation of the measurements is in the form of crossplots which resemble depth dose profiles. The evaluation of the measured data can be performed using a hand-held calculator, but processing of the measured signals through a PC-type computer is advisable. The method is insensitive to usual fluctuations in beam flatness. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method are more than adequate. The method may also be used in modified form for photon beams.

  13. Energy constancy checking for electron beams using a wedge-shaped solid phantom combined with a beam profile scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, U F; Islam, M K; Gaballa, H; Rashid, H

    1991-01-01

    An energy constancy checking method is presented which involves a specially designed wedge-shaped solid phantom in combination with a multiple channel ionization chamber array known as the Thebes device. Once the phantom/beam scanner combination is set up, measurements for all electron energies can be made and evaluated without re-entering the treatment room. This is also valid for the readjustment of beam energies which are found to deviate from required settings. The immediate presentation of the measurements is in the form of crossplots which resemble depth dose profiles. The evaluation of the measured data can be performed using a hand-held calculator, but processing of the measured signals through a PC-type computer is advisable. The method is insensitive to usual fluctuations in beam flatness. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method are more than adequate. The method may also be used in modified form for photon beams.

  14. Beam Emittance Measurement with Laser Wire Scanners in the ILC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I.; /CERN; Blair, G.A.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    Accurate measurement of the beam phase-space is essential for the next generation of electron accelerators. A scheme for beam optics optimization and beam matrix reconstruction algorithms for the diagnostics section of the beam delivery system of the International Linear Collider based on laser-wire beam profile monitors are discussed. Possible modes of operation of the laser-wire system together with their corresponding performance are presented. Based on these results, prospects for reconstructing the ILC beam emittance from representative laser-wire beam size measurements are evaluated.

  15. In vacuum diamond sensor scanner for beam halo measurements in the beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shan; Cornebise, Patrick; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Fuster-Martínez, Nuria; Griesmayer, Erich; Guler, Hayg; Kubytskyi, Viacheslav; Sylvia, Christophe; Toshiaki, Tauchi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Bambade, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of beam halo transverse distributions is important for the understanding of beam losses and the control of backgrounds in Future Linear Colliders (FLC). A novel in vacuum diamond sensor (DSv) scanner with four strips has been designed and developed for the investigation of the beam halo transverse distributions and also for the diagnostics of Compton recoil electrons after the interaction point (IP) of ATF2, a low energy (1.3 GeV) prototype of the final focus system for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects. Using the DSv, a dynamic range of $\\sim10^6$ has been successfully demonstrated and confirmed for the first time by simultaneous beam core ($\\sim10^9$ electrons) and beam halo ($\\sim10^3$ electrons) measurements at ATF2. This report presents the characterization, performance studies and tests of the diamond sensors using an $\\alpha$ source as well as using the electron beams at PHIL, a low energy ($< 10$ MeV) photo-injector at LAL, and at ATF2. First beam halo measurement results ...

  16. Design study of an in situ PET scanner for use in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Daube-Witherspoon, M E; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zou, W; McDonough, J, E-mail: surti@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Proton beam therapy can deliver a high radiation dose to a tumor without significant damage to surrounding healthy tissue or organs. One way of verifying the delivered dose distribution is to image the short-lived positron emitters produced by the proton beam as it travels through the patient. A potential solution to the limitations of PET imaging in proton beam therapy is the development of a high sensitivity, in situ PET scanner that starts PET imaging almost immediately after patient irradiation while the patient is still lying on the treatment bed. A partial ring PET design is needed for this application in order to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the proton beam, as well as restrictions on patient positioning on the couch. A partial ring also allows us to optimize the detector separation (and hence the sensitivity) for different patient sizes. Our goal in this investigation is to evaluate an in situ PET scanner design for use in proton therapy that provides tomographic imaging in a partial ring scanner design using time-of-flight (TOF) information and an iterative reconstruction algorithm. GEANT4 simulation of an incident proton beam was used to produce a positron emitter distribution, which was parameterized and then used as the source distribution inside a water-filled cylinder for EGS4 simulations of a PET system. Design optimization studies were performed as a function of crystal type and size, system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and number of positron emitter decays. Data analysis was performed to measure the accuracy of the reconstructed positron emitter distribution as well as the range of the positron emitter distribution. We simulated scanners with varying crystal sizes (2-4 mm) and type (LYSO and LaBr{sub 3}) and our results indicate that 4 mm wide LYSO or LaBr{sub 3} crystals (resulting in 4-5 mm spatial resolution) are adequate; for a full-ring, non-TOF scanner we predict a low bias (<0.6 mm) and a good precision (<1

  17. Design study of an in situ PET scanner for use in proton beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Zou, W.; Daube-Witherspoon, M. E.; McDonough, J.; Karp, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    Proton beam therapy can deliver a high radiation dose to a tumor without significant damage to surrounding healthy tissue or organs. One way of verifying the delivered dose distribution is to image the short-lived positron emitters produced by the proton beam as it travels through the patient. A potential solution to the limitations of PET imaging in proton beam therapy is the development of a high sensitivity, in situ PET scanner that starts PET imaging almost immediately after patient irradiation while the patient is still lying on the treatment bed. A partial ring PET design is needed for this application in order to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the proton beam, as well as restrictions on patient positioning on the couch. A partial ring also allows us to optimize the detector separation (and hence the sensitivity) for different patient sizes. Our goal in this investigation is to evaluate an in situ PET scanner design for use in proton therapy that provides tomographic imaging in a partial ring scanner design using time-of-flight (TOF) information and an iterative reconstruction algorithm. GEANT4 simulation of an incident proton beam was used to produce a positron emitter distribution, which was parameterized and then used as the source distribution inside a water-filled cylinder for EGS4 simulations of a PET system. Design optimization studies were performed as a function of crystal type and size, system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and number of positron emitter decays. Data analysis was performed to measure the accuracy of the reconstructed positron emitter distribution as well as the range of the positron emitter distribution. We simulated scanners with varying crystal sizes (2-4 mm) and type (LYSO and LaBr3) and our results indicate that 4 mm wide LYSO or LaBr3 crystals (resulting in 4-5 mm spatial resolution) are adequate; for a full-ring, non-TOF scanner we predict a low bias (<0.6 mm) and a good precision (<1 mm) in the

  18. A fast wire scanner, used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring. In order to minimize blow-up of the beam through multiple Coulomb scattering, the wires are very thin (in the version shown here it is actually a twisted strand of carbon fibres with a total diameter of about 25 microns) and are swept through the beam at high speed (a linear motor, not mounted here, accelerates the wires to up to 20 m/s). One measures either the secondary emission current from the wire, or the signal from a scintillator/photomultiplier combination downstream from the wire scanner receiving the shower from nuclear reactions of beam particles with the wire nuclei. There are four such fast wire scanners in the 26 GeV PS and eight in the 1.4 GeV Booster.

  19. Primary Beam Air Kerma Dependence on Distance from Cargo and People Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.; Cerra, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The distance dependence of air kerma or dose rate of the primary radiation beam is not obvious for security scanners of cargo and people in which there is relative motion between a collimated source and the person or object being imaged. To study this problem, one fixed line source and three moving-source scan-geometry cases are considered, each characterized by radiation emanating perpendicular to an axis. The cases are 1) a stationary line source of radioactive material, e.g., contaminated solution in a pipe; 2) a moving, uncollimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; 3) a moving, collimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; and 4) a translating, narrow “pencil” beam emanating in a flying-spot, raster pattern. Each case is considered for short and long distances compared to the line source length or path traversed by a moving source. The short distance model pertains mostly to dose to objects being scanned and personnel associated with the screening operation. The long distance model pertains mostly to potential dose to bystanders. For radionuclide sources, the number of nuclear transitions that occur a) per unit length of a line source, or b) during the traversal of a point source, is a unifying concept. The “universal source strength” of air kerma rate at a meter from the source can be used to describe x-ray machine or radionuclide sources. For many cargo and people scanners with highly collimated fan or pencil beams, dose varies as the inverse of the distance from the source in the near field and with the inverse square of the distance beyond a critical radius. Ignoring the inverse square dependence and using inverse distance dependence is conservative in the sense of tending to overestimate dose.

  20. First results of the INSIDE in-beam PET scanner for the on-line monitoring of particle therapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cerello, P.; Coli, S.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferrero, V.; Fiorina, E.; Giraudo, G.; Kostara, E.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Peroni, C.; Pirrone, G.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Rosso, V.; Sportelli, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2016-12-01

    Quality assessment of particle therapy treatments by means of PET systems has been carried out since late `90 and it is one of the most promising in-vivo non invasive monitoring techniques employed clinically. It can be performed with a diagnostic PET scanners installed outside the treatment room (off-line monitoring) or inside the treatment room (in-room monitoring). However the most efficient way is by integrating a PET scanner with the treatment delivery system (on-line monitoring) so that the biological wash out and the patient repositioning errors are minimized. In this work we present the performance of the in-beam PET scanner developed within the INSIDE project. The INSIDE PET scanner is made of two planar heads, 10 cm wide (transaxially) and 25 cm long (axially), composed of pixellated LFS crystals coupled to Hamamatsu MPPCs. Custom designed Front-End Electronics (FE) and Data AcQuisition (DAQ) systems allow an on-line reconstruction of PET images from separated in-spill and inter-spill data sets. The INSIDE PET scanner has been recently delivered at the CNAO (Pavia, Italy) hadrontherapy facility and the first experimental measurements have been carried out. Homogeneous PMMA phantoms and PMMA phantoms with small air and bone inserts were irradiated with monoenergetic clinical proton beams. The activity range was evaluated at various benchmark positions within the field of view to assess the homogeneity of response of the PET system. Repeated irradiations of PMMA phantoms with clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beams were performed to evaluate the reproducibility of the PET signal. The results found in this work show that the response of the INSIDE PET scanner is independent of the position within the radiation field. Results also show the capability of the INSIDE PET scanner to distinguish variations of the activity range due to small tissue inhomogeneities. Finally, the reproducibility of the activity range measurement was within 1 mm.

  1. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-21

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications.

  2. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The

  3. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  4. Dedicated scanner for laboratory investigations on cone-beam CT/SPECT imaging of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Russo, Paolo, E-mail: russo@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Cesarelli, Mario; Ospizio, Roberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Biomedica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Passeggio, Giuseppe; Roscilli, Lorenzo; Pontoriere, Giuseppe; Rocco, Raffaele [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-02-11

    We describe the design, realization and basic tests of a prototype Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography (CBBCT) scanner, combined with a SPECT head consisting of a compact pinhole gamma camera based on a photon counting CdTe hybrid pixel detector. The instrument features a 40 {mu}m focal spot X-ray tube, a 50 {mu}m pitch flat panel detector and a 1-mm-thick, 55 {mu}m pitch CdTe pixel detector. Preliminary imaging tests of the separate CT and gamma-ray units are presented showing a resolution in CT of 3.2 mm{sup -1} at a radial distance of 50 mm from the rotation axis and that the 5 and 8 mm hot masses ({sup 99m}Tc labeled with a 15:1 activity ratio with respect to the background) can be detected in planar gamma-ray imaging with a contrast-to-noise ratio of about 4.

  5. Method of the ion beam emittance measurement in the injection beam line of DC-72 cyclotron in the presence of its space charge using the scanner to determine beam dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Kasarinov, N Y; Kalagin, I V; Kazacha, V I

    2002-01-01

    The gradient method for measuring the transversal emittance of a high current ion beam in the injection channel of the cyclotron DC-72 is considered. The standard scanner is proposed for measuring the transversal dimensions of the beam. The formulae for determination of the mean square beam dimensions by current signals from the scanner needle are adduced. The method of the emittance recovery for axial-symmetric ion beam is set for the case when the space charge effect is essential. The algorithm for tuning of the quadrupole lenses in the injection channel of the cyclotron DC-72 for obtaining the axial-symmetric ion beam is proposed. The evaluations of the expected accuracy of the proposed method for the emittance recovery have been carried out.

  6. Evaluation of patient dose using a virtual CT scanner: Applications to 4DCT simulation and Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, J. J.; McNitt-Gray, M. F.; Cagnon, C. H.; Angel, E.; Agazaryan, N.; Zankl, M.

    2008-02-01

    This work evaluates the effects of patient size on radiation dose from simulation imaging studies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). 4DCT studies are scans that include temporal information, frequently incorporating highly over-sampled imaging series necessary for retrospective sorting as a function of respiratory phase. This type of imaging study can result in a significant dose increase to the patient due to the slower table speed as compared with a conventional axial or helical scan protocol. Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging is a relatively new imaging technique that requires an on-board kilovoltage x-ray tube and a flat-panel detector. Instead of porting individual reference fields, the kV tube and flat-panel detector are rotated about the patient producing a cone-beam CT data set (kV-CBCT). To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of adult patients and virtual source models of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. The GSF family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models, were implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The adult patient models represent a range of patient sizes and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented. Simulated 4DCT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a multi-detector CT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, bow-tie filtration, and helical source path. Standard MCNPX tally functions were applied to each model to estimate absolute organ dose based upon an air-kerma normalization measurement for nominal scanner operating parameters.

  7. Demonstration of a laserwire emittance scanner for hydrogen ion beams at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, T; Bosco, A; Gibson, S M; Roncarolo, F; Boorman, G; Raich, U; Bravin, E; Pozimski, J K; Letchford, A; Gabor, C

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive, compact laserwire system has been developed to measure the transverse emittance of an H- beam and has been demonstrated at the new LINAC4 injector for the LHC at CERN. Light from a low power, pulsed laser source is conveyed via fibre to collide with the H- beam, a fraction of which is neutralized and then intercepted by a downstream diamond detector. Scanning the focused laser across the H- beam and measuring the distribution of the photo-neutralized particles enables the transverse emittance to be reconstructed. The vertical phase-space distribution of a 3 MeV beam during LINAC4 commissioning has been measured by the laserwire and verified with a conventional slit and grid method.

  8. 宽排CT探测器CT剂量指数应用初探%Discussion on CT dose index for wide beam CT scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彬; 白玫

    2013-01-01

    Objective: With the increasing of beam width of CT scanner, traditional CT dose index (CTDI) encountered difficulties when expressing dosimetry for wide beam CT scanner. This article discussed the evolution and application of CTDI for wide beam CT scanners. Method: This article demonstrated principles of traditional CTDI and the limitation of it as a dosimetry for wide beam CT scanners, and introduced the evolution of CTDI for wide beam CT scanners and their principles and measurements. Results: IEC amended traditional CTDI and recommended a tiered approach to the definition of CTDI to be more adaptive for wide beam CT scanners. And with the approach of several time measurements at different locations, 150mm long PMMA phantom and 100mm long ion chamber could still be used for the measurements of new tiered CTDI. Conclusion: New tiered CTDI provided a more accurate dosimetry for wide beam CT scanners with a reservation of basic concept and measurement conditions of traditional CTDI.%目的:随着射线宽度的不断增加,传统CT剂量指数(CTDI)在表征CT剂量时遇到瓶颈问题,不能够很好地表征宽排CT探测器的剂量水平.本文探讨CTDI在CT宽排探测器剂量表征量方面的概念演化和应用方式.方法:介绍传统CTDI表征CT剂量的原理和方式,展示传统CTDI在表征宽排CT探测器时的局限性,阐述宽排CT探测器CTDI剂量表征量方式的演变过程,初步探讨宽排CTDI探测器CTDI表征和测量.结果:IEC在对传统CTDI进行修正的基础上推出分层次CTDI表征的方式,能更好适应宽排CT探测器的剂量表征.通过多点分次测量,新定义的分层次CTDI仍然可采用传统的150mm有机玻璃CT剂量体模和100mm电离室进行测量.结论:分层次CTDI表征方式能在保留传统CTDI基本概念和常规测试条件的基础上较好地表征宽排CT探测器的剂量水平.

  9. Eye-safe diode laser Doppler lidar with a MEMS beam-scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2016-02-08

    We present a novel Doppler lidar that employs a cw diode laser operating at 1.5 μm and a micro-electro-mechanical-system scanning mirror (MEMS-SM). In this work, two functionalities of the lidar system are demonstrated. Firstly, we describe the capability to effectively steer the lidar probe beam to multiple optical transceivers along separate lines-of-sight. The beam steering functionality is demonstrated using four lines-of-sight--each at an angle of 18° with respect to their symmetry axis. Secondly, we demonstrate the ability to spatially dither the beam focus to reduce the mean irradiance at the probing distance (R = 60 m) of each line-of-sight--elevant for meeting eye-safety requirements. The switching time of the MEMS-SM is measured to be in the order of a few milliseconds. Time-shared (0.25 s per line-of-sight) radial wind speed measurements at 50 Hz data rate are experimentally demonstrated. Spatial dithering of the beam focus is also implemented using a spiral scan trajectory resulting in a 16 dB reduction of beam focus mean irradiance.

  10. Eye-safe diode laser Doppler lidar with a MEMS beam-scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel Doppler lidar that employs a cw diode laser operating at 1.5 μm and a micro-electro-mechanical-system scanning mirror (MEMS-SM). In this work, two functionalities of the lidar system are demonstrated. Firstly, we describe the capability to effectively steer the lidar probe beam...... at the probing distance (R = 60 m) of each lineof-sight – relevant for meeting eye-safety requirements. The switching time of the MEMS-SM is measured to be in the order of a few milliseconds. Time-shared (0.25 s per line-of-sight) radial wind speed measurements at 50 Hz data rate are experimentally demonstrated...

  11. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  12. Twisting wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Gharibyan, V; Krouptchenkov, I; Nölle, D; Tiessen, H; Werner, M; Wittenburg, K

    2012-01-01

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  13. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol.

  14. A comparative study for image quality and radiation dose of a cone beam computed tomography scanner and a multislice computed tomography scanner for paranasal sinus imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cock, Jens de; Canning, John [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Zanca, Federica; Hermans, Robert [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben [KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of a state of the art cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) system in patients with sinonasal poliposis. In this retrospective study two radiologists evaluated 57 patients with sinonasal poliposis who underwent a CBCT or MSCT sinus examination, along with a control group of 90 patients with normal radiological findings. Tissue doses were measured using a phantom model with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Overall image quality in CBCT was scored significantly higher than in MSCT in patients with normal radiologic findings (p-value: 0.00001). In patients with sinonasal poliposis, MSCT scored significantly higher than CBCT (p-value: 0.00001). The average effective dose for MSCT was 42 % higher compared to CBCT (108 μSv vs 63 μSv). CBCT and MSCT are both suited for the evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important structures of the paranasal sinuses can be better delineated with MSCT, whereas in patients without sinonasal poliposis, CBCT turns out to define the important structures of the sinonasal region better. However, given the lower radiation dose, CBCT can be considered for the evaluation of the sinonasal structures in patients with sinonasal poliposis. (orig.)

  15. Effect of light source instability on uniformity of 3D reconstructions from a cone beam optical CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, J; Taylor, M L; Holloway, L; Kron, T; Franich, R D

    2014-12-01

    Temporally varying light intensity during acquisition of projection images in an optical CT scanner can potentially be misinterpreted as physical properties of the sample. This work investigated the impact of LED light source intensity instability on measured attenuation coefficients. Different scenarios were investigated by conducting one or both of the reference and data scans in a 'cold' scanner, where the light source intensity had not yet stabilised. Uniform samples were scanned to assess the impact on measured uniformity. The orange (590 nm) light source decreased in intensity by 29 % over the first 2 h, while the red (633 nm) decreased by 9 %. The rates of change of intensity at 2 h were 0.1 and 0.03 % respectively over a 5 min period-corresponding to the scan duration. The normalisation function of the reconstruction software does not fully account for the intensity differences and discrepancies remain. Attenuation coefficient inaccuracies of up to 8 % were observed for data reconstructed from projection images acquired with a cold scanner. Increased noise was observed for most cases where one or both of the scans was acquired without sufficient warm-up. The decrease in accuracy and increase in noise were most apparent for data reconstructed from reference and data scans acquired with a cold scanner on different days.

  16. BEPC II wire scanner system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Yan-Feng; WANG Lin; ZHAO Ying; YUE Jun-Hui; LI Xiao-Ping; CAO Jian-She; MA Li

    2010-01-01

    To monitor the beam profile at the end of the linac non-destructively,a wire scanner as a new diagnostic instrument was designed,manufactured and installed in 2007.Since then,several measurements have been carried out using this device.This paper describes the whole system of the wire scanner and the testing results.

  17. Scanner Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  18. Laser Wire Scanner Compton Scattering Techniques for the Measurement of the Transverse Beam Size of Particle Beams at Future Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Agapov, I; Blair, G A; Bosser, J; Braun, H H; Bravin, E; Boorman, G; Boogert, S T; Carter, J; D'amico, E; Delerue, N; Howell, D F; Doebert, S; Driouichi, C; Frisch, J; Hutchins, K Honkavaaram S; Kamps, T; Lefevre, T; Lewin, H; Paris, T; Poirier, F; Price, M T; Maccaferi, R; Malton, S; Penn, G; Ross, I N; Ross, M; Schlarb, H; Schmueser, P; Schreiber, S; Sertore, D; Walker, N; Wendt, M; Wittenburg, K

    2014-01-01

    This archive summarizes a working paper and conference proceedings related to laser wire scanner development for the Future Linear Collider (FLC) in the years 2001 to 2006. In particular the design, setup and data taking for the laser wire experiments at PETRA II and CT2 are described. The material is focused on the activities undertaken by Royal Holloway University of London (RHUL).

  19. Wire Scanner Motion Control Card

    CERN Document Server

    Forde, S E

    2006-01-01

    Scientists require a certain beam quality produced by the accelerator rings at CERN. The discovery potential of LHC is given by the reachable luminosity at its interaction points. The luminosity is maximized by minimizing the beam size. Therefore an accurate beam size measurement is required for optimizing the luminosity. The wire scanner performs very accurate profile measurements, but as it can not be used at full intensity in the LHC ring, it is used for calibrating other profile monitors. As the current wire scanner system, which is used in the present CERN accelerators, has not been made for the required specification of the LHC, a new design of a wire scanner motion control card is part of the LHC wire scanner project. The main functions of this card are to control the wire scanner motion and to acquire the position of the wire. In case of further upgrades at a later stage, it is required to allow an easy update of the firmware, hence the programmable features of FPGAs will be used for this purpose. The...

  20. Modeling and design of a cone-beam CT head scanner using task-based imaging performance optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is important for diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, postoperative bleeding, and other head and neck injuries. This paper details the design and development of a cone-beam CT (CBCT) system developed specifically for the detection of low-contrast ICH in a form suitable for application at the point of care. Recognizing such a low-contrast imaging task to be a major challenge in CBCT, the system design began with a rigorous analysis of task-based detectability including critical aspects of system geometry, hardware configuration, and artifact correction. The imaging performance model described the three-dimensional (3D) noise-equivalent quanta using a cascaded systems model that included the effects of scatter, scatter correction, hardware considerations of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs), and digitization bit depth. The performance was analyzed with respect to a low-contrast (40-80 HU), medium-frequency task representing acute ICH detection. The task-based detectability index was computed using a non-prewhitening observer model. The optimization was performed with respect to four major design considerations: (1) system geometry (including source-to-detector distance (SDD) and source-to-axis distance (SAD)); (2) factors related to the x-ray source (including focal spot size, kVp, dose, and tube power); (3) scatter correction and selection of an antiscatter grid; and (4) x-ray detector configuration (including pixel size, additive electronics noise, field of view (FOV), and frame rate, including both CMOS and a-Si:H FPDs). Optimal design choices were also considered with respect to practical constraints and available hardware components. The model was verified in comparison to measurements on a CBCT imaging bench as a function of the numerous design parameters mentioned above. An extended geometry (SAD  =  750 mm, SDD  =  1100

  1. Use of an optical digital reader for establishing criterion of quality control in clinical beams; Uso de un lector optico digital (scanner) para establecer criterios de control de calidad en haces clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genis S, R. [Unidad de Radioterapia, Hospital Medica Sur, S.A. Pte. de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    The goal of this work is to present a procedure for realizing the control of the clinical radiation fields through typical radiographic film of verification in radiotherapy and showing the results of the analysis carried out in the expositions of reference fields for photons and electrons using an optical digital reader of high resolution (600 x 1200 dpi) named scanner and a computer program for images edition. It was possible to obtain the quantification of the following parameters: alinement of the radiation beam with the luminous beam, homogeneity or levelling of the radiation field, and self symmetry with respect to the center of the luminous field. With the purpose to compare the results versus an usual method it was realized measurements of the same images with a luminous photo densitometer with 1 mm collimation window. (Author)

  2. Network Security Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Network Security Scanner (NSS) is a tool that allows auditing and monitoring remote network computers for possible vulnerabilities, checks your network for all potential methods that a hacker might use to attack it. Network Security Scanner is a complete networking utilities package that includes a wide range of tools for network security auditing, vulnerability Auditing, scanning, monitoring and more. Network Security Scanner (NSS) is an easy to use, intuitive network security scanner that c...

  3. Experimental assessment of the influence of beam hardening filters on image quality and patient dose in volumetric 64-slice X-ray CT scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, Mohammad Reza; Mehranian, Abolfazi; Maleki, Asghar; Ghadiri, Hossien; Ghafarian, Pardis; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Beam hardening filters have long been employed in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to preferentially absorb soft and low-energy X-rays having no or little contribution to image formation, thus allowing the reduction of patient dose and beam hardening artefacts. In this work, we studied the influence o

  4. Assessment of the effective dose in supine, prone, and oblique positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel combined extremity and maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koivisto, J.; Wolff, J.; Järnstedt, J.; Dastidar, P.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to assess the organ and effective doses (International Commission on Radiological Protection [ICRP] 103 standard) resulting from supine, prone, and oblique phantom positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) dev

  5. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierick, Manuel, E-mail: Manuel.Dierick@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Loo, Denis, E-mail: info@XRE.be [XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Masschaele, Bert [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van den Bulcke, Jan [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Acker, Joris, E-mail: Joris.VanAcker@UGent.be [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle, E-mail: Veerle.Cnudde@UGent.be [UGCT-SGIG, Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc, E-mail: Luc.VanHoorebeke@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV{sub max}) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  6. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography (www.ugct.ugent.be) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kVmax) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  7. The PS Booster Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, S; Priestnall, K; Raich, U

    2003-01-01

    The very tight emittance budget for LHC type beams makes precise emittance measurements in the injector complex a necessity. The PS machine uses 2 fast wire scanners per transverse plane for emittance measurement of the circulating beams. In order to ease comparison the same type of wire scanners have been newly installed in the upstream machine, the PS Booster, where each of the 4 rings is equipped with 2 wire scanners measuring the horizontal and vertical profiles. Those wire scanners use new and more modern control and readout electronics featuring dedicated intelligent motor movement controllers, which relieves the very stringent real time constraints due to the very high speed of 20m/s. In order to be able to measure primary beams at the very low injection energy of the Booster (50MeV) secondary emission currents from the wire can be measured as well as secondary particle flows at higher primary particle energies during and after acceleration. The solution adopted for the control of the devices is descri...

  8. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Martin P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  9. Colorimetric Scanner Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Y. Hardeberg

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methods for the colorimetric characterisation of colour scanners are proposed and evaluated. These methods apply equally to other colour image input devices such as digital cameras. The goal of our characterisation is to establish the relationship between the device-dependent colour space of the scanner and the device-independent CIELAB colour space. The scanner characterisation is based on polynomial regression techniques. Several regression schemes have been tested. The retained method consists in applying a non-linear correction to the scanner RGB values followed by a 3rd order 3D polynomial regression function directly to CIELAB space. This method gives very good results in terms of residual colour differences. This is partly due to the fact that the RMS error that is minimised in the regression corresponds to ΔE*ab which is well correlated to visual colour differences.

  10. Cobalt-60 Container Scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a special container scanner in which the radiation source is a conventional radiography 60Co projector of (100-300)×3 .7×1010Bq. With a specia l sensitive array detector, invented by Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology ( INET) of Tsinghua University and other technical innovations, t he characteristics of the 60Co scanner qualify it for use in c ontainer insp ection. Its contrast indicator (CI) and image quality indicator (IQI) for 10 0 mm steel are equal to 0.7% and 2.5%, respectively, and the steel penetration ( SP) is about 240 mm. The 60Co container scanner is much more ec onomical and more reliable than those scanners using an accelerator source. Also, its penetr ation ability is much better than that of an X-ray machine scanner. This paper p resents the system design, the main difficulties and their technical solutions, the inspection characteristics and the special features of the 60Co sc anner.

  11. Laser Scanner For Automatic Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando D.; Correia, Bento A.; Rebordao, Jose M.; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-01-01

    The automated magazines are beeing used at industry more and more. One of the problems related with the automation of a Store House is the identification of the products envolved. Already used for stock management, the Bar Codes allows an easy way to identify one product. Applied to automated magazines, the bar codes allows a great variety of items in a small code. In order to be used by the national producers of automated magazines, a devoted laser scanner has been develloped. The Prototype uses an He-Ne laser whose beam scans a field angle of 75 degrees at 16 Hz. The scene reflectivity is transduced by a photodiode into an electrical signal, which is then binarized. This digital signal is the input of the decodifying program. The machine is able to see barcodes and to decode the information. A parallel interface allows the comunication with the central unit, which is responsible for the management of automated magazine.

  12. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam.

  13. Microarray Scanner for Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liqiang; Lu zukang; Li Yingsheng; Zheng Xufeng

    2003-01-01

    A novel pseudo confocal microarray scanner is introduced, in which one dimension scanning is performed by a galvanometer optical scanner and a telecentric objective, another dimension scanning is performed by a stepping motor.

  14. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  15. Measurement Report for the PS-boosterWire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Vollinger, Christine; Kramer, Patrick; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This Note discusses the EM-measurements carried out on the prototype of the PS-Booster wire scanner. The aim of these measurements was to identify intrinsic resonances that are to be evaluated for their contribution to the longitudinal beam impedance of the machine.

  16. Pure Nano-Rotation Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed and tested a novel rotation scanner for nano resolution and accurate rotary motion about the rotation center. The scanner consists of circular hinges and leaf springs so that the parasitic error at the center of the scanner in the X and Y directions is minimized, and rotation performance is optimized. Each sector of the scanner's system was devised to have nano resolution by minimizing the parasitic errors of the rotation center that arise due to displacements other than rotation. The analytic optimal design results of the proposed scanner were verified using finite element analyses. The piezoelectric actuators were used to attain nano-resolution performances, and a capacitive sensor was used to measure displacement. A feedback controller was used to minimize the rotation errors in the rotation scanner system under practical conditions. Finally, the performance evaluation test results showed that the resonance frequency was 542 Hz, the resolution was 0.09 μrad, and the rotation displacement was 497.2 μrad. Our test results revealed that the rotation scanner exhibited accurate rotation about the center of the scanner and had good nano precision.

  17. Laser Scanner Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, B.

    2005-09-06

    In the Summer of 2004 a request for proposals went out to potential vendors to offer a three-dimensional laser scanner for a number of unique metrology tasks at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Specifications were established including range, accuracy, scan density, resolution and field of view in consideration of anticipated department requirements. Four vendors visited the site to present their system and they were asked to perform three unique tests with their system on a two day visit to SLAC. Two of the three tests were created to emulate real-world applications at SLAC while the third was an accuracy and resolution series of experiments. The scope of these tests is presented and some of the vendor's results are included.

  18. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  19. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively.

  20. Intraoral 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  1. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, R A; Dugad, S R; Garde, C S; Gopal, A V; Gupta, S K; Prabhu, S S

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 - σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  2. Nogle muligheder i scanner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn

    2000-01-01

    I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data......I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data...

  3. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-21

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5-10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  4. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Kaloshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  5. Aircraft Scanners = NASA Digital Aerial Scanners (TMS, TIMS, NS001): Pre 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Aircraft Scanners data set contains digital imagery acquired from several multispectral scanners including NS-001 Mutispectral scanner, Daedalus thematic mapper...

  6. Design and Test of Wire-Scanners for SwissFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, G L; Brands, H; Heimgartner, P; Ischebeck, R; Kammerer, A; Löhl, F; Lüscher, R; Mohanmurthy, P; Ozkan, C; Schlott, V; Schulz, L; Rippstein, B; Seiler, C; Trovati, S; Valitutti, P; Zimoch, D

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL light-facility will provide coherent X-rays in the wavelength region 7-0.7 nm and 0.7-0.1 nm. In SwissFEL, view-screens and wire-scanners will be used to monitor the transverse profile of a 200/10pC electron beam with a normalized emittance of 0.4/0.2 mm.mrad and a final energy of 5.8 GeV. Compared to view screens, wire-scanners offer a quasi-non-destructive monitoring of the beam transverse profile without suffering from possible micro-bunching of the electron beam. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and beam-test of the SwissFEL wire-scanner prototype will be discussed.

  7. The mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner in IHEP U-70 accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. T.; Makhov, S. S.; Savin, D. A.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner based on a servomotor. The design of the wire scanner is motivated by the need to measure the transverse profile of the high power proton and carbon beams at the IHEP U-70 accelerator. This paper formulates the requirements to the fast wire scanner system for the high intensity proton beam at the U-70 accelerator. The results on the design of electro-mechanical device for the wire scanner with a wire traveling speed 10-20 m/s are presented. The solution consists in a brushless servomotor and standard motor control electronics. High radiation levels in the accelerator enclosure dictate the use of a resolver as the position feedback element.

  8. Evaluation of disparate laser beam deflection technologies by means of number and rate of resolvable spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Peter; Hohenstein, Ralph; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-08-15

    We introduce a method to objectively evaluate systems of differing beam deflection technologies that commonly are described by disparate technical specifications. Using our new approach based on resolvable spots we will compare commercially available random-access beam deflection technologies, namely galvanometer scanners, piezo scanners, MEMS scanners, acousto-optic deflectors, and electro-optic deflectors.

  9. A case study in scanner optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, N J; Gibson, N M

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound scanner preset programmes are factory set or tailored to user requirements. Scanners may, therefore, have different settings for the same application, even on similar equipment in a single department. The aims of this study were: (1) to attempt to match the performance of two scanners, where one was preferred and (2) to assess differences between six scanners used for breast ultrasound within our organisation. The Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software was used to compare imaging performance. Images of a Gammex RMI 404GS test object were collected from six scanners, using default presets, factory presets and settings matched to a preferred scanner. Resolution, low contrast performance and high contrast performance were measured. The performance of two scanners was successfully matched, where one had been preferred. Default presets varied across the six scanners, three different presets being used. The most used preset differed in settings across the scanners, most notably in the use of different frequency modes. The factory preset was more consistent across the scanners, the main variation being in dynamic range (55-70 dB). Image comparisons showed significant differences, which were reduced or eliminated by adjustment of settings to match a reference scanner. It is possible to match scanner performance using the Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software as a verification tool. Ultrasound users should be aware that scanners may not behave in a similar fashion, even with apparently equivalent presets. It should be possible to harmonise presets by consensus amongst users.

  10. Optimizing spatial resolution with the mechanical design of an X-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Hughes, Simon H. C.; Slocum, Robert E.

    The most important factor limiting spatial resolution in a well-designed CT scanner - the width of the X-ray beam as it passes through the object being examined - is described. The Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS), a second-generation CT scanner that has a variable geometry to allow a wide variety of objects to be scanned at peak spatial resolution, even with different radiation sources, is described.

  11. Laser identification system based on acousto-optical barcode scanner principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansuvarov, Ruslan A.; Korol, Georgy I.; Preslenev, Leonid N.; Bestugin, Aleksandr R.; Paraskun, Arthur S.

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of the bar code in the modern world is the unique identification of the product, service, or any of their features, so personal and stationary barcode scanners so widely used. One of the important parameters of bar code scanners is their reliability, accuracy of the barcode recognition, response time and performance. Nowadays, the most popular personal barcode scanners contain a mechanical part, which extremely impairs the reliability indices. Group of SUAI engineers has proposed bar code scanner based on laser beam acoustic deflection effect in crystals [RU patent No 156009 issued 4/16/2015] Through the use of an acousto-optic deflector element in barcode scanner described by a group of engineers SUAI, it can be implemented in the manual form factor, and the stationary form factor of a barcode scanner. Being a wave electronic device, an acousto-optic element in the composition of the acousto-optic barcode scanner allows you to clearly establish a mathematical link between the encoded function of the bar code with the accepted input photodetector intensities function that allows you to speak about the great probability of a bar code clear definition. This paper provides a description of the issued patent, the description of the principles of operation based on the mathematical analysis, a description of the layout of the implemented scanner.

  12. Use of Radioactive Ion Beams for Biomedical Research 2. in-vivo dosimetry using positron emitting rare earth isotopes with the rotating prototype PET scanner at the Geneva Cantonal Hospital

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS331 \\\\ \\\\ The use of radioactive metal ions (such as $^{90}$Y, $^{153}$Sm or $^{186}$Re) in cancer therapy has made some progress, but has been hampered by factors that could be addressed at CERN with a greater likelihood of success than at any other installation in the world. The present proposal seeks to use the unique advantage of CERN ISOLDE to get round these problems together with the PET scanners at the Cantonal Hospital Geneva (PET~=~positron emission tomography). Radioisotope production by spallation at ISOLDE makes available a complete range of isotopes having as complete a diversity of types and energy of radiation, of half-life, and of ionic properties as one would wish. Among these isotopes several positron-emitters having clinical relevance are available.\\\\ \\\\Some free rare earth chelatas are used presently in palliation of painful bone metastases. Curative effects are not able for the moment with this kind of radiopharmaceuticals. More and better data on the biokinetics and bio-distribution...

  13. Compensation strategies for PET scanners with unconventional scanner geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlich, B; Oehler, M

    2006-01-01

    The small animal PET scanner ClearPET®Neuro, developed at the Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH in cooperation with the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN), represents scanners with an unconventional geometry: due to axial and transaxial detector gaps ClearPet®Neuro delivers inhomogeneous sinograms with missing data. When filtered backprojection (FBP) or Fourier rebinning (FORE) are applied, strong geometrical artifacts appear in the images. In this contribution we present a method that takes the geometrical sensitivity into account and converts the measured sinograms into homogeneous and complete data. By this means artifactfree images are achieved using FBP or FORE. Besides an advantageous measurement setup that reduces inhomogeneities and data gaps in the sinograms, a modification of the measured sinograms is necessary. This modification includes two steps: a geometrical normalization and corrections for missing data. To normalize the measured sinograms, computed sinograms are used that describe the geometric...

  14. Fast and High Accuracy Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Koujili, M; Koopman, J; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; De Freitas, J; Ait Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2009-01-01

    Scanning of a high intensity particle beam imposes challenging requirements on a Wire Scanner system. It is expected to reach a scanning speed of 20 m.s-1 with a position accuracy of the order of 1 μm. In addition a timing accuracy better than 1 millisecond is needed. The adopted solution consists of a fork holding a wire rotating by a maximum of 200°. Fork, rotor and angular position sensor are mounted on the same axis and located in a chamber connected to the beam vacuum. The requirements imply the design of a system with extremely low vibration, vacuum compatibility, radiation and temperature tolerance. The adopted solution consists of a rotary brushless synchronous motor with the permanent magnet rotor installed inside of the vacuum chamber and the stator installed outside. The accurate position sensor will be mounted on the rotary shaft inside of the vacuum chamber, has to resist a bake-out temperature of 200°C and ionizing radiation up to a dozen of kGy/year. A digital feedback controller allows maxi...

  15. Physical performance evaluation of a 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Kandatsu, Susumu; Tanada, Shuji; Aradate, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional (4D) imaging that employs continuous rotations of a cone-beam. Since a cone-beam scan along a circular orbit does not collect a complete set of data to make an exact reconstruction of a volume [three-dimensional (3D) image], it might cause disadvantages or artifacts. To examine effects of the cone-beam data collection on image quality, we have evaluated physical performance of the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner with 0.5 mm slices and compared it to that of a 16-slice CT-scanner with 0.75 mm slices. As a result, we found that image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were independent of z coordinate. A Feldkamp artifact was observed in distortion measurements. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of slice sensitivity profiles (SSP) increased with z coordinate though it seemed to be caused by other reasons than incompleteness of data. With regard to low contrast detectability, smaller objects were detected more clearly at the midplane (z = 0 mm) than at z = 40 mm, though circular-band like artifacts affected detection. The comparison between the 16-slice and the 256-slice scanners showed better performance for the 16-slice scanner regarding the SSP, low contrast detectability, and distortion. The inferiorities of the 256-slice scanner in other than distortion measurement (Feldkamp artifact) seemed to be partly caused by the prototype nature of the scanner and should be improved in the future scanner. The image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were almost identical for both CTs. The 256-slice scanner was superior to the 16-slice scanner regarding the PSF, though it was caused by the smaller transverse beam width of the 256-slice scanner. In order to compare both scanners comprehensively in terms of exposure dose, noise, slice thickness, and transverse spatial resolution, K=Dsigma2ha3 was calculated, where D was exposure dose (CT dose index), sigma was magnitude of

  16. A New Proton CT Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Coutrakon, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rykalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Naimuddin, M

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction, and preliminary testing of a second generation proton CT scanner is presented. All current treatment planning systems at proton therapy centers use X-ray CT as the primary imaging modality for treatment planning to calculate doses to tumor and healthy tissues. One of the limitations of X-ray CT is in the conversion of X-ray attenuation coefficients to relative (proton) stopping powers, or RSP. This results in more proton range uncertainty, larger target volumes and therefore, more dose to healthy tissues. To help improve this, we present a novel scanner capable of high dose rates, up to 2~MHz, and large area coverage, 20~x~24~cm$^2$, for imaging an adult head phantom and reconstructing more accurate RSP values.

  17. A noble refractive optical scanner with linear response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Yair J.; Lai, Zhenhua; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-03-01

    Many applications in various fields of science and engineering use steered optical beam systems. Currently, many methods utilize mirrors in order to steer the beam. However, this approach is an off-axis solution, which normally increases the total size of the system as well as its error and complexity. Other methods use a "Risely Prisms" based solution, which is on-axis solution, however it poses some difficulties from an engineering standpoint, and therefore isn't widely used. We present here a novel technique for steering a beam on its optical axis with a linear deflection response. We derived the formulation for the profile required of the refractive optical component necessary for preforming the beam steering. The functionality of the device was simulated analytically using Matlab, as well as using a ray-tracing software, Zemax, and showed agreement with the analytical model. An optical element was manufactured based on the proposed design and the device was tested. The results show agreement with our hypothesis. We also present some proposed geometries of the several other devices, all based on the same concept, which can be used for higher performance applications such as two-dimensional scanner, video rate scanner etc.

  18. Laser trepanning of CFRP with a scanner head for IR and UV lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Kenji; Aoyama, Mitsuaki; Fujisaki, Akira; Miyato, Taizo; Kayahara, Takashi; Harada, Yoshihisa; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    The dual beam of cw-350 W single-mode near-IR fiber laser and ns-pulsed-35 W UV laser were used in the experiments for cutting. The laser beam on the sample surface was scanned with a galvanometer scanner and focused with the f-theta lens of 400 mm focal length for IR and UV laser irradiations. A prototype remote scanner head for the multiple laser irradiations has been developed for a high-quality and high-speed laser processing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). In this paper, we report on the laser trepanning of circular patterns on CFRP.

  19. Alignment and resolution studies of a MARS scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P; Bell, S T; Chelkov, G; Demichev, M; Gongadze, A; Kotov, S; Kozhevnikov, D; Kruchonak, U; Potrap, I; Smolyanskiy, P; Zhemchugov, A

    2015-01-01

    The MARS scanner is designed for the x-ray spectroscopic study of samples with the aid of computer tomography methods. Computer tomography allows the reconstruction of slices of an investigated sample using a set of shadow projections obtained for different angles. Projections in the MARS scanner are produced using a cone x-ray beam geometry. Correct reconstruction in this scheme requires precise knowledge of several geometrical parameters of a tomograph, such as displacement of a rotation axis, x-ray source position with respect to a camera, and camera inclinations. Use of inaccurate parameters leads to a poor sample reconstruction. Non-ideal positioning of camera, x-ray source and cylindrical rotating frame (gantry) itself on which these parts are located, leads to the need for tomograph alignment. In this note we describe the alignment procedure that was used to get different geometrical corrections for the reconstruction. Also, several different estimations of the final spatial resolution for reconstructe...

  20. Polarization property analysis of a periscopic scanner with three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufei; Yan, Changxiang

    2016-02-20

    The polarization properties of a two-axis periscopic optical scanner constituted by a pair of rotating planar mirrors have been studied by using the three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing matrix method. The separate and cumulative matrices that define the transformation of the polarization state are obtained and expressed in terms of the rotation angles of two mirrors. The variations of diattenuation and retardance are investigated and graphically shown as functions of the rotation angles. On this basis, a further investigation about the cumulative polarization aberrations of three different metal-coated periscopic scanners is accomplished. Finally, the output polarization states of the three metal-coated scanners are calculated with the input beam of the arbitrary polarization states, and the results show that aluminum film is more appropriate than gold film or silver film for the polarization-maintaining periscopic scanner.

  1. Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

  2. Optimization of PET scanner geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Lars-Eric; Karp, J.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Modern positron emission tomographs (PET), when used for 3D imaging, have a wide open gantry without intra plane septa and only little shielding. In order to reduce the scatter contamination from activity inside and outside the field-of-view (FOV), and to block radiation originating from activity outside-the-FOV, we have investigated the implementation of septa and additional patient shielding on our existing whole body PET scanner. A series of Monte Carlo simulations, based on EGS4, were performed to predict the potential benefits. Our simulations include point and line sources at various radial and axial positions in the FOV of the scanner, and different sized uniform cylinders (up to 100 cm long and 50 cm in diameter). The scanner itself is based on 6 continuous NaI(Tl) crystals, an axial FOV of 25.6 cm, a ring diameter of 90 cm, and a transaxial FOV of 56 cm. The results show that septa can reduce the relative scatter fraction and effectively block radiation from outside-the-FOV, but they also reduce the sensitivity for true events, leading to a decrease of the trues-to-singles ratio that is not desirable. The use of septa is only advantageous for large objects, if the loss of true events is compensated for by increasing the injected activity. Patient shields that are mounted outside-the-FOV reduce the contamination from scattered and single events without interfering with true events. They are more effective for objects with a small diameter and less effective for objects with a large diameter. (author)

  3. Modeling of a piezoelectric micro-scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Chaehoi, A; Cornez, D; Kirk, K

    2008-01-01

    Micro-scanners have been widely used in many optical applications. The micro-scanner presented in this paper uses multimorph-type bending actuators to tilt a square plate mirror. This paper presents a complete analytical model of the piezoelectric micro-scanner. This theoretical model based on strength of material equations calculates the force generated by the multimorphs on the mirror, the profile of the structure and the angular deflection of the mirror. The proposed model, used to optimize the design of the piezoelectric silicon micro-scanner, is intended for further HDL integration, allowing in this way system level simulation and optimization.

  4. Compact implementation of dynamic receive apodization in ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    The image quality in medical ultrasound scanners is determined by several factors, one of which is the ability of the receive beamformer to change the aperture weighting function with depth and beam angle. In digital beamformers, precise dynamic apodization can be achieved by representing...... the function by numeric sequences. For a 15 cm scan depth and 100 lines per image, a 64-channel, 40 MHz ultrasound beamformer may need almost 50 million coefficients. A more coarse representation of the aperture relieves the memory requirements but does not enable compact and precise beamforming. Previously...

  5. Vacuum Actuator and Controller Design for a Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Herranz Alvarez, J; Koujili, M; Sirvent Blasco, J L

    2012-01-01

    To cope with increasing requirements in terms of accuracy and beam intensity limits a beam wire scanner (BWS) design is under development for the CERN accelerators complex. The main parameters have been determined; the wire speed should be 20 m·s -1 when interacting with the beam and a beam width determination accuracy of 2µm under the harsh radioactive environment should be reached. To meet this goal, the proposed solution locates all moveable parts of the actuator and the angular sensors in the beam vacuum pipe in order to reduce the friction and to allow a direct position measurement. One absolute positioning sensor will be used for the brushless motor feedback and one custom, high precision incremental design will target the beam size determination. The laboratory tests set up for the actuator and the incremental sensor will be presented along with the motor control feedback loops developed with the DSpace environment using Simulink and MatLab tools. Finally, the development of the digital...

  6. Interpretation of Wire-Scanner asymmetric profiles in a Low-Energy ring

    CERN Document Server

    Cieslak-Kowalska, Magdalena Anna

    2016-01-01

    In the CERN PS Booster, wire-scanner profile measurements performed at injection energy are affected by a strong asymmetry. The shape was reproduced with the code PyORBIT, assuming that the effect is due to the beam evolution during the scans, under the influence of space-charge forces and Multiple Coulomb Scattering at the wire itself. Reproducing the transverse profiles during beam evolution allows to use them reliably as input for simulation benchmarking.

  7. 3D whole body scanners revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Haar, F.B. ter

    2013-01-01

    An overview of whole body scanners in 1998 (H.A.M. Daanen, G.J. Van De Water. Whole body scanners, Displays 19 (1998) 111-120) shortly after they emerged to the market revealed that the systems were bulky, slow, expensive and low in resolution. This update shows that new developments in sensing and

  8. Non-Destructive Testing Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Bio-Imaging Research's technology that originated in an aerospace program has come full circle with a new aerospace adaptation called the Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System, or ACTIS. The medical version of CT scans the human body for tumors or other abnormalities, the ACTIS system finds imperfections in aerospace structures and components, such as castings, assemblies, rocket motors and nozzles. ACTIS is described by its developer as the most versatile CT scanner available for non-destructive testing applications. ACTIS is a variable geometry system. ACTIS source and detectors can be moved closer together or farther apart to optimize the geometry for different sizes of test objects. The combination of variable geometry, three sources, and focusing detectors makes ACTIS cost effective for a broad range of applications. System can scan anything from very small turbine blades to large rocket assemblies.

  9. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  10. Reliability of a 3D surface laser scanner for orthodontic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnoto, Budi; Evans, Carla A

    2002-10-01

    A device for recreating three-dimensional (3D) objects on a computer is the surface laser scanner. By triangulating distances between the reflecting laser beam and the scanned surface, the surface laser scanner can detect not only an object's length and width but also its depth. The scanner's ease of use has opened various possibilities in laboratory research and clinical investigation. We assessed the reliability of generating 3D object reconstructions using the Minolta Vivid700 3D surface laser scanner (Minolta USA, Ramsey, NJ). Accuracy and reproducibility were tested on a geometrical calibrated cylinder, a dental study model, and a plaster facial model. Tests were conducted at varying distances between the object and the scanner. It was found that (1) in the calibrated cylinder tests, spatial distance measurement was accurate to 0.5 mm (+/- 0.1 mm) in the vertical dimension and 0.3 mm (+/- 0.3 mm) in the horizontal dimension; (2) in the study model test, molar width was accurate to 0.2 mm (+/- 0.1 mm, P >.05), and palatal vault depth could be measured to 0.7 mm (+/- 0.2 mm, P > 0.05); and (3) for the facial model, an accuracy of 1.9 +/- 0.8 mm was obtained. The findings suggest that the surface laser scanner has great research potential because of its accuracy and ease of use. Treatment changes, growth, surgical simulations, and many other orthodontic applications can be approached 3-dimensionally with this device.

  11. Evaluating Commercial Scanners for Astronomical Image Digitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcoe, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    Many organizations have been interested in understanding if commercially available scanners are adequate for scientifically useful digitization. These scanners range in price from a few hundred to a few tens of thousands of dollars (USD), often with little apparent difference in performance specifications. This paper describes why the underlying technology used in flatbed scanners tends to effectively limit resolutions to the 600-1200 dots per inch (dpi) range and how the overall system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) can be used to evaluate the quality of the digitized data for the small feature sizes found in astronomical images. Two scanners, the Epson V750 flatbed scanner and the Nikon Cool Scan 9000ED film strip scanner, are evaluated through their Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF). The MTF of the Harvard DASCH scanner is also shown for comparison. The particular goal of this evaluation was to understand if the scanners could be used for digitizing spectral plates at the University of Toronto. The plates of primary interest were about 15 mm (5/8 inch) wide by 180 mm (7~inches) long and ˜50 mm x 80 mm (2 x 3 inches). The results of the MTF work show that the Epson scanner, despite claims of high resolution, is of limited value for scientific imaging of feature sizes below about 50 μm and therefore not a good candidate for digitizing the spectral plates and problematic for scanning direct plates. The Nikon scanner is better and, except for some frustrating limitations in its software, its performance seems to hold promise as a digitizer for spectral plates in the University of Toronto collection.

  12. Computed tomography dose measurements with radiochromic films and a flatbed scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Ropolo, R

    2010-01-01

    Gafchromic XR-QA films were developed for patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. A possible application of these films is the measurement of doses in computed tomography. In this study a method to evaluate the CTDI using Gafchromic XR-QA film and a flatbed scanner was developed and tested. Film samples were cut to dimensions of 6 x 170 mm2 in order to have an integration area similar to that of a pencil ionization chamber, with the possibility of changing the integration length. Prior to exposing these films to a computed tomography beam, the angular dependence of the film dose response was investigated by exposing film strips to a static x-ray beam at different angles in the range 0 degrees-180 degrees. A difference of 49% was found between the response with the axis beam parallel to the film surface (90 degrees) and with the axis beam perpendicular (0 degrees and 180 degrees). Integrating over a 360 degrees exposure like the one in computed tomography, a difference of less than 2% was estimated, which is comparable with the measurement error obtainable with XR-QA film. A calibration with a CT beam in the scout mode was performed and film strips were then exposed to single axial scans and to helical scans both in air and in phantoms. Two different types of flatbed scanners were used to read the film samples, a Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL scanner and an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner, and the accuracy of the results were compared. For beam collimations above 10 mm differences between CTDI measured by film and CTDI measured by ionization chamber below 9% were found for the Epson scanner, with an average estimated error at 1 sigma level of 5%. For the Microtek scanner and for the same film samples, differences below 11% with an average error at 1 sigma level of 8% were founded. The 1 sigma uncertainty of the measured CTDI was provided by the method for each measurement, and it was shown that about the 95% of the differences between the CTDI measurements with

  13. A Cross-Platform Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten

    We describe a smartphone brain scanner with a low-costwireless 14-channel Emotiv EEG neuroheadset interfacingwith multiple mobile devices. This personal informaticssystem enables minimally invasive and continuouscapturing of brain imaging data in natural settings. Thesystem applies an inverse...

  14. Design and simulation of the wire scanner for the injector linac of BEPC Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Yan-Feng; MA Hui-Zhou; CAO Jian-She; MA Li

    2008-01-01

    BEPC Ⅱ,the upgrade project of Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC),is an accelerator with large beam current and high luminosity,so an efficient and stable injector is required.Several beam diagnostic and monitoring instruments are used.A new diagnostic instrument--wire scanner,has been designed and will be used to nleasure the profile of the linac beam of BEPC Ⅱ.This paper describes the prototype of this system and the cause of heat generating of the wire.Some simulation results of the heat and force by using finite element method software-ANSYS(R),2) are presented and discussed.

  15. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  16. Beam-Profile Instrumentation for a Beam-Halo Measurement Overall Description, Operation, and Beam Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gilpatrick, J D; Day, L; Kerstiens, D; Stettler, M; Valdiviez, R

    2001-01-01

    The halo experiment presently being conducted at the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has specific instruments that acquire horizontally and vertically projected particle-density beam distributions out to greater than 105:1 dynamic range. We measure the core of the distributions using traditional wire scanners, and the tails of the distribution using water-cooled graphite scraping devices. The wire scanner and halo scrapers are mounted on the same moving frame whose location is controlled with stepper motors. A sequence within the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software communicates with a National Instrument LabVIEW virtual instrument to control the movement and location of the scanner/scraper assembly. Secondary electrons from the wire scanner 33 μm carbon wire and protons impinging on the scraper are both detected with a lossy-integrator electronic circuit. Algorithms implemented within EPICS and in Research Systems Interactiv...

  17. Flexural resonance vibrations of piezoelectric ceramic tubes in Besocke-style scanners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui; Zhang Shu-Yi; Fan Li

    2012-01-01

    Flexural resonance vibrations of piezoelectric ceramic tubes in Besocke-style scanners with nanometer resolution are studied by using an electro-mechanical coupling Timoshenko beam model.Meanwhile,the effects of friction,the first moment,and moment of inertia induced by mass loads are considered.The predicted resonance frequencies of the ceramic tubes are sensitive to not only the mechanical parameters of the scanners,but also the friction acting on the attached shaking ball and corresponding bending moment on the tubes,The theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the related experimental measurements.This model and corresponding results are applicable for optimizing the structures and performances of the scanners.

  18. Uncertainty Propagation for Terrestrial Mobile Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezian, c.; Vallet, Bruno; Soheilian, Bahman; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanners are used more and more in mobile mapping systems. They provide 3D point clouds that are used for object reconstruction and registration of the system. For both of those applications, uncertainty analysis of 3D points is of great interest but rarely investigated in the literature. In this paper we present a complete pipeline that takes into account all the sources of uncertainties and allows to compute a covariance matrix per 3D point. The sources of uncertainties are laser scanner, calibration of the scanner in relation to the vehicle and direct georeferencing system. We suppose that all the uncertainties follow the Gaussian law. The variances of the laser scanner measurements (two angles and one distance) are usually evaluated by the constructors. This is also the case for integrated direct georeferencing devices. Residuals of the calibration process were used to estimate the covariance matrix of the 6D transformation between scanner laser and the vehicle system. Knowing the variances of all sources of uncertainties, we applied uncertainty propagation technique to compute the variance-covariance matrix of every obtained 3D point. Such an uncertainty analysis enables to estimate the impact of different laser scanners and georeferencing devices on the quality of obtained 3D points. The obtained uncertainty values were illustrated using error ellipsoids on different datasets.

  19. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  20. Determination of the weighted CT dose index in modern multi-detector CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisinakis, K; Damilakis, J; Tzedakis, A; Papadakis, A; Theocharopoulos, N; Gourtsoyiannis, N

    2007-11-07

    The aim of the present study was to (a) evaluate the underestimation in the value of the free-in-air (CTDI(air)) and the weighted CT dose index (CTDI(w)) determined with the standard 100 mm pencil chamber, i.e. the CTDI(100) concept, for the whole range of nominal radiation beam collimations selectable in a modern multi-slice CT scanner, (b) estimate the optimum length of the pencil-chamber and phantoms for accurate CTDI(w) measurements and (c) provide CTDI(w) values normalized to free-in-air CTDI for different tube-voltage, nominal radiation beam collimations and beam filtration values. The underestimation in the determination of CTDI(air) and CTDI(w) using the CTDI(100) concept was determined from measurements obtained with standard polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms and arrays of thermoluminescence dosimeters. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to simulate standard CTDI measurements on a 16-slice CT scanner. The optimum pencil-chamber length for accurate determination of CTDI(w) was estimated as the minimum chamber length for which a further increase in length does not alter the value of the CTDI. CTDI(w)/CTDI(air) ratios were determined using Monte Carlo simulation and the optimum detector length for all selectable tube-voltage values and for three different values of beam filtration. To verify the Monte Carlo results, measured values of CTDI(w)/CTDI(air) ratios using the standard 100 mm pencil ionization chamber were compared with corresponding values calculated with Monte Carlo experiments. The underestimation in the determination of CTDI(air) using the 100 mm pencil chamber was less than 1% for all beam collimations. The underestimation in CTDI(w) was 15% and 27% for head and body phantoms, respectively. The optimum detector length for accurate CTDI(w) measurements was found to be 50 cm for the beam collimations commonly employed in modern multi-detector (MD) CT scanners. The ratio of CTDI(w)/CTDI(air) determined using the optimum

  1. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  2. Operation of the preclinical head scanner for proton CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@ucsc.edu [SCIPP, U.C. Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Geoghegan, T.; Harvey, E.; Johnson, R.P.; Plautz, T.E.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [SCIPP, U.C. Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R.F.; Piersimoni, P.; Schulte, R.W. [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Karbasi, P.; Schubert, K.E.; Schultze, B. [School of Engineering and Computer Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Giacometti, V. [Center for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-09-21

    We report on the operation and performance tests of a preclinical head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed CT scans with 200 MeV protons from both the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) and the cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center (NMCPC). The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 7 min. The reconstruction of various phantoms verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power (RSP) and the spatial resolution in a variety of materials. The dose for an image with better than 1% uncertainty in the RSP is found to be close to 1 mGy.

  3. Operation of the preclinical head scanner for proton CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Geoghegan, T.; Harvey, E.; Johnson, R. P.; Plautz, T. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R. F.; Piersimoni, P.; Schulte, R. W.; Karbasi, P.; Schubert, K. E.; Schultze, B.; Giacometti, V.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the operation and performance tests of a preclinical head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed CT scans with 200 MeV protons from both the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) and the cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center (NMCPC). The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 7 min. The reconstruction of various phantoms verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power (RSP) and the spatial resolution in a variety of materials. The dose for an image with better than 1% uncertainty in the RSP is found to be close to 1 mGy.

  4. Vibration measurements of a wire scanner - Experimental setup and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Juan; Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new performance demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 m s-1 and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire have been identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations has been given high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This article presents a new strategy to measure the wire vibrations based on the piezoresistive effect of the wire itself. An electronic readout system based on a Wheatstone bridge is used to measure the variation of the carbon wire resistance, which is directly proportional to the wire elongation caused by the oscillations.

  5. A flexible and wearable terahertz scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Oda, S.; Kawano, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging technologies based on terahertz (THz) waves have great potential for use in powerful non-invasive inspection methods. However, most real objects have various three-dimensional curvatures and existing THz technologies often encounter difficulties in imaging such configurations, which limits the useful range of THz imaging applications. Here, we report the development of a flexible and wearable THz scanner based on carbon nanotubes. We achieved room-temperature THz detection over a broad frequency band ranging from 0.14 to 39 THz and developed a portable THz scanner. Using this scanner, we performed THz imaging of samples concealed behind opaque objects, breakages and metal impurities of a bent film and multi-view scans of a syringe. We demonstrated a passive biometric THz scan of a human hand. Our results are expected to have considerable implications for non-destructive and non-contact inspections, such as medical examinations for the continuous monitoring of health conditions.

  6. Characterization of the Ferrara animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Di Domenico, G; Damiani, C; Del Guerra, A; Gilardi, M C; Motta, A; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated small animal PET scanner, YAPPET, was designed and built at Ferrara University. Each detector consists of a 20x20 matrix of 2x2x30 mm sup 3 YAP:Ce finger-like crystals glued together and directly coupled to a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier. The scanner is made from four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance of 7.5 cm from the center and the field of view (FOV) is 4 cm both in the transaxial direction and in the axial direction. The system operates in 3D acquisition mode. The performance parameters of YAPPET scanner such as spatial, energy and time resolution, as well as its sensitivity and counting rate have been determined. The average spatial resolution over the whole FOV is 1.8 mm at FWHM and 4.2 mm at FWTM. The sensitivity at the center is 640 cps/mu Ci.

  7. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  8. Metal Optics For Laser Profile Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, T.; Hock, F.

    1987-01-01

    Laser scanners are a valuable tool for qualitiy control in hostile hot and vibrating environments. Their high measuring speed allows time minimisation of disturbing influences. The loss of accuracy of systems due to thermal distortion could be minimised by designing mechanical-optical systems with low temperature gradients and small differences between thermal expansions of the components. For application in the forging production a laser scanner measuring in situ a series of profile lines describing the hot forging tools has been designed using aluminium for all distortion sensitive mechanical and optical components.

  9. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  10. Rail profile control using laser triangulation scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronahin, Ð. ńlexandr M.; Larionov, Daniil Yu.; Podgornaya, Liudmila N.; Shalymov, Roman V.; Filatov, Yuri V.; Bokhman, Evgueny D.

    2016-11-01

    Rail track geometric parameters measurement requires knowledge of left and right rail head location in each section. First of all displacement in transverse plane of rail head point located at a distance of 14 mm below the running surface, must be controlled [1]. It is carried out by detecting of each rail profile using triangulation laser scanners. Optical image recognition is carried out successfully in the laboratory, approaches used for this purpose are widely known. However, laser scanners operation has several features on railways leading to necessity of traditional approaches adaptation for solving these particular problems. The most significant problem is images noisiness due to the solar flashes and the effect of "Moon path" on the smooth rail surface. Using of optical filters gives inadequate result, because scanner laser diodes radiation frequency varies with temperature changes that forbid the use of narrow-band filters. Consideration of these features requires additional constructive and algorithmic solutions, including involvement of information from other sensors of the system. The specific usage of optical scanners for rail profiles control is the subject of the paper.

  11. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature...

  12. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, 110 Donner, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla. (author)

  13. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  14. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  15. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  16. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  17. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G. Jackson, E-mail: williams270@llnl.gov; Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kojima, Sadaoki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka, 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Millecchia, Matthew [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  18. The use of mobile 3D scanners in maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Florian; Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Ayoub, Nassim; Goloborodko, Evgeny; Ghassemi, Alireza; Lethaus, Bernd; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    There are many possibilities for the use of three-dimensional (3D) scanners in maxillofacial surgery. This study aimed to investigate whether the bundling and syncing of two 3D scanners has advantages over single-scanner acquisition in terms of scan quality and the time required to scan an object. Therefore, the speed and precision of 3D data acquisition with one scanner versus two synced scanners was measured in 30 subjects. This was done by analyzing the results obtained by scanning test objects attached to the forehead and cheeks of the subjects. Statistical methods included the Student t test for paired samples. Single-scanner recording resulted in significantly lower mean error of measurement than synced recording with two scanners for length (P scanner method resulted in a significantly lowermean error of measurement than the two-scanner method for frontal/lower plane angles (P scanners resulted in a significant reduction of scanning time (P 3D scanner, the bundling of two 3D scanners resulted in faster scanning times but lower scan quality.

  19. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section...

  20. Oblique fluorescence in a MARS scanner with a CdTe-Medipix3RX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Broeke, L.; Atharifard, A.; Goulter, B. P.; Healy, J. L.; Ramyar, M.; Panta, R. K.; Anjomrouz, M.; Shamshad, M.; Largeau, A.; Mueller, K.; Walsh, M. F.; Aamir, R.; Smithies, D. J.; Doesburg, R.; Rajendran, K.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Knight, D.; Chernoglazov, A.; Mandalika, H.; Bateman, C. J.; Bell, S. T.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.

    2016-12-01

    The latest version of the MARS small bore scanner makes use of the Medipix3RX ASIC, bonded to a CdTe or CZT semi-conductor layer, to count x-ray photons and create a spectroscopic CT data set. The MARS imaging chain uses the energy-resolved 2D transmission images to construct quantitative 3D spectral and material images. To improve the spectral performance of the imaging system it is important that the energy response of the detector is well calibrated. A common methodology for energy calibration is to use x-ray fluorescence (XRF), due to its effective monochromatic nature. Oblique (off-axis) XRF can be measured in situ in the MARS small bore scanner. A monoatomic foil is placed in front of the x-ray source and off-axis XRF is measured. A key issue is identifying near optimal measurement positions that maximize the XRF signal while minimizing transmitted and scattered x-rays from the primary beam. This work shows the development of a theoretical model that is able to identify where in the detector plane XRF is maximum. We present: (1) a theoretical model that calculates the XRF photon distribution across the detector plane produced from illuminated foils attached to the scanner's filter bar; (2) preliminary experimental measurements of the XRF distribution outside of the main beam taken with a CdTe-Medipix3RX detector; and (3) a comparison between the model and experiment. The main motivation behind creating this model is to identify the region in the detector plane outside of the main beam where XRF is at a maximum. This provides the optimum detector location for measuring a monochromatic XRF source with minimal polychromatic contamination for its use in per-pixel energy calibration of Medipix3RX detectors in MARS scanners.

  1. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhalkar, H S; Oldham, M

    2008-01-01

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of approximately 5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 microm) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the "gold standard" technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few

  2. 2D MEMS scanner integrating a position feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30μrad (around 13bits in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  3. Compact beamforming in medical ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2003-01-01

    This Ph.D. project was carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging, Technical University of Denmark, under the supervision of Prof. Jørgen Arendt Jensen, Assoc. Prof. Jens Sparsø and Prof. Erik Bruun. The goal was to investigate methods for efficient beamforming, which make it possible...... compact implementation of the beamformer compared to the case where conventional A/D conversion is used. The compact and economic beamforming is a key aspect in the progress of medical ultrasound imaging. Currently, 64 or 128 channels are widely used in scanners, top-of-the-range scanners have 256...... with an introduction into medical ultrasound, its basic principles, system evolution and its place among medical imaging techniques. Then, ultrasound acoustics is introduced, as a necessary base for understanding the concepts of acoustic focusing and beamforming, which follow. The necessary focusing information...

  4. Electrothermal MEMS fiber scanner for optical endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyungmin; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-02-22

    We report a novel MEMS fiber scanner with an electrothermal silicon microactuator and a directly mounted optical fiber. The microactuator comprises double hot arm and cold arm structures with a linking bridge and an optical fiber is aligned along a silicon fiber groove. The unique feature induces separation of resonant scanning frequencies of a single optical fiber in lateral and vertical directions, which realizes Lissajous scanning during the resonant motion. The footprint dimension of microactuator is 1.28 x 7 x 0.44 mm3. The resonant scanning frequencies of a 20 mm long optical fiber are 239.4 Hz and 218.4 Hz in lateral and vertical directions, respectively. The full scanned area indicates 451 μm x 558 μm under a 16 Vpp pulse train. This novel laser scanner can provide many opportunities for laser scanning endomicroscopic applications.

  5. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia.A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  6. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus deli......) that are based on Linux operating systems. Thus our system runs on multiple platforms, including Maemo/MeeGo based smartphones, Android-based smartphones and tablet devices....

  7. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-06-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface.

  8. Refractive beam shapers for focused laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-09-01

    Focusing of laser radiation is most often used approach in various industrial micromachining applications like scribing, PCB drilling, and is important in scientific researches like laser heating in geophysics experiments with diamond anvil cells (DAC). Control of intensity distribution in focal spot is important task since optimum intensity profiles are rather flat-top, doughnut or "inverse-Gauss" than typical for lasers Gaussian profile. Because of high intensity of modern CW and pulsed lasers it is advisable to use refractive beam shaping optics with smooth optical surfaces providing high radiation resistance. Workable optical solutions can be built on the base of diffraction theory conclusion that flat-top intensity profile in focal plane of a lens is created when input beam has Airy-disk intensity distribution. It is suggested to apply refractive beam shapers converting, with minimum wavefront deformation, Gaussian profile of TEM00 beam to a beam with Airy disk intensity distribution, thereby optimizing conditions of interference near the focal plane of a lens after the beam shaper and providing flat-top, doughnut, "inverse-Gauss" profiles. This approach allows operation with CW and ultra-short pulse lasers, using F-theta lenses and objectives, mirror scanners, provides extended depth of field similar to Rayleigh length of comparable TEM00 beam, easy integration in industrial equipment, simple adjustment procedure and switching between profiles, telescope and collimator implementations. There will be considered design basics of beam shapers, analysis of profile behaviour near focal plane, examples of implementations in micromachining systems and experimental DAC setups, results of profile measurements and material processing.

  9. Precise radiochromic film dosimetry using a flat-bed document scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Seuntjens, Jan; Sham, Edwin; Podgorsak, Ervin B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Kirov, Assen S; Soares, Christopher G

    2005-07-01

    In this study, a measurement protocol is presented that improves the precision of dose measurements using a flat-bed document scanner in conjunction with two new GafChromic film models, HS and Prototype A EBT exposed to 6 MV photon beams. We established two sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by measurement and calibration curve fit parameters contributions. We have quantitatively assessed the influence of different steps in the protocol on the overall dose measurement uncertainty. Applying the protocol described in this paper on the Agfa Arcus II flat-bed document scanner, the overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty for an uniform field amounts to 2% or less for doses above around 0.4 Gy in the case of the EBT (Prototype A), and for doses above 5 Gy in the case of the HS model GafChromic film using a region of interest 2 X 2 mm2 in size.

  10. Mathematical modelling of scanner-specific bowtie filters for Monte Carlo CT dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Andrade, M. E. A.; de Araújo, M. W. C.; Brenner, D. J.; Khoury, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of bowtie filters in CT scanners is to homogenize the x-ray intensity measured by the detectors in order to improve the image quality and at the same time to reduce the dose to the patient because of the preferential filtering near the periphery of the fan beam. For CT dosimetry, especially for Monte Carlo calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses to patients, it is important to take the effect of bowtie filters into account. However, material composition and dimensions of these filters are proprietary. Consequently, a method for bowtie filter simulation independent of access to proprietary data and/or to a specific scanner would be of interest to many researchers involved in CT dosimetry. This study presents such a method based on the weighted computer tomography dose index, CTDIw, defined in two cylindrical PMMA phantoms of 16 cm and 32 cm diameter. With an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo (MC) code, ratios CTDIw/CTDI100,a were calculated for a specific CT scanner using PMMA bowtie filter models based on sigmoid Boltzmann functions combined with a scanner filter factor (SFF) which is modified during calculations until the calculated MC CTDIw/CTDI100,a matches ratios CTDIw/CTDI100,a, determined by measurements or found in publications for that specific scanner. Once the scanner-specific value for an SFF has been found, the bowtie filter algorithm can be used in any MC code to perform CT dosimetry for that specific scanner. The bowtie filter model proposed here was validated for CTDIw/CTDI100,a considering 11 different CT scanners and for CTDI100,c, CTDI100,p and their ratio considering 4 different CT scanners. Additionally, comparisons were made for lateral dose profiles free in air and using computational anthropomorphic phantoms. CTDIw/CTDI100,a determined with this new method agreed on average within 0.89% (max. 3.4%) and 1.64% (max. 4.5%) with corresponding data published by CTDosimetry (www.impactscan.org) for the CTDI HEAD and BODY phantoms

  11. Characterization of radiochromic films EBT3 by means of the scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red and Epson 10000-XL use; Caracterizacion de films radiocromicos EBT3 mediante el uso de scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red y Epson 10000-XL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Adrada, A.; Filipuzzi, M., E-mail: fisicamedina11@gmail.com [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The Radiochromic film have become an attractive tool for verification of dose distributions in IMRT because these have high spatial resolution film, are near water equivalent and not require revealed, A critical aspect of the use of these film is used for digitizing scanner The purpose of this paper is to characterize EBT3 using two types of scanner. Were employed The Radiochromic film EBT3, was used photon beam 6 MV generated by a linear accelerator Siemens Primus, he films were irradiated at a dose range between 0 Gy a 9 Gy. The stabilization time after irradiation was 24 hours. The films were digitized with a scanner Epson 10000-XL y el VIDAR Dosimetry Pro Red. We used the software for construction of the calibration curve. The resolution of each dosimetry system was analyzed through the results of the spatial response function by analyzing a step pattern. The Epson scanner is most sensitive to the red channel. This is less than that obtained with the Vidar. The Vidar scanner spatial response profiles disturbs not opposed to Epson analyzed. The calibration curves for both dosimetry systems can be employed. However, the sensitivity and repeatability of the system is better than Red Vidar Epson 10000-XL. (author)

  12. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Meier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  13. Design and construction of a new actuator for the LHC wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Koujili, Mohamed

    The LHC collides two protons beams with an energy of 7 TeV each resultingin a aimed total particle rate of about 109 Hz. The particle rateis determined by the production cross section, a natural constant and theluminosity accelerator dependent parameter describing the particle beams.The luminosity depends on the number of particles in each beam linearlyand on the transverse dimensions of the particle beam inversely. It increaseswith the particle beam density and therefore the probability of interactions.To optimize the transverse beams sizes, pro_le monitors are used to measureparameter depending changes. Within the LHC, three di_erent typesof pro_le monitors are installed: Wire scanner (WS), Synchrotron lightmonitor and Rest Gas Pro_le Monitor. The WS monitor is considered tobe the most accurate of these monitors and serves as a calibration devicefor the two others. The WS is an electro-mechanical device which measuresthe transverse beam density pro_le in an intermittent way. As the wirepasses through the be...

  14. The Lick Observatory image-dissector scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L. B.; Wampler, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    A scanner that uses an image dissector to scan the output screen of an image tube has proven to be a sensitive and linear detector for faint astronomical spectra. The image-tube phosphor screen acts as a short-term storage element and allows the system to approach the performance of an ideal multichannel photon counter. Pulses resulting from individual photons, emitted from the output phosphor and detected by the image dissector, trigger an amplifier-discriminator and are counted in a 24-bit, 4096-word circulating memory. Aspects of system performance are discussed, giving attention to linearity, dynamic range, sensitivity, stability, and scattered light properties.

  15. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  16. A volume scanner for diffuse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafa, Elham; Roberts, Nicolas; Sharafutdinova, Galiya; Holdsworth, John

    2016-11-01

    Non-invasive optical screening mammography has a significant barrier in the extreme scatter of human tissue at optical wavelengths. A volume scanner suited for high numerical aperture capture of scattered light from diffuse media has been designed, modelled using Trace Pro software and experimentally constructed. Modelling results indicate the presence of an embedded volume with different scatter properties from the bulk yields a measurable difference in the overall scatter pattern and intensity recorded. Work towards a full tomographic reconstruction from scattered light recorded on the two dimensional array detector is currently underway.

  17. Circumference estimation using 3D-whole body scanners and shadow scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Clothing designers and manufacturers use traditional body dimensions as their basis. When 3D-whole body scanners are introduced to determine the body dimensions, a conversion has to be made, since scan determined circumference measures are slightly larger than the traditional values. This pilot stud

  18. Cavity mode related wire breaking of the SPS Wire Scanners and loss measurements of wire materials

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, Federico

    2003-01-01

    During the SPS high intensity run 2002 with LHC type beam, the breaking of several of the carbon wires in the wire scanners has been observed in their parking position. The observation of large changes in the wire resistivity and thermionic electron emission clearly indicated strong RF heating that was depending on the bunch length. A subsequent analysis in the laboratory, simulating the beam by two probe antennas or by a powered stretched wire, showed two main problems: i) the housing of the wire scanner acts as a cavity with a mode spectrum starting around 350MHz and high impedance values around 700 MHz; ii) the carbon wire used so far appears to be an excellent RF absorber and thus dissipates a significant part of the beam-induced power. Different wire materials are compared with the classical cavity mode technique for the determination of the complex permittivity in the range of 2-4 GHz. As a resonator a rectangular TE01n type device is utilized.

  19. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    OpenAIRE

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Boone, Matthieu; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2013-01-01

    UGCT is a user facility for multidisciplinary micro-CT research. The scanners at UGCT are custom designed and built by the Radiation Physics research group (UGent). This paper describes the two latest scanners that were developed in collaboration with XRE: HECTOR, a high energy micro-CT scanner, and EMCT, a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification. HECTOR is a 240 kV 280 W system with a nominal resolution of 4 micrometer. A 40x40 cm² flat panel detector which can be tiled res...

  20. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  1. 3D optical two-mirror scanner with focus-tunable lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Petr; Miks, Antonin

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents formulas for a ray tracing in the optical system of two-mirror optical scanner with a focus-tunable lens. Furthermore, equations for the calculation of focal length which ensure focusing of a beam in the desired point in a detection plane are derived. The uncertainty description of such focal length follows as well. The chosen vector approach is general; therefore, the application of formulas in various configurations of the optical systems is possible. In the example situation, the authors derived formulas for mirrors' rotations and the focal length depending on the position of the point in the detection plane.

  2. Design of a high-precision fast wire scanner for the SPS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Veness, R; Dehning, B; Emery, J; Herranz Alvarez, J; Koujili, M; Samuelsson, S; Sirvent, J-L

    2012-01-01

    Studies are going on of a new wire scanner concept. All moving parts are inside the beam vacuum and it is specified for use in all the machines across the CERN accelerator complex. Key components have been developed and tested. Work is now focussing on the installation of a prototype for test in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerator. This article presents the specification of the device and constraints on the design for integration in the different accelerators at CERN. The design issues of the mechanical components are discussed and optimisation work shown. Finally, the prototype design, integrating the several components into the vacuum tank is presented.

  3. Identification of scanner models by comparison of scanned hologram images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Shigeru

    2014-08-01

    A method to identify scanner models that had been used to forge low-level counterfeit currencies was proposed in this study. The method identified a scanner model by characterizing differences between hologram images that exist in low-level counterfeit currencies. Twenty scanners of 18 different models were used to make samples of hologram images used in this study. The method was divided into two steps: identification of capturing conditions and identification of the scanner model. The first proposed protocol used correlations of spatial distribution of brightness to identify capturing conditions. A second proposed protocol used correlations of color distributions to identify a scanner model. The effectiveness of the protocols was demonstrated with numerical methods and sample images. The preliminary study revealed that it is necessary to consider the orientation of the holograms when the scanner models were identified, but 180° rotations can be ignored. Moreover, it is necessary to consider position in the main scanning direction of the bed for charged-coupled-device scanners. The demonstration showed that the first protocol could correctly identify the capturing conditions of almost all hologram images. However, one image could not be identified correctly; the protocol could distinguish images captured by charged-coupled-device scanners and those captured by contact image sensor scanners if the hologram was placed on the right or left edge of the scanner bed, but could not distinguish them if the hologram was placed on the inside. The demonstration also showed that the second protocol could correctly identify scanner models of all hologram images.

  4. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R [Loma Linda UniversityMedical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  5. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  6. A ’Millipede’ scanner model - Energy consumption and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.

    2008-01-01

    This short report (1) describes an energy model for the seek and read/write operations in a mass-balanced Y-scanner for parallel-probe storage by IBM [1] and (2) updates the settings of the MEMS model in DiskSim with recent published figures from this XY-scanner. To speedup system simulations, a str

  7. Convenient integrating sphere scanner for accurate luminous flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S.; Lindemann, M.; Jordan, W.; Binder, U.; Anokhin, M.

    2009-08-01

    Measurement results and applications of a recently developed device for the measurement of the spatial uniformity of integrating spheres are presented. Due to the complexity of their implementation, sphere scanners are mainly used by national metrology institutes to increase the accuracy of relative and absolute luminous flux measurements (Ohno et al 1997 J. IES 26 107-14, Ohno and Daubach 2001 J. IES 30 105-15, Ohno 1998 Metrologia 35 473-8, Hovila et al 2004 Metrologia 41 407-13). The major drawback of traditional scanners for integrating spheres is the necessity of a complex and time-consuming sphere modification, as the lamp holder has to be replaced by a new scanner holder with additional cables for power supply and for communication with the stepping motor control unit (Ohno et al 1997 J. IES 26 107-14). Therefore, with traditional scanners the relative spatial sphere responsivity already changes due to the installation of a special scanner holder. The new scanner simply substitutes the lamp under test: it can be screwed into an E27 lamp socket, as it needs only two electrical contacts. Two wires are simultaneously used for the power supply of the stepping motor control unit, the scanner light source (LED) and for the signal transmission of commands and results. The benefits of scanner-assisted measurements are shown for spotlight lamp calibrations.

  8. Thermionic scanner pinpoints work function of emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    In the electron tube testing, a thermionic scanner makes accurate spatial resolution measurements of the metallic surface work functions of emitters. The scanner determines the emitter function and its local departures from the mean value on a point-by-point basis for display on an oscilloscope.

  9. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  10. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S.;

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning...

  11. Study of PET scanner designs using clinical metrics to optimize the scanner axial FOV and crystal thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Werner, M. E.; Karp, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the trade-off between crystal thickness and scanner axial field-of-view FOV (AFOV) for clinical PET imaging. Clinical scanner design has evolved towards 20-25 mm thick crystals and 16-22 cm long scanner AFOV, as well as time-of-flight (TOF) imaging. While Monte Carlo studies demonstrate that longer AFOV and thicker crystals will lead to higher scanner sensitivity, cost has prohibited the building of commercial scanners with >22 cm AFOV. In this study, we performed a series of system simulations to optimize the use of a given amount of crystal material by evaluating the impact on system sensitivity and noise equivalent counts (NEC), as well as image quality in terms of lesion detectability. We evaluated two crystal types (LSO and LaBr3) and fixed the total crystal volume used for each type (8.2 L of LSO and 17.1 L of LaBr3) while varying the crystal thickness and scanner AFOV. In addition, all imaging times were normalized so that the total scan time needed to scan a 100 cm long object with multiple bed positions was kept constant. Our results show that the highest NEC cm-1 in a 35 cm diameter ×70 cm long line source cylinder is achieved for an LSO scanner with 10 mm long crystals and AFOV of 36 cm, while for LaBr3 scanners, the highest NEC cm-1 is obtained with 20 mm long crystals and an AFOV of 38 cm. Lesion phantom simulations show that the best lesion detection performance is achieved in scanners with long AFOV (≥36 cm) and using thin crystals (≤10 mm of LSO and ≤20 mm of LaBr3). This is due to a combination of improved NEC, as well as improved lesion contrast estimation due to better spatial resolution in thinner crystals. Alternatively, for lesion detection performance similar to that achieved in standard clinical scanner designs, the long AFOV scanners can be used to reduce the total scan time without increasing the amount of crystal used in the scanner. In addition, for LaBr3 based scanners, the reduced lesion

  12. Gigapixel microscopy using a flatbed scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2012-01-01

    Microscopy imaging systems with a very wide field-of-view (FOV) are highly sought in biomedical applications. In this paper, we report a wide FOV microscopy imaging system that uses a low-cost scanner and a closed-circuit-television (CCTV) lens. We show that such an imaging system is capable to capture a 10 mm * 7.5 mm FOV image with 0.77 micron resolution, resulting in 0.54 gigapixels (109 pixels) across the entire image (26400 pixels * 20400 pixels). The resolution and field curve of the proposed system were characterized by imaging a USAF resolution target and a hole-array target. A 1.6 gigapixel microscopy image (0.54 gigapixel with 3 colors) of a pathology slide was acquired by using such a system for application demonstration.

  13. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  14. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data types, such as B-mode, M-mode, pulsed Doppler, and color flow imaging, the machine provides users with full control over imaging parameters such as transmit level, excitation waveform, beam angle, and focal depth. Beamformed RF data can be acquired from regions of interest throughout the image plane and stored to a file with a simple button press. For clinical trials and investigational purposes, when an identical image plane is desired for both an experimental and a reference data set, interleaved data can be captured. This form of data acquisition allows switching between multiple setups while maintaining identical transducer, scanner, region of interest, and recording time. Data acquisition is controlled through a graphical user interface running on the PC. This program implements an interface for third-party software to interact with the application. A software development toolkit is developed to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement their customized solutions for different applications. Three examples of system use are presented in this paper: evaluation of synthetic aperture sequential beamformation, transverse

  15. A New Generation of X-ray Baggage Scanners Based on a Different Physical Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Speller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available X-ray baggage scanners play a basic role in the protection of airports, customs, and other strategically important buildings and infrastructures. The current technology of baggage scanners is based on x-ray attenuation, meaning that the detection of threat objects relies on how various objects differently attenuate the x-ray beams going through them. This capability is enhanced by the use of dual-energy x-ray scanners, which make the determination of the x-ray attenuation characteristics of a material more precise by taking images with different x-ray spectra, and combining the information appropriately. However, this still has limitations whenever objects with similar attenuation characteristics have to be distinguished. We describe an alternative approach based on a different x-ray interaction phenomenon, x-ray refraction. Refraction is a familiar phenomenon in visible light (e.g., what makes a straw half immersed in a glass of water appear bent, which also takes place in the x-ray regime, only causing deviations at much smaller angles. Typically, these deviations occur at the boundaries of all objects. We have developed a system that, like other “phase contrast” based instruments, is capable of detecting such deviations, and therefore of creating precise images of the contours of all objects. This complements the material-related information provided by x-ray attenuation, and helps contextualizing the nature of the individual objects, therefore resulting in an increase of both sensitivity (increased detection rate and specificity (reduced rate of false positives of baggage scanners.

  16. On the spectral quality of scanner illumination with LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chengwu

    2013-01-01

    Document scanner illumination has evolved along with general illumination technologies. LEDs have become more and more popular as the illumination sources for document scanning. LED technologies provide a wide range of choices both in terms of structural design and spectral compositions. In this report, we examine some popular LED technologies used for document scanner. We evaluate the color rendering performance of scanner models with different illumination technologies by examining their rendering of the Macbeth ColorChecker™ in sRGB. We found that more phosphors in phosphor conversion types of white LEDs may not be necessarily advantageous in terms of scanner color rendering performance. Also CIS type of scanner may be sensitive to the peak wavelength shift and can be particularly problematic when the peaks are out of certain range.

  17. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  18. Enhanced Algorithms for Estimating Tree Trunk Diameter Using 2D Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Ringdahl

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate vehicle localization in forest environments is still an unresolved problem. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS have well known limitations in dense forest, and have to be combined with for instance laser based SLAM algorithms to provide satisfying accuracy. Such algorithms typically require accurate detection of trees, and estimation of tree center locations in laser data. Both these operations depend on accurate estimations of tree trunk diameter. Diameter estimations are important also for several other forestry automation and remote sensing applications. This paper evaluates several existing algorithms for diameter estimation using 2D laser scanner data. Enhanced algorithms, compensating for beam width and using multiple scans, were also developed and evaluated. The best existing algorithms overestimated tree trunk diameter by ca. 40%. Our enhanced algorithms, compensating for laser beam width, reduced this error to less than 12%.

  19. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.hofmann@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva 1211 (Switzerland); John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Bravin, Enrico [CERN, Geneva 1211 (Switzerland); Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O. [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca [CERN, Geneva 1211 (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H{sup −} ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H{sup −} beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H{sup −} beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H{sup 0}/e{sup −} pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H{sup 0} particles are separated from the unstripped H{sup −} ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H{sup −} beam, the transverse emittance of the H{sup −} beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  20. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Thomas; Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio; Bravin, Enrico; Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O.; Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H- beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H- beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H0/e- pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H0 particles are separated from the unstripped H- ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H- beam, the transverse emittance of the H- beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  1. Design of a Piezoelectric-Driven Tilt Mirror for a Fast Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Ho; Lee, Hu-Seung; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yun, So-Nam; Ham, Young-Bog; Yun, Dong-Won

    2012-09-01

    Recently, laser scanners have been used for laser processing such as cutting, welding, and grooving, especially in the automotive industry. The laser scanners need a high-speed driving to minimize cracks caused by thermal shock of brittle materials. Therefore, a novel laser processing system that is composed of a laser source and a piezoelectric-driven tilt mirror to control the reflection angle of the laser beam, and a stage equipped with the tilt mirror has been investigated. In this study, a piezoelectric-driven tilt mirror is designed and analyzed for scanning performance to achieve a beam spot of 30 µm, a pattern width of 1 mm, an overlap ratio of 70% of the circle area, and a scanning speed of 1 m/s. Then, structural analysis of the tilt mirror with three piezoelectric actuators is performed to determine the maximum reflection angle and resonance frequency. Finally, a prototype tilt mirror is fabricated and its basic characteristics are experimentally investigated and discussed.

  2. Beam Interaction with Thin Materials: Heat Deposition, Cooling Phenomena and Damage Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2012-01-01

    Thin targets, inserted into particle beams can serve various purposes, starting from beam emittance measurements like in wire scanner or scintillating screens up to beam content modifications like in case of stripper foils. The mechanisms of energy deposition in a thin target for various beam types are discussed, together with properties of particles produced in this kind of interaction. The cooldown processes, from heat transfer up to cooling by sublimation, and their efficiencies are presented. Finally, damage conditions are discussed and conclusions about typical damage limits are drawn. The experiments performed with the wire scanners at CERN accelerators and a mathematical model of heating and cooling of a wire are presented.

  3. Determining organ doses from computed tomography scanners using cadaveric subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griglock, Thomas M.

    The use of computed tomographic (CT) imaging has increased greatly since its inception in 1972. Technological advances have increased both the applicability of CT exams for common health problems as well as the radiation doses used to perform these exams. The increased radiation exposures have garnered much attention in the media and government agencies, and have brought about numerous attempts to quantify the amount of radiation received by patients. While the overwhelming majority of these attempts have focused on creating models of the human body (physical or computational), this research project sought to directly measure the radiation inside an actual human being. Three female cadaveric subjects of varying sizes were used to represent live patients. Optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters were used to measure the radiation doses. A dosimeter placement system was developed, tested, and optimized to allow accurate and reproducible placement of the dosimeters within the cadaveric subjects. A broad-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner was utilized to perform all CT exams, including five torso exams, four cardiac exams, and three organ perfusion exams. Organ doses ranged in magnitude from less than 1 to over 120 mGy, with the largest doses measured for perfusion imaging. A methodology has been developed that allows fast and accurate measurement of actual organ doses resulting from CT exams. The measurements made with this methodology represent the first time CT organ doses have been directly measured within a human body. These measurements are of great importance because they allow comparison to the doses measured using previous methods, and can be used to more accurately assess the risks from CT imaging.

  4. Feasibility studies on the direct wire readout on wire scanners in electron accelerators; Durchfuehrbarkeitsstudien zur direkten Drahtauslese an Wirescannern in Elektronen-Beschleunigern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Michael

    2010-10-15

    This bachelor thesis deals essentially with the signal processing of a so-called wire scanner, a special monitor, which comes to application in the beam diagnostics of particle accelerators. In this direct wire readout the voltage signal, which is induced by the particle beam in the measurement wire of the wire scanner, shall be directly read out. The aim of this thesis is to show fundamental considerations and perform studies, which study, whether and how in the future by means of a suited data transmission as well as readout electronics conclusion on the most important parameters of the beam, like position and profile, are possible. The measurement system presented here is divided in three main components: Signal measurement, signal preparation, and signal stretching. A suited test facility was developed and is presented in detail, in which then all components, like for instance the transmission cables, the wire-scanner fork, and the developed measurement circuit, are studied, which are of importance for a faultless signal transmission and presentation. Extensive measurements on the single components, as well as calculations for the signal transmission on and in the wire scanner were performed, whereby a good agreement could be found. Thereafter a comparison and a selection of the component used in this project were made. Furthermore improvement proposals, new constructions, and outlooks are presented, which could be of importance in further works.

  5. A general solution for the registration of optical multispectral scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The paper documents a general theory for registration (mapping) of data sets gathered by optical scanners such as the ERTS satellite MSS and the Skylab S-192 MSS. This solution is generally applicable to scanners which have rotating optics. Navigation data and ground control points are used in a statistically weighted adjustment based on a mathematical model of the dynamics of the spacecraft and the scanner system. This adjustment is very similar to the well known photogrammetric adjustments used in aerial mapping. Actual tests have been completed on NASA aircraft 24 channel MSS data, and the results are very encouraging.

  6. From Beamline to Scanner with 225Ac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew K. H.; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Kunz, Peter; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Schaffer, Paul; Sossi, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Due to the high linear energy transfer and short range of alpha-radiation, targeted radiation therapy using alpha-emitting pharmaceuticals that successfully target small disease clusters will kill target cells with limited harm to healthy tissue, potentially treating the most aggressive forms of cancer. As the parent of a decay chain with four alpha- and two beta-decays, 225Ac is a promising candidate for such a treatment. However, this requires retention of the entire decay chain at the target site, preventing the creation of freely circulating alpha-emitters that reduce therapeutic effect and increase toxicity to non-target tissues. Two major challenges to 225Ac pharmaceutical development exist: insufficient global supply, and the difficulty of preventing toxicity by retaining the entire decay chain at the target site. While TRIUMF works towards large-scale (C i amounts) production of 225Ac, we already use our Isotope Separation On-Line facility to provide small (overview of this research program and the journey of 225Ac from the beamline to the scanner. This research is funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  7. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Nosratieh, Anita; Gelskey, Dale; Yang Kai; Huang Shinying; Chen Lin; Boone, John M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Rm. 0505, ACC Ellison Bldg., 4860 Y St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Rm. 2303, GBSF, 451 E. Health Science Dr., Davis, California 95616 (United States); Diagnostic Imaging Specialists Corporation (DISC), 163 St. Malo Street, St. Malo, Manitoba R0A 1T0 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Rm. 0505, ACC Ellison Bldg., 4860 Y St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Rm. 0505, ACC Ellison Bldg., 4860 Y St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Rm. 2303, GBSF, 451 E. Health Science Dr., Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or ''bow tie'' (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam's profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibility of the COBRA theory is further validated experimentally through the employment of a prototype real-time radiation meter and a known BT filter. Methods: The COBRA method consisted of four basic steps: (1) The probe was placed at the edge of a scanner's field of view; (2) a real-time signal train was collected as the scanner's gantry rotated with the x-ray beam on; (3) the signal train, without a BT filter, was modeled using peak values measured in the signal train of step 2; and (4) the relative attenuation of the BT filter was estimated from filtered and unfiltered data sets. The prototype probe was first verified to have an isotropic and linear response to incident x-rays. The COBRA method was then tested on a dedicated breast CT scanner with a custom-designed BT filter and compared to the conventional step-and-shoot characterization of the BT filter. Using basis decomposition of dual energy signal data, the thickness of the filter was estimated and compared to the BT filter's manufacturing specifications. The COBRA method was also demonstrated with a clinical whole body CT scanner using the body BT filter. The relative attenuation was calculated at four discrete x-ray tube potentials and used to estimate the thickness of the BT filter. Results: The prototype probe was found to have a linear and isotropic response to x-rays. The relative attenuation produced from the COBRA method fell within the error of the relative attenuation

  8. Whole-body 3D scanner and scan data report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addleman, Stephen R.

    1997-03-01

    With the first whole-body 3D scanner now available the next adventure confronting the user is what to do with all of the data. While the system was built for anthropologists, it has created interest among users from a wide variety of fields. Users with applications in the fields of anthropology, costume design, garment design, entertainment, VR and gaming have a need for the data in formats unique to their fields. Data from the scanner is being converted to solid models for art and design and NURBS for computer graphics applications. Motion capture has made scan data move and dance. The scanner has created a need for advanced application software just as other scanners have in the past.

  9. Building a 3D Computed Tomography Scanner From Surplus Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners are expensive imaging devices, often out of reach for small research groups. Designing and building a CT scanner from modular components is possible, and this article demonstrates that realization of a CT scanner from components is surprisingly easy. However, the high costs of a modular X-ray source and detector limit the overall cost savings. In this article, the possibility of building a CT scanner with available surplus X-ray parts is discussed, and a practical device is described that incurred costs of less than $16,000. The image quality of this device is comparable with commercial devices. The disadvantage is that design constraints imposed by the available components lead to slow scan speeds and a resolution of 0.5 mm. Despite these limitations, a device such as this is attractive for imaging studies in the biological and biomedical sciences, as well as for advancing CT technology itself.

  10. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a detector (or detectors) whose position moves in two directions with respect...

  11. Landsat 1-5 Multispectral Scanner V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) was a sensor onboard Landsats 1 through 5 and acquired images of the Earth nearly continuously from July 1972 to...

  12. Computer vision and laser scanner road environment perception

    OpenAIRE

    García, Fernando; Ponz Vila, Aurelio; Martín Gómez, David; Escalera, Arturo de la; Armingol, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Data fusion procedure is presented to enhance classical Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). The novel vehicle safety approach, combines two classical sensors: computer vision and laser scanner. Laser scanner algorithm performs detection of vehicles and pedestrians based on pattern matching algorithms. Computer vision approach is based on Haar-Like features for vehicles and Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) features for pedestrians. The high level fusion procedure uses Kalman Filter...

  13. Fret Replica Inspection Laser Scanner (FRILS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretz, S.; Hanley, K., E-mail: steve.kretz@opg.com, E-mail: kelly.hanley@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Inspection Maintenance and Commercial Services, Pickering, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In the stress analysis of flaws and artifacts found in pressure tubes, it is crucial to have detailed knowledge of the flaw geometry. Fuel channel inspections by ultrasonic or eddy current inspection methods alone cannot provide the complete required geometry information. Replicas, which are a negative impression of surface pressure tube indications, are scanned with a laser system which will provide the additional detail required. FRILS was initially developed in 1993 to establish in-house capability of profiling indications on the inside diameter surface of pressure tubes. The need of this profiling was initially a response to the discovery of fuel bundle bearing pad fretting (FBBPF) caused by flow induced fuel bundle vibration. The benefits of the system were soon realized as a tool for profiling debris type indications. Although the primary use of FRILS is to profile FBBBF and Debris Fretting, since its inception the FRILS inspection system has become an instrumental tool in flaw assessment for: Fuel Bundle Bearing Pad Frets (FBBPF); Debris Frets; Scratches; Crevice Corrosion; Oxide Jacking; Areas of surface roughness; and, Weld Profiling. Replicas are collected via acquisition from tooling on both the Channel and Gauging Apparatus for Reactors (CIGAR) and the Advanced Non-Destructive Examination (ANDE) systems. The ANDE system is a high speed data acquisition system which includes both an ultrasonic inspection tool and a replication tool. Although both of these tools were designed to be delivered with the UDM, the platform for these tools was built with flexibility allowing for adoption to other delivery systems. These tools were based on the experience of the CIGAR inspection system. The CIGAR system has also undergone many system upgrades resulting in reduced inspection times. The FRILS system - Fret Replication Inspection Laser Scanner system was developed and has been upgraded to meet the demands of the improved inspection and replication systems. FRILS

  14. Beam Diagnostics Instrumentation for the High Energy Beam Transport Line of I.P.H.I.

    CERN Document Server

    Ausset, P; Coacolo, J L; Lesrel, J; Maymon, J N; Olivier, A; Rouviere, N; Solal-Cohen, M; Vatrinet, L; Yaniche, J F

    2005-01-01

    I.P.H.I. is a High Intensity Proton Injector under construction at Saclay (C.N.R.S/ I.N.2P.3; C.E.A. / D.A.P.N.I.A and C.E.R.N. collaboration). An E.C.R. produces a 100 keV, 100 mA C.W. proton beam which will be accelerated at 3 MeV by a 4 vanes R.F.Q. operating at 352.2 MHz. Finally, a High Energy Beam Transport Line (H.E.B.T.) will deliver the beam to a beam stopper and will be equipped with appropriate beam diagnostics to carry intensity; centroïd beam transverse position, transverse beam profiles, beam energy and energy spread measurements for the commissioning of I.P.H.I. These beam diagnostics will operate under both pulsed and C.W. operation. Transverse beam profile measurements will be acquired under low and high duty factor pulsed beam operation using a slow wire scanner and a C.C.D. camera to image the beam-induced fluorescence. The beam instrumentation of the H.E.B.T. is reviewed and preliminary obtained transverse profile measurements at 100 keV are described.

  15. Beam diagnostics instrumentation for the high energy beam transfer line of I.P.H.I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ausset, P.; Berthelot, S.; Coacolo, J.L.; Lesrel, J.; Maymon, J.N.; Olivier, A.; Rouviere, N.; Solal, M.; Vatrinet, L.; Yaniche, J.F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, (IN2P3/CNRS) 91 - Orsay (France); Belyaev, G.; Roudskoy, I. [I.T.E.P. Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    I.P.H.I. is a High Intensity Proton Injector under construction at Saclay. An E.C.R. source produces a 100 keV, 100 mA C.W. proton beam which will be accelerated at 3 MeV by a 4 vanes R.F.Q. operating at 352.2 MHz. Finally, a High Energy Beam Transport Line (H.E.B.T.) will deliver the beam to a beam stopper and will be equipped with appropriate beam diagnostics to carry intensity, centroid beam transverse position, transverse beam profiles, beam energy and energy spread measurements for the commissioning of I.P.H.I. These beam diagnostics will operate under both pulsed and C.W. operation. Transverse beam profile measurements will be acquired under low and high duty factor pulsed beam operation using a slow wire scanner and a C.C.D. camera to image the beam-induced fluorescence. The beam instrumentation of the H.E.B.T. is reviewed and preliminary obtained transverse profile measurements at 100 keV are described. (authors)

  16. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners.

  17. Evaluation of MRI-based Polymer Gel Dosimetry for Measurement of CT Dose Index (CTDI on 64 slices CT Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leaila Karimi-Afshar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Computed tomography (CT has numerous applications in clinical procedures but its main problem is its high radiation dose to the patients compared to other imaging modalities using x-ray. CT delivers approximately high doses to the nearby tissues due to the scattering effect, fan beam (beam divergence and limited collimator efficiency. The radiation dose from multi-slice scanners is greater than the single-slice scanners and since multi-slice scanners increasingly employ a wide beam, 100 mm ion chambers currently used in measuring the CTDI100, are not capable of accurately measuring the total dose profile of the slice width. Therefore, the CT dose is underestimated by using them. The purpose of this study is to measure the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI of a GE multi-slice CT scanner (64-slice using polymer gel dosimetry based on MRI imaging (MRPD. CTDI is the sum of point doses along the central axis and estimates the average patient dose during CT scanning. Materials and Methods: For measuring CTDI, after designing and fabricating the phantom and preparing the MAGIC gel, MRI imaging using a 1.5 T Siemens MRI scanner was performed with the imaging parameters of ST = 2 mm, NEX = 1, TE = 20-640 ms and TR = 2000 ms. CTDI was measured with a 100 mm ion chamber (CTDI100 and also the MAGIC gel with MRPD method for 10 mm and 40 mm CT scan nominal widths. Results: Following the measurement of the CTDI100 for 10 mm and 40 mm nominal slice widths of the multi-slice scanner using both ion chamber and MAGIC gel, the results showed that the ion chamber underestimates CTDI100 by 28.71% and 14.03% compared to gel for 10 mm and 40 mm respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: It was concluded from this study that gel dosimeters have the capability to measure CTDI in wide beams of multi-slice CT scanners whereas 100 mm standard ion chamber due to its limited length is not reliable even for a 10 mm beam width. In addition, due to the 3

  18. Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

  19. High-throughput machining using high average power ultrashort pulse lasers and ultrafast polygon scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, high-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (Aluminium, Copper, Stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high pulse repetition frequency picosecond laser with maximum average output power of 270 W in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner. Initially, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find out the optimal architecture for ultrafast and precision laser beam scanning. Remarkable 1,000 m/s scan speed is achieved on the substrate, and thanks to the resulting low pulse overlap, thermal accumulation and plasma absorption effects are avoided at up to 20 MHz pulse repetition frequencies. In order to identify optimum processing conditions for efficient high-average power laser machining, the depths of cavities produced under varied parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. The maximum removal rate is achieved as high as 27.8 mm3/min for Aluminium, 21.4 mm3/min for Copper, 15.3 mm3/min for Stainless steel and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3 when full available laser power is irradiated at optimum pulse repetition frequency.

  20. Operating and maintenance manual for the HFIR production model homogeneity scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.W.; Shipp, R.L.; Sliski, T.F.; Longaker, W.H.; Klindt, K.K.

    1984-12-01

    The fuel material in a HFIR fuel is U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ dispersed in aluminum, resembling an airfoil in cross section. To ensure uniform generation of heat within the plate, all plates must be tested (nondestructively) to determine that the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ content is within specified limits. The HFIR homogeneity scanner developed for this purpose is a density/thickness gauge that bombards a plate with a highly collimated, 0.062-in.-diam beam of x rays and detects those transmitted through the plate. Variations in the transmitted x rays due to absorption in the fuel plate are a measure of fuel denisty. In addition to the fuel plates for HFIR, fuel plates for several other reactors, such as the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) are also checked by the homogeneity scanner by using other sets of standards. All of the other reactors have a uniform cross section. This manual describes procedures for its electronic components.

  1. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubele, M. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Miet.Loubele@uzleuven.be; Bogaerts, R. [Department of Experimental Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Ria.Bogaerts@med.kuleuven.be; Van Dijck, E. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, R. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: ruben.pauwels@med.kuleuven.be; Vanheusden, S. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Suetens, P. [ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Paul.Suetens@esat.kuleuven.be; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Guy.Marchal@uzleuven.be (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, and NewTom 3G) and compared to the dose levels for corresponding image acquisition protocols for 3 MSCT scanners (Somatom VolumeZoom 4, Somatom Sensation 16 and Mx8000 IDT). The effective dose was calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), placed in a Rando Alderson phantom, and expressed according to the ICRP 103 (2007) guidelines (including a separate tissue weighting factor for the salivary glands, as opposed to former ICRP guidelines). Results: Effective dose values ranged from 13 to 82 {mu}Sv for CBCT and from 474 to 1160 {mu}Sv for MSCT. CBCT dose levels were the lowest for the Accuitomo 3D, and highest for the i-CAT. Conclusions: Dose levels for CBCT imaging remained far below those of clinical MSCT protocols, even when a mandibular protocol was applied for the latter, resulting in a smaller field of view compared to various CBCT protocols. Considering this wide dose span, it is of outmost importance to justify the selection of each of the aforementioned techniques, and to optimise the radiation dose while achieving a sufficient image quality. When comparing these results to previous dosimetric studies, a conversion needs to be made using the latest ICRP recommendations.

  2. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  3. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Part I. On subjective image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, X.; Jacobs, R.; Hassan, B.; Li, L.M.; Pauwels, R.; Corpas, L.; Souza, P.C.; Martens, W.; Alonso, A.; Lambrichts, I.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To compare image quality and visibility of anatomical structures in the mandible between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: One dry mandible was scanned with five CBCT scanners (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, NewTom 3G, Galileo

  4. Future spaceborne ocean missions using high sensitivity multiple-beam radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2014-01-01

    Design considerations concerning a scanning as well as a push-broom microwave radiometer system are presented. Strict requirements to spatial and radiometric resolution leads to a multiple-beam scanner achieving good sensitivity through integration over many beams, or to a push-broom system where...

  5. Commissioning and First Performance of the LHC Beam Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, O R

    2010-01-01

    This paper will outline the progress with LHC commissioning to date, detailing the performance achieved with all the main LHC beam instrumentation systems. It will include an overview of the beam loss system and its role in machine protection, along with that of the beam position system and its use for automatic orbit control. Results will be shown from the highly sensitive base band tune system as well as the bunch-bybunch and DC beam current transformer systems, the synchrotron light monitoring systems, the wire scanner system and OTR screens.

  6. Model of Carbon Wire Heating in Accelerator Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2008-01-01

    A heat flow equation with beam-induced heating and various cooling processes for a carbon wire passing through a particle beam is solved. Due to equation nonlinearity a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used. Heating of the wire due to the beam-induced electromagnetic field is taken into account. An estimation of the wire sublimation rate is made. The model is tested on SPS, LEP and Tevatron Main Injector data. Results are discussed and conclusions about limits of Wire Scanner operation on LHC beams are drawn.

  7. Characterization of a Large, Low-Cost 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imagery-based 3D scanning can be performed by scanners with multiple form factors, ranging from small and inexpensive scanners requiring manual movement around a stationary object to large freestanding (nearly instantaneous units. Small mobile units are problematic for use in scanning living creatures, which may be unwilling or unable to (or for the very young and animals, unaware of the need to hold a fixed position for an extended period of time. Alternately, very high cost scanners that can capture a complete scan within a few seconds are available, but they are cost prohibitive for some applications. This paper seeks to assess the performance of a large, low-cost 3D scanner, presented in prior work, which is able to concurrently capture imagery from all around an object. It provides the capabilities of the large, freestanding units at a price point akin to the smaller, mobile ones. This allows access to 3D scanning technology (particularly for applications requiring instantaneous imaging at a lower cost. Problematically, prior analysis of the scanner’s performance was extremely limited. This paper characterizes the efficacy of the scanner for scanning both inanimate objects and humans. Given the importance of lighting to visible light scanning systems, the scanner’s performance under multiple lighting configurations is evaluated, characterizing its sensitivity to lighting design.

  8. Effects of sitting versus standing and scanner type on cashiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, K R; Psihogios, J P; Meulenbroek, R G

    2001-06-10

    In the retail supermarket industry where cashiers perform repetitive, light manual material-handling tasks when scanning and handling products, reports of musculoskeletal disorders and discomfort are high. Ergonomics tradeoffs exist between sitting and standing postures, which are further confounded by the checkstand design and point-of-sale technology, such as the scanner. A laboratory experiment study was conducted to understand the effects of working position (sitting versus standing) and scanner type (bi-optic versus single window) on muscle activity, upper limb and spinal posture, and subjective preference of cashiers. Ten cashiers from a Dutch retailer participated in the study. Cashiers exhibited lower muscle activity in the neck and shoulders when standing and using a bi-optic scanner. Shoulder abduction was also less for standing conditions. In addition, all cashiers preferred using the bi-optic scanner with mixed preferences for sitting (n = 6) and standing (n = 4). Static loading of the muscles was relatively high compared with benchmarks, suggesting that during the task of scanning, cashiers may not have adequate recovery time to prevent fatigue. It is recommended that retailers integrate bi-optic scanners into standing checkstands to minimize postural stress, fatigue and discomfort in cashiers.

  9. EGRONOMIC FINGERPRINT SCANNER DESIGN FOR PEOPLE WITH MOTOR NEURON DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Al-Alwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint devices have evolved with time for authentication and identification purposes. It is used in generic security and social applications where identification and logging is required when entering that premises. In some circumstances the lag time increases due to increase in human entrees such as at immigration points, airports, random security checkups, attendance loggers. The increase in overall time due to individual human delay factors present a major hindrance in smooth security as well as organizational operations. The delay could occur due to non-technical factor such as not placing the fingers firmly in the surface of the device. This is a major cause of concern for senior citizens and people with motor neuron diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, a design is proposed in this research which can help the scanner to acquire fast and precise fingerprint scan of senior citizens and people with motor neuron diseases. This design uses ergonomically designed cover head for the scanner whose working is based on the Poka Yoke principle which assists firm finger placement on the scanner. In this research, 250 fingerprint scans were taken for statistical analysis using a normal fingerprint scanner and our proposed model scanner. Statistical comparison between the two results shows that our proposed model performs much better in terms of time consumption and accuracy.

  10. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Buchmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York’s Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

  11. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Stephen L

    2011-12-14

    During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

  12. Hologon Laser Scanners For Nonimpact Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Charles J.

    1983-09-01

    A novel holographic laser beam deflector is described which is invariant with regard to deflector wobble and centration errors, has high radiometric efficiency and provides a bow free scan. The deflector's insensitivity to mechanical error and absence of facet pyramidal error enables a flat field, linearized, high resolution image to be generated utilizing only a simple spherical optical system. In addition to the cost benefits derived from using spherical optical elements, the inherent symmetry they provide readily enables the deflector system to be extended to two dimensional scanning applications. Performance data for a hologon deflector system operating at 633 nm will be presented. Also, a procedure for determining what parameters must be incorporated into the hologon deflector element for nonimpact printing applications will be outlined.

  13. Performance evaluation of a LYSO-based PET scanner for monitoring of dose delivery in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiani, E.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Panetta, D.; Sportelli, G.; Rosso, V.

    2015-12-01

    The DoPET scanner is a compact positron emission tomography (PET) device. It has been developed for monitoring the range of charged particles during therapy with hadron beams. Previous works have focused on the development and upgrade of the device and on data analysis. In this paper, a full performance characterization of the DoPET system in terms of the energy resolution, spatial resolution, sensitivity, uniformity, and noise equivalent count rate is reported. All measurements refer to an adapted version of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4 - 2008 protocol, which was written originally for small animal PET systems. Since DoPET is a dual head planar system, it requires a modified characterisation procedure with respect to those described for ring geometries as in the NEMA NU 4 - 2008 protocol. The presented procedure may be of interest for any other PET system with a similar geometry as DoPET.

  14. 2D MEMS electrostatic cantilever waveguide scanner for potential image display application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the current status of our micro-fabricated SU-8 2D electrostatic cantilever waveguide scanner. The current design utilizes a monolithically integrated electrostatic push-pull actuator. A 4.0 μm SU-8 rib waveguide design allows a relatively large core cross section (4μm in height and 20 μm in width to couple with existing optical fiber and a broad band single mode operation (λ= 0.7μm to 1.3μm with minimal transmission loss (85% to 87% output transmission efficiency with Gaussian beam profile input. A 2D scanning motion has been successfully demonstrated with two fundamental resonances found at 202 and 536 Hz in vertical and horizontal directions. A 130 μm and 19 μm, corresponding displacement and 0.062 and 0.009 rad field of view were observed at a +150V input. Beam divergence from the waveguide was corrected by a focusing GRIN lens and a 5μm beam diameter is observed at the focal plane. The transmission efficiency is low (~10% and cantilever is slightly under tensile residual stress due to inherent imperfection in the process and tooling in fabrication. However, 2D light scanning pattern was successfully demonstrated using 1-D push-pull actuation.

  15. Mechanical Design and Evaluation of the MP-11-Like Wire Scanner Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maestas, Alfred J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raybun, Joseph L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jason P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sattler, F. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16

    A wire scanner (WS) is a linearly actuated diagnostic device that uses fiber wires (such as Tungsten or Silicon Carbide) to obtain the position and intensity profile of the proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) particle accelerator. LANSCE will be installing approximately 86 new WS in the near future as part of the LANSCE Risk Mitigation project. These 86 new WS include the replacement of many current WS and some newly added to the current linear accelerator and other beam lines. The reason for the replacement and addition of WS is that many of the existing actuators have parts that are no longer readily available and are difficult to find, thus making maintenance very difficult. One of the main goals is to construct the new WS with as many commercially-available-off-the-shelf components as possible. In addition, faster beam scans (both mechanically and in term of data acquisition) are desired for better operation of the accelerator. This document outlines the mechanical design of the new MP-11-like WS prototype and compares it to a previously built and tested SNS-like WS prototype.

  16. Design and performance of HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Geagan, M.; Muehllehner, G. (UGM Medical Systems Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    A new PET scanner for brain imaging (and animals) has been designed with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The design is an evolution of the PENN-PET scanner, which uses large position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, with Anger-type positioning logic, and which allows 3-D volume imaging, without septa. The new design is built with a single annular crystal coupled to 180 photomultiplier tubes, and uses local triggering electronics to subdivide the detector into small zones and to determine coincident events within the detector. The axial acceptance angle of [+-] 27 deg, with a field-of-view of 25.6 cm, is larger than any currently operating PET scanner. Performance measurements are presented.

  17. Calibration procedure for a laser triangulation scanner with uncertainty evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, Gianfranco; Minetola, Paolo; Barbato, Giulio

    2016-11-01

    Most of low cost 3D scanning devices that are nowadays available on the market are sold without a user calibration procedure to correct measurement errors related to changes in environmental conditions. In addition, there is no specific international standard defining a procedure to check the performance of a 3D scanner along time. This paper aims at detailing a thorough methodology to calibrate a 3D scanner and assess its measurement uncertainty. The proposed procedure is based on the use of a reference ball plate and applied to a triangulation laser scanner. Experimental results show that the metrological performance of the instrument can be greatly improved by the application of the calibration procedure that corrects systematic errors and reduces the device's measurement uncertainty.

  18. Spectral reflectance estimation using a six-color scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kohno, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Hirokazu; Nohara, Fuminori; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed for estimating the spectral reflectance function of an object surface by using a six-color scanner. The scanner is regarded as a six-band spectral imaging system, since it captures six color channels in total from two separate scans using two difference lamps. First, we describe the basic characteristics of the imaging systems for a HP color scanner and a multiband camera used for comparison. Second, we describe a computational method for recovering surface-spectral reflectances from the noisy sensor outputs. A LMMSE estimator is presented as an optimal estimator. We discuss the reflectance estimation for non-flat surfaces with shading effect. A solution method is presented for the reliable reflectance estimation. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is examined in detail on experiments using the Macbeth Color Checker and non-flat objects.

  19. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  20. Restoration of Hyperspectral Push-Broom Scanner Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut

    1997-01-01

    Several effects combine to distort the multispectral data that are obtained from push-broom scanners. We develop an algorithm for restoration of such data, illustrated on images from the ROSIS scanner. In push-broom scanners variation between elements in the detector array results in a strong...... striping along flight lines. A non-systematic striping is also present along flight lines. Furthermore, line drop-outs occur, and finally, various types of electronic noise of salt-and-pepper type are also present. We describe techniques for the correction for all these types of effects. Line drop...... back into the original spectral space results in noise corrected variables. The noise components will now have been removed from the entire original data set by working on a smaller set of noise contaminated transformed variables only. The application of the above techniques results in a dramatic...

  1. Laser-based satellite communication systems stabilized by non-mechanical electro-optic scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael; Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Gann, Derek; Luey, Benjamin; Gamble, Joseph D.; Anderson, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Laser communications systems provide numerous advantages for establishing satellite-to-ground data links. As a carrier for information, lasers are characterized by high bandwidth and directionality, allowing for fast and secure transfer of data. These systems are also highly resistant to RF influences since they operate in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, far from radio bands. In this paper we will discuss an entirely non-mechanical electro-optic (EO) laser beam steering technology, with no moving parts, which we have used to form robust 400 Mbps optical data connections through air. This technology will enable low cost, compact, and rugged free space optical (FSO) communication modules for small satellite applications. The EO beam-steerer at the heart of this system is used to maintain beam pointing as the satellite orbits. It is characterized by extremely low values for size, weight and power consumption (SWaP) - approximately 300 cm3, 300 g, and 5 W respectively, which represents a marked improvement compared to heavy, and power-consuming gimbal mechanisms. It is capable of steering a 500 mW, 1 mm short wave infrared (SWIR) beam over a field of view (FOV) of up to 50° x 15°, a range which can be increased by adding polarization gratings, which provide a coarse adjust stage at the EO beam scanner output. We have integrated this device into a communication system and demonstrated the capability to lock on and transmit a high quality data stream by modulation of SWIR power.

  2. Performance Assessment of Wire-Scanners at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Baud, G; Emery, J; Gras, JJ; Guerrero, A; Piselli, E

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the current fast wire-scanner devices installed in circular accelerators at CERN with an emphasis on the error studies carried out during the last two runs. At present the wire-scanners have similar acquisition systems but are varied in terms of mechanics. Several measurement campaigns were performed aimed at establishing optimal operational settings and to identify and assess systematic errors. In several cases the results led to direct performance improvements while in others this helped in defining the requirements for new detectors.

  3. A ’Millipede’ scanner model - Energy consumption and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.

    2008-01-01

    This short report (1) describes an energy model for the seek and read/write operations in a mass-balanced Y-scanner for parallel-probe storage by IBM [1] and (2) updates the settings of the MEMS model in DiskSim with recent published figures from this XY-scanner. To speedup system simulations, a straight forward second-order model is used without control loop. Read/write operation is modeled by quasi-static calculations. To approximate seek behavior, ’bang-bang’ control is assumed; the result...

  4. Scanner baseliner monitoring and control in high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Pavan; Chung, Woong Jae; Aung, Nyan; Subramany, Lokesh; Gao, Haiyong; Gomez, Juan-Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze performance of different customized models on baseliner overlay data and demonstrate the reduction in overlay residuals by ~10%. Smart Sampling sets were assessed and compared with the full wafer measurements. We found that performance of the grid can still be maintained by going to one-third of total sampling points, while reducing metrology time by 60%. We also demonstrate the feasibility of achieving time to time matching using scanner fleet manager and thus identify the tool drifts even when the tool monitoring controls are within spec limits. We also explore the scanner feedback constant variation with illumination sources.

  5. Localization of a mobile laser scanner via dimensional reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtola, Ville V.; Virtanen, Juho-Pekka; Vaaja, Matti T.; Hyyppä, Hannu; Nüchter, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    We extend the concept of intrinsic localization from a theoretical one-dimensional (1D) solution onto a 2D manifold that is embedded in a 3D space, and then recover the full six degrees of freedom for a mobile laser scanner with a simultaneous localization and mapping algorithm (SLAM). By intrinsic localization, we mean that no reference coordinate system, such as global navigation satellite system (GNSS), nor inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used. Experiments are conducted with a 2D laser scanner mounted on a rolling prototype platform, VILMA. The concept offers potential in being extendable to other wheeled platforms.

  6. Satellite orientation and position for geometric correction of scanner imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    The USGS Mini Image Processing System currently relies on a polynomial method for geometric correction of Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data. A large number of ground control points are required because polynomials do not model the sources of error. In order to reduce the number of necessary points, a set of mathematical equations modeling the Landsat satellite motions and MSS scanner has been derived and programmed. A best fit to the equations is obtained by using a least-squares technique that permits computation of the satellite orientation and position parameters based on only a few control points.-from Author

  7. Calibration of Images with 3D range scanner data

    OpenAIRE

    Adalid López, Víctor Javier

    2009-01-01

    Projecte fet en col.laboració amb EPFL 3D laser range scanners are used in extraction of the 3D data in a scene. Main application areas are architecture, archeology and city planning. Thought the raw scanner data has a gray scale values, the 3D data can be merged with colour camera image values to get textured 3D model of the scene. Also these devices are able to take a reliable copy in 3D form objects, with a high level of accuracy. Therefore, they scanned scenes can be use...

  8. Estimating Single Tree Stem Volume of Pinus sylvestris Using Airborne Laser Scanner and Multispectral Line Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available So far, only a few studies have been carried out in central European forests to estimate individual tree stem volume of pine trees from high resolution remote sensing data. In this article information derived from airborne laser scanner and multispectral line scanner data were tested to predict the stem volume of 178 pines (Pinus sylvestris in a study site in the south-west of Germany. First, tree crowns were automatically delineated using both multispectral and laser scanner data. Next, tree height, crown diameter and crown volume were derived for each crown segment. All combinations of the derived tree features were used as explanatory variables in allometric models to predict the stem volume. A model with tree height and crown diameter had the best performance with respect to the prediction accuracy determined by a leave-one-out cross-validation: Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 24.02% and Bias = 1.36%.

  9. Analysis of the EBT3 Gafchromic film irradiated with 6 MV photons and 6 MeV electrons using reflective mode scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Nicolas; Francis, Ziad; Abboud, Marie

    2014-09-01

    We explore in our study the effects of electrons and X-rays irradiations on the newest version of the Gafchromic EBT3 film. Experiments are performed using the Varian "TrueBeam 1.6" medical accelerator delivering 6 MV X-ray photons and 6 MeV electron beams as desired. The main interest is to compare the responses of EBT3 films exposed to two separate beams of electrons and photons, for radiation doses ranging up to 500 cGy. The analysis is done on a flatbed EPSON 10000 XL scanner and cross checked on a HP Scanjet 4850 scanner. Both scanners are used in reflection mode taking into account landscape and portrait scanning positions. After thorough verifications, the reflective scanning method can be used on EBT3 as an economic alternative to the transmission method which was also one of the goals of this study. A comparison is also done between single scan configuration including all samples in a single A4 (HP) or A3 (EPSON) format area and multiple scan procedure where each sample is scanned separately on its own. The images analyses are done using the ImageJ software. Results show significant influence of the scanning configuration but no significant differences between electron and photon irradiations for both single and multiple scan configurations. In conclusion, the film provides a reliable relative dose measurement method for electrons and photons irradiations in the medical field applications.

  10. Beam diagnostics measurements at 3 MeV of the LINAC4 H- beam at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Zocca, F; Duraffourg, M; Focker, G J; Gerard, D; Kolad, B; Lenardon, F; Ludwig, M; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F; Sordet, M; Tan, J; Tassan-Viol, J; Vuitton, C; Feshenko, A

    2014-01-01

    As part of the CERN LHC injector chain upgrade, LINAC4 [1, 2] will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV, replacing the old 50 MeV proton linac. The ion source, the Low Energy Beam Transfer (LEBT) line, the 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole and the Medium Energy Beam Transfer (MEBT) line hosting a chopper, have been commissioned in the LINAC4 tunnel. Diagnostic devices are installed in the LEBT and MEBT line and in a movable diagnostics test bench which is temporarily added to the MEBT exit. The paper gives an overview of all the instruments used, including beam current transformers, beam position monitors, wire scanners and wire grids for transverse profile measurements, a longitudinal bunch shape monitor and a slit-and-grid emittance meter. The instrumentation performance is discussed and the measurement results that allowed characterizing the 3 MeV beam in the LINAC4 tunnel are summarized.

  11. Beam Instrumentation of the PXIE LEBT Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Arcy, R. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, v. [Fermilab; Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The PXIE accelerator [1] is the front-end test stand of the proposed Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) [2] initiative: a CW-compatible pulsed H- superconducting RF linac upgrade to Fermilab’s injection system. The PXIE Ion Source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section are designed to create and transfer a 1-10 mA $H^{-}$ beam, in either pulsed (0.001–16 ms) or DC mode, from the ion source through to the injection point of the RFQ. This paper discusses the range of diagnostic tools – Allison-type Emittance Scanner, Faraday Cup, Toroid, DCCT, electrically isolated diaphragms – involved in the commissioning of the beam line and preparation of the beam for injection into the RFQ.

  12. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  13. Scanners, optical character readers, Cyrillic alphabet and Russian translations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    1995-01-01

    The writing of code for capture, in a uniform format, of bit maps of words and characters from scanner PICT files is presented. The coding of Dynamic Pattern Matched for the identification of the characters, words and sentences in preparation for translation is discussed.

  14. Vision Assisted Laser Scanner Navigation for Autonomous Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2008-01-01

    .5 m). The front looking camera is used to classify the road from this distance and forward, taking a seed area from the laser scanner data and from this estimate the outline of the visible part of the road. The method has been tested successfully on gravelled and asphalt roads in a national park...

  15. Benchmarking Advanced Control Algorithms for a Laser Scanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Ordys, A.W.; Smillie, I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes tests performed on the laser scanner system toassess feasibility of modern control techniques in achieving a requiredperformance in the trajectory following problem. The two methods tested areQTR H-infinity and Predictive Control. The results are ilustated ona simulation example....

  16. Impact of topographic mask models on scanner matching solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Pomplun, Jan; Renwick, Stephen P.

    2014-03-01

    Of keen interest to the IC industry are advanced computational lithography applications such as Optical Proximity Correction of IC layouts (OPC), scanner matching by optical proximity effect matching (OPEM), and Source Optimization (SO) and Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) used as advanced reticle enhancement techniques. The success of these tasks is strongly dependent on the integrity of the lithographic simulators used in computational lithography (CL) optimizers. Lithographic mask models used by these simulators are key drivers impacting the accuracy of the image predications, and as a consequence, determine the validity of these CL solutions. Much of the CL work involves Kirchhoff mask models, a.k.a. thin masks approximation, simplifying the treatment of the mask near-field images. On the other hand, imaging models for hyper-NA scanner require that the interactions of the illumination fields with the mask topography be rigorously accounted for, by numerically solving Maxwell's Equations. The simulators used to predict the image formation in the hyper-NA scanners must rigorously treat the masks topography and its interaction with the scanner illuminators. Such imaging models come at a high computational cost and pose challenging accuracy vs. compute time tradeoffs. Additional complication comes from the fact that the performance metrics used in computational lithography tasks show highly non-linear response to the optimization parameters. Finally, the number of patterns used for tasks such as OPC, OPEM, SO, or SMO range from tens to hundreds. These requirements determine the complexity and the workload of the lithography optimization tasks. The tools to build rigorous imaging optimizers based on first-principles governing imaging in scanners are available, but the quantifiable benefits they might provide are not very well understood. To quantify the performance of OPE matching solutions, we have compared the results of various imaging optimization trials obtained

  17. High-throughput machining using a high-average power ultrashort pulse laser and high-speed polygon scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (aluminum, copper, and stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high-average power picosecond laser in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed polygon mirror-based biaxial scanning system. Therefore, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find the best architecture for high-speed and precision laser beam scanning. In order to identify the optimum conditions for efficient processing when using high-average laser powers, the depths of cavities made in the samples by varying the processing parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. For overlapping pulses of optimum fluence, the removal rate is as high as 27.8 mm3/min for aluminum, 21.4 mm3/min for copper, 15.3 mm3/min for stainless steel, and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3, when a laser beam of 187 W average laser powers irradiates. On stainless steel, it is demonstrated that the removal rate increases to 23.3 mm3/min when the laser beam is very fast moving. This is thanks to the low pulse overlap as achieved with 800 m/s beam deflection speed; thus, laser beam shielding can be avoided even when irradiating high-repetitive 20-MHz pulses.

  18. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality.

  19. A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

  20. SU-E-T-121: Dosimetric Characterization of Gafchromic Film EBT3 Using Vidar DosimetryPro Advantage RED and EPSON Expression 10000XL Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L; Adrada, A; Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to characterize EBT3 using two types of scanner, analyzing the factors of influence of each dosimetry system. Methods: The film used in this study was GAFCHROMIC EBT3, the films were exposed at a dose range between 0Gy a 9Gy in a solid water phantom, SSD=100cm, 5cm depth and perpendicularly to the 6MV photon beam generated by a Novalis TX linear accelerator equipped with an HDMLC. A Farmer type ion chamber TN30013 (PTW) was used to determine the dose delivered to the film. The films were digitized with a scanner EPSON expression 10000XL and the VIDAR DosimetryPro Adventage RED. Software RIT113v6.1 was used for construction of the calibration curve and analysis. The film characteristics investigated were: response at different dose levels, sensitivity to orientation and side and resolution through the results of the spatial response function by analyzing a step pattern. Additionally, 20 IMRT treatment fields were measured with both scanner and compared with calculated dose using gamma index analysis (3%-3mm). Results: The OD obtained for dose level 2Gy in the orientation portrait of the film on the scanner EPSON is (0,222±0,19) and for Vidar RED (0,252±0,10) and landscape is for EPSON (0,211±0,25) and for Vidar RED (0,250±0,11) . The orientation dependence with respect to film side is about 0,09% for EPSON and about 0.03% for VIDAR. The spatial response function increase in response to the Gaussian function FWHM EPSON scanner (0.18mm) compared with VIDAR scanner function (less than 0.06mm) was observed. We analyzed 20 total plan dose distributions the number of pixels with gamma>1 (3%-3mm) was 0.7%±1.2 [0.1%; 2.82%] for EBT3-VIDAR y 2%±2.9 [0.2%; 3.5%] for EBT3-EPSON. Conclusion: VIDAR scanner shows better sensitivity. EBT3 film shows a different response between portrait and landscape orientation. Step pattern is better reproduce by VIDAR scanner.

  1. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  2. Design and Development of a Megavoltage CT Scanner for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are (i) to provide 2- and 3-dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, (ii) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images and (iii) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a 'third generation' CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion are performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm is employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement ((DBLTURN).75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy.

  3. Robust Object Segmentation Using a Multi-Layer Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beomseong Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The major problem in an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS is the proper use of sensor measurements and recognition of the surrounding environment. To this end, there are several types of sensors to consider, one of which is the laser scanner. In this paper, we propose a method to segment the measurement of the surrounding environment as obtained by a multi-layer laser scanner. In the segmentation, a full set of measurements is decomposed into several segments, each representing a single object. Sometimes a ghost is detected due to the ground or fog, and the ghost has to be eliminated to ensure the stability of the system. The proposed method is implemented on a real vehicle, and its performance is tested in a real-world environment. The experiments show that the proposed method demonstrates good performance in many real-life situations.

  4. Robust object segmentation using a multi-layer laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beomseong; Choi, Baehoon; Yoo, Minkyun; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Euntai

    2014-10-29

    The major problem in an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) is the proper use of sensor measurements and recognition of the surrounding environment. To this end, there are several types of sensors to consider, one of which is the laser scanner. In this paper, we propose a method to segment the measurement of the surrounding environment as obtained by a multi-layer laser scanner. In the segmentation, a full set of measurements is decomposed into several segments, each representing a single object. Sometimes a ghost is detected due to the ground or fog, and the ghost has to be eliminated to ensure the stability of the system. The proposed method is implemented on a real vehicle, and its performance is tested in a real-world environment. The experiments show that the proposed method demonstrates good performance in many real-life situations.

  5. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging.

  6. Lensless image scanner using multilayered aperture array for noncontact imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new imaging system of a simple structure that uses a set of layered aperture arrays above a linear image sensor instead of an imaging lens. The image scanner transfers the image information by detecting the scattering rays from the object directly without any collecting power, as if it were an optical stamp. Since the aperture arrays shield the stray rays propagating obliquely, the image information can be read with high resolution even if the object floats within a few millimeters. The aperture arrays with staggered alignment in two lines widen the space with the adjacent pixel without decimating information. We manufactured a prototype model of 300-dpi resolution, whose height is as little as 5 mm. The experimental result shows that ghost images can be restricted sufficiently, and our scanner can clearly read an object within a space of <3.5 mm, meaning that it has a large depth of field of 3.5 mm.

  7. Quality of Plate Copies Digitized with a Commercially Available Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnitski, V.; Davis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Digitization of all the (ca. 8,000) 8"x10" plates of the Maria Mitchell Observatory's plate collection with the commercially available scanner AgfaScan T5000 took about 1.5 years. Scanning these plates with the same nominal resolution (10-20 microns) using one of the best astronomical digital microdensitometers would be about 8 times longer, and, correspondingly, 8 times more expensive. Such a fast job may raise doubts in the quality of the scans. We show, by comparison with the control scans obtained with the STScI's GAMMA laser microdensitometer, that the additional random errors for stellar photometry introduced by AgfaScan T5000 are, typically, less than 0.05 mag, and that this scanner does not produce any detectable additional astrometric errors. This project was supported by the NSF/REU grant AST-0354056 and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  8. Scanner tags, comic book piracy and participatory culture

    OpenAIRE

    Delwiche, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    To learn more about the motivations of individuals who scan and distribute comic books, this study reports findings from a content analysis of 389 scanner tags extracted from comic books posted on the torrent network Pirate Bay. Coded according to four categories linked to the literature on comic fandom and participatory culture, tags were analyzed in terms of recognition, aesthetic style, textual signifiers, and visual signifiers. Though comic book pirates seek recognition from their peers, ...

  9. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, R.; Carriço, B.; Ferreira, C. S.; Frade, M.; Ferreira, M.; Moura, R.; Ortigão, C.; Pinheiro, J. F.; Rodrigues, P.; Rolo, I.; Silva, J. C.; Trindade, A.; Varela, J.

    2009-10-01

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 × 2 × 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean CDOI-1 is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  10. Building a 3D scanner system based on monocular vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Yuan, Lin

    2012-04-10

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional scanner system, which is built by using an ingenious geometric construction method based on monocular vision. The system is simple, low cost, and easy to use, and the measurement results are very precise. To build it, one web camera, one handheld linear laser, and one background calibration board are required. The experimental results show that the system is robust and effective, and the scanning precision can be satisfied for normal users.

  11. Whole brain CT perfusion on a 320-slice CT scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Jai Shiva Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography perfusion (CTP has been criticized for limited brain coverage. This may result in inadequate coverage of the lesion, inadequate arterial input function, or omission of the lesion within the target perfusion volume. The availability of 320-slice CT scanners offers whole brain coverage. This minimizes the chances of misregistration of lesions regardless of location, and makes the selection of the arterial input function easy. We present different clinical scenarios in which whole brain CTP is especially useful.

  12. Dynamic 3D computed tomography scanner for vascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark K.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2000-04-01

    A 3D dynamic computed-tomography (CT) scanner was developed for imaging objects undergoing periodic motion. The scanner system has high spatial and sufficient temporal resolution to produce quantitative tomographic/volume images of objects such as excised arterial samples perfused under physiological pressure conditions and enables the measurements of the local dynamic elastic modulus (Edyn) of the arteries in the axial and longitudinal directions. The system was comprised of a high resolution modified x-ray image intensifier (XRII) based computed tomographic system and a computer-controlled cardiac flow simulator. A standard NTSC CCD camera with a macro lens was coupled to the electro-optically zoomed XRII to acquire dynamic volumetric images. Through prospective cardiac gating and computer synchronized control, a time-resolved sequence of 20 mm thick high resolution volume images of porcine aortic specimens during one simulated cardiac cycle were obtained. Performance evaluation of the scanners illustrated that tomographic images can be obtained with resolution as high as 3.2 mm-1 with only a 9% decrease in the resolution for objects moving at velocities of 1 cm/s in 2D mode and static spatial resolution of 3.55 mm-1 with only a 14% decrease in the resolution in 3D mode for objects moving at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Application of the system for imaging of intact excised arterial specimens under simulated physiological flow/pressure conditions enabled measurements of the Edyn of the arteries with a precision of +/- kPa for the 3D scanner. Evaluation of the Edyn in the axial and longitudinal direction produced values of 428 +/- 35 kPa and 728 +/- 71 kPa, demonstrating the isotropic and homogeneous viscoelastic nature of the vascular specimens. These values obtained from the Dynamic CT systems were not statistically different (p less than 0.05) from the values obtained by standard uniaxial tensile testing and volumetric measurements.

  13. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, R; Carrico, B; Ferreira, C S; Frade, M; Ferreira, M; Moura, R; Ortigao, C; Pinheiro, J F; Rodrigues, P; Rolo, I; Silva, J C; Trindade, A; Varela, J [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, 1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: frade@lip.pt

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 x 2 x 20 mm{sup 3} LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean C{sub DOI}{sup -1} is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  14. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-21

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  15. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Adamovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2013-12-21

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans.

  16. Using Laser Scanners to Augment the Systematic Error Pointing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    The antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) rely on precise pointing algorithms to communicate with spacecraft that are billions of miles away. Although the existing systematic error pointing model is effective at reducing blind pointing errors due to static misalignments, several of its terms have a strong dependence on seasonal and even daily thermal variation and are thus not easily modeled. Changes in the thermal state of the structure create a separation from the model and introduce a varying pointing offset. Compensating for this varying offset is possible by augmenting the pointing model with laser scanners. In this approach, laser scanners mounted to the alidade measure structural displacements while a series of transformations generate correction angles. Two sets of experiments were conducted in August 2015 using commercially available laser scanners. When compared with historical monopulse corrections under similar conditions, the computed corrections are within 3 mdeg of the mean. However, although the results show promise, several key challenges relating to the sensitivity of the optical equipment to sunlight render an implementation of this approach impractical. Other measurement devices such as inclinometers may be implementable at a significantly lower cost.

  17. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D scanner as an alternative to current methods. For this study, the surfaces of ten samples oftuff were digitized by means of a 3D scanner, and the results were compared with the corresponding Rock JointCoefficient (JRC values. Up until now such 3D scanner have been mostly used in the automotive industry, whereastheir use for comparison with obtained JRC coefficient values in rock mechanics is presented here for the first time.The proposed new method is a faster, more precise and more accurate than other existing test methods, and is apromising technique for use in this area of study in the future.

  18. An endoscopic 3D scanner based on structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Christoph; Forster, Frank; Schick, Anton; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-07-01

    We present a new endoscopic 3D scanning system based on Single Shot Structured Light. The proposed design makes it possible to build an extremely small scanner. The sensor head contains a catadioptric camera and a pattern projection unit. The paper describes the working principle and calibration procedure of the sensor. The prototype sensor head has a diameter of only 3.6mm and a length of 14mm. It is mounted on a flexible shaft. The scanner is designed for tubular cavities and has a cylindrical working volume of about 30mm length and 30mm diameter. It acquires 3D video at 30 frames per second and typically generates approximately 5000 3D points per frame. By design, the resolution varies over the working volume, but is generally better than 200μm. A prototype scanner has been built and is evaluated in experiments with phantoms and biological samples. The recorded average error on a known test object was 92μm.

  19. A biaxial PZT optical scanner for pico-projector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, K.; Koyama, T.; Saito, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2015-02-01

    We report a newly developed two-dimensional MEMS optical scanner based on the ADRIP (Arc Discharge Reactive Ion-Plating) deposited piezoelectric PZT film of typical 4 μm. A circular mirror of 1.2 mm in diameter is suspended within a pair of resonant mechanism that oscillates at 25 kHz for ±12° mechanical angle with a typical voltage of 10 V. A gimbal plate including the mirror is supported with another pair of meandering suspensions to tilt the plate in the orthogonal direction at 60 Hz for the off-resonant vertical motion of ±8° mechanical. Overall power consumption of the piezoelectric actuation was 100 mW or less. As a mechanical reinforce, a rib-structure was designed on the backside of the mirror by using a structural optimization tool TOSCA to suppress the dynamic curvature to 100 nm or less. A piezoelectric sensor was also integrated in the identical PZT film after optimizing the electrode shape to pick up the mechanical angle of the scanner and to give a trigger signal to the control system. A plug-in type pico-projector optics and electronics has been assembled in a 7.5 cm × 12 cm × 5 cm volume with RGB lasers to demonstrate a HD (high definition) class image projection of 720 horizontal lines. The fundamental resonance of the entire scanner mechanism was made to be 1 kHz or higher, thereby exhibiting a compatibility with vehicle applications.

  20. Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics in the MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruey-Song; Sereno, Martin I

    2008-03-30

    Imaging the neural basis of visuomotor actions using fMRI is a topic of increasing interest in the field of cognitive neuroscience. One challenge is to present realistic three-dimensional (3-D) stimuli in the subject's peripersonal space inside the MRI scanner. The stimulus generating apparatus must be compatible with strong magnetic fields and must not interfere with image acquisition. Virtual 3-D stimuli can be generated with a stereo image pair projected onto screens or via binocular goggles. Here, we describe designs and implementations for automatically presenting physical 3-D stimuli (point-light targets) in peripersonal and near-face space using fiber optics in the MRI scanner. The feasibility of fiber-optic based displays was demonstrated in two experiments. The first presented a point-light array along a slanted surface near the body, and the second presented multiple point-light targets around the face. Stimuli were presented using phase-encoded paradigms in both experiments. The results suggest that fiber-optic based displays can be a complementary approach for visual stimulus presentation in the MRI scanner.

  1. INSIDE in-beam positron emission tomography system for particle range monitoring in hadrontherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Attili, Andrea; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Belcari, Nicola; Camarlinghi, Niccolo'; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Coli, Silvia; Del Guerra, Alberto; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrero, Veronica; Fiorina, Elisa; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Kostara, Eleftheria; Morrocchi, Matteo; Pennazio, Francesco; Peroni, Cristiana; Piliero, Maria Antonietta; Pirrone, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel D; Rosso, Valeria; Sala, Paola; Sportelli, Giancarlo; Wheadon, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The quality assurance of particle therapy treatment is a fundamental issue that can be addressed by developing reliable monitoring techniques and indicators of the treatment plan correctness. Among the available imaging techniques, positron emission tomography (PET) has long been investigated and then clinically applied to proton and carbon beams. In 2013, the Innovative Solutions for Dosimetry in Hadrontherapy (INSIDE) collaboration proposed an innovative bimodal imaging concept that combines an in-beam PET scanner with a tracking system for charged particle imaging. This paper presents the general architecture of the INSIDE project but focuses on the in-beam PET scanner that has been designed to reconstruct the particles range with millimetric resolution within a fraction of the dose delivered in a treatment of head and neck tumors. The in-beam PET scanner has been recently installed at the Italian National Center of Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) in Pavia, Italy, and the commissioning phase has just started. The results of the first beam test with clinical proton beams on phantoms clearly show the capability of the in-beam PET to operate during the irradiation delivery and to reconstruct on-line the beam-induced activity map. The accuracy in the activity distal fall-off determination is millimetric for therapeutic doses.

  2. Multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography scanner using an all optical detection scheme for 3D morphological skin imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Edward Z; Povazay, Boris; Laufer, Jan; Alex, Aneesh; Hofer, Bernd; Pedley, Barbara; Glittenberg, Carl; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    A noninvasive, multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography (PAT/OCT) scanner for three-dimensional in vivo (3D) skin imaging is described. The system employs an integrated, all optical detection scheme for both modalities in backward mode utilizing a shared 2D optical scanner with a field-of-view of ~13 × 13 mm(2). The photoacoustic waves were detected using a Fabry Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor placed on the surface of the skin. The sensor is transparent in the spectral range 590-1200 nm. This permits the photoacoustic excitation beam (670-680 nm) and the OCT probe beam (1050 nm) to be transmitted through the sensor head and into the underlying tissue thus providing a backward mode imaging configuration. The respective OCT and PAT axial resolutions were 8 and 20 µm and the lateral resolutions were 18 and 50-100 µm. The system provides greater penetration depth than previous combined PA/OCT devices due to the longer wavelength of the OCT beam (1050 nm rather than 829-870 nm) and by operating in the tomographic rather than the optical resolution mode of photoacoustic imaging. Three-dimensional in vivo images of the vasculature and the surrounding tissue micro-morphology in murine and human skin were acquired. These studies demonstrated the complementary contrast and tissue information provided by each modality for high-resolution 3D imaging of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. Potential applications include characterizing skin conditions such as tumors, vascular lesions, soft tissue damage such as burns and wounds, inflammatory conditions such as dermatitis and other superficial tissue abnormalities.

  3. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung An, Su; Beak, Cheol-Ha; Lee, Kisung; Hyun Chung, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10C, 11C, and 15O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  4. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  5. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  6. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  7. Beam collimator

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    A four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with SPS secondary beams, the collimator operates under vacuum conditions. See Annual Report 1976 p. 121 and photo 7701014.

  8. Comparison of three-dimensional scanner systems for craniomaxillofacial imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Paul G M; Beaumont, Caroline A A; Borghi, Alessandro; Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Breakey, Richard W F; Rodgers, William; Angullia, Freida; Jeelani, N U Owase; Schievano, Silvia; Dunaway, David J

    2017-04-01

    Two-dimensional photographs are the standard for assessing craniofacial surgery clinical outcomes despite lacking three-dimensional (3D) depth and shape. Therefore, 3D scanners have been gaining popularity in various fields of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including craniomaxillofacial surgery. Head shapes of eight adult volunteers were acquired using four 3D scanners: 1.5T Avanto MRI, Siemens; 3dMDface System, 3dMD Inc.; M4D Scan, Rodin4D; and Structure Sensor, Occipital Inc. Accuracy was evaluated as percentage of data within a range of 2 mm from the 3DMDface System reconstruction, by surface-to-surface root mean square (RMS) distances, and with facial distance maps. Precision was determined by RMS. Relative to the 3dMDface System, accuracy was the highest for M4D Scan (90% within 2 mm; RMS of 0.71 mm ± 0.28 mm), followed by Avanto MRI (86%; 1.11 mm ± 0.33 mm) and Structure Sensor (80%; 1.33 mm ± 0.46). M4D Scan and Structure Sensor precision were 0.50 ± 0.04 mm and 0.51 ± 0.03 mm, respectively. Clinical and technical requirements govern scanner choice; however, 3dMDface System and M4D Scan provide high-quality results. It is foreseeable that compact, handheld systems will become more popular in the near future.

  9. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with 18F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a 22Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at different offsets from the center of the field of view (FOV), as well as at different energy and coincidence windows. The noise equivalent count rates (NECR) and the system scatter fraction were measured using rat-like (Φ = 60, L = 150 mm) and mouse-like (Φ = 25 mm, L = 70 mm) cylindrical phantoms. Line sources filled with high activity 18F (>250 MBq) were inserted parallel to the axes of the phantoms (13.5 and 10 mm offset). For each phantom, list-mode data were collected over 24 h at 350-650 keV and 250-750 keV energy windows and 3.4 ns coincidence window. System scatter fraction was measured when the random event rates were below 1%. Performance phantoms consisting of cylinders with hot rod inserts filled with 18F were imaged. In addition, we performed imaging studies that show the suitability of the Inveon scanner for imaging small structures such as those in mice with a variety of tracers. The radial, tangential and axial resolutions at the center of FOV were 1.46 mm, 1.49 and 1.15 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 2 cm, the FWHM values were 1.73, 2.20 and 1.47 mm, respectively. At a coincidence window of 3.4 ns, the sensitivity was 5.75% for EW = 350-650 keV and 7.4% for EW = 250-750 keV. For an energy window of 350-650 keV, the peak NECR was 538 kcps at 131.4 MBq for the rat-like phantom, and 1734 kcps at 147.4 MBq for the mouse-like phantom. The system scatter fraction values were 0.22 for the rat phantom and 0.06 for the mouse phantom. The Inveon system

  10. Optical monitoring of scoliosis by 3D medical laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiñonez, Julio C.; Sergiyenko, Oleg Yu.; Preciado, Luis C. Basaca; Tyrsa, Vera V.; Gurko, Alexander G.; Podrygalo, Mikhail A.; Lopez, Moises Rivas; Balbuena, Daniel Hernandez

    2014-03-01

    Three dimensional recording of the human body surface or anatomical areas have gained importance in many medical applications. In this paper, our 3D Medical Laser Scanner is presented. It is based on the novel principle of dynamic triangulation. We analyze the method of operation, medical applications, orthopedically diseases as Scoliosis and the most common types of skin to employ the system the most proper way. It is analyzed a group of medical problems related to the application of optical scanning in optimal way. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system and its method uncertainty.

  11. Investigation of a near-infrared-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Satoi, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    In the near-infrared-ray computed tomography (NIR-CT) scanner, NIR rays are produced from a light-emitting diode (LED) and detected using an NIR phototransistor (PT). The wavelengths of the LED peak intensity and the PT high sensitivity in the data table are both 940 nm. The photocurrents flowing through the PTR are converted into voltages using an emitter-follower circuit, and the output voltages are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter. The NIR projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object, and the scanning is conducted in both directions of its movement.

  12. Scatter fraction of the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, P; Raczyński, L; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, J; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammad, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    A novel Positron Emission Tomography system, based on plastic scintillators, is being developed by the J-PET collaboration. In this article we present the simulation results of the scatter fraction, representing one of the parameters crucial for background studies defined in the NEMA-NU-2-2012 norm. We elaborate an event selection methods allowing to suppress events in which gamma quanta were scattered in the phantom or underwent the multiple scattering in the detector. The estimated scatter fraction for the single-layer J-PET scanner varies from 37% to 53% depending on the applied energy threshold.

  13. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  14. Comparative evaluation of ultrasound scanner accuracy in distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, F. P.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop and compare two different automatic methods for accuracy evaluation in ultrasound phantom measurements on B-mode images: both of them give as a result the relative error e between measured distances, performed by 14 brand new ultrasound medical scanners, and nominal distances, among nylon wires embedded in a reference test object. The first method is based on a least squares estimation, while the second one applies the mean value of the same distance evaluated at different locations in ultrasound image (same distance method). Results for both of them are proposed and explained.

  15. Applicability of optical scanner method for fine root dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tomonori; Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Khoon Kho, Lip; Katayama, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Fine root dynamics is one of the important components in forest carbon cycling, as ~60 % of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to root growth and metabolic activities. Various techniques have been developed for monitoring fine root biomass, production, mortality in order to understand carbon pools and fluxes resulting from fine roots dynamics. The minirhizotron method is now a widely used technique, in which a transparent tube is inserted into the soil and researchers count an increase and decrease of roots along the tube using images taken by a minirhizotron camera or minirhizotron video camera inside the tube. This method allows us to observe root behavior directly without destruction, but has several weaknesses; e.g., the difficulty of scaling up the results to stand level because of the small observation windows. Also, most of the image analysis are performed manually, which may yield insufficient quantitative and objective data. Recently, scanner method has been proposed, which can produce much bigger-size images (A4-size) with lower cost than those of the minirhizotron methods. However, laborious and time-consuming image analysis still limits the applicability of this method. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a new protocol for scanner image analysis to extract root behavior in soil. We evaluated applicability of this method in two ways; 1) the impact of different observers including root-study professionals, semi- and non-professionals on the detected results of root dynamics such as abundance, growth, and decomposition, and 2) the impact of window size on the results using a random sampling basis exercise. We applied our new protocol to analyze temporal changes of root behavior from sequential scanner images derived from a Bornean tropical forests. The results detected by the six observers showed considerable concordance in temporal changes in the abundance and the growth of fine roots but less in the decomposition. We also examined

  16. Feature-space transformation improves supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Achterberg, Hakim C.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Image-segmentation techniques based on supervised classification generally perform well on the condition that training and test samples have the same feature distribution. However, if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, their feature distributions...... that our feature space transformation improved the Dice overlap of segmentations obtained with an SVM classifier from 0.36 to 0.85 when only 10 atlases were used and from 0.79 to 0.85 when around 100 atlases were used....

  17. Large-scale three-dimensional measurement via combining 3D scanner and laser rangefinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinlong; Sun, Zhengxing; Bai, Suqin

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) measurement method of large-scale objects by integrating a 3D scanner and a laser rangefinder. The 3D scanner, used to perform partial section measurement, is fixed on a robotic arm which can slide on a guide rail. The laser rangefinder, used to compute poses of the 3D scanner, is rigidly connected to the 3D scanner. During large-scale measurement, after measuring a partial section, the 3D scanner is straightly moved forward along the guide rail to measure another section. Meanwhile, the poses of the 3D scanner are estimated according to its moved distance for different partial section alignments. The performance and effectiveness are evaluated by experiments.

  18. Comparison of back side chrome focus monitor to focus self-metrology of an immersion scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'havé, Koen; Machida, Takahiro; Laidler, David; Cheng, Shaunee

    2007-03-01

    Monitoring of the focus performance is recognized to be an important part of a periodic scanner health check, but can one simply apply all techniques that have been used for dry scanners to immersion scanners? And if so how do such techniques compare to scanner self-metrology tests that are used to set up the tool? In this paper we look at one specific off-line focus characterization technique, Back Side Chrome (BSC), which we then try to match with results obtained from two self-metrology focus tests, available on the scanner chosen for this work. The latter tests are also used to set up the immersion scanner. We point out a few concerns, discuss their effect and indicate that for each generation of immersion tool one should redo the entire exercise.

  19. Spatial and temporal-controlled tissue heating on a modified clinical ultrasound scanner for generating mild hyperthermia in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Dustin E; Lai, Chun-Yen; Stephens, Douglas N; Sutcliffe, Patrick; Paoli, Eric E; Barnes, Stephen H; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2010-01-01

    A new system is presented for generating controlled tissue heating with a clinical ultrasound scanner, and initial in vitro and in vivo results are presented that demonstrate both transient and sustained heating in the mild-hyperthermia range of 37 ( degrees )C-42 ( degrees )C. The system consists of a Siemens Antares ultrasound scanner, a custom dual-frequency three-row transducer array and an external temperature feedback control system. The transducer has two outer rows that operate at 1.5 MHz for tissue heating and a center row that operates at 5 MHz for B-mode imaging to guide the therapy. We compare the field maps obtained using a hydrophone against calculations of the ultrasound beam based on monochromatic and linear assumptions. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we compare predicted time-dependent thermal profiles to measured profiles for soy tofu as a tissue-mimicking phantom. In vitro results show differential heating of 6 ( degrees )C for chicken breast and tofu. In vivo tests of the system were performed on three mice bearing Met-1 tumors, which is a model of aggressive, metastatic, and highly vascular breast cancer. In superficially implanted tumors, we demonstrate controlled heating to 42 ( degrees )C. We show that the system is able to maintain the temperature to within 0.1 ( degrees )C of the desired temperature both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Novel multi-beam radiometers for accurate ocean surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Novel antenna architectures for real aperture multi-beam radiometers providing high resolution and high sensitivity for accurate sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean vector wind (OVW) measurements are investigated. On the basis of the radiometer requirements set for future SST/OVW missions, co......, conical scanners and push-broom antennas are compared. The comparison will cover reflector optics and focal plane array configuration....

  1. Estimation of blood velocity vectors using transverse ultrasound beam focusing and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Lacasa, Isabel Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    Modern ultrasound scanners estimate the blood velocity by tracking the movement of the blood scatterers along the ultrasound beam. This is done by emitting pulsed ultrasound fields and finding the shift in position from pulse to pulse by correlating the received signals. Only the velocity component...... along the beam direction is found, and this is a serious limitation in the current scanners, since most blood vessels are parallel to the skin surface. A method to find the velocity across the vessel has been suggested by Bonnefous (1988). Here a number of parallel receive beams are measured and used...... or across it or in any direction to the beam. The focused lines, thus, follow the flow and a cross-correlation of lines from different pulses can find the movement of the blood particles between pulse emissions and, thus, the blood velocity. The new approach is investigated using the Field II simulation...

  2. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Bednarski, T; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kubicz, E; Moskal, I; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N; Białas, P; Gajos, A; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W

    2014-01-01

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta...

  3. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Unidad PET/CT-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)], E-mail: avilarod@uwalumni.com; Wilson, J.S.; McQuarrie, S.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8 MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired.

  4. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Wilson, J S; McQuarrie, S A

    2009-11-01

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired.

  5. Helicopter downwash measured by continuous-wave Doppler lidars with agile beam steering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas; Hansen, Per;

    2012-01-01

    A ground-based remote sensing short-range WindScanner with agile beam steering based on a modified ZephIR continuous-wave wind lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and a double prism arrangement has recently been developed at the Department of Wind Energy at the DTU Risø campus. The Wind...

  6. Irradiation in helical scanner: doses estimation, parameters choice; Irradiation en scanner helicoidal: estimation des doses, choix des parametres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Boyer, B.; Jouan, E.; Beauvais, H

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of helical scanners improves the diagnosis abilities and the service done to the patients. The rational use allows to give the patients a ratio benefit/risk far better than the almost medical examinations. It is particularly true for over sixty years old aged people, that have a null genetic risk and a practically null carcinogen risk; However, for young adults and children, it is necessary to banish any useless irradiation and limit exposure to the strict necessary for the diagnosis. It is necessary to develop a radiation protection culture, possible by the radiation doses index display and doses benchmarks knowledge. (N.C.)

  7. Advancements on galvanometer scanners for high-end applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2014-03-01

    Galvanometer-based scanners (GSs) are the most utilized devices for lateral scanning. Their applications range from commercial and industrial to biomedical imaging. They are used mostly for 2-D scanning (with typically two GSs), but also for 1-D or 3-D scanning (the latter by example with GSs in combination with Risley prisms). This paper presents an overview of our contributions in the field of GSs with regard to the requirements of their most challenging applications. Specifically, we studied the optimal scanning functions - to produce the maximum possible duty cycleη, and we found that, contrary to what has been stated in the literature, the scanning function that provides the highest η is not linear plus sinusoidal, but linear plus parabolic. The most common GS input signals (i.e., sawtooth, triangular, and sinusoidal) were investigated experimentally to determine the scanning regimes that produce the minimum image artifacts, for example in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). The triangular signal was thus shown to be the best from this point of view, and several rules-of-thumb were extracted to make the best of GSs in OCT. We also discuss aspects of the command functions of GSs that are necessary to achieve a trade-off between a performance criteria related to the duty cycle and voltage regimes of the device. We finally review aspects of the control solutions of GSs we investigated, to obtain the highest possible precision or the fastest possible response of the scanner.

  8. Evaluation of Fingerprint Images Captured by Optical Fingerprint Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideyo; Matsumoto, Noriyuki; Kuwayama, Kiyoaki; Umezaki, Taizo

    In this paper, we propose the way to evaluate fingerprint image-quality and how to discriminate remnants from captured images. First, we investigate evaluating fingerprint image-quality. Fingerprint image-quality can be digitized using the "measure" we proposed. We simulate using the dataset consists of 1425 fingerprint images captured from 57 people in Feb, which contains a lot of faded images. In the simulation using all our database, recognition rate is 95.6% while type II error is 0.01%. Recognition rate is improved to 98.1%, with rejecting 3.7% faded images evaluated by our measure from the database. Recognition rate is improved to 99.6%, rejecting 14.2% faded images. And we investigate the way to apply the measure of image-quality to fingerprint verification device with customer’s satisfaction in real world. Next we propose the way to discriminate between remnants and fingerprint images captured from optical scanner by using frequency analysis. We can perfectly prevent the fingerprint verification device from malfunctioning caused by remnant, when strong flashlight or direct sunlight slant in optical scanner in real world.

  9. Noninvasive thermometry with a clinical x-ray CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallone, B.G.; Moran, P.R.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1982-09-01

    A CT scanner yields CT numbers which are proportional to the fractional difference in effective local electron density of the subject material with respect to that of calibration material. A homogeneous water-equivalent material is used as a calibration phantom under isothermal conditions. Any temperature variation (spatial or temporal) in the subject material subsequently scanned, will generate a CT-number shift in the CT image because of density changes due to thermal expansion. The potential use of the thermally generated CT-number shift in noninvasive thermometry during cancer hyperthermia was studied in vitro in samples of water and muscle tissue. The reproducibility of the area-averaged CT-number measurement on our EMI-7070 scanner was found to depend strongly on the time interval between successive counterclockwise scans and on the size of the region of interest used for area averaging. A linear relationship was found between the CT number and water density in the water temperature range from 10 to 55 /sup 0/C. In the hyperthermia temperature range (36--50 /sup 0/C), the relationship between the CT number and temperature itself is linear, with a CT-number thermal shift of about 0.4 and 0.45 HU//sup 0/C for water and muscle tissue, respectively. The achievable temperature discrimination is a fraction of /sup 0/C at spatial resolutions of the order of a centimeter.

  10. Deformation Measurement Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbesoglu, M. O.; Bakirman, T.; Gokbayrak, O.

    2016-10-01

    Historical structures are one of the most essential element of cultural heritage. They reflect history, lifestyle and tradition of a country and society. However, they are damaged through the years due to human activities and natural hazards. Therefore, digital documentation of structures and monuments is critical for preservation, sustainability and protection of cultural heritage. Terrestrial laser scanner is a widespread used tool for obtaining 3D representation of real world. In this study, we aimed to measure deformation of deformed minaret of a historical mosque using terrestrial laser scanner. In order to represent the geometry of the deformed minaret with high accuracy, 31 horizontal sections were created from the transition segment to the spire of the minaret with 30 cm intervals. The changing curvatures of the minaret were analysed in three parts; cylindrical part, balcony part and upper part. The offsets from the vertical axes for the parts of the minaret were found as 10.14 cm, 13.97 cm and 16.51 cm, respectively.

  11. Towards a mechanical MPI scanner based on atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Tonyushkin, Alexey; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We report on our progress in the development of an atomic magnetometer (AM) based low-frequency X-space MPI scanner, expected to be free from SAR and PNS constraints. We address major challenges in coil and sensor design due to specificAMproperties. Compared to our previous workwe have changed the AM's mode of operation towards its implementation for detecting weak SPIO response fields in the presence of nearby-located strong drive/selection fields. We demonstrate that a pump-probe AM scheme in a buffer gas filled alkali vapour cell can tolerate mT/m gradients while maintaining a sensitivity in the one-digit pT/Hz^(1/2) range over a bandwidth from DC to several kHz. We give a detailed description of the drive/selection coils' geometry and their hardware implementations that will provide both field-free-line (FFL) and field-free-point (FFP) modes of operation, compatible with a best performance AM operation. We estimate the achievable field of view and spatial resolution of the scanner as well as its sensitivi...

  12. Adaptation of Industrial Hyperspectral Line Scanner for Archaeological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljković, V.; Gajski, D.

    2016-06-01

    The spectral characteristic of the visible light reflected from any of archaeological artefact is the result of the interaction of its surface illuminated by incident light. Every particular surface depends on what material it is made of and/or which layers put on it has its spectral signature. Recent archaeometry recognises this information as very valuable data to extend present documentation of artefacts and as a new source for scientific exploration. However, the problem is having an appropriate hyperspectral imaging system available and adopted for applications in archaeology. In this paper, we present the new construction of the hyperspectral imaging system, made of industrial hyperspectral line scanner ImSpector V9 and CCD-sensor PixelView. The hyperspectral line scanner is calibrated geometrically, and hyperspectral data are geocoded and converted to the hyperspectral cube. The system abilities are evaluated for various archaeological artefacts made of different materials. Our experience in applications, visualisations, and interpretations of collected hyperspectral data are explored and presented.

  13. Source mask optimization study based on latest Nikon immersion scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Chenming; Zhang, Wei; Nishinaga, Hisashi; El-Sewefy, Omar; Gao, Gen-Sheng; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Zhang, Recoo; Zhu, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    The 2x nm logic foundry node has many challenges since critical levels are pushed close to the limits of low k1 ArF water immersion lithography. For these levels, improvements in lithographic performance can translate to decreased rework and increased yield. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) is one such route to realize these image fidelity improvements. During SMO, critical layout constructs are intensively optimized in both the mask and source domain, resulting in a solution for maximum lithographic entitlement. From the hardware side, advances in source technology have enabled free-form illumination. The approach allows highly customized illumination, enabling the practical application of SMO sources. The customized illumination sources can be adjusted for maximum versatility. In this paper, we present a study on a critical layer of an advanced foundry logic node using the latest ILT based SMO software, paired with state-of-the-art scanner hardware and intelligent illuminator. Performance of the layer's existing POR source is compared with the ideal SMO result and the installed source as realized on the intelligent illuminator of an NSR-S630D scanner. Both simulation and on-silicon measurements are used to confirm that the performance of the studied layer meets established specifications.

  14. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  15. Improving CT scan capabilities with a new trauma workflow concept: Simulation of hospital logistics using different CT scanner scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung Kon Jin, P.H.P., E-mail: p.fungkonjin@amc.uva.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dijkgraaf, M.G.W., E-mail: m.dijkgraaf@amc.uva.nl [Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alons, C.L., E-mail: clalons@few.vu.nl [Department of Mathematics, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijk, C. van, E-mail: c.vankuijk@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.beenen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koole, G.M., E-mail: koole@few.vu.nl [Department of Mathematics, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.uva.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Introduction: The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow (ATW) concept includes a sliding gantry CT scanner serving two mirrored (trauma) rooms. In this study, several predefined scenarios with a varying number of CT scanners and CT locations are analyzed to identify the best performing patient flow management strategy from an institutional perspective on process quality. Materials and methods: A total of six clinically relevant scenarios with variables that included the number of CT scanners, CT scanner location, and different patient categories (regular, urgent, and trauma patients) were evaluated using computer simulation. Each scenario was simulated using institutional data and was assessed for patient waiting times, idle time of CT scanners, and overtime due to scheduling. The best 2- and 3-scanner scenarios were additionally evaluated with the ATW-concept. Results: Based on institutional data, the best 2-scanner scenario distributes all 3 patient categories over both scanners and plans 4 urgent patients per hour while locating both scanners outside of the trauma room. The best 3-scanner scenario distributes urgent and regular patients over all 3 scanners and trauma patients on only 1 scanner and locates all CT scanners outside of the trauma room. The ATW concept reduces waiting times and overtime, while increasing idle time. Conclusion: Choosing the optimal planning and distribution strategies depends on the number and location of available CT scanners, along with number of trauma, urgent and regular patients. The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow concept could provide institutions with the ability of early CT scanning in trauma patients without influencing regular and urgent CT scanning.

  16. Electronic modulated beam-steerable silicon waveguide array antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, R.E.; Jacobs, H.; Freibergs, E.; Klohn, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The design and experimental findings for a low-cost easily fabricated millimeter-wave line scanner is described. This antenna consists of a 1-mm X 1-mm silicon dielectric rod with a metal grating (periodic structure) on the upper surface and p-i-n diodes mounted on the sidewall. A narrow 8/sup 0/ beam is radiated from the grated (perturbed) surface at an angle dependent on the guide and perturbation spacing. The beam angle is switched over a 10/sup 0/ angle by application of a dc forward current through the p-i-n diode modulators.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of sensitivity and NECR of an entire-body PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-07-01

    The current positron emission tomography (PET) design is aimed toward establishing an entire-body PET scanner. An entire-body PET scanner is a scanner whose axial field of view (FOV) covers the whole body of a patient, whereas whole-body PET scanner can be of any axial FOV length, but was designed for a whole-body scan. Despite its high production cost, an entire-body depth-of-interaction PET scanner offers many benefits, such as shorter and dynamic PET time acquisition, as well as higher sensitivity and count rate performance. This PET scanner may be cost-effective for clinical PET scanners with high scan throughput. In this work, we evaluated the sensitivity and count rate performance of a 2-m-long PET scanner with conventional data acquisition (DAQ) architecture, using Monte Carlo simulation, and we evaluated two ring diameters (60 and 80 cm) to reduce the scanner cost. From simulation of scanning with a 2-m axial FOV, the sensitivity for a 2-m-long PET scanner of 60 and 80-cm diameter is around 80 and 68 times higher, respectively, than that of the conventional PET scanner. In addition, for the 2-m-long PET scanner with 60-cm diameter, the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was 843 kcps at 125 MBq, whereas the peak for the 80-cm diameter was 989 kcps at 200 MBq. This shows gains of 15.3 and 17.95, respectively, in comparison with that of the conventional PET scanner. The 2-m-long PET scanner with 60-cm ring diameter could not only reduce the number of detectors by 21 %, but also had a 17 % higher sensitivity compared to that with an 80-cm ring diameter. On the other hand, despite the higher sensitivity, the NECR of the 60-cm ring diameter was smaller than that of the 80-cm ring diameter. This results from the single data loss due to dead time, whereas grouping of axially stacked detectors was used in the conventional DAQ architecture. Parallelization of the DAQ architecture is therefore important for the 2-m-long PET scanner to achieve its optimal

  18. Quantitative evaluation of three-dimensional facial scanners measurement accuracy for facial deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Sun, Yu-chun; Yang, Hui-fang; Lyu, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the measurement accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) facial scanners for facial deformity patients from oral clinic. Methods: 10 patients in different types of facial deformity from oral clinical were included. Three 3D digital face models for each patient were obtained by three facial scanners separately (line laser scanner from Faro for reference, stereophotography scanner from 3dMD and structured light scanner from FaceScan for test). For each patient, registration based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm was executed to align two test models (3dMD data & Facescan data) to the reference models (Faro data in high accuracy) respectively. The same boundaries on each pair models (one test and one reference models) were obtained by projection function in Geomagic Stuido 2012 software for trimming overlapping region, then 3D average measurement errors (3D errors) were calculated for each pair models also by the software. Paired t-test analysis was adopted to compare the 3D errors of two test facial scanners (10 data for each group). 3D profile measurement accuracy (3D accuracy) that is integrated embodied by average value and standard deviation of 10 patients' 3D errors were obtained by surveying analysis for each test scanner finally. Results: 3D accuracies of 2 test facial scanners in this study for facial deformity were 0.44+/-0.08 mm and 0.43+/-0.05 mm. The result of structured light scanner was slightly better than stereophotography scanner. No statistical difference between them. Conclusions: Both test facial scanners could meet the accuracy requirement (0.5mm) of 3D facial data acquisition for oral clinic facial deformity patients in this study. Their practical measurement accuracies were all slightly lower than their nominal accuracies.

  19. Vegetated landslide monitoring: target tracking with terrestrial laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Martin; Carrea, Dario; Abellan, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring landslides with terrestrial LiDAR is currently a well-known technique. One problem often encountered is the vegetation that produces shadow areas on the scans. Indeed, the points behind the obstacle are hidden and are absent from the point cloud. Thereby, locations monitored with terrestrial laser scanner are mostly rock instabilities and few vegetated landslides, being difficult or even impossible to survey vegetated slopes using this method. The Peney landslide (Geneva, Switzerland) is partially vegetated by bushes and trees, and in order to monitor its displacements during the drawdown of the Verbois reservoir located at its base, which activates the movement, an alternative solution has to be found. The Goal of this study are: (1) to illustrate a technique to monitor vegetated landslides with a terrestrial laser scanner and (2) to compare the both manual and automatic methods for displacement vectors extraction. We installed 14 targets, four of which are in stable areas which are considered as references. Targets are made of expanded polystyrene, two are spherical and 12 are cubic. They were installed on metallic poles ranging between 2 to 4 meters high. The LiDAR device was located on a fixed point on a pontoon on the reservoir opposite bank. The whole area, including the targets, needed three scans to be entirely covered and was scanned 10 times along on two weeks (duration of drawdown - filling). The acquired point clouds were cleaned and georeferenced. In order to determine the displacements for every target, two methods (manual and automatic) were used. The manual method consists on manual selection of, for example, the apex of the cubes, and so to have its 3D coordinates for a comparison in time. The automatic method uses an algorithm that recognises shapes trough time series. The obtained displacements were compared with classical measurement methods (theodolite and extensometer) showing good resemblance of results, indicating the validity of

  20. Performance of the Transverse Oscillation method using beamformed data from a commercial scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Nikolov, S.; Haugaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    of this is evaluated on a commercial platform. Beamformed data are acquired using a commercial BK Medical scanner as opposed to the previously reported results obtained with the experimental scanner RASMUS. The implementation is evaluated using an in-house circulating flow rig by calculating the relative mean standard...

  1. Step-height measurements on sand surfaces: A comparison between optical scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, Seyed Alireza; Tiedje, Niels Skat;

    2016-01-01

    based on triangulation principle using fringe projection was also used to measure the step heights resulting in a point cloud for each scanning. A similar measurement procedure with scanner was made using the scanners software to simulate a ball probe with the same size of CMM probe and following...

  2. The estimation of pre- and postpromotion dips with store-level scanner data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerde, Harald J. van; Leeflang, Peter S.H.; Wittink, Dick R.

    1999-01-01

    One of the mysteries of store-level scanner data modeling is the lack of a dip in sales in the week(s) following a promotion. Researchers expect to find a postpromotion dip because analyses of household scanner panel data indicate that consumers tend to accelerate their purchases in response to a pr

  3. The estimation of pre- and postpromotion dips with store-level scanner data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Heerde, HJ; Leeflang, PSH; Wittink, DR

    2000-01-01

    One of the mysteries of store-level scanner data modeling is the lack of a dip in sales in the weeks following a promotion. Researchers expect to find a postpromotion dip because analyses of household scanner panel data indicate that consumers tend to accelerate their purchases in response to a prom

  4. Validity and Repeatability of the Sizestream 3D Scanner and Poikos Modeling System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, T.E.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body scanning becomes increasingly important in the medical, ergonomical and apparel industry. The SizeStream 3D body scanner is a 3D body scanner in the shape of a fitting room that can generate a 3D copy of the human body in a few seconds. The Poikos modeling system generate

  5. Calibration between a Laser Range Scanner and an Industrial Robot Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for findingthe transformation between a laser scanner and a robotmanipulator. We present the design of a flat calibration targetthat can easily fit between a laser scanner and a conveyor belt,making the method easily implementable in a manufacturingline.We prove ...

  6. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Andriessen, Frank S; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned wit

  7. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.J.; Andriessen, F.S.; Wismeijer, D.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intr

  8. Development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at NIU

    CERN Document Server

    Uzunyan, S A; Boi, S; Coutrakon, G; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Gearhart, A; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Zutshi, V; Ford, R; Fitzpatrick, T; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Lalwani, K; Naimuddin, M

    2013-01-01

    We describe the development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at Northern Illinois University (NIU) in collaboration with Fermilab and Delhi University. This paper provides an overview of major components of the scanner and a detailed description of the data acquisition system (DAQ).

  9. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  10. Demonstration: A smartphone 3D functional brain scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    We demonstrate a fully portable 3D real-time functional brain scanner consisting of a wireless 14-channel ‘Neuroheadset‘ (Emotiv EPOC) and a Nokia N900 smartphone. The novelty of our system is the ability to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...... delivery, data acquisition, logging, brain state decoding, and 3D visualization of the cortical EEG sources. Custom-made software realized in Qt has been implemented on the phone, which allow for either the phone to process the EEG data locally or transmit it to a server when more advanced machine learning......, tablet computers, and netbooks) that are based on Linux operating systems....

  11. Advanced Multispectral Scanner (AMS) study. [aircraft remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The status of aircraft multispectral scanner technology was accessed in order to develop preliminary design specifications for an advanced instrument to be used for remote sensing data collection by aircraft in the 1980 time frame. The system designed provides a no-moving parts multispectral scanning capability through the exploitation of linear array charge coupled device technology and advanced electronic signal processing techniques. Major advantages include: 10:1 V/H rate capability; 120 deg FOV at V/H = 0.25 rad/sec; 1 to 2 rad resolution; high sensitivity; large dynamic range capability; geometric fidelity; roll compensation; modularity; long life; and 24 channel data acquisition capability. The field flattening techniques of the optical design allow wide field view to be achieved at fast f/nos for both the long and short wavelength regions. The digital signal averaging technique permits maximization of signal to noise performance over the entire V/H rate range.

  12. Detector characterization for an inline PET scanner in hadrontherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taverne, Marina [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Boutemeur, Madjid [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Buthod, Anthony [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Guigues, Laurent [CREATIS, INSA Lyon, avenue Albert Einstein, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Henriquet, Pierre [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Lollierou, Julien [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Ricol, Marie-Charlotte [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Rosset-Lanchet, Remi [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Roubin, Mathieu [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Saidi, Reda [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Sappey-Marinier, Dominique [CREATIS, INSA Lyon, avenue Albert Einstein, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Testa, Etienne [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France)]. E-mail: taverne@ipnl.in2p3.fr

    2007-02-01

    Our group at the 'Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon' (IPNL) is working on physics and detectors for medical imaging. We are presently developing a small animal Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) scanner prototype with an innovative slow control and data acquisition features, for a demonstration purpose and within the crystal clear international collaboration. We also investigate a feasibility study of an online PET dedicated for inline and in situ dose deposition control in hadrontherapy. Here, we present the characterization setup and method we used to calibrate the detector heads of our PET prototype. Each of these heads consists of a single block continuous scintillating LySO crystal coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier equipped with its proper acquisition readout chain.

  13. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  14. ARIES segmented gamma-ray scanner user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, R.S.; Sheppard, G.A.; Schneider, C.M.

    1998-04-16

    The segmented gamma-ray scatter (SGS) designated as Win{_}SGS at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility has been installed and is intended for use in quantifying the radioisotope content of DOE-STD-3013-96 equivalent containers. The SGS features new software written in C and a new user interface that runs under Microsoft Windows{trademark}. The operation of the ARIES Segmented Gamma-ray Scanner is documented in this manual. It covers user instructions as well as hardware and software details. Additional information is found in the documentation for the commercially available components and modules that compose the SGS. The objective of the ARIES project is to demonstrate technology to dismantle plutonium pits from excess nuclear weapons, convert the plutonium to a metal ingot or an oxide powder, package the metal or oxide, and verify the contents of the package by nondestructive assay.

  15. An intensity-based stochastic model for terrestrial laser scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujanz, D.; Burger, M.; Mettenleiter, M.; Neitzel, F.

    2017-03-01

    Up until now no appropriate models have been proposed that are capable to describe the stochastic characteristics of reflectorless rangefinders - the key component of terrestrial laser scanners. This state has to be rated as unsatisfactory especially from the perception of Geodesy where comprehensive knowledge about the precision of measurements is of vital importance, for instance to weigh individual observations or to reveal outliers. In order to tackle this problem, a novel intensity-based stochastic model for the reflectorless rangefinder of a Zoller + Fröhlich Imager 5006 h is experimentally derived. This model accommodates the influence of the interaction between the emitted signal and object surface as well as the acquisition configuration on distance measurements. Based on two different experiments the stochastic model has been successfully verified for three chosen sampling rates.

  16. Modeling of estuarne chlorophyll a from an airborne scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, Siamak; Catts, Glenn P.; Cloern, James E.; Knight, Allen W.

    1987-01-01

    Near simultaneous collection of 34 surface water samples and airborne multispectral scanner data provided input for regression models developed to predict surface concentrations of estuarine chlorophyll a. Two wavelength ratios were employed in model development. The ratios werechosen to capitalize on the spectral characteristics of chlorophyll a, while minimizing atmospheric influences. Models were then applied to data previously acquired over the study area thre years earlier. Results are in the form of color-coded displays of predicted chlorophyll a concentrations and comparisons of the agreement among measured surface samples and predictions basedon coincident remotely sensed data. The influence of large variations in fresh-water inflow to the estuary are clearly apparent in the results. The synoptic view provided by remote sensing is another method of examining important estuarine dynamics difficult to observe from in situ sampling alone.

  17. Design, construction, characterization, and application of a hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Haaland, David M; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2004-04-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a hyperspectral microarray scanner for functional genomic research. The hyperspectral instrument operates with spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 30 microm and records the emission spectrum between 490 and 900 nm with a spectral resolution of 3 nm for each pixel of the microarray. This spectral information, when coupled with multivariate data analysis techniques, allows for identification and elimination of unwanted artifacts and greatly improves the accuracy of microarray experiments. Microarray results presented in this study clearly demonstrate the separation of fluorescent label emission from the spectrally overlapping emission due to the underlying glass substrate. We also demonstrate separation of the emission due to green fluorescent protein expressed by yeast cells from the spectrally overlapping autofluorescence of the yeast cells and the growth media.

  18. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  19. Surface curvature of pelvic joints from three laser scanners: separating anatomy from measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chiara; Gaudio, Daniel; Cattaneo, Cristina; Buckberry, Jo; Wilson, Andrew S; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have reported that quantifying symphyseal and auricular surface curvature changes on 3D models acquired by laser scanners has a potential for age estimation. However, no tests have been carried out to evaluate the repeatability of the results between different laser scanners. 3D models of the two pelvic joints were generated using three laser scanners (Custom, Faro, and Minolta). The surface curvature, the surface area, and the distance between co-registered meshes were investigated. Close results were found for surface areas (differences between 0.3% and 2.4%) and for distance deviations (average laser scanners, but still showing similar trends with increasing phases/scores. Applying a smoothing factor to the 3D models, it was possible to separate anatomy from the measurement error of each instrument, so that similar curvature values could be obtained (p laser scanner.

  20. Design considerations for a limited angle, dedicated breast, TOF PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: surti@mail.med.upenn.edu, E-mail: joelkarp@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2008-06-07

    Development of partial ring, dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanners is an active area of research. Due to the limited angular coverage, generation of distortion and artifact-free, fully 3D tomographic images is not possible without rotation of the detectors. With time-of-flight (TOF) information, it is possible to achieve the 3D tomographic images with limited angular coverage and without detector rotation. We performed simulations for a breast scanner design with a ring diameter and an axial length of 15 cm and comprising a full (180{sup 0} in-plane angular coverage), 2/3 (120{sup 0} in-plane angular coverage) or 1/2 (90{sup 0} in-plane angular coverage) ring detector. Our results show that as the angular coverage decreases, improved timing resolution is needed to achieve distortion-free and artifact-free images with TOF. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) value for small hot lesions in a partial ring scanner is similar to a full ring non-TOF scanner. Our results indicate that a timing resolution of 600 ps is needed for a 2/3 ring scanner, while a timing resolution of 300 ps is needed for a 1/2 ring scanner. We also analyzed the ratio of lesion CRC to the background pixel noise (SNR) and concluded that TOF improves the SNR values of the partial ring scanner, and helps to compensate for the loss in sensitivity due to reduced geometric sensitivity in a limited angle coverage PET scanner. In particular, it is possible to maintain similar SNR characteristic in a 2/3 ring scanner with a timing resolution of 300 ps as in a full ring non-TOF scanner.

  1. Design considerations for a limited angle, dedicated breast, TOF PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    Development of partial ring, dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanners is an active area of research. Due to the limited angular coverage, generation of distortion and artifact-free, fully 3D tomographic images is not possible without rotation of the detectors. With time-of-flight (TOF) information, it is possible to achieve the 3D tomographic images with limited angular coverage and without detector rotation. We performed simulations for a breast scanner design with a ring diameter and an axial length of 15 cm and comprising a full (180° in-plane angular coverage), 2/3 (120° in-plane angular coverage) or 1/2 (90° in-plane angular coverage) ring detector. Our results show that as the angular coverage decreases, improved timing resolution is needed to achieve distortion-free and artifact-free images with TOF. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) value for small hot lesions in a partial ring scanner is similar to a full ring non-TOF scanner. Our results indicate that a timing resolution of 600 ps is needed for a 2/3 ring scanner, while a timing resolution of 300 ps is needed for a 1/2 ring scanner. We also analyzed the ratio of lesion CRC to the background pixel noise (SNR) and concluded that TOF improves the SNR values of the partial ring scanner, and helps to compensate for the loss in sensitivity due to reduced geometric sensitivity in a limited angle coverage PET scanner. In particular, it is possible to maintain similar SNR characteristic in a 2/3 ring scanner with a timing resolution of 300 ps as in a full ring non-TOF scanner.

  2. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  3. Evaluation of resistive-plate-chamber-based TOF-PET applied to in-beam particle therapy monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Espallardo, I.; Diblen, F.; Rohling, H.; Solevi, P.; Gillam, J.; Watts, D.; España, S.; Vandenberghe, S.; Fiedler, F.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-05-01

    Particle therapy is a highly conformal radiotherapy technique which reduces the dose deposited to the surrounding normal tissues. In order to fully exploit its advantages, treatment monitoring is necessary to minimize uncertainties related to the dose delivery. Up to now, the only clinically feasible technique for the monitoring of therapeutic irradiation with particle beams is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we have compared a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based PET scanner with a scintillation-crystal-based PET scanner for this application. In general, the main advantages of the RPC-PET system are its excellent timing resolution, low cost, and the possibility of building large area systems. We simulated a partial-ring scanner based on an RPC prototype under construction within the Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica (TERA). For comparison with the crystal-based PET scanner we have chosen the geometry of a commercially available PET scanner, the Philips Gemini TF. The coincidence time resolution used in the simulations takes into account the current achievable values as well as expected improvements of both technologies. Several scenarios (including patient data) have been simulated to evaluate the performance of different scanners. Initial results have shown that the low sensitivity of the RPC hampers its application to hadron-beam monitoring, which has an intrinsically low positron yield compared to diagnostic PET. In addition, for in-beam PET there is a further data loss due to the partial ring configuration. In order to improve the performance of the RPC-based scanner, an improved version of the RPC detector (modifying the thickness of the gas and glass layers), providing a larger sensitivity, has been simulated and compared with an axially extended version of the crystal-based device. The improved version of the RPC shows better performance than the prototype, but the extended version of the crystal-based PET outperforms all other options.

  4. TH-C-19A-08: PDD Discrepancies at Opposite Biases From Very Small Volume Ion Chambers When Using Water Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, V; Zhao, H; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B [University of Utah Hospitals, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, B; James, J; McCullough, K [University Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Lynch, B [Center for Cancer Care, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: As more so-called micro ion chambers become commercially available, medical physicists may be inclined to use them during the linear accelerator commissioning process, in an attempt to better characterize the beam in steep dose gradient areas. The purpose of this work is to inform the medical physics community of a non-trivial, anomalous behavior observed when very small chambers are used in certain beam scanning configurations. Methods: A total of six ion chambers (0.007cc to 0.6cc) were used to scan PDDs from a 10×10cm2 field at both +300V and −300V biases. PDDs were scanned using three different water tank scanning systems to determine whether different scanners exhibit the same abnormality. Finally, PDDs were sampled using an external electrometer to bypass the internal electrometer of the scanner to determine the potential contributions of the scanner electronics to the abnormality observed. Results: We observed a reproducible, significant difference (over-response with depth) in PDDs acquired when using very small ion chambers with certain bias and watertank combinations, on the order of 3–5% at a depth of 25 cm in water. This difference was not observed when the PDDs were sampled using the ion chambers in conjunction with an external electrometer. This suggests a contribution of interference produced by the controller box and scanning system, which becomes significant for the very small signals collected by very small ion chambers, especially at depth, as the signal level is reduced even further. Conclusion: Based on the results observed here, if currently available very small ion chambers are used with specific bias and scanning water-tank combinations, erroneous PDD data may be collected. If this data is used as input to the Treatment Planning System, systematic errors on the order of 3%–5% may be introduced into the treatment planning process.

  5. MRI-derived measurements of human subcortical, ventricular and intracranial brain volumes: Reliability effects of scan sessions, acquisition sequences, data analyses, scanner upgrade, scanner vendors and field strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicich, Jorge; Czanner, Silvester; Han, Xiao; Salat, David; van der Kouwe, Andre; Quinn, Brian; Pacheco, Jenni; Albert, Marilyn; Killiany, Ronald; Blacker, Deborah; Maguire, Paul; Rosas, Diana; Makris, Nikos; Gollub, Randy; Dale, Anders; Dickerson, Bradford C; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-05-15

    Automated MRI-derived measurements of in-vivo human brain volumes provide novel insights into normal and abnormal neuroanatomy, but little is known about measurement reliability. Here we assess the impact of image acquisition variables (scan session, MRI sequence, scanner upgrade, vendor and field strengths), FreeSurfer segmentation pre-processing variables (image averaging, B1 field inhomogeneity correction) and segmentation analysis variables (probabilistic atlas) on resultant image segmentation volumes from older (n=15, mean age 69.5) and younger (both n=5, mean ages 34 and 36.5) healthy subjects. The variability between hippocampal, thalamic, caudate, putamen, lateral ventricular and total intracranial volume measures across sessions on the same scanner on different days is less than 4.3% for the older group and less than 2.3% for the younger group. Within-scanner measurements are remarkably reliable across scan sessions, being minimally affected by averaging of multiple acquisitions, B1 correction, acquisition sequence (MPRAGE vs. multi-echo-FLASH), major scanner upgrades (Sonata-Avanto, Trio-TrioTIM), and segmentation atlas (MPRAGE or multi-echo-FLASH). Volume measurements across platforms (Siemens Sonata vs. GE Signa) and field strengths (1.5 T vs. 3 T) result in a volume difference bias but with a comparable variance as that measured within-scanner, implying that multi-site studies may not necessarily require a much larger sample to detect a specific effect. These results suggest that volumes derived from automated segmentation of T1-weighted structural images are reliable measures within the same scanner platform, even after upgrades; however, combining data across platform and across field-strength introduces a bias that should be considered in the design of multi-site studies, such as clinical drug trials. The results derived from the young groups (scanner upgrade effects and B1 inhomogeneity correction effects) should be considered as preliminary and in

  6. Comparison of working efficiency of terrestrial laser scanner in day and night conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, A. E.; Kalkan, K.

    2013-10-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning is a popular and widely used technique to scan existing objects, document historical sites and items, and remodel them if and when needed. Their ability to collect thousands of point data per second makes them an invaluable tool in many areas from engineering to historical reconstruction. There are many scanners in the market with different technical specifications. One main technical specification of laser scanners is range and illumination. In this study, it is tested to be determined the optimal working times of a laser scanner and the scanners consistency with its specifications sheet. In order to conduct this work, series of GNSS measurements in Istanbul Technical University have been carried out, connected to the national reference network, to determine precise positions of target points and the scanner, which makes possible to define a precise distance between the scanner and targets. Those ground surveys has been used for calibration and registration purposes. Two different scan campaigns conducted at 12 am and 11 pm to compare working efficiency of laser scanner in different illumination conditions and targets are measured with a handheld spectro-radiometer in order to determine their reflective characteristics. The obtained results are compared and their accuracies have been analysed.

  7. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  8. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  9. Development of a versatile XRF scanner for the elemental imaging of paintworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaud, E.; Pichon, L.; Laval, E.; Gonzalez, V.; Eveno, M.; Calligaro, T.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning XRF is a powerful elemental imaging technique introduced at the synchrotron that has recently been transposed to laboratory. The growing interest in this technique stems from its ability to collect images reflecting pigment distribution within large areas on artworks by means of their elemental signature. In that sense, scanning XRF appears highly complementary to standard imaging techniques (Visible, UV, IR photography and X-ray radiography). The versatile XRF scanner presented here has been designed and built at the C2RMF in response to specific constraints: transportability, cost-effectiveness and ability to scan large areas within a single working day. The instrument is based on a standard X-ray generator with sub-millimetre collimated beam and a SDD-based spectrometer to collected X-ray spectra. The instrument head is scanned in front of the painting by means of motorised movements to cover an area up to 300 × 300 mm2 with a resolution of 0.5 mm (600 × 600 pixels). The 15-kg head is mounted on a stable photo stand for rapid positioning on paintworks and maintains a free side-access for safety; it can also be attached to a lighter tripod for field measurements. Alignment is achieved with a laser pointer and a micro-camera. With a scanning speed of 5 mm/s and 0.1 s/point, elemental maps are collected in 10 h, i.e. a working day. The X-ray spectra of all pixels are rapidly processed using an open source program to derive elemental maps. To illustrate the capabilities of this instrument, this contribution presents the results obtained on the Belle Ferronnière painted by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Musée du Louvre, prior to its restoration at the C2RMF.

  10. Development of a versatile XRF scanner for the elemental imaging of paintworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravaud, E.; Pichon, L.; Laval, E.; Eveno, M. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); Gonzalez, V.; Calligaro, T. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche Chimie Paris, UMR8247, Paris (France)

    2016-01-15

    Scanning XRF is a powerful elemental imaging technique introduced at the synchrotron that has recently been transposed to laboratory. The growing interest in this technique stems from its ability to collect images reflecting pigment distribution within large areas on artworks by means of their elemental signature. In that sense, scanning XRF appears highly complementary to standard imaging techniques (Visible, UV, IR photography and X-ray radiography). The versatile XRF scanner presented here has been designed and built at the C2RMF in response to specific constraints: transportability, cost-effectiveness and ability to scan large areas within a single working day. The instrument is based on a standard X-ray generator with sub-millimetre collimated beam and a SDD-based spectrometer to collected X-ray spectra. The instrument head is scanned in front of the painting by means of motorised movements to cover an area up to 300 x 300 mm{sup 2} with a resolution of 0.5 mm (600 x 600 pixels). The 15-kg head is mounted on a stable photo stand for rapid positioning on paintworks and maintains a free side-access for safety; it can also be attached to a lighter tripod for field measurements. Alignment is achieved with a laser pointer and a micro-camera. With a scanning speed of 5 mm/s and 0.1 s/point, elemental maps are collected in 10 h, i.e. a working day. The X-ray spectra of all pixels are rapidly processed using an open source program to derive elemental maps. To illustrate the capabilities of this instrument, this contribution presents the results obtained on the Belle Ferronniere painted by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Musee du Louvre, prior to its restoration at the C2RMF. (orig.)

  11. Development of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three sets of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Units (HIBEMUs) are being developed at Peking University. They are HIBEMU-2 (slit-wire type, one direction), HIBEMU-3 (Allison scanner type, one direction) and HIBEMU-4 (slit-wire type, two directions). For HIBEMU-2 and HIBEMU-3, more recent work has been done on software redesign in order to measure beam emittance and to draw phase diagram more efficiently and precisely. Software for control and data processing of them were developed in Labveiw environment, trying to improve calculation rationality and to offer user-friendly interface. Mechanical modification was also done for HIBEMU-3, mainly concentrating on the protection of Faraday cups from being overheated by the high intensity beam and also from interference of secondary electrons. This paper will also cover the mechanical structure as well as the software development of HIBEMU-4, which is a two-direction emittance scanner newly designed and manufactured for the high energy beam transport (HEBT) of Peking University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY (PKUNIFTY). At the end of this paper, comparison and analysis of the three HIBEMUs are given to draw forth better design of the future emittance measurement facility.

  12. Accuracy evaluation of a lower-cost and four higher-cost laser scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Valentina; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2016-01-04

    Knowing the accuracy of laser scanners is imperative to select the best scanner to generate bone models. However, errors stated by manufacturers may not apply to bones. The three objectives of this study were to determine: 1) whether the overall error stated by the manufacturers of five laser scanners was different from the root mean squared error (RMSE) computed by scanning a gage block; 2) the repeatability of 3D models generated by the laser scanners when scanning a complex freeform surface such as a distal femur and whether this differed from the repeatability when scanning a gage block; 3) whether the errors for one lower-cost laser scanner are comparable to those of four higher-cost laser scanners. The RMSEs in scanning the gage block were 2 to 52µm lower than the overall errors stated by the manufacturers. The repeatability in scanning the bovine femur 10 times was significantly worse than that in scanning the gage block 10 times. The precision of the lower-cost laser scanner was comparable to that of the higher-cost laser scanners, but the bias was an order of magnitude greater. The contributions of this study are that 1) the overall errors stated by the manufacturers are an upper bound when simple geometric objects like a gage block are scanned, 2) the repeatability is worse on average three times when scanning a complex freeform surface compared to scanning the gage block, and 3) the main difference between the lower-cost and the higher-cost laser scanners is the bias.

  13. Revised benchmarking of contact-less fingerprint scanners for forensic fingerprint detection: challenges and results for chromatic white light scanners (CWL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiltz, Stefan; Leich, Marcus; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Ulrich, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Mobile contact-less fingerprint scanners can be very important tools for the forensic investigation of crime scenes. To be admissible in court, data and the collection process must adhere to rules w.r.t. technology and procedures of acquisition, processing and the conclusions drawn from that evidence. Currently, no overall accepted benchmarking methodology is used to support some of the rules regarding the localisation, acquisition and pre-processing using contact-less fingerprint scanners. Benchmarking is seen essential to rate those devices according to their usefulness for investigating crime scenes. Our main contribution is a revised version of our extensible framework for methodological benchmarking of contact-less fingerprint scanners using a collection of extensible categories and items. The suggested main categories describing a contact-less fingerprint scanner are properties of forensic country-specific legal requirements, technical properties, application-related aspects, input sensory technology, pre-processing algorithm, tested object and materials. Using those it is possible to benchmark fingerprint scanners and describe the setup and the resulting data. Additionally, benchmarking profiles for different usage scenarios are defined. First results for all suggested benchmarking properties, which will be presented in detail in the final paper, were gained using an industrial device (FRT MicroProf200) and conducting 18 tests on 10 different materials.

  14. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, K; de Ruiter, N J A; Chernoglazov, A I; Panta, R K; Butler, A P H; Butler, P H; Bell, S T; Anderson, N G; Woodfield, T B F; Tredinnick, S J; Healy, J L; Bateman, C J; Aamir, R; Doesburg, R M N; Renaud, P F; Gieseg, S P; Smithies, D J; Mohr, J L; Mandalika, V B H; Opie, A M T; Cook, N J; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J; Atharifard, A; Clyne, M; Bones, P J; Bartneck, C; Grasset, R; Schleich, N; Billinghurst, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D reconstruction software and volume visualisation using a custom volume rendering software. Narrow high energy acquisition using the photon-processing detector revealed substantial reduction in beam hardening effects and metal artefacts.

  15. Scanner color management model based on improved back-propagation neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwu Li

    2008-01-01

    Scanner color management is one of the key techniques for color reproduction in information optics.A new scanner color management model is presented based on analyzing rendering principle of scanning objects.In this model,a standard color target is taken as experimental sample.Color blocks in color shade area are used to substitute complete color space to solve the difficulties in selecting experimental color blocks.Immune genetic algorithm is used to correct back-propagation neural network(BPNN)to speed up the convergence of the model.Experimental results show that the model can improve the accuracy of scanner color management.

  16. 3D handheld laser scanner based approach for automatic identification and localization of EEG sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koessler, Laurent; Cecchin, Thierry; Ternisien, Eric; Maillard, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes and assesses for the first time the use of a handheld 3D laser scanner for scalp EEG sensor localization and co-registration with magnetic resonance images. Study on five subjects showed that the scanner had an equivalent accuracy, a better repeatability, and was faster than the reference electromagnetic digitizer. According to electrical source imaging, somatosensory evoked potentials experiments validated its ability to give precise sensor localization. With our automatic labeling method, the data provided by the scanner could be directly introduced in the source localization studies.

  17. Beam screens for the LHC beam pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1997-01-01

    Cross-section of LHC prototype beam pipes showing the beam screens. Slits in the screens allow residual gas molecules to be pumped out and become frozen to the walls of the ultra-cold beam pipe. Beam screens like these have been designed to line the beam pipes, absorbing radiation before it can hit the magnets and warm them up, an effect that would greatly reduce the magnetic field and cause serious damage.

  18. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  19. Fast Automatic Precision Tree Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Disney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for constructing quickly and automatically precision tree models from point clouds of the trunk and branches obtained by terrestrial laser scanning. The input of the method is a point cloud of a single tree scanned from multiple positions. The surface of the visible parts of the tree is robustly reconstructed by making a flexible cylinder model of the tree. The thorough quantitative model records also the topological branching structure. In this paper, every major step of the whole model reconstruction process, from the input to the finished model, is presented in detail. The model is constructed by a local approach in which the point cloud is covered with small sets corresponding to connected surface patches in the tree surface. The neighbor-relations and geometrical properties of these cover sets are used to reconstruct the details of the tree and, step by step, the whole tree. The point cloud and the sets are segmented into branches, after which the branches are modeled as collections of cylinders. From the model, the branching structure and size properties, such as volume and branch size distributions, for the whole tree or some of its parts, can be approximated. The approach is validated using both measured and modeled terrestrial laser scanner data from real trees and detailed 3D models. The results show that the method allows an easy extraction of various tree attributes from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning point clouds.

  20. a Light-Weight Laser Scanner for Uav Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Torres, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP) as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  1. A LIGHT-WEIGHT LASER SCANNER FOR UAV APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. G. Tommaselli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  2. The Surface Wave Scattering-Microwave Scanner (SWS-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Chamtouri, Maha; Merchiers, Olivier; Tortel, Hervé; Litman, Amélie; Bailly, Jean-Sébastien; Lacroix, Bernard; Francoeur, Mathieu; Vaillon, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    The Surface Wave Scattering-Microwave Scanner (SWS-MS) is a device that allows the measurement of the electromagnetic fields scattered by objects totally or partially submerged in surface waves. No probe is used to illuminate the sample, nor to guide or scatter the local evanescent waves. Surface waves are generated by total internal reflection and the amplitude and phase of the fields scattered by the samples are measured directly, both in the far-field and the near-field regions. The device's principles and their practical implementation are described in details. The surface wave generator is assessed by measuring the spatial distribution of the electric field above the surface. Drift correction and the calibration method for far-field measurements are explained. Comparison of both far-field and near-field measurements against simulation data shows that the device provides accurate results. This work suggests that the SWS-MS can be used for producing experimental reference data, for supporting a better understanding of surface wave scattering, for assisting in the design of near-field optical or infrared systems thanks to the scale invariance rule in electrodynamics, and for performing nondestructive control of defects in materials.

  3. Modified robust sliding-mode control method for wafer scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguang Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the precision motion control of a long-stroke reticle stage driven by the permanent magnet linear motor in wafer scanner. A robust sliding-mode control method is proposed for tracking the reference trajectory in the presence of un-modeled dynamics, parametric uncertainty and external disturbances including force ripple, cogging and friction in the controlled system. A modified sliding-mode term based on the variable structure technique for eliminating the tracking error is employed in the proposed control law. The system stability and tracking convergence of the closed-loop control system are guaranteed by Lyapunov theory theoretically. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by comparative experiments on a linear motion testbed. The experimental results show that better tracking performance can be achieved by the proposed method compared with the conventional proportional–integral–derivative method and it can be considered as a possible alternative in the precision motion control system.

  4. Evaluation of a laser scanner for surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D L; Berg, D C; Raso, V J; Lou, E; Durdle, N G; Mahood, J K; Moreau, M J

    2002-01-01

    A Minolta VIVID 700 portable non-contact 3D laser scanner was evaluated on 15 subjects with idiopathic scoliosis. The 3D map was compared to two structured light pattern (lines and dots) techniques to determine the reliability, ease of use, speed, and quality. The parameters used for the clinical assessment of scoliosis were measured twice for the Minolta and light projection systems. The edges of the image and areas where occlusion typically occur were examined. The absolute distance in calculated depth between adjacent points was examined to determine errors. The Minolta system and the dot pattern produced regular grids of points. The light projection pattern produced an irregular grid, with more resolution along the video line and less resolution between projected lines, resulted in a somewhat jagged appearance of the surface map. The Minolta system was less sensitive to edge effects, occlusion, and sharp transitions of depth. The comparison of clinical parameters showed good results between repetitions but moderate results between techniques.

  5. High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

    1995-01-01

    High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

  6. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  7. Symptoms and Cognitive Effects of Exposure to Magnetic Stray Fields of MRI Scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vocht, Frank Gérard de

    2006-01-01

    People working routinely with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems report a number of symptoms related to their presence in the inhomogeneous static magnetic fields (the stray field) surrounding these scanners. Experienced symptoms and neurobehavioral performance among engineers manufacturing 0.

  8. [Determination of loganin in Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc. by TLC scanner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K M; Yang, X J; Yu, M Q; Xie, C; Xu, L Z

    1994-12-01

    The content of loganin extracted from Cornus of ficinalis was determined directly on a CS-930 TLC scanner. The method is simple and sensitive, and can serve as an index for checking the quality of C. of ficinalis.

  9. Scanner external calibration algorithm based on fixed point in robot remanufacturing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Sheng; CUI Pei-zhi; SHEN Chan-duo; GUO Ying-chun

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the scanner exterior calibration algorithm when the scanner is arranged by the robot and the object scanned is fixed on a rotate device in the Robot Remanufacturing System. The method of calibrating the relationship between the scanner coordinate and the robot Tool0, such as the rotation, Rx, Ry, R,, and the transformation X, Y, Z is studied. The data of Tool0 can be directly obtained from the relationship with the robot base-coordinate. So, the coordinate relationship between the scanner coordinate and the robot base coordinate can be easily gotten. This paper explains the basic algorithm theory, computing method, data collecting process and the resulted data in detail. The calibration algorithm is deduced under the orthogonal coordinate.

  10. 'What does a scanner see?' Techno-fascination and unreliability in the mind-game film.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster, L.

    2008-01-01

    In popular cinema, paranoia and conspiracy plots often go hand in hand with questions of technological innovation. For example, A Scanner Darkly (Richard Linklater, US 2006) combines issues such as audiovisual surveillance, conspiracy, and manipulation without disambiguating between paranoid delusio

  11. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this phase II SBIR is to design and build new non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  12. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vescent Photonics propose to design and build revolutionary non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  13. Characterization of radiation beam filtration in computerized tomography equipments. Dosimetric influence; Caracterizacion de la filtracion del haz de radiacion en equipos de tomografia computarizada. Influencia dosimetrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Tortosa, M.; Echevarne, M. [Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Spain); Calzado Cantera, A. [Universidad Complutense (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The basic dosimetric quantities used in CT to assess doses to patient are the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) which can be determined either from measurements free-in-air or in standard head or body phantoms. CTDI values measured for different type of scanners can present high differences (up to a factor two). These differences are mainly due to differences in quality of the X ray beam as a consequence of differences in physical filtration. The filters used varied widely according to the manufacturer and model of scanner. Some scanners use a single fixed absorber, while others utilize two or more absorbers devoted specifically to anatomical areas (body or head) or different kind of examinations (pediatric,.). A good knowledge of the features of these absorbers (equivalent thickness and shape) is very useful in order to compare dose and to optimize the procedures for clinical use. however, such information is not always available and the assessment of the total filtration after installation of the scanners is seldom tackled. Dose measurements have been performed in order to determine the beam filtration and its influence on dose for a sample of seven third generation CT scanners. Measurements were conducted according to the ImPACT protocol, prepared specifically for the CT Scanner Dose Survey, in which we were participating. The investigated parameters were the half value layer and CT dose indexes (measured free-in-air and within phantoms), and an operational description of the shaping filters after selectable FOV values, as well. (Author) 32 refs.

  14. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-08-21

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m(-2)) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE OF A LASER SCANNER FOR PREDICTIVE AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zeisler, J; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the use of a laser scanner for future advanced driver assistance systems. We focus on the important task of predicting the target vehicle for longitudinal ego vehicle control. Our motivation is to decrease the reaction time of existing systems during cut-in maneuvers of other traffic participants. A state-of-the-art laser scanner, the Ibeo Scala B2 R , is presented, providing its sensing characteristics and the subsequent high level object data output. We ev...

  16. Preprocessing techniques to reduce atmospheric and sensor variability in multispectral scanner data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    Multispectral scanner data are potentially useful in a variety of remote sensing applications. Large-area surveys of earth resources carried out by automated recognition processing of these data are particularly important. However, the practical realization of such surveys is limited by a variability in the scanner signals that results in improper recognition of the data. This paper discusses ways by which some of this variability can be removed from the data by preprocessing with resultant improvements in recognition results.

  17. Predicting the Impact of Full Body Scanners on Air Travel and Passenger Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    porn is among the legal and operational issues under discussion. Simon Davies of Privacy International voiced his concern over the current privacy...May 31, 2010, from http://www.tampaairport.com/security/index.asp Travis, A. (2010). New scanners break child porn laws. Guardian.co.uk. Retrieved...May 20, 2010, from http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/jan/04/new-scanners- child- porn -laws TSA.gov, Transportaion Security Administration. (2010

  18. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  19. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. Development of a computed tomographic scanner for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V; Parker, D L; Stanley, J H; Phillips, T L; Boyd, D P; Kan, P T

    1980-08-01

    The authors describe a low-cost CT scanner integrated with a radiotherapy simulator and designed for treatment planning. The standard rotational gantry and x-ray tube of the simulator are used with a multiwire xenon lonization chamber and simple current-proportional readout system to measure patient attenuation, avoiding problems associated with diagnostic CT scanners in treatment planning. Although design constraints limit performance, software compensation techniques have reduced artifacts and given satisfactory images.

  1. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  2. POINT-BASED VERSUS PLANE-BASED SELF-CALIBRATION OF STATIC TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. K. Chow

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Systematic trends are apparent when studying the self-calibration residuals of many modern static terrestrial laser scanners. Since the operation of terrestrial laser scanners is comparable to an efficient robotic total station, the sensor modelling parameters are developed in the spherical coordinate system where the raw observables of the scanner are range, horizontal angle, and vertical angle. Sensor calibration parameters are already well established for both hybrid and panoramic type laser scanners through the signalized target-based self-calibration method. In this paper, a less labour-intensive and more efficient planar-feature based terrestrial laser scanner self-calibration method, which is more suitable for in-situ self-calibration, is presented. Through simulation it will be demonstrated that the point-based self-calibration and plane-based self-calibration shares many common characteristics. Plane-based self-calibration results from real data captured with the panoramic type Leica HDS6100 and hybrid type Trimble GS200 scanner are also presented to show the practicality of the proposed method and as a comparison to the point-based self-calibration.

  3. The 3D scanner prototype utilize object profile imaging using line laser and octave software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdini, Mugi; Manunggal, Trikarsa Tirtadwipa; Samsi, Agus

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional scanner or 3D Scanner is a device to reconstruct the real object into digital form on a computer. 3D Scanner is a technology that is being developed, especially in developed countries, where the current 3D Scanner devices is the advanced version with a very expensive prices. This study is basically a simple prototype of 3D Scanner with a very low investment costs. 3D Scanner prototype device consists of a webcam, a rotating desk system controlled by a stepper motor and Arduino UNO, and a line laser. Objects that limit the research is the object with same radius from its center point (object pivot). Scanning is performed by using object profile imaging by line laser which is then captured by the camera and processed by a computer (image processing) using Octave software. On each image acquisition, the scanned object on a rotating desk rotated by a certain degree, so for one full turn multiple images of a number of existing side are finally obtained. Then, the profile of the entire images is extracted in order to obtain digital object dimension. Digital dimension is calibrated by length standard, called gage block. Overall dimensions are then digitally reconstructed into a three-dimensional object. Validation of the scanned object reconstruction of the original object dimensions expressed as a percentage error. Based on the results of data validation, horizontal dimension error is about 5% to 23% and vertical dimension error is about +/- 3%.

  4. An investigation of sensitivity limits in PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, L.; Townsend, D.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, M.; Rothfuss, H.; Schmand, M.; Casey, M. E.; Bendriem, B.

    2007-10-01

    Current systems for positron emission tomography (PET) generally cover a small solid angle which implies low sensitivity and therefore patient studies are relatively lengthy with acquisition comprising multiple bed positions. For cylindrical geometry, the axial field-of-view (FOV) may be increased by incorporating additional rings of block detectors in order to increase the solid angle coverage and hence the overall sensitivity. In this study we have taken that approach to the limit and studied an ultimate configuration with an axial extent up to 1 m or more. We have estimated the point source sensitivity and the absolute sensitivity (NEMA NU-2 2001). These sensitivity values can then be converted into count rates, for a particular phantom. A system comprising three rings of blocks based on the HIREZ block detector (Siemens Molecular Imaging) with 48 blocks/ring is taken as the starting point. Additional rings of blocks are then added. The diameter of the system for this study is 85.5 cm and the axial extent ranged from 16.4 cm, that of the current HIREZ system, up to over 3 m in order to obtain data points with a solid angle close to 4 π. In all calculations, the detectors were assumed to be lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) with a crystal thickness of 2 cm. The calculated count rate values are based on actual experimental data from the Siemens HIREZ scanner and then scaled based on the ratio of the calculated absolute sensitivity to the measured HIREZ absolute sensitivity. The point source sensitivity is given by the solid angle, the square of the crystal sensitivity and the square of the detector packing fraction. The point source sensitivity as a function of the axial extent shows an exponential increase reaching a limiting value as the solid angle approaches 4 π. A system with 100 cm axial extent has a solid angle of ˜75% of 4 π.

  5. Hybrid approach for attenuation correction in PET/MR scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Ribeiro, A., E-mail: afribeiro@fc.ul.pt [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Almeida, P. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-01-11

    Aim: Attenuation correction (AC) of PET images is still one of the major limitations of hybrid PET/MR scanners. Different methods have been proposed to obtain the AC map from morphological MR images. Although, segmentation methods normally fail to differentiate air and bone regions, while template or atlas methods usually cannot accurately represent regions anatomically different from the template image. In this study a feed forward neural network (FFNN) algorithm is presented which directly outputs the attenuation coefficients by non-linear regression of the images acquired with an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence guided by the template-based AC map (TAC-map). Materials and methods: MR as well as CT data were acquired in four subjects. The UTE images and the TAC-map were the inputs of the presented FFNN algorithm for training as well as classification. The resulting attenuation maps were compared with CT-based, PNN-based and TAC maps. All the AC maps were used to reconstruct the PET emission data which were then compared for the different methods. Results: For each subject dice coefficients D were calculated between each method and the respective CT-based AC maps. The resulting Ds show higher values for all FFNN-based tissues comparatively to both TAC-based and PNN-based methods, particularly for bone tissue (D=0.77, D=0.51 and D=0.71, respectively). The AC-corrected PET images with the FFNN-based map show an overall lower relative difference (RD=3.90%) than those AC-corrected with the PNN-based (RD=4.44%) or template-based (RD=4.43%) methods. Conclusion: Our results show that an enhancement of current methods can be performed by combining both information of new MR image sequence techniques and general information provided from template techniques. Nevertheless, the number of tested subjects is statistically low and current analysis for a larger dataset is being carried out.

  6. A new nonuniformity correction algorithm for infrared line scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jing; Jin, Wei-qi; Dong, Li-quan; Wang, Xia

    2006-05-01

    Nonuniformity correction (NUC) is a critical task for achieving higher performances in modern infrared imaging systems. The striping fixed pattern noise produced by the scanning-type infrared imaging system can hardly be removed clearly by many scene-based non-uniformity correction methods, which can work effectively for staring focal plane arrays (FPA). We proposed an improved nonuniformity algorithm that corrects the aggregate nonuniformity by two steps for the infrared line scanners (IRLS). The novel contribution in our approach is the integration of local constant statistics (LCS) constraint and neural networks. First, the nonuniformity due to the readout electronics is corrected by treating every row of pixels as one channel and normalizing the channel outputs so that each channel produces pixels with the same mean and standard deviation as median value of the local channels statistics. Second, for IRLS every row is generated by pushbrooming one detector on line sensors, we presume each detector has one neuron with a weight and an offset as correction parameters, which can update column by column recursively at Least Mean Square sense. A one-dimensional median filter is used to produce ideal output of linear neural network and some optimization strategies are added to increase the robustness of learning process. Applications to both simulated and real infrared images demonstrated that this algorithm is self-adaptive and able to complete NUC by only one frames. If the nonuniformity is not so severe then only the first step can obtain a good correction result. Combination of two steps can achieve a higher correction level and remove stripe pattern noise clearly.

  7. Forest Attributes Estimation Using Aerial Laser Scanner and TM Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shataee Joibary

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat-TM data.Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany.Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples.Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m3 ha–1 and 0.48, respectively compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m3 ha–1 but unbiased (0.03 compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m3 ha–1 but slightly biased (–1.04.Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data.Key words: forest attributes estimation; ALS; TM; non-parametric algorithms.

  8. Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.

  9. Forest attributes estimation using aerial laser scanner and TM data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shataee, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat- TM data. Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany. Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples. Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1 and 0.48, respectively) compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1) but unbiased (0.03) compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1 but slightly biased (-1.04). Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data. (Author)

  10. TU-F-201-04: Applications in Small Fields and Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, I. [Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Since the introduction of radiochromic films (RCF) for radiation dosimetry, the scope of RCF dosimetry has expanded steadily to include many medical applications, such as radiation therapy and diagnostic radiology. The AAPM Task Group (TG) 55 published a report on the recommendations for RCF dosimetry in 1998. As the technology is advancing rapidly, and its routine clinical use is expanding, TG 235 has been formed to provide an update to TG-55 on radiochromic film dosimetry. RCF dosimetry applications in clinical radiotherapy have become even more widespread, expanding from primarily brachytherapy and radiosurgery applications, and gravitating towards (but not limited to) external beam therapy (photon, electron and protons), such as quality assurance for IMRT, VMAT, Tomotherapy, SRS/SRT, and SBRT. In addition, RCF applications now extend to measurements of radiation dose in particle beams and patients undergoing medical exams, especially fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures and CT. The densitometers/scanners used for RCF dosimetry have also evolved from the He-Ne laser scanner to CCD-based scanners, including roller-based scanner, light box-based digital camera, and flatbed color scanner. More recently, multichannel RCF dosimetry introduced a new paradigm for external beam dose QA for its high accuracy and efficiency. This course covers in detail the recent advancements in RCF dosimetry. Learning Objectives: Introduce the paradigm shift on multichannel film dosimetry Outline the procedures to achieve accurate dosimetry with a RCF dosimetry system Provide comprehensive guidelines on RCF dosimetry for various clinical applications One of the speakers has a research agreement from Ashland Inc., the manufacturer of Gafchromic film.

  11. Evaluation of Multiple-Sampling Function used with a Microtek flatbed scanner for Radiation Dosimetry Calibration of EBT2 Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liyun [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow [Department of Nursing, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan 71101, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan 73657, Taiwan (China); Ding, Hueisch-Jy [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Ing-Ming [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Shu Zen College of Medicine and Management, Kaohsiung 82144, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pang-Yu, E-mail: pangyuchen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan 70142, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tsair-Fwu, E-mail: tflee@kuas.edu.tw [Medical Physics and Informatics Laboratory, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung 80778, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-01

    The radiochromic EBT2 film is a widely used quality assurance device for radiation therapy. This study evaluated the film calibration performance of the multiple-sampling function, a function of the ScanWizard Pro scanning software provided by the manufacturer, when used with Microtek 9800XL plus (9800XL{sup +}) flatbed scanner. By using the PDD method, each one of the eight EBT2 films, four delivered by 290 monitor unit (MU) and four by 88 MU via 6-MV photon beams, was tightly sandwiched in a 30{sup 3}-cm{sup 3} water equivalent polystyrene phantom prior to irradiation. Before and after irradiation, all films were scanned using the Microtek 9800XL{sup +} scanner with five different modes of the multiple-sampling function, which could generate the image with the averaged result of multiple-sampling. The net optical densities (netOD) on the beam central axis of film were assigned to corresponding depth doses for calibration. For each sampling mode with either delivered MU, the depth-dose uncertainty of a single film from repeated scans and that of a single scan of the four films were analyzed. Finally, the calibration error and the combined calibration uncertainty between film determined depth-doses and delivered depth-doses were calculated and evaluated for each sampling mode. All standard deviations and the calibration error were demonstrated to be unrelated to the number of sampling lines. The calibration error of the 2-line and 16-line mode was within 3 cGy and better than that of the other modes. The combined uncertainty of the 2-line mode was the lowest, which was generally less than 6 cGy except for the delivered dose around 100 cGy. The evaluation described herein revealed that the EBT2 film calibrated with the 2-line mode has relatively lower error, scanning time and combined uncertianty. Therefore, it is recommended for routine EBT2 film calibration and verification of treatment plans.

  12. Beam imaging sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  13. Ultracold ordered electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habs, D.; Kramp, J.; Krause, P.; Matl, K.; Neumann, R.; Schwalm, D.

    1988-01-01

    We have started an experimental program to develop an ultracold electron beam, which can be used together with a standard electron cooling device in the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring TSR. In contrast to the standard-type design using electron beam extraction beam extraction from a heated cathode, the ultracold beam is produced by photoemission of electrons from a cooled semiconductor crystal irradiated with an intense near-infrared laser light beam. Adiabatic acceleration is expected to provide ordering of the electron beam itself. Besides the cooling of ion beams to extremely low temperatures, with the aim of obtaining crystallization, the ultracold beam will constitute an excellent target for atomic physics experiments.

  14. In situ micro-focused X-ray beam characterization with a lensless camera using a hybrid pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachatkou, Anton, E-mail: anton.kachatkou@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Sackville Street Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Marchal, Julien [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Silfhout, Roelof van, E-mail: anton.kachatkou@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Sackville Street Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-04

    Position and size measurements of a micro-focused X-ray beam, using an X-ray beam imaging device based on a lensless camera that collects radiation scattered from a thin foil placed in the path of the beam at an oblique angle, are reported. Results of studies on micro-focused X-ray beam diagnostics using an X-ray beam imaging (XBI) instrument based on the idea of recording radiation scattered from a thin foil of a low-Z material with a lensless camera are reported. The XBI instrument captures magnified images of the scattering region within the foil as illuminated by the incident beam. These images contain information about beam size, beam position and beam intensity that is extracted during dedicated signal processing steps. In this work the use of the device with beams for which the beam size is significantly smaller than that of a single detector pixel is explored. The performance of the XBI device equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid pixel X-ray imaging sensor is analysed. Compared with traditional methods such as slit edge or wire scanners, the XBI micro-focused beam characterization is significantly faster and does not interfere with on-going experiments. The challenges associated with measuring micrometre-sized beams are described and ways of optimizing the resolution of beam position and size measurements of the XBI instrument are discussed.

  15. Contrast imaging with a monochromatic x-ray scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Donald J.; Popovic, Kosta; Williams, Mark B.

    2008-03-01

    We are currently developing a monochromatic x-ray source for small animal tomographic imaging. This source consists of a conventional cone beam microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten target coupled to a filter that uses Bragg diffraction to transmit only x-rays within a narrow energy range (~3 keV FWHM). A tissue-equivalent mouse phantom was used to a) evaluate how clearly CT imaging using the quasi-monoenergetic beam is able to differentiate tissue types compared to conventional polyenergetic CT, and b) to test the ability of the source and Bragg filter combination to perform dual energy, iodine contrast enhanced imaging. Single slice CT scans of the phantom were obtained both with polyenergetic (1.8 mm Al filtration) and quasi-monoenergetic beams. Region of interest analysis showed that pixel value variance was signifcantly reduced in the quasi-monochromatic case compared to the polyenergetic case, suggesting a reduction in the variance of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissue equivalent materials due to the narrower energy spectrum. To test dual energy iodine K-edge imaging, vials containing solutions with a range of iodine contrasts were added to the phantom. Single-slice CT scans were obtained using spectra with maximum values at 30 and 35 keV, respectively. Analysis of the resulting difference images (35 keV image - 30 keV image) shows that the magnitude of the difference signal produced by iodine exceeds that of bone for iodine concentrations above ~20 mg/ml, and that of muscle and fat tissues for iodine concentrations above ~5 mg/ml.

  16. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was

  17. En-face coherence imaging using galvanometer scanner modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoleanu, A G; Dobre, G M; Jackson, D A

    1998-02-01

    We introduce a novel optical path-modulation technique for a low-coherence interferometric imaging system based on transverse scanning of the target with a galvanometric scanning-mirror pair. The path modulation arises when the beam that is incident upon one of the scanning mirrors does not fall on its axis of rotation. The method is demonstrated by the production of en-face low-coherence images of different objects such as a fiber-optic tip and a human retina invivo .

  18. The use of cone-beam computed tomography in an orthodontic department in between research and daily clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Paolo M; Melsen, Birte

    2008-01-01

    A correct orthodontic diagnosis needs to be based on accurate images of the craniofacial region and is crucial for the development of a valid treatment plan. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner allows 3D imaging of the craniofacial complex. CBCT scanners represent a significant advantage in imaging capabilities for dentistry and orthodontics, replacing conventional 2D radiographic images with 3D data sets and only a small increase in radiation. The present study surveys the rationale, advantages, and disadvantages of the available CBCT appliances and presents answers to questions often asked in relation to this technology.

  19. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  20. Automating slope monitoring in mines with terrestrial lidar scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Static terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have been an important component of slope monitoring for some time, and many solutions for monitoring the progress of a slide have been devised over the years. However, all of these solutions have required users to operate the lidar equipment in the field, creating a high cost in time and resources, especially if the surveys must be performed very frequently. This paper presents a new solution for monitoring slides, developed using a TLS and an automated data acquisition, processing and analysis system. In this solution, a TLS is permanently mounted within sight of the target surface and connected to a control computer. The control software on the computer automatically triggers surveys according to a user-defined schedule, parses data into point clouds, and compares data against a baseline. The software can base the comparison against either the original survey of the site or the most recent survey, depending on whether the operator needs to measure the total or recent movement of the slide. If the displacement exceeds a user-defined safety threshold, the control computer transmits alerts via SMS text messaging and/or email, including graphs and tables describing the nature and size of the displacement. The solution can also be configured to trigger the external visual/audio alarm systems. If the survey areas contain high-traffic areas such as roads, the operator can mark them for exclusion in the comparison to prevent false alarms. To improve usability and safety, the control computer can connect to a local intranet and allow remote access through the software's web portal. This enables operators to perform most tasks with the TLS from their office, including reviewing displacement reports, downloading survey data, and adjusting the scan schedule. This solution has proved invaluable in automatically detecting and alerting users to potential danger within the monitored areas while lowering the cost and work required for

  1. Indirect identification and compensation of lateral scanner resonances in atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D J; Youcef-Toumi, K; Fantner, G E

    2011-08-05

    Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires accurate nanopositioning at high speeds. However, high speed operation excites resonances in the AFM's mechanical scanner that can distort the image, and therefore typical users of commercial AFMs elect to operate microscopes at speeds below which scanner resonances are observed. Although traditional robust feedforward controllers and input shaping have proven effective at minimizing the influence of scanner distortions, the lack of direct measurement and use of model-based controllers have required disassembling the microscope to access lateral scanner motion with external sensors in order to perform a full system identification experiment, which places excessive demands on routine microscope operators. Further, since the lightly damped instrument dynamics often change from experiment to experiment, model-based controllers designed from offline system identification experiments must trade off high speed performance for robustness to modeling errors. This work represents a new way to automatically characterize the lateral scanner dynamics without addition of lateral sensors, and shape the commanded input signals in such a way that disturbing dynamics are not excited. Scanner coupling between the lateral and out-of-plane directions is exploited and used to build a minimal model of the scanner that is also sufficient to describe the nature of the distorting resonances. This model informs the design of an online input shaper used to suppress spectral components of the high speed command signals. The method presented is distinct from alternative approaches in that neither an information-complete system identification experiment nor microscope modification are required. Because the system identification is performed online immediately before imaging, no tradeoff of performance is required. This approach has enabled an increase in the scan rates of unmodified commercial AFMs from 1-4 lines s(-1) to

  2. Note: Laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Abhijit [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India); Department of Physics, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam (India); Boruah, Bosanta R., E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this work we describe laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators are capable of displaying 85 colored images in 1 s using a time dithering technique. Each colored image, in fact, comprises 24 single bit (black and white) images displayed sequentially. We have used each single bit image to write a binary phase hologram. For a collimated laser beam incident on the hologram, one of the diffracted beams can be made to travel along a user defined direction. We have constructed a beam scanner employing the above arrangement and demonstrated its use to scan a single laser beam in a laser scanning optical sectioning microscope setup.

  3. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  4. Preliminary results of a prototype C-shaped PET designed for an in-beam PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun; Lee, Kisung; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be utilized in particle beam therapy to verify the dose distribution of the target volume as well as the accuracy of the treatment. We present an in-beam PET scanner that can be integrated into a particle beam therapy system. The proposed PET scanner consisted of 14 detector modules arranged in a C-shape to avoid blockage of the particle beam line by the detector modules. Each detector module was composed of a 9×9 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals optically coupled to four 29-mm-diameter PMTs using the photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. In this study, a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation study was conducted to design a C-shaped PET scanner and then experimental evaluation of the proposed design was performed. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards and were 6.1 mm and 5.61 cps/kBq, respectively, which is in good agreement with our simulation, with an error rate of 12.0%. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-shaped in-beam PET system, which we expect will be useful for measuring dose distribution in particle therapy.

  5. Preliminary results of a prototype C-shaped PET designed for an in-beam PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Il [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun, E-mail: ychung@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kisung [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun [Nucare Medical System, Inc., Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be utilized in particle beam therapy to verify the dose distribution of the target volume as well as the accuracy of the treatment. We present an in-beam PET scanner that can be integrated into a particle beam therapy system. The proposed PET scanner consisted of 14 detector modules arranged in a C-shape to avoid blockage of the particle beam line by the detector modules. Each detector module was composed of a 9×9 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals optically coupled to four 29-mm-diameter PMTs using the photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. In this study, a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation study was conducted to design a C-shaped PET scanner and then experimental evaluation of the proposed design was performed. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards and were 6.1 mm and 5.61 cps/kBq, respectively, which is in good agreement with our simulation, with an error rate of 12.0%. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-shaped in-beam PET system, which we expect will be useful for measuring dose distribution in particle therapy.

  6. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  7. Off-Axis Undulator Radiation for CLIC Drive Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. In this paper we propose the use of relatively inexpensive permanent-magnet undulators to generate off-axis visible Synchrotron Radiation from the CLIC Drive Beam. The field strength and period length of the undulator should be designed such that the on-axis undulator wavelength is in the ultra-violet. A smaller but still useable amount of visible light is then generated in a hollow cone. This light can be reflected out of the beam pipe by a ring-shaped mirror placed downstream and imaged on a camera. In this contribution, results of SRW and ZEMA...

  8. Application of a long-range terrestrial laser scanner in research on lowland geodynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Daria; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Tyszkowski, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Progress in the LIDAR technology allows collection of data over a longer range and with a higher precision than most of geodetic measurement methods. It is particularly useful in areas that are inaccessible, dangerous, or with a highly variable morphology. These include mountains, steep slopes of river valleys, and edges of water bodies. Because of a high variation in altitude, they are particularly prone to geodynamic processes. In recent years, such areas have been surveyed more and more often with the use of Airborne Laser Scanning, but the high costs and low frequency of surveys make it difficult to trace the dynamics of phenomena and recorded processes. A few years ago, a new method for imaging of land surfaces started to be used: Terrestrial Laser Scanning. The latest scanners make long-distance scanning possible, up to several kilometres), which until recently had been reserved exclusively for Airborne Laser Scanning. The ease and mobility of scanning allows recording of geodynamic processes immediately after their initiation and their constant monitoring, with a high frequency of data collection. The usefulness of long-distance Terrestrial Laser Scanning is presented here on the basis of mass movements on slopes of a large river valley (the lower Vistula valley) and edges of artificial water bodies. These areas were selected because of a high dynamics of geodynamic processes. The scanning was performed at a distance of 2-4 km from the objects, with a resolution of 0.002°. Such parameters of the equipment and the broad scope and long range enable researchers simultaneous scanning of wide belts of the marginal zone. They also allow precise imaging of slopes, including the microforms that cannot be recorded with any other method. Thanks to the characteristics of laser beam reflection, it is also possible to perform analyses that allow identification of landslide initiation, as well as initial stages of erosion of river banks and edges of water bodies. In this

  9. ISR beam scrapers

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Beam scrapers seen in the direction of the beam. The two horizontal scraper foils are near the centre of the beam pipe andthe two scrapers for protection of the vacuum chamber are further outside. In the lower part of the beam pipe is the vertical halo scraping blade.

  10. Telecommunication using muon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography in detection of simulated mandibular condyle erosions

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriar Shahab; Nafiseh Nikkerdar; Maryam Goodarzi; Amin Golshah; Sanaz Sharifi Shooshtari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the detection of simulated mandibular condyle erosions. Materials and Methods: Seventeen dry human mandibles were used in this in vitro study. NewTom VG CBCT scanner (New Tom VG, Verona, Veneto region, Italy) was used for the condyles imaging (pre-erosion and post-erosion image). Thirty three lesions were created on the superior (11 cases), anterior (11 cases), and posterior surfaces (11 cases) o...

  12. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Sorapong Aootaphao; Saowapak S. Thongvigitmanee; Jartuwat Rajruangrabin; Chalinee Thanasupsombat; Tanapon Srivongsa; Pairash Thajchayapong

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter ...

  13. Advanced mix-and-match using a high-NA i-line scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijten, Jan P.; Harris, Thomas A.; van der Heijden, Ludo; Witko, David; Cossins, John; Foster, James; Ritchie, Douglas R.

    2000-07-01

    Step and Scan technology has matured for the current generation of semiconductor lithography tools and has become the standard for most new fabs and fab expansions. It is estimated that for the year 1999, more than 64 percent of new exposure tool shipments from all vendors were step and scan platforms. For economical mass production in sub 180 nm applications, DUV and i-line lithography have to be combined with critical layers that are exposure during DUV. Semi- critical and non-critical layers are exposed using i-line. The choice to use a stepper ora scanner for the i-line platform becomes critical in terms of operating cost and technical capability. This paper reports on the performance of high resolution, high throughput i-line scanners that are used in mix and match with DUV scanners. Advanced imaging capability is demonstrated on the ASML PAS 5500/400 i-line scanner as well as alignment performance on the most difficult layers using the ATHENA advanced alignment system. Matching strategies are presented along with a cost analysis showing the merits of using i-line scanners for semi- critical and non-critical layers in mix and match.

  14. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-21

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq (18)F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  15. Temporal Stability of the Velodyne HDL-64E S2 Scanner for High Accuracy Scanning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Glennie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The temporal stability and static calibration and analysis of the Velodyne HDL‑64E S2 scanning LiDAR system is discussed and analyzed. The mathematical model for measurements for the HDL-64E S2 scanner is updated to include misalignments between the angular encoder and scanner axis of rotation, which are found to be a marginally significant source of error. It is reported that the horizontal and vertical laser offsets cannot reliably be obtained with the current calibration model due to their high correlation with the horizontal and vertical offsets. By analyzing observations from two separate HDL-64E S2 scanners it was found that the temporal stability of the horizontal angle offset is near the quantization level of the encoder, but the vertical angular offset, distance offset and distance scale are slightly larger than expected. This is felt to be due to long term variations in the scanner range, whose root cause is as of yet unidentified. Nevertheless, a temporally averaged calibration dataset for each of the scanners resulted in a 25% improvement in the 3D planar misclosure residual RMSE over the standard factory calibration model.

  16. A LabVIEW® based generic CT scanner control software platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, M; Van Loo, D; Masschaele, B; Boone, M; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2010-01-01

    UGCT, the Centre for X-ray tomography at Ghent University (Belgium) does research on X-ray tomography and its applications. This includes the development and construction of state-of-the-art CT scanners for scientific research. Because these scanners are built for very different purposes they differ considerably in their physical implementations. However, they all share common principle functionality. In this context a generic software platform was developed using LabVIEW® in order to provide the same interface and functionality on all scanners. This article describes the concept and features of this software, and its potential for tomography in a research setting. The core concept is to rigorously separate the abstract operation of a CT scanner from its actual physical configuration. This separation is achieved by implementing a sender-listener architecture. The advantages are that the resulting software platform is generic, scalable, highly efficient, easy to develop and to extend, and that it can be deployed on future scanners with minimal effort.

  17. Preclinical positron emission tomography scanner based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator: initial design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolin, Alexander V; Martone, Peter F; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Raylman, Raymond R

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanners designed for imaging of small animals have transformed translational research by reducing the necessity to invasively monitor physiology and disease progression. Virtually all of these scanners are based on the use of pixelated detector modules arranged in rings. This design, while generally successful, has some limitations. Specifically, use of discrete detector modules to construct PET scanners reduces detection sensitivity and can introduce artifacts in reconstructed images, requiring the use of correction methods. To address these challenges, and facilitate measurement of photon depth-of-interaction in the detector, we investigated a small animal PET scanner (called AnnPET) based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator. The scanner was created by placing 12 flat facets around the outer surface of the scintillator to accommodate placement of silicon photomultiplier arrays. Its performance characteristics were explored using Monte Carlo simulations and sections of the NEMA NU4-2008 protocol. Results from this study revealed that AnnPET's reconstructed spatial resolution is predicted to be [Formula: see text] full width at half maximum in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. Peak detection sensitivity is predicted to be 10.1%. Images of simulated phantoms (mini-hot rod and mouse whole body) yielded promising results, indicating the potential of this system for enhancing PET imaging of small animals.

  18. Development of a mixed pixel filter for improved dimension estimation using AMCW laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Sohn, Hoon; Cheng, Jack C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate dimension estimation is desired in many fields, but the traditional dimension estimation methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In the recent decades, 3D laser scanners have become popular for dimension estimation due to their high measurement speed and accuracy. Nonetheless, scan data obtained by amplitude-modulated continuous-wave (AMCW) laser scanners suffer from erroneous data called mixed pixels, which can influence the accuracy of dimension estimation. This study develops a mixed pixel filter for improved dimension estimation using AMCW laser scanners. The distance measurement of mixed pixels is firstly formulated based on the working principle of laser scanners. Then, a mixed pixel filter that can minimize the classification errors between valid points and mixed pixels is developed. Validation experiments were conducted to verify the formulation of the distance measurement of mixed pixels and to examine the performance of the proposed mixed pixel filter. Experimental results show that, for a specimen with dimensions of 840 mm × 300 mm, the overall errors of the dimensions estimated after applying the proposed filter are 1.9 mm and 1.0 mm for two different scanning resolutions, respectively. These errors are much smaller than the errors (4.8 mm and 3.5 mm) obtained by the scanner's built-in filter.

  19. Ultracold Ordered Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Kramp, J.; Krause, P.; Matl, K.; Neumann, R.; Schwalm, D.

    1988-01-01

    We have started an experimental program to develop an ultracold electron beam, which can be used together with a standard electron cooling device in the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring TSR. In contrast to the standard-type design using electron beam extraction from a heated cathode, the ultracold beam is produced by photoemission of electrons from a cooled semiconductor crystal irradiated with an intense near-infrared laser light beam. Adiabatic acceleration is expected to provide ordering of the electron beam itself. Besides the cooling of ion beams to extremely low temperatures, with the aim of obtaining crystallization, the ultracold beam will constitute an excellent target for atomic physics experiments.

  20. Verification of CTDI and Dlp values for a head tomography reported by the manufacturers of the CT scanners, using a CT dose profiler probe, a head phantom and a piranha electrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo C, E.; Garcia F, I. B.; Garcia H, J.; Roman L, S. [Servicios de Salud de Michoacan, Centro Estatal de Atencion Oncologica, Gertrudis Bocanegra No. 300, Col. Cuauhtemoc, 58020 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Salmeron C, O., E-mail: edithcastillocorona@gmail.com [Servicios de Salud de Michoacan, Hospital General Dr. Miguel Silva, Isidro Huarte s/n, Centro Historico, 58000 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The extensive use of Computed Tomography (CT) and the associated increase in patient dose calls for an accurate dose evaluation technique. The CT contributes up to 70% of the total dose given to patients during X-ray examinations. The rapid advancements in CT technology are placing new demands on the methods and equipment that are used for quality assurance. The wide beam widths found in CT scanners with multiple beam apertures make it impossible to use existing CT ionization chambers to measure the total dose given to the patient. Using a standard 10 cm CT ionization chamber may result in inaccurate measurements due to underestimation of the dose profile for wide beams. The use a CT dose profiler based on solid-state technology and the Piranha electrometer from RTI electronics provides a potential solution to the arising concerns over patient dose. This study intend to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of CT Dose Index (CTDI) and Dose Length Product (Dlp) values for a head tomography reported by the manufacturers of the CT scanners at each study. (Author)

  1. Accuracy and precision of the three-dimensional assessment of the facial surface using a 3-D laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, L; Zimmermann, A; Brockmann, G; Baurecht, H; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Papadopulos, N A; Papadopoulos, M A; Sader, R; Biemer, E; Zeilhofer, H F

    2006-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) recording of the surface of the human body or anatomical areas has gained importance in many medical specialties. Thus, it is important to determine scanner precision and accuracy in defined medical applications and to establish standards for the recording procedure. Here we evaluated the precision and accuracy of 3-D assessment of the facial area with the Minolta Vivid 910 3D Laser Scanner. We also investigated the influence of factors related to the recording procedure and the processing of scanner data on final results. These factors include lighting, alignment of scanner and object, the examiner, and the software used to convert measurements into virtual images. To assess scanner accuracy, we compared scanner data to those obtained by manual measurements on a dummy. Less than 7% of all results with the scanner method were outside a range of error of 2 mm when compared to corresponding reference measurements. Accuracy, thus, proved to be good enough to satisfy requirements for numerous clinical applications. Moreover, the experiments completed with the dummy yielded valuable information for optimizing recording parameters for best results. Thus, under defined conditions, precision and accuracy of surface models of the human face recorded with the Minolta Vivid 910 3D Scanner presumably can also be enhanced. Future studies will involve verification of our findings using test persons. The current findings indicate that the Minolta Vivid 910 3D Scanner might be used with benefit in medicine when recording the 3-D surface structures of the face.

  2. Parabolic scaling beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nan; Xie, Changqing

    2014-06-15

    We generalize the concept of diffraction free beams to parabolic scaling beams (PSBs), whose normalized intensity scales parabolically during propagation. These beams are nondiffracting in the circular parabolic coordinate systems, and all the diffraction free beams of Durnin's type have counterparts as PSBs. Parabolic scaling Bessel beams with Gaussian apodization are investigated in detail, their nonparaxial extrapolations are derived, and experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions.

  3. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  4. Preliminary hyperspectral volcano observations using Airborne Radiative Spectral Scanner (ARTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitsufuchi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne-imaging spectral systems can often efficiently identify volcanic phenomena that are difficult to detect by satellite imagery. Since 1990, the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has been developing our original airborne-imaging spectral systems for volcano observations. In 2006, we developed a new airborne hyperspectral sensor, the Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner (ARTS), for hyperspectral volcano observations. ARTS is a push-broom imaging spectrometer covering wavelengths from 380 to 1100nm (VNIR; 288 bands), 950 to 2450nm (SWIR; 101 bands), and 8000 to 11500nm (LWIR; 32 bands) and has precise position and attitude measurement systems (GPS/IMU) to achieve direct geo-correction of the acquired image. The ARTS specifications were planned to provide hyperspectral images to support developing algorithms for remotely sensing the geothermal distribution, ash- fall areas, and content of volcanic gas columns. ARTS will also be useful for operational volcanic observations to assess volcanic activity and to mitigate volcanic disasters.Before beginning the operational use of ARTS, it is important to validate its in-flight performance. Therefore, we have been conducting validation on the B200 platform. In this study, we present the results of two experiment observations, the overflight of ARTS instrument at the NIED building site on April 5, 2007, and the volcano observations flight over active volcano (Sakurajima volcano) just after its eruption on April 8, 2008. At the NIED building site, we validated the radiometric fidelity of all bands and the accuracy of geo-corrections. At the Sakurajima volcano, we tried to demonstrate the functions of ARTS, especially those for volcano observation. At the NIED building site, the validation results indicate that the geo-correction accuracy is typically less than a two-pixel difference (RMS), and that there was good agreement between the predicted radiance at the sensor and

  5. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  6. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, X.; Lambrichts, I.; Sun, Y.; Denis, K.; Hassan, B.; Li, L.; Pauwels, R.; Jacobs, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G,

  7. Influence of object location in cone beam computed tomography (NewTom 5G and 3D Accuitomo 170) on gray value measurements at an implant site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsa, A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hassan, B.; van der Stelt, P.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the gray value variation at an implant site with different object location within the selected field of view (FOV) in two cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Methods A 1-cm-thick section from the edentulous region of a dry human mandible w

  8. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently.

  9. Effect of temperature on calibration quality of structured-light three-dimensional scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, M; Kamiński, M; Sitnik, R; Bogdan, A; Karaszewski, M

    2014-08-10

    This paper presents the outcome of research into the effects of ambient temperature changes on structured-light three-dimensional (3D) scanners. The tests were conducted in a thermal chamber and consisted of a comparison of the 3D measurement of a special reference unit (made of a carbon composite) performed at different temperatures, with measurements performed at the calibration temperature. A contact measuring arm with temperature compensation was used as a reference. Based on the results of these experiments, we propose a method that allows us to extend the existing scanner calibration method by using a temperature-correction procedure that is based on linear and nonlinear mathematical models. An exemplary application of this procedure has shown that the range of temperatures in which scanner accuracy is within declared limits can be increased 11-fold.

  10. Comparison of solid shapes geometry derived by a laser scanner and a total station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Andreas; Lakakis, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    The laser scanning technology has become a common method for the daily applications of a large variety of scientists and professionals. Even for more sophisticated projects, laser scanners have been proved a very useful tool at researchers' and engineers' disposal. In this paper, we investigated the ability of a laser scanner compared to the ability of a total station to provide the geometry of solids. The tests were made in the laboratory facilities of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, in a variety of distances between the measuring instrument and the object. The solids that were used differ in shape, material and color. The objects are a wooden cube, a metal cube and a wooden pyramid. The absolute dimensions of the solid shapes were provided by the use of a caliper and were compared to the dimensions that were calculated by the coordinates produced by the total station and laser scanner measurements.

  11. On Ground Surface Extraction Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner for Cim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Chikatsu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Satellite positioning systems such as GPS and GLONASS have created significant changes not only in terms of spatial information but also in the construction industry. It is possible to execute a suitable construction plan by using a computerized intelligent construction. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the amount of earthwork is important for operating heavy equipment, and measurement of ground surface with high accuracy is required. A full-waveform airborne laser scanner is expected to be capable of improving the accuracy of ground surface extraction for forested areas, in contrast to discrete airborne laser scanners, as technological innovation. For forested areas, fundamental studies for construction information management (CIM) were conducted to extract ground surface using full-waveform airborne laser scanners based on waveform information.

  12. Evaluation of a rotary laser body scanner for body volume and fat assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, M Reese; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H; Yu, Wurong; Stanforth, Philip R; Xu, Bugao

    2010-07-08

    This paper reports the evaluation tests on the reliability and validity of a 3-dimensional (3D) laser body scanner for estimation of body volume and % fat. Repeated measures of body imaging were performed for reproducibility analysis. Validity of the instrument was assessed by comparison of measures of body volume by imaging to hydrodensitometry, and body fat was compared to hydrodensitometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Reproducibility analysis showed little difference between within-subjects measurements of volume (ICC ≥ 0.99, p laser body scanner and hydrodensitometry were strongly related (r = 0.99, p 0.05). These findings indicate that the 3D laser body scanner is a reliable and valid technique for the estimation of body volume. Furthermore, body imaging is an accurate measure of body fat, as compared to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. This new instrument is promising as a quick, simple to use, and inexpensive method of body composition analysis.

  13. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Pfeiffer, Norman [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany); Herrmann, Lutz [Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is described. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts. (orig.)

  14. [Prospects of the use of mobile MRI scanner in medical service of the Armed Forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, V N; Dydykin, A V; Rikun, A O; Filisteev, P A; Zayats, V V; Zhigalov, A A

    2015-10-01

    Computed tomography is currently one of the most informative methods of diagnostics of a broad range of injuries and diseases, as well as an effective additional mean for various surgical interventions thank to intraoperative use. In this regard, the question of the necessity of the use of this diagnostic technology in mobile hospitals is one of the current tasks. The article analyses the experience of the use of mobile CT scanners at the medical service of the armed forces of foreign states and provides calculations indicating the necessity of the introduction of mobile CT scanners into the hospital link. The review and classification of mobile CT scanners have allowed to formulate technical requirements for their hardware capabilities, as well as to draw conclusions about the conditions of their effective use.

  15. Effective energy measurement using radiochromic film: application of a mobile scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotanda, Tatsuhiro; Katsuda, Toshizo; Gotanda, Rumi; Kuwano, Tadao; Akagawa, Takuya; Tanki, Nobuyoshi; Tabuchi, Akihiko; Shimono, Tetsunori; Kawaji, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    The effective energy calculated using the half-value layer (HVL) is an important parameter for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC). However constant monitoring has not been performed because measurements using an ionization chamber (IC) are time-consuming and complicated. To solve these problems, a method using radiochromic film (GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry film (GAF-EBT2) with slight energy dependency errors), a mobile scanner and step-shaped aluminum (SSAl) filter is developed. The results of the method using a mobile scanner were compared with those of the recommended method using an IC in order to evaluate its applicability. The difference ratios of the effective energies by each method using a mobile scanner with GAF-EBT2 were less than 5% compared with results of an IC. It is considered that this method offers a simple means of determining HVL for QA and QC consistently and quickly without the need for an IC dosimeter.

  16. Effects of ramp vibrational states on flexural intrinsic vibrations in Besocke-style scanners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui; Jiang Guo-Zhu; Liu Zhao-Qun; Zhang Shu-Yi; Fan Li

    2013-01-01

    For both the vibrating and steady supporting surfaces of a scanning disk in a Besocke-style piezoelectric scanner,a theoretical model is given by considering the nonlinear lateral friction at the micro-contact interface between the positioning legs and the supporting surface.Numerical simulations demonstrate that unexpected flexural vibrations can arise from a vibrating ramp,and their frequencies are lower than the eigenfrequencies of the scanner in the linearly elastic regime.The vibrations essentially depend on 1) the vibrational states of the supporting ramp and the steel ball tips on the three piezoelectric positioning legs,and 2) the tribological characteristics of the contacts between the tips and the ramp.The results give an insight into the intrinsic vibrations of the scanners,and are applicable in designing and optimizing piezoelectric scanning systems.

  17. EU Directive 2004/40: field measurements of a 1.5 T clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, S F; Collins, D J; Scuffham, J W; Leach, M O

    2007-06-01

    The European Union (EU) Physical Agents (EMF) Directive [1] must be incorporated into UK law in 2008. The directive, which applies to employees working in MRI, sets legal exposure limits for two of the three types of EMF exposure employed in MRI; time-varying gradient fields and radiofrequency (RF) fields. Limits on the static field are currently not included but may be added at a later date. Conservative action values have been set for all three types of exposure including the static field. The absolute exposure limits will exclude staff from the scanner bore and adjacent areas during scanning, impacting on many clinical activities such as anaesthetic monitoring during sedated scans, paediatric scanning and interventional MRI. When the legislation comes into force, NHS Trusts, scanner companies and academic institutions will be required to show compliance with the law. We present results of initial measurements performed on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. For the static field, the proposed action value is exceeded at 40 cm from the scanner bore and would be exceeded when positioning a patient for scanning. For the RF field, the action values were only exceeded within the bore at distances of 40 cm from the scanner ends during a very RF intensive sequence; MRI employees are unlikely to be in the bore during an acquisition. For the time-varying gradient fields the action values were exceeded 52 cm out from the mouth of the bore during two clinical sequences, and estimated current densities show the exposure limit to be exceeded at 40 cm for frequencies above 333 Hz. Limiting employees to distances greater than these from the scanner during acquisition will have a severe impact on the future use and development of MRI.

  18. Optimization of 3-dimensional imaging of the breast region with 3-dimensional laser scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Yassouridis, Alexander; Zimmermann, Alexander; Brockmann, Gernot; Wöhnl, Antonia; Blaschke, Matthias; Eder, Maximilian; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja; Rosenberg, Robert; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Biemer, Edgar

    2006-03-01

    The anatomic conditions of the female breast require imaging the breast region 3-dimensionally in a normal standing position for quality assurance and for surgery planning or surgery simulation. The goal of this work was to optimize the imaging technology for the mammary region with a 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanner, to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the method, and to allow optimum data reproducibility. Avoiding the influence of biotic factors, such as mobility, we tested the most favorable imaging technology on dummy models for scanner-related factors such as the scanner position in comparison with the torso and the number of scanners and single shots. The influence of different factors of the breast region, such as different breast shapes or premarking of anatomic landmarks, was also first investigated on dummies. The findings from the dummy models were then compared with investigations on test persons, and the accuracy of measurements on the virtual models was compared with a coincidence analysis of the manually measured values. The best precision and accuracy of breast region measurements were achieved when landmarks were marked before taking the shots and when shots at 30 degrees left and 30 degrees right, relative to the sagittal line, were taken with 2 connected scanners mounted with a +10-degree upward angle. However, the precision of the measurements on test persons was significantly lower than those measured on dummies. Our findings show that the correct settings for 3D imaging of the breast region with a laser scanner can achieve an acceptable degree of accuracy and reproducibility.

  19. MFP scanner diagnostics using a self-printed target to measure the modulation transfer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibao; Bauer, Peter; Wagner, Jerry; Allebach, Jan P.

    2014-01-01

    In the current market, reduction of warranty costs is an important avenue for improving profitability by manufacturers of printer products. Our goal is to develop an autonomous capability for diagnosis of printer and scanner caused defects with mid-range laser multifunction printers (MFPs), so as to reduce warranty costs. If the scanner unit of the MFP is not performing according to specification, this issue needs to be diagnosed. If there is a print quality issue, this can be diagnosed by printing a special test page that is resident in the firmware of the MFP unit, and then scanning it. However, the reliability of this process will be compromised if the scanner unit is defective. Thus, for both scanner and printer image quality issues, it is important to be able to properly evaluate the scanner performance. In this paper, we consider evaluation of the scanner performance by measuring its modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF is a fundamental tool for assessing the performance of imaging systems. Several ways have been proposed to measure the MTF, all of which require a special target, for example a slanted-edge target. It is unacceptably expensive to ship every MFP with such a standard target, and to expect that the customer can keep track of it. To reduce this cost, in this paper, we develop new approach to this task. It is based on a self-printed slanted-edge target. Then, we propose algorithms to improve the results using a self-printed slanted-edge target. Finally, we present experimental results for MTF measurement using self-printed targets and compare them to the results obtained with standard targets.

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  1. The optimal optical readout for the x-ray light valve—Document scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Oakham, P.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The x-ray light valve (XLV) is a novel, potentially low-cost, x-ray detector that converts an x-ray exposure into an optical image stored in a liquid crystal cell. This optical image is then transferred from the liquid crystal cell to a computer through an optical-to-digital imaging readout system. Previously, CCD-based cameras were used for the optical readout, but recently it was proposed that an inexpensive optical scanner, such as an office document scanner, is a better match to the optic...

  2. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Jonathan K; Dahlbom, Magnus L; Moses, William W; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Wang, Wenli; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-07-07

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15-22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining detector thickness has significant cost implications. In addition, random coincidences, detector dead time, and object attenuation may reduce scanner performance as the AFOV increases. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to find the optimal scanner geometry (i.e. AFOV, detector thickness and acceptance angle) based on count-rate performance for a range of scintillator volumes ranging from 10 to 93 l with detector thickness varying from 5 to 20 mm. We compare the results to the performance of a scanner based on the current Siemens Biograph mCT geometry and electronics. Our simulation models were developed based on individual components of the Siemens Biograph mCT and were validated against experimental data using the NEMA NU-2 2007 count-rate protocol. In the study, noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed as a function of maximum ring difference (i.e. acceptance angle) and activity concentration using a 27 cm diameter, 200 cm uniformly filled cylindrical phantom for each scanner configuration. To reduce the effect of random coincidences, we implemented a variable coincidence time window based on the length of the lines of response, which increased NECR performance up to 10% compared to using a static coincidence time window for scanners with a large maximum ring difference values. For a given scintillator volume, the optimal configuration results in modest count-rate performance gains of up to 16% compared to the shortest AFOV scanner with the thickest detectors. However, the longest AFOV of approximately 2 m with

  3. Sensitivity of linear CCD array based film scanners used for film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Wang, Yi-Zhen; Tomic, Nada; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-11-01

    Film dosimetry is commonly performed by using linear CCD array transmission optical densitometers. However, these devices suffer from a variation in response along the detector array. If not properly corrected for, this nonuniformity may lead to significant overestimations of the measured dose as one approaches regions close to the edges of the scanning region. In this note, we present measurements of the spatial response of an AGFA Arcus II document scanner used for radiochromic film dosimetry. Results and methods presented in this work can be generalized to other CCD based transmission scanners used for film dosimetry employing either radiochromic or radiographic films.

  4. Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain morphometry is extensively used in cross-sectional studies. However, the difference in the estimated values of the morphometric measures between patients and healthy subjects may be small and hence overshadowed by the scanner-related variability, especially with multicentre and longitudinal studies. It is important therefore to investigate the variability and reliability of morphometric measurements between different scanners and different sessions of the same scanner. Methods We assessed the variability and reliability for the grey matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral hemisphere volumes as well as the global sulcal index, sulcal surface and mean geodesic depth using Brainvisa. We used datasets obtained across multiple MR scanners at 1.5 T and 3 T from the same groups of 13 and 11 healthy volunteers, respectively. For each morphometric measure, we conducted ANOVA analysis and verified whether the estimated values were significantly different across different scanners or different sessions of the same scanner. The between-centre and between-visit reliabilities were estimated from their contribution to the total variance, using a random-effects ANOVA model. To estimate the main processes responsible for low reliability, the results of brain segmentation were compared to those obtained using FAST within FSL. Results In a considerable number of cases, the main effects of both centre and visit factors were found to be significant. Moreover, both between-centre and between-visit reliabilities ranged from poor to excellent for most morphometric measures. A comparison between segmentation using Brainvisa and FAST revealed that FAST improved the reliabilities for most cases, suggesting that morphometry could benefit from improving the bias correction. However, the results were still significantly different across different scanners or different visits. Conclusions Our results confirm that for morphometry

  5. People counting and re-identification using fusion of video camera and laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bo; Olivera, Santiago; Wagley, Raj

    2016-05-01

    We present a system for people counting and re-identification. It can be used by transit and homeland security agencies. Under FTA SBIR program, we have developed a preliminary system for transit passenger counting and re-identification using a laser scanner and video camera. The laser scanner is used to identify the locations of passenger's head and shoulder in an image, a challenging task in crowed environment. It can also estimate the passenger height without prior calibration. Various color models have been applied to form color signatures. Finally, using a statistical fusion and classification scheme, passengers are counted and re-identified.

  6. Performance review of a slide scanner based automated counting system for PADC radon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahimi, Z.-F. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: fero.ibrahimi@hpa.org.uk; Miles, J.C.H. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    The HPA operates a radon measuring service determining the radon concentration (Bqm{sup -3}) in enclosed areas using passive PADC (CR-39) detectors. Since 2003 over 116,000 radon detectors have been analysed in the laboratory using a Nikon LS2000 slide scanner. Digital images of the etched PADC are analysed by in-house etched-track and area counting software. The slide scanner method is briefly described along with its performance across the dynamic range of the detectors. Blind Tests, validation and other quality assurance performance results are reported and discussed.

  7. Digital data storage of core image using high resolution full color core scanner; Kokaizodo full color scanner wo mochiita core image no digital ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, W.; Ujo, S.; Osato, K.; Takasugi, S. [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on digitization of core images by using a new type core scanner system. This system consists of a core scanner unit (equipped with a CCD camera), a personal computer and ancillary devices. This is a modification of the old type system, with measurable core length made to 100 cm/3 scans, and resolution enhanced to 5100 pixels/m (1024 pixels/m in the old type). The camera was changed to that of a color specification, and the A/D conversion was improved to 24-bit full color. As a result of carrying out a detail reproduction test on digital images of this core scanner, it was found that objects can be identified at a level of about the size of pixels constituting the image in the case when the best contrast is obtained between the objects and the background, and that in an evaluation test on visibility of concaves and convexes on core surface, reproducibility is not very good in large concaves and convexes. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Imaging the attenuation coefficients of positron beams in matter: positron attenuation tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Charles [Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-18

    A new positron annihilation imaging modality is described that enables nondestructive measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of positron beams in heterogeneous materials. This positron attenuation tomography (PAT) technique utilizes a positron emission tomography (PET) system embedded within a uniform static magnetic field, such as is found in integrated PET/MRI scanners. A Ga68-generated positron beam constrained by a 3T magnetic field penetrates objects placed within the scanner. The positrons slow down and annihilate within the object. The resulting annihilation distribution is tomographically imaged by the PET camera. This image may be interpreted as a map of the product of the positron beam's flux and its LAC at each point in the volume. It is shown that under certain easily achieved conditions this image can be decomposed into separate maps of the flux and the LACs, without need for auxiliary measurements. Although these LACs may depend on both beam and material properties, a beam softening correction is demonstrated that effectively removes the dependence on beam variation, leaving a relative LAC that is characteristic of the material. Unlike x-ray, gamma-ray or other transmission techniques, PAT does not require the penetration of the beam entirely through the object. High resolution and high contrast images of positron beam LACs in objects may be produced over nearly the full range of the positron beam, which for Ga68 beta-rays in a 3T field is about 0.5 g/cm{sup 2}. The first examples of PAT images and an initial characterization of performance will be presented.

  9. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Pyramid beam splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  11. SU-F-207-01: Comparison of Beam Characteristics and Organ Dose From Four Commercial Multidetector Computed Tomography Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, T; Araki, F [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric properties and patient organ doses from four commercial multidetector CT (MDCT) using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation based on the absorbed dose measured using a Farmer chamber and cylindrical water phantoms according to AAPM TG-111. Methods: Four commercial MDCT were modeled using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The incident photon spectrum and bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined so that calculated values of aluminum half-value layer (Al-HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air agreed with measured values. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and cylindrical water phantoms. The dose distributions of head, chest, and abdominal scan were calculated using patient CT images and mean organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs at 120 kVp of Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 9.1, 7.5, 7.2, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated Al-HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 5%. For adult head scans, mean doses for eye lens from Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 21.7, 38.5, 47.2 and 28.4 mGy, respectively. For chest scans, mean doses for lung from Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 21.1, 26.1, 35.3 and 24.0 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans, the mean doses for liver from Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 16.5, 21.3, 22.7, and 18.0 mGy, respectively. The absorbed doses increased with decreasing Al-HVL. The organ doses from Aquilion were two greater than those from Brilliance in head scan. Conclusion: MC dose distributions based on absorbed dose measurement in cylindrical water phantom are useful to evaluate individual patient organ doses.

  12. Two-Dimensional Rotorcraft Downwash Flow Field Measurements by Lidar-Based Wind Scanners with Agile Beam Steering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas; Hansen, Per;

    2014-01-01

    A major risk to helicopters is the unexpected encounter of degraded visual environments in close-to-ground operations, where a loss of visibility often is caused by clouds of dust (brownout) or snow (whiteout) stirred up by intense downwash. The understanding of the phenomenon is limited, and the......A major risk to helicopters is the unexpected encounter of degraded visual environments in close-to-ground operations, where a loss of visibility often is caused by clouds of dust (brownout) or snow (whiteout) stirred up by intense downwash. The understanding of the phenomenon is limited......, and there is a need for instruments that can measure flow fields on scales larger than a few meters with good resolution. This paper reports on the use of synchronized continuous-wave Doppler lidars for rotorcraft downwash flow field studies. Built from a modified ZephIR wind lidar and a double-prism arrangement...... position; all points in space within a cone with a full opening angle of 1208 can be reached from about 8mout to some hundred meters depending on the range resolution required. The first two-dimensional mean wind fields measured in a horizontal plane and in a vertical plane below a hovering search...

  13. A Refractive-Diffractive Element Design for Resonant Scanner Angular Correction: The Symmetric Beam Retardation Approach (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-18

    in obtaining equation (A14) which included these terms to the 6th order in its derivation, we found the following relationship: t t t eB y eeB dt...A19) Following the same approach as before, the 4th order equation can be written as: t t t eB y eeB dt dn dt nd dt nd dt nd 2 1 0

  14. WindScanner.dk - a new Remote Sensing based Research Infrastructure for on- and offshore Wind Energy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    Recent measurement achievements obtained with new 3D remote sensing based WindScanners will be presented. Our new WindScanner research infrastructure (www.windscanner.dk) development based on remote sensing wind lidars will be presented and first results shown. Wind velocity 3D vector measurement...

  15. Efficacy of a dynamic collimator for overranging dose reduction in a second- and third-generation dual source CT scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Booij (Ronald); M.L. Dijkshoorn (Marcel); M. van Straten (Marcel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the renewed dynamic collimator in a third-generation dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and to determine the improvements over the second-generation scanner. Methods: Collimator efficacy is defined as the percentage overrangi

  16. Technology as an Occasion for Structuring: Evidence from Observations of CT Scanners and the Social Order of Radiology Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    New technologies such as the CT scanner are challenging traditional role relations among radiology workers and may be altering the organizational and occupational structure of radiological work. This paper expands recent sociological thought by showing how identical CT scanners occasion similar structuring processes and created divergent forms of…

  17. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  18. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  19. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  20. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M A

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  1. High energy beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  2. Robustness of intrinsic connectivity networks in the human brain to the presence of acoustic scanner noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langers, Dave R. M.; van Dijk, Pim

    2011-01-01

    Evoked responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are affected by the presence of acoustic scanner noise (ASN). Particularly, stimulus-related activation of the auditory system and deactivation of the default mode network have repeatedly been shown to diminish. In contrast, little is

  3. A Movable Phantom Design for Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Correction Studies on High Resolution PET Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Svarer, C.; Sibomana, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Head movements during brain imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) impair the image quality which, along with the improvement of the spatial resolution of PET scanners, in general, raises the importance of motion correction. Here, we present a new design for an automatic...

  4. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild;

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  5. WindScanner.eu - a new Remote Sensing Research Infrastructure for On- and Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Siggaard Knudsen, Søren; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    A new remote sensing based research infrastructure for atmospheric boundary-layer wind and turbulence measurements named WindScanner have during the past three years been in its early phase of development at DTU Wind Energy in Denmark. During the forthcoming three years the technology will be dis...

  6. Evaluation of image quality and dose on a flat-panel CT-scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Suess, Ch.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Flohr, T.

    2005-04-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) scanner. We focused on improving the image quality using different detector settings and reducing x-ray scatter intensities. For the presented results we used a Varian 4030CB flat-panel detector mounted in a multislice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Systems). The scatter intensities may severely impair image quality in flat-panel detector CT systems. To reduce the impact of scatter we tested bowtie shaped filters, anti-scatter grids and post-processing correction algorithms. We evaluated the improvement of image quality by each method and also by a combination of the several methods. To achieve an extended dynamic range in the projection data, we implemented a novel dynamic gain-switching mode. The read out charge amplifier feedback capacitance is changing dynamically in this mode, depending on the signal level. For this scan mode dedicated corrections in the offset and gain calibration are required. We compared image quality in terms of low contrast for both, the dynamic mode and the standard fixed gain mode. VCT scanners require different types of dose parameters. We measured the dose in a 16 cm CTDI phantom and free air in the scanners iso-center and defined a new metric for a VCT dose index (VCTDI). The dose for a high quality VCT scan of this prototype scanner varied between 15 and 40 mGy.

  7. Modeling and Calibration of a Novel One-Mirror Galvanometric Laser Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengyi; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong

    2017-01-15

    A laser stripe sensor has limited application when a point cloud of geometric samples on the surface of the object needs to be collected, so a galvanometric laser scanner is designed by using a one-mirror galvanometer element as its mechanical device to drive the laser stripe to sweep along the object. A novel mathematical model is derived for the proposed galvanometer laser scanner without any position assumptions and then a model-driven calibration procedure is proposed. Compared with available model-driven approaches, the influence of machining and assembly errors is considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, a plane-constraint-based approach is proposed to extract a large number of calibration points effectively and accurately to calibrate the galvanometric laser scanner. Repeatability and accuracy of the galvanometric laser scanner are evaluated on the automobile production line to verify the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed calibration approach yields similar measurement performance compared with a look-up table calibration method.

  8. Modeling and Calibration of a Novel One-Mirror Galvanometric Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser stripe sensor has limited application when a point cloud of geometric samples on the surface of the object needs to be collected, so a galvanometric laser scanner is designed by using a one-mirror galvanometer element as its mechanical device to drive the laser stripe to sweep along the object. A novel mathematical model is derived for the proposed galvanometer laser scanner without any position assumptions and then a model-driven calibration procedure is proposed. Compared with available model-driven approaches, the influence of machining and assembly errors is considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, a plane-constraint-based approach is proposed to extract a large number of calibration points effectively and accurately to calibrate the galvanometric laser scanner. Repeatability and accuracy of the galvanometric laser scanner are evaluated on the automobile production line to verify the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed calibration approach yields similar measurement performance compared with a look-up table calibration method.

  9. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A...

  10. Comparison of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control for a laser scanner system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordys, A.W.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Smillie, I.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tests performed on a laser scanner system to assess the feasibility of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control design techniques in achieving a required performance in a trajectory folowing problem. The two methods are compared with respect to achieved scan times...

  11. Cantilevered bimorph-based scanner for high speed atomic force microscopy with large scanning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yusheng; Shang, Guangyi; Cai, Wei; Yao, Jun-en

    2010-05-01

    A cantilevered bimorph-based resonance-mode scanner for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging is presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for mounting a sample stage and the other one of that is fixed on the top of a conventional single tube scanner. High speed scanning is realized with the bimorph-based scanner vibrating at resonant frequency driven by a sine wave voltage applied to one piezolayer of the bimorph, while slow scanning is performed by the tube scanner. The other piezolayer provides information on vibration amplitude and phase of the bimorph itself simultaneously, which is used for real-time data processing and image calibration. By adjusting the free length of the bimorph, the line scan rate can be preset ranging from several hundred hertz to several kilohertz, which would be beneficial for the observation of samples with different properties. Combined with a home-made AFM system and a commercially available data acquisition card, AFM images of various samples have been obtained, and as an example, images of the silicon grating taken at a line rate of 1.5 kHz with the scan size of 20 microm are given. By manually moving the sample of polished Al foil surface while scanning, the capability of dynamic imaging is demonstrated.

  12. Wide-area scanner for high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kobashi, Toshihide; Shibata, Mikihiro; Nishiyama, Jun; Yasuda, Ryohei; Ando, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) has recently been established. The dynamic processes and structural dynamics of protein molecules in action have been successfully visualized using HS-AFM. However, its maximum scan ranges in the X- and Y-directions have been limited to ~1 μm and ~4 μm, respectively, making it infeasible to observe the dynamics of much larger samples, including live cells. Here, we develop a wide-area scanner with a maximum XY scan range of ~46 × 46 μm(2) by magnifying the displacements of stack piezoelectric actuators using a leverage mechanism. Mechanical vibrations produced by fast displacement of the X-scanner are suppressed by a combination of feed-forward inverse compensation and the use of triangular scan signals with rounded vertices. As a result, the scan speed in the X-direction reaches 6.3 mm/s even for a scan size as large as ~40 μm. The nonlinearity of the X- and Y-piezoelectric actuators' displacements that arises from their hysteresis is eliminated by polynomial-approximation-based open-loop control. The interference between the X- and Y-scanners is also eliminated by the same technique. The usefulness of this wide-area scanner is demonstrated by video imaging of dynamic processes in live bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  13. Measuring Short- and Long-run Promotional Effectiveness on Scanner Data Using Persistence Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); D.M. Hanssens (Dominique); V.R. Nijs; J-B.E.M. Steenkamp (Jan-Benedict)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe use of price promotions to stimulate brand and firm performance is increasing. We discuss how (i) the availability of longer scanner data time series, and (ii) persistence modeling, have lead to greater insights into the dynamic effects of price promotions, as one can now quantify th

  14. Analysis of uncertainty and repeatability of a low-cost 3D laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, María-Eugenia; Felicísimo, Angel M

    2012-01-01

    Portable 3D laser scanners are a valuable tool for compiling elaborate digital collections of archaeological objects and analysing the shapes and dimensions of pieces. Although low-cost desktop 3D laser scanners have powerful capacities, it is important to know their limitations. This paper performs an analysis of the uncertainty and repeatability of the NextEngine™ portable low-cost 3D laser scanner by scanning an object 20 times in two different resolution modes-Macro and Wide. Some dimensions of the object were measured using a digital calliper, and these results were used as the "true" or control data. In comparing the true and the scanned data, we verified that the mean uncertainty in the Macro Mode is approximately half that of the Wide Mode, at ± 0.81 mm and ± 1.66 mm, respectively. These experimental results are significantly higher than the accuracy specifications provided by the manufacturer. An analysis of repeatability shows that the successive replicates do not match in the same position. The results are better in Macro Mode than in Wide Mode; it is observed that the repeatability factor is slightly larger than the corresponding mode accuracy, with ± 0.84 vs. ± 0.81 mm in Macro Mode and ± 1.82 vs. ± 1.66 mm in Wide Mode. We suggest several improvements, such as adding an external reference scale or providing a calibrated object to allow for a self-calibration operation of the scanner.

  15. Reliability and validity of measurements of facial swelling with a stereophotogrammetry optical three-dimensional scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Visser, Anita; Vissink, Arjan; Ren, Yijin

    2014-01-01

    Volume changes in facial morphology can be assessed using the 3dMD DSP400 stereo-optical 3-dimensional scanner, which uses visible light and has a short scanning time. Its reliability and validity have not to our knowledge been investigated for the assessment of facial swelling. Our aim therefore wa

  16. Work-related factors associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Cambron-Goulet, Évelyne; Kromhout, Hans

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to identify work-related and personal factors associated with workers' exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) from MRI scanners. METHODS: Measurements of personal exposure to SMF and TVMF were performed among MRI staff

  17. A preliminary report of multispectral scanner data from the Cleveland harbor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, D.; Raquet, C.; Svehla, R.; Wachter, D.; Salzman, J.; Coney, T.; Gedney, D.

    1975-01-01

    Imagery obtained from an airborne multispectral scanner is presented. A synoptic view of the entire study area is shown for a number of time periods and for a number of spectral bands. Using several bands, sediment distributions, thermal plumes, and Rhodamine B dye distributions are shown.

  18. Inter-laboratory comparison of medical computed tomography (CT) scanners for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Bager; Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch

    2013-01-01

    differences in CT performance. The presented Round Robin scheme has demonstrated its potential as such a method. The benefit of the phantom set is that it provides a convenient way of comparing volume determination between different CT scanners. The suggested phantoms are mimicking important carcass features...

  19. The Potential of Light Laser Scanners Developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles - The Review and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarska, M.; Ostrowski, W.; Bakuła, K.; Górski, K.; Kurczyński, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing have found small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be a valuable source of data in various branches of science and industry (e.g., agriculture, cultural heritage). Recently, the growing role of laser scanning in the application of UAVs has also been observed. Laser scanners dedicated to UAVs consist of four basic components: a laser scanner (LiDAR), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver and an on-board computer. The producers of the system provide users with detailed descriptions of the accuracies separately for each component. However, the final measurement accuracy is not given. This paper reviews state-of-the-art of laser scanners developed specifically for use on a UAV, presenting an overview of several constructions that are available nowadays. The second part of the paper is focussed on analysing the influence of the sensor accuracies on the final measurement accuracy. Mathematical models developed for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) accuracy analyses are used to estimate the theoretical accuracies of different scanners with conditions typical for UAV missions. Finally, the theoretical results derived from the mathematical simulations are compared with an experimental use case.

  20. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  1. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance an

  2. Addressing Spatial Variability of Surface-Layer Wind with Long-Range WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Kelly, Mark C.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of mean wind measurements from a coordinated system of long-range WindScanners. From individual scan patterns the mean wind field was reconstructed over a large area, and hence it highlights the spatial variability. From comparison with sonic anemometers, the quality...

  3. Preliminary results of a proficiency testing of industrial CT scanners using small polymer items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    This work presents preliminary results concerning a proficiency testing for intercomparison of industrial CT scanners. Two audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation. The two items were a single polymer complex geometry part and a simple geometry item made of two...

  4. Modeling and Calibration of a Novel One-Mirror Galvanometric Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengyi; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong

    2017-01-01

    A laser stripe sensor has limited application when a point cloud of geometric samples on the surface of the object needs to be collected, so a galvanometric laser scanner is designed by using a one-mirror galvanometer element as its mechanical device to drive the laser stripe to sweep along the object. A novel mathematical model is derived for the proposed galvanometer laser scanner without any position assumptions and then a model-driven calibration procedure is proposed. Compared with available model-driven approaches, the influence of machining and assembly errors is considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, a plane-constraint-based approach is proposed to extract a large number of calibration points effectively and accurately to calibrate the galvanometric laser scanner. Repeatability and accuracy of the galvanometric laser scanner are evaluated on the automobile production line to verify the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed calibration approach yields similar measurement performance compared with a look-up table calibration method. PMID:28098844

  5. Distribution of Energy Deposited in Plastic Tubing and Copper-Wire Insulation by Electron Beam Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Walther Batsberg; Miller, Arne; Pejtersen, K.

    1978-01-01

    Scanned electron beam treatment is used to improve the physical properties of certain polymers, such as shrinkable plastic tubing and insulated wire and cable. Tubing or wires are passed at high speed under the beam scanner, and the material is irradiated to absorbed doses of several Mrad...... as uniformly as possible, usually by means of a multipass arrangement. In the present study, using irradiation by a scanned 0.4 MeV electron beam, measurements were made of high-resolution distributions of absorbed dose in polyethylene tubing and copper wire coated with polyethylene, nylon, or polyvinyl...... chloride insulation. Radiochromic dye films equivalent to the insulating materials were used as accurate dosimeters having a response independent of dose rate. Irradiations were in various geometries, wire and plastic thicknesses, positions along the beam scan, and with different backing materials near...

  6. Empirical model for controlling beam-beam effects in ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzen, G

    1980-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction may limit the beam intensity in ISABELLE. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the beam-beam interaction, there appears to be no reliable method at present for computing the effects of the beam-beam interaction. The steps taken at ISABELLE to limit beam-beam effects are based largely on the experience accumulated at the ISR. At the ISR, the beam-beam effects do not appear to be large, and the beam intensity at the ISR does not appear to be limited by beam-beam effects. The beam-beam effects may be much stronger in ISABELLE because of factors like higher intensity and stronger non-linearities.

  7. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  8. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  9. Electron beam focusing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  10. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Zschornacka, G.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviole...

  11. A count-rate model for PET scanners using pixelated Anger-logic detectors with different scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 110 Donner Building (HUP), 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2005-12-07

    A high count-rate simulation (HCRSim) model has been developed so that all results are derived from fundamental physics principles. Originally developed to study the behaviour of continuous sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors, this model is now applied to PET scanners based on pixelated Anger-logic detectors using lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) and lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators. This simulation has been used to study the effect on scanner deadtime and pulse pileup at high activity levels due to the scintillator stopping power ({mu}), decay time ({tau}) and energy resolution. Simulations were performed for a uniform 20 cm diameter x 70 cm long cylinder (NEMA NU2-2001 standard) in a whole-body scanner with an 85 cm ring diameter and a 25 cm axial field-of-view. Our results for these whole-body scanners demonstrate the potential of a pixelated Anger-logic detector and the relationship of its performance with the scanner NEC rate. Faster signal decay and short coincidence timing window lead to a reduction in deadtime and randoms fraction in the LaBr{sub 3} and LSO scanners compared to GSO. The excellent energy resolution of LaBr{sub 3} leads to the lowest scatter fraction for all scanners and helps compensate for reduced sensitivity compared to the GSO and LSO scanners, leading to the highest NEC values at high activity concentrations. The LSO scanner has the highest sensitivity of all the scanner designs investigated here, therefore leading to the highest peak NEC value but at a lower activity concentration than that of LaBr{sub 3}.

  12. Beam injection into RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  13. An Electromagnetic Beam Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electromagnetic beam converter and a method for conversion of an input beam of electromagnetic radiation having a bell shaped intensity profile a(x,y) into an output beam having a prescribed target intensity profile l(x',y') based on a further development...

  14. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wicher J van der Meer

    Full Text Available Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared.A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona, the iTero (Cadent and the Lava COS (3M. In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation between the cylinders was assessed. These values were compared to the measurements made on a high accuracy 3D scan of the master model.The distance errors were the smallest and most consistent for the Lava COS. The distance errors for the Cerec were the largest and least consistent. All the angulation errors were small.The Lava COS in combination with a high accuracy scanning protocol resulted in the smallest and most consistent errors of all three scanners tested when considering mean distance errors in full arch impressions both in absolute values and in consistency for both measured distances. For the mean angulation errors, the Lava COS had the smallest errors between cylinders 1-2 and the largest errors between cylinders 1-3, although the absolute difference with the smallest mean value (iTero was very small (0,0529°. An expected increase in distance and/or angular errors over the length of the arch due to an accumulation of registration errors of the patched 3D surfaces could be observed in this study design, but the effects were statistically not significant.For making impressions of implant cases for digital workflows, the most accurate scanner with the scanning protocol that will ensure the most accurate digital impression should be used. In our study model that was the Lava COS with the high accuracy scanning protocol.

  15. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  16. A UGV-based laser scanner system for measuring tree geometric characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghui; Lan, Yubin; Zheng, Yongjun; Lee, Kevin; Cui, Suxia; Lian, Jian-ao

    2013-09-01

    This paper introduces a laser scanner based measurement system for measuring crop/tree geometric characteristics. The measurement system, which is mounted on a Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV), contains a SICK LMS511 PRO laser scanner, a GPS, and a computer. The LMS511 PRO scans objects within distance up to 80 meters with a scanning frequency of 25 up to 100Hz and with an angular resolution of 0.1667° up to 1°. With an Ethernet connection, this scanner can output the measured values in real time. The UGV is a WIFI based remotely controlled agricultural robotics system. During field tests, the laser scanner was mounted on the UGV vertically to scan crops or trees. The UGV moved along the row direction with certain average travel speed. The experimental results show that the UGV's travel speed significantly affects the measurement accuracy. A slower speed produces more accurate measuring results. With the developed measurement system, crop/tree canopy height, width, and volume can be accurately measured in a real-time manner. With a higher spatial resolution, the original data set may even provide useful information in predicting crop/tree growth and productivity. In summary, the UGV based measurement system developed in this research can measure the crop/tree geometric characteristics with good accuracy and will work as a step stone for our future UGV based intelligent agriculture system, which will include variable rate spray and crop/tree growth and productivity prediction through analyzing the measured results of the laser scanner system.

  17. [Exposure to static magnetic field and health hazards during the operation of magnetic resonance scanners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof; Politański, Piotr; Zmyślony, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners belong to the most modern imaging diagnostic devices, which involve workers' exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) during the preparation and performance of MRI examinations. This paper presents the data on workers' exposure to SMF in the vicinity of MRI scanners and the analysis of SMF-related biological effects and health hazards to find out whether softening the legislative requirements concerning protection against SMF exposure of workers involved in MRI diagnostics is justified. Measurements in the vicinity of 1.5 T MRI magnets showed that exposure to SMF by various scanners depends on both SMF of magnets and scanners design, as well as on work organization. In a routine examination of one patient the radiographer is exposed to SMF exceeding 0.5 mT for app. 1.5-7 min, and up to 1.3 min to SMF exceeding 70 mT. In examinations of patients who need more attention, the duration of exposure may be significantly longer. The mean values (B mean) of exposure to SMF are 5.6-85 mT (mean 30 +/- 19 mT, N = 16). These data demonstrate that only well designed procedures, proper organization of workplace and awareness of workers how to attend the patients without being exposed to strong SMF allow for meeting the requirements of labor law concerning workers' exposure to SMF. The analysis of the available literature on biological effects of SMF has disclosed the lack of data on health effects of many years exposure of workers and the abundance of data demonstrating the biological activity of SMF. Therefore, a radical softening of legislative requirements concerning the exposure of workers' head or trunk is premature, and what is more, it is not indispensable for the development of MRI diagnostic. Such an action should be preceded by extensive international investigations on the health status of workers exposed to electromagnetic fields by MRI scanners.

  18. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  19. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners : A comprehensive survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; Vocht, Frank De; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there

  20. ScaRaB (Scanner for Radiation Budget). Final report; Das Strahlungsbilanzradiometer ScaRaB (Scanner for Radiation Budget). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J. [VEGA Informations-Technologien GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hollmann, R.; Stuhlmann, R.; Raschke, E. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    2000-07-01

    A new radiometer for radiation budget measurements (scanner for radiation budget, (ScaRaB)) was developed within a German-French-Russian framework. In 1994/1995 the first instrument was launched on the METEOR satellite. The 2{sup nd} instrument was then launched in 1998 on the sunsynchronous Resurs satellite. The report describes the work done at GKSS within the ScaRaB project: calibration and validation. It gives an overview of related international and national research programmes and the future usefulness of the derived products to the scientific community. The work was funded by DLR under the contract number: FKZ 50-EE-9218. (orig.)

  1. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  2. Assessment of protocols in cone beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beam using effective dose and P{sub ka}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, W. O.; Linhares de O, M. V. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho, Salvador, 40301015 Bahia (Brazil); Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria Prof. Jose Aloisio de Campos, Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, 49-100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The cone beam CT is an emerging technology in dental radiology with significant differences the point of view of design technology between the various manufacturers on the world market. This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using TLDs and air kerma - area product (P{sub ka}) as kerma index. Measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain the image the maxilla-mandible in equipment Gendex GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14 cm x 8.5 cm - maxilla / mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5 cm x 8.5 cm - maxillary / mandible). Was used LiF dosimeters (TLD 100) inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom manufactured by Radiology Support Devices. For all protocols evaluated the value of P{sub ka} using a meter Diamentor E2 and PTW system Radcal Rapidose. The results obtained for Effective Dose / P{sub ka} these measurements were separated by protocol image. Protocol [GX1]: 44.5 μSv/478 mGy cm{sup 2}; protocol [GX2]: 54.8 μSv/507 mGy cm{sup 2}. These values indicate that the relationship between the diameter of the image acquired in the protocol [GX1] and the diameter of the image in the protocol [GX2] is equal to 1.65, the Effective Dose for the first protocol has lower value at 18%. P{sub ka} values reveal very similar results between the two protocols, although, common sense leads to the interpretation that imaging protocols with field of view (Fov) of large diameters imply high values of effective dose when compared to small diameters. However, in this particular case, this is not true due to the asymmetrical beam technology. Conclude that for the cases where the scanner uses asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients with respect to the use of symmetrical beam and / or to Fov images with a smaller diameter. (Author)

  3. Do we really need to thank the Beatles for the financing of the development of the computed tomography scanner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Zeev V; Vos, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the revenues from the selling of the Beatles' records by Electric and Musical Industries (EMI) allowed the company to develop the computed tomography (CT) scanner. Some went to define this as the Beatles' gift to medicine. However, significant controversies and discrepancies arise from analysis of this statement, making its correctness doubtful. The details of financing required for the CT development and the part of EMI in financial input have never been publicly announced. This work analyzes the financial contributions to the CT development and investigates if the revenues received from the sales of the Beatles' records were used for the creation of the CT scanner. Timeline of the development of the EMI CT scanner and the financial inputs of EMI and British Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) were assessed. Without salary expenses to Godfrey Hounsfield and his team, the development of the CT scanner cost EMI approximately £100,000. The British DHSS's expenses were £606,000. Hence, the financial contribution of DHSS into the development of the CT scanner was significantly bigger than that of EMI. Accordingly, British tax payers and officials of British DHSS are to be thanked for the CT scanner. The Beatles' input into the world's culture is valuable and does not require decoration by nonexistent connection to the development of CT. A positive aspect to this misconception is that it keeps in public memory the name of the company that developed the CT scanner.

  4. Integrating a MRI scanner with a 6 MV radiotherapy accelerator: dose increase at tissue-air interfaces in a lateral magnetic field due to returning electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2005-04-07

    In the framework of the development of the integration of a MRI-scanner with a linear accelerator, the influence of a lateral, magnetic field on the dose distribution has to be determined. Dose increase is expected at tissue-air boundaries, due to the electron return effect (ERE): electrons entering air will describe a circular path and return into the phantom causing extra dose deposition. Using IMRT with many beam directions, this exit dose will not constitute a problem. Dose levels behind air cavities will decrease because of the absence of electrons crossing the cavity. The ERE has been demonstrated both by simulation and experiment. Monte Carlo simulations are performed with GEANT4, irradiating a water-air-water phantom in a lateral magnetic field. Also an air tube in water has been simulated, resulting in slightly twisted regions of dose increase and decrease. Experimental demonstration is achieved by film measurement in a perspex-air-perspex phantom in an electromagnet. Although the ERE causes dose increase before air cavities, relatively flat dose profiles can be obtained for the investigated cases using opposite beam configurations. More research will be necessary whether this holds for more realistic geometries with the use of IMRT and whether the ERE can be turned to our advantage when treating small tumour sites at air cavities.

  5. A high-field 3He Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping polarizer operating in a 1.5 T medical scanner for lung MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, G; Wojna, A; Głowacz, B; Suchanek, M; Olejniczak, Z; Dohnalik, T

    2013-01-01

    After being hyperpolarized using the technique of Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping (MEOP), 3He can be used as a contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEOP is usually performed at low magnetic field (~ 1 mT) and low pressure (~ 1 mbar), which results in a low magnetization production rate. A delicate polarization-preserving step of compression is also required. It was demonstrated in sealed cells that high nuclear polarization values can be obtained at higher pressures with MEOP, if performed at high magnetic field (non-standard conditions). In this work the feasibility of building a high-field polarizer that operates within a commercial 1.5 T scanner was evaluated. Preliminary measurements of nuclear polarization with sealed cells filled at different 3He gas pressures (1.33 to 267 mbar) were performed. The use of an annular shape for the laser beam increased by 25 % the achievable nuclear polarization equilibrium value (Meq) at 32 and 67 mbar as compared to a Gaussian beam shape. Meq...

  6. Visualizing epithelial expression in vertical and horizontal planes with dual axes confocal endomicroscope using compact distal scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoming; Li, Haijun; Duan, Xiyu; Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Thomas

    2017-02-23

    The epithelium is a thin layer of tissue that lines hollow organs, such as colon. Visualizing in vertical cross-sections with sub-cellular resolution is essential to understanding early disease mechanisms that progress naturally in the plane perpendicular to the tissue surface. The dual axes confocal architecture collects optical sections in tissue by directing light at an angle incident to the surface using separate illumination and collection beams to reduce effects of scattering, enhance dynamic range, and increase imaging depth. This configuration allows for images to be collected in the vertical as well as horizontal plane. We designed a fast, compact monolithic scanner based on the principle of parametric resonance. The mirrors were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and were coated with aluminum to maximize near-infrared reflectivity. We achieved large axial displacements >400 m and wide lateral deflections >20o. The MEMS chip has a 3.2×2.9 mm2 form factor that allows for efficient packaging in the distal end of an endomicroscope. Imaging can be performed in either the vertical or horizontal plane with 430 m depth or 1×1 mm2 area, respectively, at 5 frames per second. We systemically administered a Cy5.5-labeled peptide that is specific for EGFR, and collected near-infrared fluorescence images ex vivo from pre-malignant mouse colonic epithelium to reveal the spatial distribution of this molecular target. Here, we demonstrate a novel scanning mechanism in a dual axes confocal endomicroscope that collects optical sections of near-infrared fluorescence in either vertical or horizontal planes to visualize molecular expression in the epithelium.

  7. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M A; Reader, A J

    2016-05-07

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  8. Range 7 Scanner Integration with PaR Robot Scanning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Jason; Burns, Bradley; Carlson, Jeffrey; Minich, Mark

    2011-01-01

    An interface bracket and coordinate transformation matrices were designed to allow the Range 7 scanner to be mounted on the PaR Robot detector arm for scanning the heat shield or other object placed in the test cell. A process was designed for using Rapid Form XOR to stitch data from multiple scans together to provide an accurate 3D model of the object scanned. An accurate model was required for the design and verification of an existing heat shield. The large physical size and complex shape of the heat shield does not allow for direct measurement of certain features in relation to other features. Any imaging devices capable of imaging the entire heat shield in its entirety suffers a reduced resolution and cannot image sections that are blocked from view. Prior methods involved tools such as commercial measurement arms, taking images with cameras, then performing manual measurements. These prior methods were tedious and could not provide a 3D model of the object being scanned, and were typically limited to a few tens of measurement points at prominent locations. Integration of the scanner with the robot allows for large complex objects to be scanned at high resolution, and for 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) models to be generated for verification of items to the original design, and to generate models of previously undocumented items. The main components are the mounting bracket for the scanner to the robot and the coordinate transformation matrices used for stitching the scanner data into a 3D model. The steps involve mounting the interface bracket to the robot's detector arm, mounting the scanner to the bracket, and then scanning sections of the object and recording the location of the tool tip (in this case the center of the scanner's focal point). A novel feature is the ability to stitch images together by coordinates instead of requiring each scan data set to have overlapping identifiable features. This setup allows models of complex objects to be developed

  9. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M. A.; Reader, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  10. Full in-beam PET measurements of 62 MeV protons onto a PMMA target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sportelli, G., E-mail: giancarlo.sportelli@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Straub, K.; Aiello, M.; Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Ferretti, S. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Marino, N. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Via G. Caruso 16, I-56122 Pisa (Italy); Nicolosi, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, I-00184 Roma Italy (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable technique to monitor in situ and non-invasively the particle range in ion beam therapy exploiting the beta+ activity produced in nuclear interactions along the beam path within the target volume. Due to the high random rates and dead-time losses induced by the particle spills, as of to date data are usually acquired during beam pauses or after the irradiation. We have developed a new PET prototype with a faster photon discrimination component that reduces the front-end dead time, and a modularized acquisition system that parallelizes the sensitive detector area, so as to enable data acquisition also during therapeutic irradiation (full in-beam measurement). The PET system has been able to sustain the single photon count rates and acquire coincidences during the beam, in conditions of sub-clinical beam currents. A study on the paralyzation conditions and dead time losses under different beam currents is presented and the feasibility of a full in-beam PET scanner is discussed.

  11. In-beam PET measurement of $^{7}Li^{3+}$ irradiation induced $\\beta^+}$-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Priegnitz, M; Parodi, K; Sommerer, F; Fiedler, F; Enghardt, W

    2008-01-01

    At present positron emission tomography (PET) is the only feasible method of an in situ and non-invasive monitoring of patient irradiation with ions. At the experimental carbon ion treatment facility of the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt an in-beam PET scanner has been integrated into the treatment site and lead to a considerable quality improvement of the therapy. Since ions other than carbon are expected to come into operation in future patient treatment facilities, it is highly desirable to extend in-beam PET also to other therapeutic relevant ions, e.g. 7Li. Therefore, by means of the in-beam PET scanner at GSI the β+-activity induced by 7Li3+ ions has been investigated for the first time. Targets of PMMA, water, graphite and polyethylene were irradiated with monoenergetic, pencil-like beams of 7Li3+ with energies between 129.1 A MeV and 205.3 A MeV and intensities ranging from 3.0 × 107 to 1.9 × 108 ions s−1. This paper presents the measured β+-activity profiles as well as d...

  12. Miniature design of galvanometer scanner circuit%小型化振镜扫描器电路设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏; 范璐璐

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,first of all,we analyze galvanometer scanner construction, second,we set up the model of galvanometer scanner servo theory,the end,we design the galvanometer scanner servo circuit.%分析了振镜扫描器的基本组成,建立了振镜扫描器伺服系统的理论模型,最后根据上述理论,设计了小型化振镜扫描器伺服驱动电路.

  13. Comparison of rankings for lean meat based on results from a CT scanner and a video image analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, N P; van de Ven, R J; Hopkins, D L

    2014-10-01

    Coopworth cross lambs born over three years were examined in this study. Differences between two machines; a computer tomography (CT) scanner and a VIAScan® system for the estimation of carcase lean weight in lamb carcases was examined. The CT scanner provided a significantly higher estimate of carcase lean. The rank correlation (0.84) between the CT scanner and the VIAScan® system for the prediction of carcase lean was significant, but there was a different ranking for carcase lean depending on which machine was used. This has important ramifications for the use of VIAScan® data in the New Zealand Sheep Improvement Ltd genetic programme.

  14. Feature Based Modeling and Mapping of Tree Trunks and Natural Terrain Using 3D Laser Scanner Measurement System

    OpenAIRE

    Hyyti, Heikki; Visala, Arto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to measure tree trunks and to model the ground using a 3D laser scanner. The 3D scanner, self-build using two 2D Sick scanners on a rotating base, measures each scan line approximately at 45° angle towards the ground and the trees. Single scan lines are segmented to find ground and tree returns. 3D point clouds from the surrounding forest are recorded while the measuring vehicle is moving. Sequential scan lines are joined together as the pose changes are r...

  15. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial “line-laser” scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a “stereophotography” (3dMD) and a “structured light” facial scanner (FaceScan) ...

  16. Perspective Intensity Images for Co-Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Digital Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yubin; Qiu, Yan; Cui, Tiejun

    2016-06-01

    Co-registration of terrestrial laser scanner and digital camera has been an important topic of research, since reconstruction of visually appealing and measurable models of the scanned objects can be achieved by using both point clouds and digital images. This paper presents an approach for co-registration of terrestrial laser scanner and digital camera. A perspective intensity image of the point cloud is firstly generated by using the collinearity equation. Then corner points are extracted from the generated perspective intensity image and the camera image. The fundamental matrix F is then estimated using several interactively selected tie points and used to obtain more matches with RANSAC. The 3D coordinates of all the matched tie points are directly obtained or estimated using the least squares method. The robustness and effectiveness of the presented methodology is demonstrated by the experimental results. Methods presented in this work may also be used for automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning point clouds.

  17. Automatic method for building indoor boundary models from dense point clouds collected by laser scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Enrique; Adán, Antonio; Cerrada, Carlos

    2012-11-22

    In this paper we present a method that automatically yields Boundary Representation Models (B-rep) for indoors after processing dense point clouds collected by laser scanners from key locations through an existing facility. Our objective is particularly focused on providing single models which contain the shape, location and relationship of primitive structural elements of inhabited scenarios such as walls, ceilings and floors. We propose a discretization of the space in order to accurately segment the 3D data and generate complete B-rep models of indoors in which faces, edges and vertices are coherently connected. The approach has been tested in real scenarios with data coming from laser scanners yielding promising results. We have deeply evaluated the results by analyzing how reliably these elements can be detected and how accurately they are modeled.

  18. Design of a 3D surface scanner prototype suitable for MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, M; Romei, M; Reni, G

    2010-01-01

    The detection of body movements during MR examination could help in reducing motion artifacts or to get patient responses during functional magnetic resonance. It can be supported by a slit scanner, that combines a camera with a light stripe projector to obtain 3D coordinates of points forming the external surface of the body. In this work we propose a slit scanner prototype based on a miniaturized projector without moving parts. Just small sized hardware is required to analyze the video signal, operating in time domain instead of spatial domain. To accomplish this, the camera is placed with its pixel columns as more parallel as possible to the projected light stripes and the camera video signal is analyzed by a resistor transistor logic after analog processing.

  19. Suspect Height Estimation Using the Faro Focus(3D) Laser Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Monique; Liscio, Eugene

    2015-11-01

    At present, very little research has been devoted to investigating the ability of laser scanning technology to accurately measure height from surveillance video. The goal of this study was to test the accuracy of one particular laser scanner to estimate suspect height from video footage. The known heights of 10 individuals were measured using an anthropometer. The individuals were then recorded on video walking along a predetermined path in a simulated crime scene environment both with and without headwear. The difference between the known heights and the estimated heights obtained from the laser scanner software were compared using a one-way t-test. The height estimates obtained from the software were not significantly different from the known heights whether individuals were wearing headwear (p = 0.186) or not (p = 0.707). Thus, laser scanning is one technique that could potentially be used by investigators to determine suspect height from video footage.

  20. Using a terrestrial laser scanner to characterize vegetation-induced flow resistance in a controlled channel

    CERN Document Server

    Vinatier, Fabrice; Belaud, Gilles; Combemale, David

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation characteristics providing spatial heterogeneity at the channel reach scale can produce complex flow patterns and the relationship between plant patterns morphology and flow resistance is still an open question (Nepf 2012). Unlike experiments in laboratory, measuring the vegetation characteristics related to flow resistance on open channel in situ is difficult. Thanks to its high resolution and light weight, scanner lasers allow now to collect in situ 3D vegetation characteristics. In this study we used a 1064 nm usual Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) located 5 meters at nadir above a 8 meters long equipped channel in order to both i) characterize the vegetation structure heterogeneity within the channel form a single scan (blockage factor, canopy height) and ii) to measure the 2D water level all over the channel during steady flow within a few seconds scan. This latter measuring system was possible thanks to an additive dispersive product sprinkled at the water surface. Vegetation characteristics an...

  1. Estimation of intra-operative brain shift using a tracked laser range scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Siyi; Miga, Michael I; Thompson, Reid C; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Cao, Aize; Dawant, Benoit M

    2007-01-01

    Intra-operative brain shift limits the usefulness of image-guided neurosurgery systems (IGNS), which are based on pre-operative images. Methods that are being developed to address this problem need intra-operative measurements as input. In this work, we present an intra-operative surface shift measurement technique that relies on a tracked 3D laser range scanner. This scanner acquires both 3D range data and 2D images, which are co-registered. We compare two methods to derive displacements at every point in the field of view. The first one relies on the registration of the 2D images; the second relies on the direct 3D registration of the 3D range data. Our results, based on five data sets, show that the 2D method is preferable.

  2. Rectification of single and multiple frames of satellite scanner imagery using points and edges as control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paderes, F. C., Jr.; Mikhail, E. M.; Foerstner, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rectification of single and overlapping multiple scanner frames produced by such satellite-borne scanners as the LANDSAT MSS was carried out using a newly developed comprehensive parametric model. Tests with both simulated and real image data demonstrate conclusively that this model in general is superior to the widely used polynomial model, and that the simultaneous rectification of overlapping frames using least squares techniques yields a high accuracy than sngle frame rectification due to the inclusion of tie points between the image frames. Used to control, edges or lines, whic are much more likely to be found in images, can replace conventional control points and can easily be implemented into the least squares approach. An efficient algorithm for findng corresponding points in image paris was developed which can be used for determining tie points between image frames and thus increase the ecnomy of the whole rectification procedure.

  3. Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Monitoring the Deformations and the Damages of Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, G.; Mistretta, F.; Stochino, F.; Dessi, A.

    2016-06-01

    scanner provides the ability to detect the geometric 3D model of a building without any physical contact with the structure. Knowledge of the 3D model will give the opportunity to study the deformation and quantify the damages. Three case studies are presented relating to damaged and/or unsafe buildings: Sivillier Castle (Villasor - Sardinia- Italy), the Bell Tower of Mores (Sardinia-Italy) and industrial building (Cagliari - Italy). The first two cases concern buildings of historical and architectural importance that present a state of compromised conservation; the last, an industrial building compromised by fire. In all cases, a laser scanner survey was carried out that not only provided valuable information but also highlighted structural metric deformation and degradation.

  4. Using mid-range laser scanners to digitize cultural-heritage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Adam P; Peters, Caradoc; Minns, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Here, we explore new, more accessible ways of modeling 3D data sets that both professionals and amateurs can employ in areas such as architecture, forensics, geotechnics, cultural heritage, and even hobbyist modeling. To support our arguments, we present images from a recent case study in digital preservation of cultural heritage using a mid-range laser scanner. Our appreciation of the increasing variety of methods for capturing 3D spatial data inspired our research. Available methods include photogrammetry, airborne lidar, sonar, total stations (a combined electronic and optical survey instrument), and midand close-range scanning.1 They all can produce point clouds of varying density. In our case study, the point cloud produced by a mid-range scanner demonstrates how open source software can make modeling and disseminating data easier. Normally, researchers would model this data using expensive specialized software, and the data wouldn't extend beyond the laser-scanning community.

  5. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  6. KEKB beam instrumentation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinaga, M.; Flanagan, J.; Hiramatsu, S.; Ieiri, T.; Ikeda, H.; Ishii, H.; Kikutani, E.; Mimashi, T.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Mizuno, H.; Mori, K.; Tejima, M.; Tobiyama, M.

    2003-02-01

    For the stable high-luminosity operation and luminosity increase, the electron and positron storage rings of the KEK B-Factory (KEKB) is equipped with various beam instrumentations, which have been working well since the start of the commissioning in December, 1998. Details and performance of the beam-position monitor system based on the spectrum analysis using DSPs, the turn-by-turn BPM with four-dimensional function available for measurements of the individual bunch position, phase and intensity, the parametric beam-DCCTs designed so as to avoid the magnetic-core-selection problems for the parametric flux modulation, the bunch-by-bunch feedback system indispensable to suppress the strong multibunch instabilities in KEKB, the various optical beam diagnostic systems, such as synchrotron radiation interferometers for precise beam-size measurement, the tune meters, the bunch length monitors and the beam-loss monitors are described. Delicate machine tuning of KEKB is strongly supported by these instrumentations.

  7. Hyperon beam physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, P.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report reviews the present status and recent results in hyperon physics concentrating on results from high energy hyperon beam experiments performed at Fermilab over the past several years. The report focuses on hyperon production polarization, precision hyperon magnetic moment measurements and radiative decay studies. Modern charged hyperon beam experiments are characterized by {approx}100m long apparatus and hyperon beams with {gamma}{sub Y}{approx}100 and hyperon fluxes in the 1-100 kHz range.

  8. Chilled beam application guidebook

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, David; Gräslund, Jonas; Hogeling, Jaap; Lund Kristiansen, Erik; Reinikanen, Mika; Svensson, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Chilled beam systems are primarily used for cooling and ventilation in spaces, which appreciate good indoor environmental quality and individual space control. Active chilled beams are connected to the ventilation ductwork, high temperature cold water, and when desired, low temperature hot water system. Primary air supply induces room air to be recirculated through the heat exchanger of the chilled beam. In order to cool or heat the room either cold or warm water is cycled through the heat exchanger.

  9. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... the mechanical behavior of the beam is explained. Finally, some design criterions for reinforced glass beams are discussed....

  10. LA CARTOGRAFIA NELLA VALORIZZAZIONE DEI BENI NATURALI E CULTURALI: LE APPLICAZIONI LASER SCANNER 3D

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    La presente proposta è relativa all’utilizzo dei rilievi Laser Scanner 3D per la valorizzazione dei beni culturali e naturali. Alla base di ogni intervento volto alla valorizzazione dei beni culturali e naturali è fondamentale che ci sia un percorso di conoscenza che non sia solo storico-artistico come accade spesso, ma anche attraverso la conoscenza accurata delle sue caratteristiche (posizione, forma, geometria, materia e colore), dettagli fondamentali per tutelare e valorizz...

  11. A modified commercial scanner as an image plate for table-top optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado-Rojo, S; Lorenzana, H E; Baonza, V G

    2008-12-09

    A reliable, accurate, and inexpensive optical detector for table-top applications is described here. Based on a commercial high resolution office scanner coupled to a projection on plate, it enables a large image plate surface, allowing recording of large images without systematic errors associated to coupling optics' aberrations. Several tests on distance-dependent and steady interference patterns will be presented and discussed. The extension to other types of optical measurement by substituting the projection on plate is proposed.

  12. Mobile network architecture of the long-range WindScanner system

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Hansen, Per; Jensen, Henrik M

    2016-01-01

    In this report we have presented the network architecture of the long-range WindScanner system that allows utilization of mobile network connections without the use of static public IP addresses. The architecture mitigates the issues of additional fees and contractual obligations that are linked to the acquisition of the mobile network connections with static public IP addresses. The architecture consists of a hardware VPN solution based on the network appliances Z1 and MX60 from Cisco Meraki...

  13. Occupational exposure measurements of static and pulsed gradient magnetic fields in the vicinity of MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kännälä, Sami; Toivo, Tim; Alanko, Tommi; Jokela, Kari

    2009-04-07

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have increased occupational exposure to magnetic fields. In this study, we examined the assessment of occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields and time-varying magnetic fields generated by motion in non-homogeneous static magnetic fields of MRI scanners. These magnetic field components can be measured simultaneously with an induction coil setup that detects the time rate of change of magnetic flux density (dB/dt). The setup developed was used to measure the field components around two MRI units (1 T open and 3 T conventional). The measured values can be compared with dB/dt reference levels derived from magnetic flux density reference levels given by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The measured motion-induced dB/dt values were above the dB/dt reference levels for both MRI units. The measured values for the gradient fields (echo planar imaging (EPI) and fast field echo (FFE) sequences) also exceeded the dB/dt reference levels in positions where the medical staff may have access during interventional procedures. The highest motion-induced dB/dt values were 0.7 T s(-1) for the 1 T scanner and 3 T s(-1) for the 3 T scanner when only the static field was present. Even higher values (6.5 T s(-1)) were measured for simultaneous exposure to motion-induced and gradient fields in the vicinity of the 3 T scanner.

  14. Feasibility of Nanoparticle-Guided Radiation Therapy (NGRT) Using a Conventional CT Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    created and used as the input geometry for dose calculations within the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended ( MCNPX ) program. MCNPX is a generalized...conventional CT scanners (SOW 1b).11,12 The energy spectra were input into MCNPX for radiation energy deposition calculations (SOW 1c-d). An example of...the program developed to perform the dose calculations is shown within the appendix. Because the programming language used within MCNPX is Fortran

  15. Calorimetric calibration of head coil SAR estimates displayed on a clinical MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Bernstein, Matt A; Felmlee, Joel P; Ward, Heidi A; McGee, Kiaran P; Lanners, Diana M [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Lee, Kendall H [Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 5505 (United States)

    2008-05-21

    Calorimetric measurements were performed to determine the average specific absorption rates (SAR) resulting from MRI head examinations. The data were compared with average head coil SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner in order to refine the imaging protocols used in imaging patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBS). The experiments were performed using transmit-receive (TR) head coil on clinical 1.5 T General Electric MR scanners running 11.0 M4 revision software. The average applied SAR was derived from temperature increases measured inside a head phantom, due to deposition of RF energy during MRI scanning with a spin echo imaging sequence. The measurements were repeated for varied levels of RF transmit gain (TG) and analyzed with a range of entered patient weights. The measurements demonstrate that the ratio of the actual average head SAR to the scanner-displayed value (coil correction factor) decreases for decreasing TG or for increasing patient weight and may vary between 0.3 and 2.1. An additional retrospective patient study, however, shows that not all combinations of TG and patient weight are encountered clinically and, instead, TG generally increases with the patient weight. As a result, a much narrower range of coil correction factors (e.g., typically 0.5-1.0) will be encountered in practice. The calorimetric method described in this work could aid the physicians and technologists in refinement of the model-dependent SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner, and in selection of imaging parameters for MR head examinations within allowable SAR safety levels.

  16. Calculation of the Scattered Radiation Profile in 64 Slice CT Scanners Using Experimental Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Akbarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important parameters in x-ray CT imaging is the noise induced by detected scattered radiation. The detected scattered radiation is completely dependent on the scanner geometry as well as size, shape and material of the scanned object. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the scattered radiation in x-ray CT should be quantified for development of robust scatter correction techniques. Empirical methods based on blocking the primary photons in a small region are not able to extract scatter in all elements of the detector array while the scatter profile is required for a scatter correction procedure. In this study, we measured scatter profiles in 64 slice CT scanners using a new experimental measurement. Material and Methods: To measure the scatter profile, a lead block array was inserted under the collimator and the phantom was exposed at the isocenter. The raw data file, which contained detector array readouts, was transferred to a PC and was read using a dedicated GUI running under MatLab 7.5. The scatter profile was extracted by interpolating the shadowed area. Results: The scatter and SPR profiles were measured. Increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp resulted in an 80% fall off in SPR for a water phantom (d=210 mm and 86% for a polypropylene phantom (d = 350 mm. Increasing the air gap to 20.9 cm caused a 30% decrease in SPR. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a novel approach for measurement of scattered radiation distribution and SPR in a CT scanner with 64-slice capability using a lead block array. The method can also be used on other multi-slice CT scanners. The proposed technique can accurately estimate scatter profiles. It is relatively straightforward, easy to use, and can be used for any related measurement.

  17. Performance Characteristics of BGO Detectors for a Low Cost Preclinical PET Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PETbox is a low-cost benchtop PET scanner dedicated to high throughput preclinical imaging that is currently under development at our institute. This paper presents the design and characterization of the detectors that are used in the PETbox system. In this work, bismuth germanate scintillator was used for the detector, taking advantage of its high stopping power, high photoelectric event fraction, lack of intrinsic background radiation and low cost. The detector block was segmented into a pi...

  18. Adaptive on-line classification of multi-spectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, F. R.; Northouse, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A possible solution to the analysis of the massive amounts of multi-spectral scanner data from the Earth Resource Technical Satellite (ERTS) program is proposed. This solution is offered as an adaptive on-line classification scheme. The classifier is described as well as its controller which is based on ground truth data. Cluster analysis is presented as an alternative approach to the ground truth data. Adaptive feature selection is discussed and possible mini-computer implementations are offered.

  19. Performance evaluation of the microPET R4 PET scanner for rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoess, Christof; Richerzhagen, Norbert; Graf, Rudolf; Wienhard, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Siegel, Stefan; Smith, Anne; Newport, Danny; Goble, Rhonda N. [Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Winkeler, Alexandra [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Jacobs, Andreas; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Department of Neurology at the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The microPET R4 scanner is a dedicated positron emission tomograph (PET) for studies of rodents. A number of scanner parameters such as spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter, and count rate performance were determined in this work, which showed that the microPET R4 is a suitable PET scanner for small animals like mice and rats. In the center of the field of view (FOV) a maximal sensitivity of 43.66 cps/kBq for a centered point source was calculated from a measurement with a germanium-68 line source within an energy widow of 250-750 keV. A spatial resolution of 1.85 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) in the axial direction and 1.66 mm FWHM in the transaxial direction was measured in the center with a 1-mm-diameter sodium-22 point source. Within the inner 20 mm of the FOV the volumetric resolution is better than 15.6 {mu}l, corresponding to a linear resolution of less than 2.5 mm in all three dimensions. Images of a high-resolution phantom and from mice and rat studies illustrate the good performance of the scanner. A maximal noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was reached at 174 kcps for a mouse phantom and at 93 kcps for a rat phantom (energy window 250-750 keV). Scatter fractions were measured between 0.30 and 0.42 for an energy window of 250-750 keV and phantom diameters similar to mice and rats. A comparison with the microPET P4 model for primates illustrates the gain in sensitivity due to a smaller detector ring diameter but also the changes in NECR. (orig.)

  20. Resolving Two Beams in Beam Splitters with a Beam Position Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2002-04-01

    The beam transport system for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) anticipates multiple beam splitters. Monitoring two transversely separated beams in a common beam pipe in the splitter sections imposes certain requirements on beam diagnostics for these sections. We explore a two-beam system in a generic beam monitor and study the feasibility of resolving the transverse positions of the two beams with one diagnostics device. Effects of unequal beam currents and of finite transverse sizes of the beams are explored analytically for both the ultra relativistic case and the long-wavelength limit.