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Sample records for beam reactor hfbr

  1. HFBR handbook, 1992: High flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axe, J.D.; Greenberg, R.

    1992-10-01

    Welcome to the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), one of the world premier neutron research facilities. This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users (and new Brookhaven staff members) with (almost) everything they need to know to work at the HFBR and to help make the stay at Brookhaven pleasant as well as profitable. Safety Training Programs to comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates are in progress at BNL. There are several safety training requirements which must be met before users can obtain unescorted access to the HFBR. The Reactor Division has prepared specific safety training manuals which are to be sent to experimenters well in advance of their expected arrival at BNL to conduct experiments. Please familiarize yourself with this material and carefully pay strict attention to all the safety and security procedures that are in force at the HFBR. Not only your safety, but the continued operation of the facility, depends upon compliance

  2. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.; Milian, L.W.

    1989-08-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (K I ) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with K max values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  3. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm 3 in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept. (author)

  4. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor

  5. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. RELAP5/MOD2.5 analysis of the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] for a loss of power and coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  7. HFBR handbook. Revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.; Rorer, D.C.; Kuper, H.

    1983-08-01

    This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users and new Brookhaven staff members with the research facilities available at the HFBR. In addition to describing the beam lines and major instruments, general information is also provided on the reactor and on services available at the Laboratory

  8. Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed

  9. Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Reciniello, R. N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Holden, N. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-05-27

    The High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on October 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 mega-watts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 mega-watts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 mega-watts. The HFBR was shutdown in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of ground water from wells located adjacent to the reactor’s spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shutdown for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Department of Energy decided to permanently shutdown the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Details of the HFBR cleanup conducted during 1999-2009 will be described in the paper.

  10. A SUPER-CONDUCTING LINAC DRIVER FOR THE HFBR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, J.; Raparia, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    2000-08-21

    This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac (SCL) as a driver for the High-Flux Breeder Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac operates in Continuous Wave (CW) mode to produce an average 10 MW of beam power. The Linac beam energy is 1.0 GeV. The average proton beam intensity in exit is 10 mA.

  11. Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jih-Perng; Reciniello, Richard N; Holden, Norman E

    2012-08-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy-water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on 31 October 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 mega-watts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 mega-watts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 mega-watts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of ground water from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost 3 y for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999, the United States Department of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Details of the HFBR's cleanup performed during 1999-2009, to allow the BNL facilities to be re-accessed by the public, will be described in the paper.

  12. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is a pressurized heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor that began operation at 40 MW. The reactor was subsequently upgraded to 60 MW and operated at that level for several years. The reactor undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Questions which were raised about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal transition led to a reactor shutdown and subsequent resumption of operation at a reduced power of 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these questions is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW. Direct use of the experimental results and an understanding of the governing phenomenology supports this conclusion

  13. Radiation dosimetry at the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.

    1998-02-01

    The HFBR is a heavy water, D 2 O, cooled and moderated reactor with twenty-eight fuel elements containing a maximum of 9.8 kilograms of 235 U. The core is 53 cm high and 48 cm in diameter and has an active volume of 97 liters. The HFBR, which was designed to operate at forty mega-watts, 40 NW, was upgraded to operate at 60 NW. Since 1991, it has operated at 30 MW. In a normal 30 MW operating cycle the HFBR operates 24 hours a day for thirty days, with a six to fourteen day shutdown period for refueling and maintenance work. While most reactors attempts to minimize the escape of neutrons from the core, the HFBR's D 2 O design allows the thermal neutron flux to peak in the reflector region and maximizes the number of thermal neutrons available to nine horizontal external beams, H-1 to H-9. The HFBR neutron dosimetry effort described here compares measured and calculated energy dependent neutron and gamma ray flux densities and/or dose rates at horizontal beam lines and vertical irradiation thimbles

  14. HFBR: Review of the technical specifications against the FSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Boss, S.B.; Claiborne, E.R.; Darby, J.L.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to determine the adequacy of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Technical Specifications for 40 MW operation by comparison with the HFBR Final Safety Analysis Report, particularly the accident analyses chapter. Specifically, the Technical Specifications were compared against the Design Basis Accident (DBA) Analyses presented in the Addendum to the HFBR FSAR for 60 MW Operation. The 60 MW DBA analyses was used since it is more current and complete than the analyses presented in the original FSAR which is considered obsolete. A listing of the required systems and equipment was made for each of the accidents analyzed. Additionally, the Technical Specification instrument setpoints were compared to the DBA analyses parametric values. Also included in this review was a comparison of the Technical Specification Bases against the FSAR and the identification of any differences. The HFBR Operations Procedures Manual (OPM) was also reviewed for any inconsistencies between the FSAR or the Technical Specifications. Upon completion of this review it was determined that the Technical Specifications are well written and the items commented on should not delay the low power restart (40 MW). Additionally, the OPM is also well written and does not require further modification before restart

  15. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  16. Risk analysis of environmental hazards at the High Flux Beam Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Ho, V.S.; Johnson, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    In the late 1980s, a Level 1 internal event probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was performed for the High-Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), a US Department of Energy research reactor located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Prior to the completion of that study, a level 1 PRA for external events was initiated, including environmental hazards such as fire, internal flooding, etc. Although this paper provides a brief summary of the risks from environmental hazards, emphasis will be placed on the methodology employed in utilizing industrial event databases for event frequency determination for the HFBR complex. Since the equipment in the HFBR is different from that of, say, a commercial nuclear power plant, the current approach is to categorize the industrial events according to the hazard initiators instead of categorizing by initiator location. But first a general overview of the analysis

  17. Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Passell, L.; Rorer, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world's premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR's value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory's scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor's research capabilities

  18. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want 'more'. In the mid-50's the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments

  19. Fractography evaluation of impact and tensile specimens from the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1989-10-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed a fractographic examination of neutron irradiated and unirradiated tensile and Charpy ''V'' notch specimens. The evaluation was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate the fracture mode. Photomicrographs were then evaluated to determine the extent of ductility present on the fracture surfaces of the unirradiated specimens. Ductility area measurements ranged from 4.6--9.5% on typical photomicrographs examined. 12 figs

  20. Seismic hazard studies for the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Heymsfield, E.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a calculation to determine the site specific seismic hazard appropriate for the deep soil site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which is to be used in the risk assessment studies being conducted for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). The calculations use as input the seismic hazard defined for the bedrock outcrop by a study conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Variability in site soil properties were included in the calculations to obtain the seismic hazard at the ground surface and compare these results with those using the generic amplification factors from the LLNL study

  1. Effects of high thermal and high fast fluences on the mechanical properties of type 6061 aluminum in the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Tichler, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is an epithermal, externally moderated (by D 2 O) facility designed to produce neutron beams for research. Type 6061 T-6 aluminum was used for the beam tubes, pressure vessel, fuel cladding, and most other components in the high flux area. The HFBR has operated since 1965. The epithermal, external moderation of the HFBR means that materials irradiated in different areas of the facility receive widely different flux spectra. Thus, specimens from a control rod drive follower tube (CRDF) have received 1.5 /times/ 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 3.2 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal fluence, while those from a vertical thimble flow shroud received 1.9 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.0 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal. These numbers correspond to fast to thermal fluence ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.9. Irradiations are occurring at approximately 333/degree/K. The data indicate that the increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility result primarily from the thermal fluence, i.e., the transmutation of aluminum to silicon. These effects appear to be saturating at fluences above approximately 1.8 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal at values of 90,000 psi (6700 Kg/mm 2 ) and 9%, respectively. The specimens receiving the highest fluence ratios appear to have less increase in tensile strength and less decrease in ductility than specimens with a lower fast to thermal fluence ratio and the same thermal fluence, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the high energy neutrons in preventing formation of silicon crystallites. 7 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Seismic upgrading of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years the High Flux Beam Research (HFBR) reactor facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was upgraded from 40 to 50 MW power level. The reactor plant was built in the early sixties to the seismic design requirements of the period, using the static load approach. While the plant power level was upgraded, the seismic design was also improved according to current design criteria. This included the development of new floor response spectra for the facility and an overall seismic analysis of those systems important to the safe shutdown of the reactor. Items included in the reanalysis are the containment building with its internal structure, the piping systems, tanks, equipment, and heat exchangers. This paper describes the procedure utilized in developing the floor response spectra for the existing facility. Also included in the paper are the findings and recommendations, based on the seismic analysis, regarding the seismic adequacy of structural and mechanical systems vital to achieving the safe shutdown of the reactor. 11 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  3. Transport of spent nuclear fuel from the High Flux Beam Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, Michael; Carelli, Joseph; Shelton, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    The shipment of more than 1000 elements of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) to the Department's Savannah River Site (SRS) for long term interim storage required overcoming several significant obstacles. The project management team was comprised of DOE, BNL and NAC International personnel. This achievement involved coordinating the efforts of numerous government and contractor organizations such as the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and local governments, marine and motor carriers, and carrier inspectors. Unique experience was gained during development and execution of the project in the following areas: dry transfer of SNF to shipping casks; inter-modal transfers; logistics; cask licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); compliance with environmental regulations; transportation plan development, and stakeholder outreach and coordination

  4. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve de Mevergnies, M.

    1977-01-01

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  5. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.; Benford, J.; Cooper, R.; Dakin, D.; Ecker, B.; Lopez, O.; Putman, S.; Young, T.S.T.

    1977-01-01

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  6. Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Darby, J.L.; Ross, S.B.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske's CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation

  7. A recycling molecular beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prada-Silva, G.; Haller, G.L.; Fenn, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    In a Recycling Molecular Beam Reactor, RMBR, a beam of reactant gas molecules is formed from a supersonic free jet. After collision with a target the molecules pass through the vacuum pumps and are returned to the nozzle source. Continuous recycling permits the integration of very small reaction probabilities into measurable conversions which can be analyzed by gas chromatography. Some preliminary experiments have been carried out on the isomerization of cyclopropane

  8. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Schenter, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted

  9. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schenter, R.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  10. MAPLE research reactor beam-tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Lidstone, R.F.; Gillespie, G.E.

    1989-05-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has been developing the MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental) reactor concept as a medium-flux neutron source to meet contemporary research reactor applications. This paper gives a brief description of the MAPLE reactor and presents some results of computer simulations used to analyze the neutronic performance. The computer simulations were performed to identify how the MAPLE reactor may be adapted to beam-tube applications such as neutron radiography

  11. Reactor Operations informal monthly report December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Reactor operations at the MRR and HFBR reactors at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented for December 1994. Reactor run-time and power levels, instrumentation, mechanical maintenance, occurrence reports, and safety information are included

  12. E-beam heated linear solenoid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Bailey, V.; Oliver, D.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and system analysis shows that electron beam heated linear solenoidal reactors are attractive for near term applications which can use low gain fusion sources. Complete plant designs have been generated for fusion based breeders of fissile fuel over a wide range of component parameters (e.g., magnetic fields, reactor lengths, plasma densities) and design options (e.g., various radial and axial loss mechanisms). It appears possible that a reactor of 100 to 300 meters length operating at power levels of 1000 MWt can economically produce 2000 to 8000 kg/yr of 233 U to supply light water reactor fuel needs beyond 2000 A.D. Pure fusion reactors of 300 to 500 meter lengths are possible. Physics and operational features of reactors are described. Beam heating by classical and anomalous energy deposition is reviewed. The technology of the required beams has been developed to MJ/pulse levels, within a factor of 20 of that needed for full scale production reactors. The required repetitive pulsing appears practical

  13. Seismic fragility analysis of structural components for HFBR facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a summary of recently completed seismic fragility analyses of the HFBR facilities. Based on a detailed review of past PRA studies, various refinements were made regarding the strength and ductility evaluation of structural components. Available laboratory test data were analysed to evaluate the formulations used to predict the ultimate strength and deformation capacities of steel, reinforced concrete and masonry structures. The biasness and uncertainties were evaluated within the framework of the fragility evaluation methods widely accepted in the nuclear industry. A few examples of fragility calculations are also included to illustrate the use of the presented formulations

  14. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2 1/2 2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity

  15. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 5 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the concrete duct from Trench 5 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 5 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, and 4, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch pipe from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 5. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that resolved each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised HFBR Underground Utilities FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification

  16. Reactor - and accelerator-based filtered beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.; Harvey, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The neutrons produced in high flux nuclear reactors and in accelerator, induced fission and spallation reactions, represent the most intense sources of neutrons available for research. However, the neutrons from these sources are not monoenergetic, covering the broad range extending from 10 -3 eV up to 10 7 eV or so. In order to make quantitative measurements of the effects of neutrons and their dependence on neutron energy it is desirable to have mono-energetic neutron sources. The paper describes briefly methods of obtaining mono-energetic neutrons and different methods of filtration. This is followed by more detailed discussion of neutron window filters and a summary of the filtered beam facilities using this technique. The review concludes with a discussion of the main applications of filtered beams and their present and future importance

  17. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  18. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 D/F WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 2; the D/F Waste Line removal at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed the final status survey (FSS) of the D/F Waste Line that provided the conduit for pumping waste from Building 750 to Building 801. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goals of 15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years have been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to final status survey (FSS), were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decomissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task at the HFBR. ORISE together with DOE determined that a Type A verification of the D/F Waste Line was appropriate based on its method of construction and upon the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages in the process to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 2 of this project included the grouting and removal of 1100 feet of 2-inch pipe and 640 feet of 4-inch pipe that served as the D/F Waste Line. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that addressed each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised Phase 2 D/F Waste Line removal FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification and determine whether the intent odf

  19. Assessment of beam tube performance for the maple research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.

    1986-06-01

    The MAPLE research reactor is a versatile new research facility that can be adapted to meet the requirements of a variety of reactor applications. A particular group of reactor applications involves the use of beams of radiation extracted from the reactor core via tubes that penetrate through the biological shield and terminate in the reflector surrounding the fuelled core. An assessment is given of the neutron and gamma radiation fields entering beam tubes that are located radially or tangentially with respect to the core

  20. Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) Neutron Beam Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratanatongchai, Wichian

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Neutron beam tube of neutron radiography facility at Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (public organization) is a divergent beam. The rectangular open-end of the beam tube is 16 cm x 17 cm while the inner-end is closed to the reactor core. The neutron beam size was measured using 20 cm x 40 cm neutron imaging plate. The measurement at the position 100 cm from the end of the collimator has shown that the beam size was 18.2 cm x 19.0 cm. Gamma ray in neutron the beam was also measured by the identical position using industrial X ray film. The area of gamma ray was 27.8 cm x 31.1 cm with the highest intensity found to be along the neutron beam circumference

  1. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  2. Neutral-beam systems for magnetic-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Neutral beams for magnetic fusion reactors are at an early stage of development, and require considerable effort to make them into the large, reliable, and efficient systems needed for future power plants. To optimize their performance to establish specific goals for component development, systematic analysis of the beamlines is essential. Three ion source characteristics are discussed: arc-cathode life, gas efficiency, and beam divergence, and their significance in a high-energy neutral-beam system is evaluated

  3. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert; Hunter, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec and a liquid D 2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  4. Focused proton beams propagating in reactor of fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, K [Teikyo Heisei Univ., Uruido, Ichihara, Chiba (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    One of the difficult tasks of light ion beam fusion is to propagate the beam in the reactor cavity and to focus the beam on the target. The light ion beam has a certain local divergence angle because there are several causes for divergence at the diode. The electrostatic force induced at the leading edge causes beam divergence during propagation. To confine the beam within a small radius during propagation, the magnetic field must be employed. Here the electron beam is proposed to be launched simultaneously with the launching of the proton beam. If the electron beam has the excess current, the beam induces a magnetic field in the negative azimuthal direction, which confines the ion beam within a small radius by the electrostatic field as well as the electron beam by the Lorentz force. The metal guide around the beam path helps the beam confinement and reduces the total amount of magnetic field energy induced by the electron current. (author). 2 figs., 15 refs.

  5. Neutron beam facilities at the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    2003-01-01

    The exciting development for Australia is the construction of a modern state-of-the-art 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor which is currently under construction to replace the aging reactor (HIFAR) at ANSTO in 2006. To cater for advanced scientific applications, the replacement reactor will provide not only thermal neutron beams but also a modern cold-neutron source moderated by liquid deuterium at approximately -250 deg C, complete with provision for installation of a hot-neutron source at a later stage. The latest 'supermirror' guides will be used to transport the neutrons to the Reactor Hall and its adjoining Neutron Guide Hall where a suite of neutron beam instruments will be installed. These new facilities will expand and enhance ANSTO's capabilities and performance in neutron beam science compared with what is possible with the existing HIFAR facilities, and will make ANSTO/Australia competitive with the best neutron facilities in the world. Eight 'leading-edge' neutron beam instruments are planned for the Replacement Research Reactor when it goes critical in 2006, followed by more instruments by 2010 and beyond. Up to 18 neutron beam instruments can be accommodated at the Replacement Research Reactor, however, it has the capacity for further expansion, including potential for a second Neutron Guide Hall. The first batch of eight instruments has been carefully selected in conjunction with a user group representing various scientific interests in Australia. A team of scientists, engineers, drafting officers and technicians has been assembled to carry out the Neutron Beam Instrument Project to successful completion. Today, most of the planned instruments have conceptual designs and are now being engineered in detail prior to construction and procurement. A suite of ancillary equipment will also be provided to enable scientific experiments at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields. This paper describes the Neutron Beam Instrument Project and gives

  6. Materials research with neutron beams from a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, J.; Banks, D. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Because of the unique ways that neutrons interact with matter, neutron beams from a research reactor can reveal knowledge about materials that cannot be obtained as easily with other scientific methods. Neutron beams are suitable for imaging methods (radiography or tomography), for scattering methods (diffraction, spectroscopy, and reflectometry) and for other possibilities. Neutron-beam methods are applied by students and researchers from academia, industry and government to support their materials research programs in several disciplines: physics, chemistry, materials science and life science. The arising knowledge about materials has been applied to advance technologies that appear in everyday life: transportation, communication, energy, environment and health. This paper illustrates the broad spectrum of materials research with neutron beams, by presenting examples from the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the NRU research reactor in Chalk River. (author)

  7. The neutron beam facility at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Australian federal government gave ANSTO final approval to build a research reactor to replace HIFAR on August 25th 1999. The replacement reactor is to be a multipurpose reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and having improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The replacement reactor will commence operation in 2005 and will cater for Australian scientific, industrial and medical needs well into the 21st century. The scientific capabilities of the neutron beams at the replacement reactor are being developed in consultation with representatives from academia, industry and government research laboratories to provide a facility for condensed matter research in physics, chemistry, materials science, life sciences, engineering and earth sciences. Cold, thermal and hot neutron sources are to be installed, and neutron guides will be used to position most of the neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. Eight instruments are planned for 2005, with a further three to be developed by 2010. A conceptual layout for the neutron beam facility is presented including the location of the planned suite of neutron beam instruments. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by an accredited reactor builder in a turnkey contract. Tenders have been called for December 1999, with selection of contractor planned by June 2000. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations in consultation with the user community and interested overseas scientists. The facility will be based, as far as possible, around a neutron guide hall that is be served by three thermal and three cold neutron guides. Efficient transportation of thermal and cold neutrons to the guide hall requires the use of modern super

  8. Utilizations of filtered neutron beams at Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.; Chau, L.N.; Tan, V.H.; Hiep, N.T.; Phuong, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron beam utilizations in basic and applied researches have been important activities at the Dalat nuclear reactor. The neutron filters with single crystal of silicon are used to produce thermal neutrons at the tangential horizontal channel and quasi-monoenergetic 144 KeV and 54 KeV neutrons at the piercing beam tube. The paper presents some relevant characteristics of the filtered neutron beams at the two horizontal channels. Applications of neutron beams in prompt gamma-ray activation analysis and in nuclear data measurements are briefly described. (author)

  9. Intermediate-energy neutron beams from reactors for NCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Less, T.J.; Passmore, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses ways that a beam of intermediate-energy neutrons might be extracted from a nuclear reactor. The challenge is to suppress the fast-neutron component and the gamma-ray component of the flux while leaving enough of the intermediate-energy neutrons in the beam to be able to perform neutron capture therapy in less than an hour exposure time. Moderators, filters, and reflectors are considered. 11 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  10. Neutron beam facilities at the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: On September 3rd 1997 the Australian Federal Government announced their decision to replace the HIFAR research reactor by 2005. The proposed reactor will be a multipurpose reactor with improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The neutron beam facilities are intended to cater for Australian scientific needs well into the 21st century. In the first stage of planning the neutron Beam Facilities at the replacement reactor, a Consultative Group was formed (BFCG) to determine the scientific capabilities of the new facility. Members of the group were drawn from academia, industry and government research laboratories. The BFCG submitted their report in April 1998, outlining the scientific priorities to be addressed. Cold and hot neutron sources are to be included, and cold and thermal neutron guides will be used to position most of the instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. In 2005 it is planned to have eight instruments installed with a further three to be developed by 2010, and seven spare instrument positions for development of new instruments over the life of the reactor. A beam facilities technical group (BFTG) was then formed to prepare the engineering specifications for the tendering process. The group consisted of some members of the BFCG, several scientists and engineers from ANSTO, and scientists from leading neutron scattering centres in Europe, USA and Japan. The BFTG looked in detail at the key components of the facility such as the thermal, cold and hot neutron sources, neutron collimators, neutron beam guides and overall requirements for the neutron guide hall. The report of the BFTG, completed in August 1998, was incorporated into the draft specifications for the reactor project, which were distributed to potential reactor vendors. An assessment of the first stage of reactor vendor submissions was completed in

  11. The advanced MAPLE reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstone, R.F.; Lee, A.G.; Gillespie, G.E.; Smith, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    In Canada the need for advanced neutron sources has long been recognized. During the past several years Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has been developing the new MAPLE multipurpose reactor concept. To date, the MAPLE program has focused on the development of a modest-cost multipurpose medium-flux neutron source to meet contemporary requirements for applied and basic research using neutron beams, for small-scale materials testing and analysis and for radioisotope production. The basic MAPLE concept incorporates a compact light-water cooled and moderated core within a heavy water primary reflector to generate strong neutron flux levels in a variety of irradiation facilities. In view of renewed Canadian interest in a high-flux neutron source, the MAPLE group has begun to explore advanced concepts based on AECL's experience with heavy water reactors. The overall objective is to define a high-flux facility that will support materials testing for advanced power reactors, new developments in extracted neutron-beam applications, and/or production of radioisotopes. The design target is to attain performance levels of HFR-Grenoble, HFBR, HFIR in a new heavy water-cooled, -moderated,-reflected reactor based on rodded LEU fuel. Physics, shielding, and thermohydraulic studies have been performed for the MAPLE heavy water reactor. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Beam heating requirements for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoncini, P.J.; Brooks, J.N.; Fasolo, J.A.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Typical beam heating requirements for effective tokamak experimental power reactor (TEPR) operation have been studied in connection with the Argonne preliminary conceptual TEPR design. For an ignition level plasma (approximately 100 MWt fusion power) for the nominal case envisioned, the neutral beam is only used to heat the plasma to ignition. This typically requires a beam power output of 40 MW at 180 keV for about 3 sec with a total energy of 114 MJ supplied to the plasma. The beam requirements for an ignition device are not very sensitive to changes in wall-sputtered impurity levels or plasma resistivity. For a plasma that must be driven due to poor confinement, the beam must remain on for most of the burn cycle. For representative cases, beam powers of approximately 23 MW are required for a total on-time of 20 to 50 sec. Reqirements on power level, beam energy, on-time, and beam-generation efficiency all represent considerable advances over present technology. For the Argonne TEPR design, a total of 16 to 32 beam injectors is envisioned. For a 40-MW, 180-keV, one-component beam, each injector supplies about 7 to 14 A of neutrals to the plasma. For positive ion sources, about 50 to 100 A of ions are required per injector and some form of particle and/or energy recycling appears to be essential in order to meet the power and efficiency requirements

  13. Achievement and development of neutron beam utilization in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, Masahiko

    1996-01-01

    Especially regarding the neutron beam experiment in Japan, the basic research has been developed by utilizing the JRR-2 of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the KUR of Kyoto University over long years. Now, the JRR-3M of JAERI was revived as a high performance, general purpose reactor, and bears important roles as the neutron beam experiment center in Japan. Thanks to one of the most powerful reactor neutron sources in the world and the cold neutron source, the environment of research was greatly improved, and the excellent results of researches began to be reported. The discovery of neutrons by Chadwick and the history of the related researches are described. As neutron sources, radioisotopes, accelerators and nuclear reactors are properly used corresponding to purposes. As the utilization of research reactors for neutron sources, the utilization for irradiation and neutron beam experiment are carried out. The outline of the research reactor JRR-3M is explained. The state of utilization in neutron scattering experiment, neutron radiography, prompt γ-ray analysis and the medical irradiation of neutrons is reported. (K.I.)

  14. Repetition rates in heavy ion beam driven fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    The limits on the cavity gas density required for beam propagation and condensation times for material vaporized by target explosions can determine the maximum repetition rate of Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) driven fusion reactors. If the ions are ballistically focused onto the target, the cavity gas must have a density below roughly 10-4 torr (3×1012 cm-3) at the time of propagation; other propagation schemes may allow densities as high as 1 torr or more. In some reactor designs, several kilograms of material may be vaporized off of the target chamber walls by the target generated x-rays, raising the average density in the cavity to 100 tor or more. A one-dimensional combined radiation hydrodynamics and vaporization and condensation computer code has been used to simulate the behavior of the vaporized material in the target chambers of HIB fusion reactors.

  15. Repetition rates in heavy ion beam driven fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The limits on the cavity gas density required for beam propagation and condensation times for material vaporized by target explosions can determine the maximum repetition rate of Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) driven fusion reactors. If the ions are ballistically focused onto the target, the cavity gas must have a density below roughly 10 -4 torr (3 x 10 12 cm -3 ) at the time of propagation; other propagation schemes may allow densities as high as 1 torr or more. In some reactor designs, several kilograms of material may be vaporized off of the target chamber walls by the target generated x-rays, raising the average density in the cavity to 100 tor or more. A one-dimensional combined radiation hydrodynamics and vaporization and condensation computer code has been used to simulate the behavior of the vaporized material in the target chambers of HIB fusion reactors

  16. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpenau, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 1 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the 42-inch duct and 14-inch line in Trench 1 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 1 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, 4, and 5, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities has been performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch duct from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 1. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the gamma spectroscopy results for 14 FSS soil samples, four core samples, and one duplicate sample collected from Trench 1. Sample results for the radionuclides of concern were below the established cleanup goals. However, in sample PH-3

  17. Visual beam tube inspection at the TRIGA reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Musilek, A.; Villa, M.

    2006-01-01

    Of the four TRIGA beam tubes two have been visually inspected in 1985. Prior to the inspection the reactor was shut down for 3 weeks. The fuel elements around the beam tubes were removed. Stainless steel dummy elements were inserted in the fuel positions to shield the core radiation. The active part of the Fast Rabbit Tube was removed into the beam tube loading device and transferred to an interim storage: Front dose rate was ∼ 50 mSv/h. Generally the beam tube was very clean, after the last inspection about 30 years ago. A1 cm cut was observed at the beam tube front end. A rigid endoscope was used to check the beam tube's inner surface using a 90 degree deflection objective and photo- and video equipment. The direct dose rate in front of the beam tube was about 30 mSv/h. The beam tube was vacuum cleaned. A corroded shielding tank containing boric acid has leaked. A wooden collimator partially disintegrating due to extreme temperature was removed from beam tube D. Documentation of the inspection for visible defects is produced for later comparison

  18. Neutral-beam-injected tokamak fusion reactors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1976-08-01

    The theories of energetic-ion velocity distributions, stability, injection, and orbits were summarized. The many-faceted role of the energetic ions in plasma heating, fueling, and current maintenance, as well as in the direct enhancement of fusion power multiplication and power density, is discussed in detail for three reactor types. The relevant implications of recent experimental results on several beam-injected tokamaks are examined. The behavior of energetic ions is found to be in accordance with classical theory, large total ion energy densities are readily achieved, and plasma equilibrium and stability are maintained. The status of neutral-beam injectors and of conceptual design studies of beam-driven reactors are briefly reviewed. The principal plasma-engineering problems are those associated directly with achieving quasi-stationary operation

  19. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams

  20. Beam propagation through a gaseous reactor: classical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Buchanan, H.L.; Lee, E.P.; Chambers, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    The present calculations are applicable to any beam geometry with cylindrical symmetry, including the converging beam geometry (large entrance port with radius > or approx. = 10 cm), as well as the pencil-shaped beam (small porthole with radius approx. mm). The small porthole is clearly advantageous from the reactor vessel design point of view. While the physics of the latter mode of propagation may be more complex, analyses up to this point have not revealed any detrimental instability effects that will inhibit propagation. In fact, the large perpendicular velocity v/sub perpendicular/ that the pinched mode can accommodate provides a mechanism for the quenching of filamentary instability. Furthermore, this mode of propagation can withstand more ion scattering and is not subject to the upper bound on pressure (p < 10 torr) which is imposed on the converging beam mode

  1. Safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    One of the first tasks of the NFPQT Committee was to determine which DOE reactors would be assessed. The Committee determined that in view of the limited time available to conduct the assessment, 13 DOE reactors were of such size (physical, power or fission product inventory) to warrant review. This determination was approved by the Under Secretary. A decision was also made in the cases of three weapons material production reactors, C, K and P, to concentrate on the K reactor only, since all three are of the same basic design, have the same operating features, are all at the same site, and are all operated by the same contractor. The assessment was accomplished in the following ways: reviewing the results of assessments conducted by the DOE organizations with reactor safety responsibilities, which were undertaken in compliance with the request of the various program directors; reviewing selected documents that were requested by the Committee and assembled at DOE Headquarters; interviewing DOE Headquarters and Field Office personnel; and conducting on-site reviews of four reactors located at four different sites. The four reactors for on-site reviews were: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); K Production Reactor; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Specific findings and recommendations from the assessment are presented

  2. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of ORR, NBS, and HFBR fuel element shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel element shipping package employing a borated-phenolic foam as a thermal insulating material is designed to transport as many as seven fuel elements for use in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Brookhaven Fast Beam Reactor, or the National Bureau of Standards Reactor. This report presents the criticality safety evaluation and demonstrates that the requirements for a Fissile Class I package are satisfied by the design

  3. Heavy ion beam transport through liquid lithium first wall ICF reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    This analysis addresses the critical issue of the final transport of a heavy ion beam in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The beam must traverse the reaction chamber from the final focusing lens to the target without being disrupted. This requirement has a strong impact on the reactor design. It is essential to the development of ICF fusion reactor technology, that the restrictions placed on the reactor engineering parameters by final beam transport consideration be understood early on

  4. Muon catalyzed fusion - fission reactor driven by a recirculating beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.; Tajima, T.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    The recent experimentally inferred value of multiplicity of fusion of deuterium and tritium catalyzed by muons has rekindled interest in its application to reactors. Since the main energy expended is in pion (and consequent muon) productions, we try to minimize the pion loss by magnetically confining pions where they are created. Although it appears at this moment not possible to achieve energy gain by pure fusion, it is possible to gain energy by combining catalyzed fusion with fission blankets. We present two new ideas that improve the muon fusion reactor concept. The first idea is to combine the target, the converter of pions into muons, and the synthesizer into one (the synergetic concept). This is accomplished by injecting a tritium or deuterium beam of 1 GeV/nucleon into DT fuel contained in a magnetic mirror. The confined pions slow down and decay into muons, which are confined in the fuel causing little muon loss. The necessary quantity of tritium to keep the reactor viable has been derived. The second idea is that the beam passing through the target is collected for reuse and recirculated, while the strongly interacted portion of the beam is directed to electronuclear blankets. The present concepts are based on known technologies and on known physical processes and data. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Utilization of cold neutron beams at intermediate flux reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of cold neutron beam (CNB) facilities at U.S. reactors [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 1991; Cornell University and the University of Texas at Austin, anticipated in 1992], it is appropriate to reexamine the types of research for which they are likely to be best suited or uniquely suited. With the exception of a small-angle neutron scattering facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, there has been no prior experience in the United States with such beams, but they have been extensively used at European reactors where cold neutron sources and neutron guides were developed some years age. This paper does not discuss specialized cases such as ultracold neutrons or very high flux facilities such as the Institute Laue-Langevin ractor and the proposed advanced neutron source. Instead, it concentrates on potential utilization of CNBs at intermediate-flux reactors such as at Cornell and Texas, i.e., in the 1-MW range and operated <24 h a day

  6. Monochromatic neutron beam production at Brazilian nuclear research reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiulevicius, Roberto; Rodrigues, Claudio; Parente, Carlos B. R.; Voi, Dante L.; Rogers, John D.

    2000-12-01

    Monochomatic beams of neutrons are obtained form a nuclear reactor polychromatic beam by the diffraction process, suing a single crystal energy selector. In Brazil, two nuclear research reactors, the swimming pool model IEA-R1 and the Argonaut type IEN-R1 have been used to carry out measurements with this technique. Neutron spectra have been measured using crystal spectrometers installed on the main beam lines of each reactor. The performance of conventional- artificial and natural selected crystals has been verified by the multipurpose neutron diffractometers installed at IEA-R1 and simple crystal spectrometer in operator at IEN- R1. A practical figure of merit formula was introduced to evaluate the performance and relative reflectivity of the selected planes of a single crystal. The total of 16 natural crystals were selected for use in the neutron monochromator, including a total of 24 families of planes. Twelve of these natural crystal types and respective best family of planes were measured directly with the multipurpose neutron diffractometers. The neutron spectrometer installed at IEN- R1 was used to confirm test results of the better specimens. The usually conventional-artificial crystal spacing distance range is limited to 3.4 angstrom. The interplane distance range has now been increased to approximately 10 angstrom by use of naturally occurring crystals. The neutron diffraction technique with conventional and natural crystals for energy selection and filtering can be utilized to obtain monochromatic sub and thermal neutrons with energies in the range of 0.001 to 10 eV. The thermal neutron is considered a good tool or probe for general applications in various fields, such as condensed matter, chemistry, biology, industrial applications and others.

  7. A high intensity positron beam at the Brookhaven reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.; Lynn, K.G.; Roellig, L.O.; Mills, A.P. Jr.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a high intensity, low energy positron beam utilizing high specific activity /sup 64/Cu sources (870 Ci/g) produced in a reactor with high thermal neutron flux. Fast-to-slow moderation can be performed in a self moderation mode or with a transmission moderator. Slow positron rates up to 1.6 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s with a half life of 12.8 h are calculated. Up to 1.0 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s have been observed. New developments including a Ne moderator and an on-line isotope separation process are discussed. 21 refs., 9 figs

  8. First wall costs of an ion-beam fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1977-08-01

    This paper parametrically investigates the effects of microexplosion energy on the first wall costs of a 4000 MW/sub t/ ion-beam initiated, inertially confined fusion reactor for several first wall materials. The thermodynamic models and the results for microexplosion energies between 400 and 4000 MJ are presented. A solid stainless steel or a composite isotropic graphite over stainless steel first wall can operate for a year at a cost of 0.6 mills per kWh gross electric power output

  9. Horizontal beams creation on a mean power reactor: Isis 700 kW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, C.

    1987-08-01

    To satisfy the requests of experimenters, two horizontal beams, tangential at core, have been created. After a brief recall of the Isis reactor the author describes the realized works and gives a summary description of the two beams equipment [fr

  10. Focal spot size predictions for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Lee, E.P.; Buchanan, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Results from calculations of focal spot size for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor are summarized. In the converging beam mode, we find an enlargement of the focal spot due to multiple scattering and zeroth order self-field effects. This enlargement can be minimized by maintaining small reactors together with a careful choice of the gaseous medium. The self-focused mode, on the other hand, is relatively insensitive to the reactor environment, but is critically dependent upon initial beam quality. This requirement on beam quality can be significantly eased by the injection of an electron beam of modest current from the opposite wall

  11. Conceptual design of light ion beam inertia nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Light ion beam, inertia nuclear fusion system drew attention recently as one of the nuclear fusion systems for power reactors in the history of the research on nuclear fusion. Its beginning seemed to be the judgement that the implosion of fusion fuel pellets with light ions can be realized with the light ions which can be obtained in view of accelerator techniques. Of course, in order to generate practically usable nuclear fusion reaction by this system and maintain it, many technical difficulties must be overcome. This research was carried out for the purpose of discovering such technical problems and searching for their solution. At the time of doing the works, the following policy was adopted. Though their is the difference of fine and rough, the design of a whole reactor system is performed conformably. In order to make comparison with other reactor types and nuclear fusion systems, the design is carried out as the power plant of about one million kWe output. As the extent of the design, the works at conceptual design stage are performed to present the concept of design which satisfies the required function. Basically, the design is made from conservative standpoint. This research of design was started in 1981, and in fiscal 1982, the mutual adjustment among the design of respective parts was performed on the basis of the results in 1981, and the possible revision and new proposal were investigated. (Kako, I.)

  12. Cutting technique for reactor internals by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, O.; Sugihara, M.; Matsuda, K.; Miya, K.

    1990-01-01

    At present in Japan the verification tests on the commercial nuclear power reactor decommissioning technology are being conducted as the project of The Ministry of International Trade and Industry by Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. This paper summarizes the interim results of the verification test for the reactor core internals decommissioning technology, which is being conducted from 1986 as a theme of the above project. All core internals to be studied here are made of stainless steel, and the maximum wall thickness is about 500mm (the maximum one to be cut is about 300mm) for the PWR's, and about 100mm for the BWR's. Though the plasma cutting, arc saw cutting method, etc. have been studied u p to now as the cutting technology for decommissioning these core internals, the authors are carrying out the development and verification test of the cutting technology with the laser beam, which is expected to increase its power in future and can be applied to various materials

  13. Status of neutron beam utilization at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dien, Nguyen Nhi; Hai, Nguyen Canh

    2003-01-01

    The 500-kW Dalat nuclear research reactor was reconstructed from the USA-made 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor. After completion of renovation and upgrading, the reactor has been operating at its nominal power since 1984. The reactor is used mainly for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam researches and reactor physics study. In the framework of the reconstruction and renovation project of the 1982-1984 period, the reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems, as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed by the former Soviet Union. Some structures of the reactor, such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding have been remained from the previous TRIGA reactor. As a typical configuration of the TRIGA reactor, there are four neutron beam ports, including three radial and one tangential. Besides, there is a large thermal column. Until now only two-neutron beam ports and the thermal column have been utilized. Effective utilization of horizontal experimental channels is one of the important research objectives at the Dalat reactor. The research program on effective utilization of these experimental channels was conducted from 1984. For this purpose, investigations on physical characteristics of the reactor, neutron spectra and fluxes at these channels, safety conditions in their exploitation, etc. have been carried out. The neutron beams, however, have been used only since 1988. The filtered thermal neutron beams at the tangential channel have been extracted using a single crystal silicon filter and mainly used for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron radiography (NR) and transmission experiments (TE). The filtered quasi-monoenergetic keV neutron beams using neutron filters at the piercing channel have been used for nuclear data measurements, study on

  14. Vietnam Project For Production Of Radioactive Beam Based On ISOL Technique With The Dalat Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong Khiem; Phan Viet Cuong; Fadi Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The presence in Vietnam of Dalat nuclear reactor dedicated to fundamental studies is a unique opportunity to produce Radioactive Ion (RI) Beams with the fission of a 235 U induced by the thermal neutrons produced by the reactor. We propose to produce RI beams at the Dalat nuclear reactor using ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) technique. This project should be a unique opportunity for Vietnamese nuclear physics community to use its own facilities to produce RI beams for studying nuclear physics at an international level. (author)

  15. Scaling of heavy ion beam probes for reactor-size devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.; Jennings, W.C.; Connor, K.A.; Schoch, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy ion beam probes for reactor-size plasma devices will require beam energies of approximately 10 MeV. Although accelerator technology appears to be available, beam deflection systems and parallel plate energy analyzers present severe difficulties if existing technology is scaled in a straightforward manner. We propose a different operating mode which will use a fixed beam trajectory and multiple cylindrical energy analyzers. Development effort will still be necessary, but we believe the basic technology is available

  16. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  17. LIBRA - a light ion beam fusion conceptual reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; Moses, G.A.; Engelstad, R.L.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Lovell, E.; MacFarlane, J.; Peterson, R.R.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatovslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Cook, D.L.; Olson, R.E.; Stinnett, R.W.; Ehrhardt, J.; Kessler, G.; Stein, E.

    1990-08-01

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4 MJ shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion pulse is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbind tubes with Li 17 Pb 83 flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is 'self-pumped' by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with Li 17 Pb 83 that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequently without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of a 331 MWe LIBRA design is estimated to be 2843 Dollar/kWe while a 1200 MWe LIBRA design will cost approximately 1300 Dollar/kWe. (orig.) [de

  18. Apparatus for servicing a jet pump hold down beam in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, D.A.; Hydeman, J.E.; Slater, J.L.; Bodnar, R.J.; Golick, L.R.; Sckera, R.S.; Roth, C.H. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for replacing the hold down beam of a fluid circulating jet pump mounted in a nuclear reactor, the hold down beam having a beam body, a pair of opposed beam tabs and a pair of opposed beam positioning trunnions extending outwardly from the beam body. It comprises a housing having a lower surface configured to be positionable over the body of the hold down beam; means coupled to the housing for engaging the beam trunnions and securing the beam body against the lower surface of the housing; means coupled to the housing for depressing the beam tabs while the beam body is secured against the lower surface of the housing; means coupled to the trunnion engaging means and the beam tab depressing means for selectively actuating the trunnion engaging means and the beam tab depressing means from a position remote from the nuclear reactor; and means connectable to the housing for selectively changing the directional orientation of the beam

  19. Construction of the Neutron Beam Facility at Australia's OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed for high quality neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for eighteen neutron beam instruments to be located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The new neutron beam facility features a 20 litre liquid deuterium cold neutron source and supermirror neutron reflecting guides for intense cold and thermal neutron beams. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, where criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. The lecture will outline Australia's aspirations for neutron science at the OPAL reactor, and describe the neutron beam facility under construction. The status of this project and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed. This project is the culmination of almost a decade of effort. We now eagerly anticipate catapulting Australia's neutron beam science capability to meet the best in the world today. (author)

  20. Influence of core model parameters on the characteristics of neutron beams of the research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Khafizova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IRT MEPhI reactor is equipped with a number of facilities at horizontal experimental channels (HEC. Knowing of parameters influencing spatio-angular distribution of irradiation fields is essential for each application area. The research for neutron capture therapy (NCT facility at HEC of the reactor was made. Calculation methods have been used to estimate how the reactor core parameters influence neutron beam characteristics at the HEC output. The impact of neutron source model in Monte Carlo calculations by MCNP code on the parameters of neutron and secondary photon field at the output of irradiation beam tubes of research reactor is estimated. The study shows that specifying neutron source with fission reaction rate distribution in SDEF option gives almost the same results as criticality calculation considered the most accurate. Our calculations show that changes of the core operational parameters have insignificant influence on characteristics of neutron beams at HEC output.

  1. Status report of the program on neutron beam utilization at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan

    1996-08-01

    The thermal reactor is an intense source not only of thermal neutron, but also intermediate as well as fast neutrons. Using the filtered neutron beam technique at steady state atomic reactor allows receiving the neutrons in the intermediate energy region with the most available intense flux at present. In the near time at the Dalat reactor the filtered neutron beam technique has been applied. Utilization of the filtered neutron beams in basic and applied researches has been a important activity of the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI). This report presents some relevant characteristics of the filtered neutron beams and their utilization in nuclear data measurements, neutron capture gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron radiography, neutron dose calibration and other applications. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs

  2. Construction of the neutron beam facility at Australia's OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2006-01-01

    Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed principally for neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for 18 neutron beam instruments, located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The neutron beam facility features a 20 l liquid deuterium cold neutron source and cold and thermal supermirror neutron guides. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, when criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. This paper will outline the key features of the OPAL reactor, and will describe the neutron beam facility in particular. The status of the construction and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed

  3. Neutron capture therapy beams at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.R.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Several neutron beams that could be used for neutron capture therapy at MITR-II are dosimetrically characterized and their suitability for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and other types of tumors are described. The types of neutron beams studied are: (1) those filtered by various thicknesses of cadmium, D2O, 6Li, and bismuth; and (2) epithermal beams achieved by filtration with aluminum, sulfur, cadmium, 6Li, and bismuth. Measured dose vs. depth data are presented in polyethylene phantom with references to what can be expected in brain. The results indicate that both types of neutron beams are useful for neutron capture therapy. The first type of neutron beams have good therapeutic advantage depths (approximately 5 cm) and excellent in-phantom ratios of therapeutic dose to background dose. Such beams would be useful for treating tumors located at relatively shallow depths in the brain. On the other hand, the second type of neutron beams have superior therapeutic advantage depths (greater than 6 cm) and good in-phantom therapeutic advantage ratios. Such beams, when used along with bilateral irradiation schemes, would be able to treat tumors at any depth in the brain. Numerical examples of what could be achieved with these beams, using RBEs, fractionated-dose delivery, unilateral, and bilateral irradiation are presented in the paper. Finally, additional plans for further neutron beam development at MITR-II are discussed

  4. LETTER REPORT - INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 17 through August 23, 2010 to perform visual inspections and conduct independent measurement and sampling of the 'Outside Areas' at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) decommissioning project. During this visit, ORISE was also able to evaluate Fan House, Building 704 survey units (SUs) 4 and 5, which are part of the Underground Utilities portion of the HFBR decommissioning project. ORISE performed limited alpha plus beta scans of the remaining Fan House foundation lower walls and remaining pedestals while collecting static measurements. Scans were performed using gas proportional detectors coupled to ratemeter-scalers with audible output and encompassed an area of approximately 1 square meter around the static measurement location. Alpha plus beta scans ranged from 120 to 460 cpm. Twenty smears for gross alpha and beta activity and tritium were collected at judgmentally selected locations on the walls and pedestals of the Fan House foundation. Attention was given to joints, cracks, and penetrations when determining each sample location. Removable concentrations ranged from -0.43 to 1.73 dpm/100 cm2 for alpha and -3.64 to 7.80 dpm/100 cm2 for beta. Tritium results for smears ranged from -1.9 to 9.0 pCi/g. On the concrete pad, 100% of accessible area was scanned using a large area alpha plus beta gas proportional detector coupled to a ratemeter-scaler. Gross scan count rates ranged from 800 to 1500 cpm using the large area detector. Three concrete samples were collected from the pad primarily for tritium analysis. Tritium concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 53.3 to 127.5 pCi/g. Gamma spectroscopy results of radionuclide concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 pCi/g for Cs-137 and 0.19 to 0.22 pCi/g for Ra-226. High density scans for gamma radiation levels were performed in accessible areas in each SU, Fan House

  5. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor with HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Paredes G, L.; Aguilar, F.

    2012-10-01

    Before to change the HEU for Leu fuel of the ININ's TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor the neutron spectra were measured in two beam ports using 5 and 10 W. Measurements were carried out in a tangential and a radial beam port using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. It was found that neutron spectra are different in the beam ports, in radial beam port the amplitude of thermal and fast neutrons are approximately the same while, in the tangential beam port thermal neutron peak is dominant. In the radial beam port the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent factors are 131±11 and 124±10 p Sv-cm 2 for 5 and 10 W respectively while in the tangential beam port the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent factor is 55±4 p Sv-cm 2 for 10 W. (Author)

  6. Reactor beam calculations to determine optimum delivery of epithermal neutrons for treatment of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Nigg, D.W.; Capala, J.

    1997-01-01

    Studies were performed to assess theoretical tumor control probability (TCP) for brain-tumor treatment with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using epithermal neutron sources from reactors. The existing epithermal-neutron beams at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Facility (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor Facility (HWR) and the Finnish Research Reactor 1 (FIR1) have been analyzed and characterized using common analytical and measurement methods allowing for this inter-comparison. Each of these three facilities is unique and each offers an advantage in some aspect of BNCT, but none of these existing facilities excel in all neutron-beam attributes as related to BNCT. A comparison is therefore also shown for a near-optimum reactor beam which does not currently exist but which would be feasible with existing technology. This hypothetical beam is designated BNCT-1 and has a spectrum similar to the FIR-1, the mono-directionality of the HFR and the intensity of the BMRR. A beam very similar to the BNCT-1 could perhaps be achieved with modification of the BMRR, HFR, or FIR, and could certainly be realized in a new facility with today's technology

  7. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, M S; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Habib, N; Adib, M

    2015-03-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-133keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named "QMNB" was developed in the "MATLAB" programming language to perform the required calculations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, Alison; Saratsopoulos, John; Deura, Michael; Kenny, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  9. Seismic analysis of the APR1400 nuclear reactor system using a verified beam element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong-beom; Park, No-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Jeong; Park, Young-Pil; Choi, Youngin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simplified beam element model is constructed based on the real dynamic characteristics of the APR1400. • Time history analysis is performed to calculate the seismic responses of the structures. • Large deformations can be observed at the in-phase mode of reactor vessel and core support barrel. - Abstract: Structural integrity is the first priority in the design of nuclear reactor internal structures. In particular, nuclear reactor internals should be designed to endure external forces, such as those due to earthquakes. Many researchers have performed finite element analyses to meet these design requirements. Generally, a seismic analysis model should reflect the dynamic characteristics of the target system. However, seismic analysis based on the finite element method requires long computation times as well as huge storage space. In this research, a beam element model was developed and confirmed based on the real dynamic characteristics of an advanced pressurized water nuclear reactor 1400 (APR1400) system. That verification process enhances the accuracy of the finite element analysis using the beam elements, remarkably. Also, the beam element model reduces seismic analysis costs. Therefore, the beam element model was used to perform the seismic analysis. Then, the safety of the APR1400 was assessed based on a seismic analysis of the time history responses of its structures. Thus, efficient, accurate seismic analysis was demonstrated using the proposed beam element model.

  10. Seismic analysis of the APR1400 nuclear reactor system using a verified beam element model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong-beom [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Park, No-Cheol, E-mail: pnch@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Jeong; Park, Young-Pil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Youngin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34142 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • A simplified beam element model is constructed based on the real dynamic characteristics of the APR1400. • Time history analysis is performed to calculate the seismic responses of the structures. • Large deformations can be observed at the in-phase mode of reactor vessel and core support barrel. - Abstract: Structural integrity is the first priority in the design of nuclear reactor internal structures. In particular, nuclear reactor internals should be designed to endure external forces, such as those due to earthquakes. Many researchers have performed finite element analyses to meet these design requirements. Generally, a seismic analysis model should reflect the dynamic characteristics of the target system. However, seismic analysis based on the finite element method requires long computation times as well as huge storage space. In this research, a beam element model was developed and confirmed based on the real dynamic characteristics of an advanced pressurized water nuclear reactor 1400 (APR1400) system. That verification process enhances the accuracy of the finite element analysis using the beam elements, remarkably. Also, the beam element model reduces seismic analysis costs. Therefore, the beam element model was used to perform the seismic analysis. Then, the safety of the APR1400 was assessed based on a seismic analysis of the time history responses of its structures. Thus, efficient, accurate seismic analysis was demonstrated using the proposed beam element model.

  11. Very high flux steady state reactor and accelerator based sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Simos, N.; Shapiro, S.; Hastings, J.

    2004-01-01

    With the number of steady state neutron sources in the US declining (including the demise of the Bnl HFBR) the remaining intense sources are now in Europe (i.e. reactors - ILL and FMR, accelerator - PSI). The intensity of the undisturbed thermal flux for sources currently in operation ranges from 10 14 n/cm 2 *s to 10 15 n/cm 2 *s. The proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) was to be a high power reactor (about 350 MW) with a projected undisturbed thermal flux of 7*10 15 n/cm 2 *s but never materialized. The objective of the current study is to explore the requirements and implications of two source concepts with an undisturbed flux of 10 16 n/cm 2 *s. The first is a reactor based concept operating at high power density (10 MW/l - 15 MW/l) and a total power of 100 MW - 250 MW, depending on fissile enrichment. The second is an accelerator based concept relying on a 1 GeV - 1.5 GeV proton Linac with a total beam power of 40 MW and a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic target. In the reactor source study, the effects of fissile material enrichment, coolant temperature and pressure drop, and estimates of pressure vessel stress levels will be investigated. The fuel form for the reactor will be different from all other operating source reactors in that it is proposed to use an infiltrated graphitic structure, which has been developed for nuclear thermal propulsion reactor applications. In the accelerator based source the generation of spallation products and their activation levels, and the material damage sustained by the beam window will be investigated. (authors)

  12. HFBR restart activity A2.6: Review of FSAR and 60 MW addendum to assure consistency of operation at 40 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Ross, S.B.; Darby, J.L.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this task (HFBR Restart Activity A2.6) is to perform a review of the design basis accident (DBA) analyses sections of the 1964 HFBR-Final Safety Analysis Report; Volumes I and II, and the 1982 Addendum to the HFBR-FSAR for 60 MW operation to assure that operation at 40 MW will be consistent with these analyses. Additional documents utilized in the review included the Level 1 PRA for HFBR, HFBR-PDMs and HFBR-OPMs. The review indicates that the 1964 FSAR-DBA analysis in incomplete in the sense that it did not analyze some of the important initiators for 1-loop operation that include: Accidental throttling of primary flow control valves; seizure of primary pump; loss of secondary pump; accidental throttling of secondary flow control valves; rupture of secondary piping. The first three initiators were later studied in the 1982 addendum. The other two initiators have not been examined to-date for 1-loop operation. It is recommended that the impact of these initiators be assessed prior to the restart, if 1-loop operation is chosen for the restart. The review demonstrated that at 40 MW operation there are only a few accident initiators that will culminate in core damage (fuel melting and /or cladding failure) regardless of the availability of mitigating systems. For 1-loop Operation these accidents include: Fuel channel blockage, primary pump seizure, and large-large LOCA (a LOCA with effective break diameter > 2.81 in. is referred to as a large-large LOCA in this document as well as in PRA). Although all these accidents listed above could lead to core damage for 1-loop operation as well, the probability is expected be very low

  13. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) neutral beam design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, T.J.; Brook, J.W.; Spampinato, P.T.; Mueller, J.P.; Luzzi, T.E.; Sedgley, D.W.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ITER neutral beam design: ion dump; neutralizer and module gas flow analysis; vacuum system; cryogenic system; maintainability; power distribution; and system cost

  14. Studies on the instrumentation of a beam-tube medium flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axmann, A.; Pollet, J.L.; Queudot, J.

    1979-01-01

    In the years 1977/78, the ad hoc commitee for medium-flux reactor development of the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology developed constructional concepts for a medium-flux reactor to be utilized by beam tube experiments. The HMI has elaborated contributions for discussions of the subject of instrumentation, in particular for experiments in solid state physics. These contributions are contained in the report. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  16. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansy, M.S.; Bashter, I.I.; El-Mesiry, M.S.; Habib, N.; Adib, M.

    2015-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5–133 keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named “QMNB” was developed in the “MATLAB” programming language to perform the required calculations. - Highlights: • Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in energy range from (1.5–133) keV. • Interference between the resonance and potential scattering amplitudes. • Epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT

  17. Neutron beam utilization at the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Ismail, S.; Koerner, S.; Baron, M.; Hainbuchner, M.; Badurek, G.; Buchelt, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given about the research activities around the 250 kw TRIGA reactor Vienna, which are adequate to other neutron sources of comparable or bigger size. The topics selected for presentation range from neutron radiography, materials irradiation, neutron small-angle scattering, neutron activation analysis, neutron polarization to neutron interferometry. It is the aim of this presentation to stimulate programs for more efficient use around TRIGA research reactors with neutron flux densities of 1013 cm-2a-1 at the center of the reactor core. We briefly describe the experimental facilities installed at the 250 kw TRIGA reactor of the Austrian Universities in Vienna and present a great part of the current research activities performed with them. We believe that most of the techniques and experiments presented here are adequate for implementation to other reactors of similar or even higher power. Those technologies which require extremely specialized know-how not generally available at every research Inst.e will not be treated here or are just mentioned without any further details.(author)

  18. Requirements of a proton beam accelerator for an accelerator-driven reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-01-01

    When the authors first proposed an accelerator-driven reactor, the concept was opposed by physicists who had earlier used the accelerator for their physics experiments. This opposition arose because they had nuisance experiences in that the accelerator was not reliable, and very often disrupted their work as the accelerator shut down due to electric tripping. This paper discusses the requirements for the proton beam accelerator. It addresses how to solve the tripping problem and how to shape the proton beam

  19. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard; Xu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow (∼3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10 8 positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  20. Underwater laser beam welding technology for reactor vessel nozzles of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Masaki; Tamura, Masataka; Tamura, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    Toshiba has developed an underwater laser beam welding technology for the maintenance of reactor vessel nozzles of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which eliminates the need for the drainage of water from the reactor vessel. The new welding system makes it possible to both reduce the work period and minimize the radiation exposure of workers compared with conventional technologies for welding in ambient air. We have confirmed the effectiveness of this technology through experiments in which stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was mitigated on the inner surfaces of nozzles. We are promoting its practical application in Japan and overseas in cooperation with Westinghouse Electric Company, a group company of Toshiba. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Direct energy conversion and neutral beam injection for catalyzed D and D-3He tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.S.; Moir, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The calculated performance of single stage and Venetian blind direct energy converters for Catalyzed D and D- 3 He Tokamak reactors are discussed. Preliminary results on He pumping are outlined. The efficiency of D and T neutral beam injection is reviewed

  3. Single-crystal filters for attenuating epithermal neutrons and gamma rays in reactor beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rustad, B.M.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bahnsen, A.

    1965-01-01

    Cross section of representative samples of bismuth and quartz were measured at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures over neutron energy range of 0.0007 to 2.0 ev to obtain data for design of single-crystal 32-cm bismuth filters for attenuating fast neutrons and γ-rays in reactor beams; filters may...

  4. New north beam tube for the neutron radiography reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron radiography of the fuel undergoing examination in the argon cell is performed in the NRAD Facility and is one of many examinations performed on the fuel. The reactor and examination procedure are described. The new radiography system, developed to expand the present radiography capabilities to radiograph both irradiated and unirradiated specimens and to provide for the development of new radiography techniques without interfering with the argon cell production schedule is presented

  5. Telescope-based cavity for negative ion beam neutralization in future fusion reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Hreibi, Ali; Chaibi, Walid

    2018-03-01

    In future fusion reactors, heating system efficiency is of the utmost importance. Photo-neutralization substantially increases the neutral beam injector (NBI) efficiency with respect to the foreseen system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) based on a gaseous target. In this paper, we propose a telescope-based configuration to be used in the NBI photo-neutralizer cavity of the demonstration power plant (DEMO) project. This configuration greatly reduces the total length of the cavity, which likely solves overcrowding issues in a fusion reactor environment. Brought to a tabletop experiment, this cavity configuration is tested: a 4 mm beam width is obtained within a ≃1.5  m length cavity. The equivalent cavity g factor is measured to be 0.038(3), thus confirming the cavity stability.

  6. Upgrades of the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hungyuan B.; Brugger, R.M.; Rorer, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The first epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) was installed in 1988 and produced a neutron beam that was satisfactory for the development of NCT with epithermal neutrons. This beam was used routinely until 1992 when the beam was upgraded by rearranging fuel elements in the reactor core to achieve a 50% increase in usable flux. Next, after computer modeling studies, it was proposed that the Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderator material in the shutter that produced the epithermal neutrons could be rearranged to enhance the beam further. However, this modification was not started because a better option appeared, namely to use fission plates to move the source of fission neutrons closer to the moderator and the patient irradiation position to achieve more efficient moderation and production of epithermal neutrons. A fission plate converter (FPC) source has been designed recently and, to test the concept, implementation of this upgrade has started. The predicted beam parameters will be 12 x 10{sup 9} n{sub epi}/cm{sup 2}sec accompanying with doses from fast neutrons and gamma rays per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10{sup -11} and < 1 x 10{sup -11} cGycm{sup 2}/n, respectively, and a current-to-flux ratio of epithermal neutrons of 0.78. This conversion could be completed by late 1996.

  7. The neutron beam intensity increase by in-core fuel management enhancement in multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Vukadin, Z.; Konstantinovic, J.

    1986-01-01

    The exploitation characteristics of an existing multipurpose research reactor can be increased not only by great reconstruction, but also, to the considerable extent, by the in-core fuel management sophistication. The optimisation of the in-core fuel management procedure in such reactors is governed (among others) by the identified reactor utilisation goals, i.e. by weighting factors dedicated to different utilisation goals, which are often (regarding the in-core fuel management procedure) highly controversial. In this work the best solution for in-core fuel management is sought, with the highest weighting factor dedicated to the neutron beam usage, rather than sample irradiation in the reactor core. The term in-core fuel management includes: the core configuration, the locations of the fresh fuel inflow zone and spent fuel excite zone, and the fuel transfers between these two zones (author)

  8. A low background pulsed neutron polyenergetic beam at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Habib, N.; Abu-El-Ela, M.; Wahba, M.; Kilany, M.

    1991-12-01

    A low background pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-RR-1 is produced by a rotor and rotating collimator suspended in magnetic fields. Each of them is mounted on its mobile platform and whose centres are 66 cm apart, rotating synchronously at speeds up to 16000 rpm. It was found that the neutron burst produced by the rotor with almost 100% transmission passes through the collimator, when the rotation phase between them is 28.8 deg. Moreover the background level achieved at the detector position is low, constant and free from peaks due to gamma rays and fast neutrons accompanying the reactor thermal beam. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  9. Application of CO2 laser beam weld for repair of fuel element of nuclear reactor 'YAYOI'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagi, Hideharu; Sukegawa, Toshio; Saito, Isao; Sasuga, Norihiko; Aizawa, Nagaaki; Miya, Kenzo

    1986-01-01

    The present studies are to develop CO 2 laser beam welding techniques in order to apply for repoint of nuclear reactor fuel of Fast Neutron Source Reactor YAYOI. For that purpos, many experiments were conduted to obtain various effects of laser welding variables with use of SUS 304 plates, pipes and simulated dumy fuels. These experiments provided us an optimal welding condition through metallurgical observations, non-destructive and mechanical tests. It was found that the laser welds exhibited properties equivalent to those of the base metal, in addition they provided us a favorable system than that of electron beam welds against a cladding of radioactive nuclear fuel in a hot cell. The present paper reports on the characteristics of laser welds, structural analysis of fuel element and a system design of remotely operated devices setting in a hot cell. (author)

  10. Dosimetry issues for an ultra-high flux beam and multipurpose research reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is a new user facility for all fields of neutron research, including neutron beam experiments, materials analysis, materials testing, and isotope production. The complement and layout of the experimental facilities have been determined sufficiently, at a conceptual design level, to make reliable cost and schedule estimates. The source of neutrons will be a heavy water reactor, constructed largely of aluminum, with an available thermal neutron flux 5--10 times higher than existing research reactors. Among the dosimetry issues to be faced are damage prediction and surveillance for component life attainment; measurement of fluence and spectra in regions where both change substantially over a distance of a few centimeters; and characterization and measurement of the radiation field in the research areas around the neutron beam experiments

  11. Measurement of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for the Radiation Beam from Neutron Source Reactor YAYOI -Comparisons with Cyclotron Neutron and 60Co Gamma Ray-

    OpenAIRE

    HIROAKI, WAKABAYASHI; SHOZO, SUZUKI; AKIRA, ITO; Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo; Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo; Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo

    1983-01-01

    Radiation biology and/or therapy research and development for a research reactor beam need specific RBEs of neutrons as well as of specific reactions. RBEs for reactor beams measured in situ condition are interesting because actual radiation effects on each biological system are different depending on detailed conditions of irradiation. A small powered research reactor (Fast Neutron Source Reactor: YAYOI) was examined here as a neutron beam source for obtaining survival curves in a manner usu...

  12. Reactor-moderated intermediate-energy neutron beams for neutron-capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to producing an intermediate energy beam is moderating fission neutrons escaping from a reactor core. The objective of this research is to evaluate materials that might produce an intermediate beam for NCT via moderation of fission neutrons. A second objective is to use the more promising moderator material in a preliminary design of an NCT facility at a research reactor. The evaluations showed that several materials or combinations of materials could produce a moderator source for an intermediate beam for NCT. The best neutron spectrum for use in NCT is produced by Al 2 O 3 , but mixtures of Al metal and D 2 O are also attractive. Using the best moderator materials, results were applied to the design of an NCT moderator at the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor's bio-medical facility. The amount of photon shielding and thermal neutron absorber were optimized with respect to the desired photon dose rate and intermediate neutron flux at the patient position

  13. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Aguilar, F.; Paredes, L.; Rivera M, T.

    2013-10-01

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, radial and tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research. Measurements were carried out with the core with mixed fuel (Leu 8.5/20 and Flip Heu 8.5/70). Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6 Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter high density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code; from each spectrum the total neutron flux, the neutron mean energy and the neutron ambient dose equivalent dose were determined. Measured spectra show fission (E≥ 0.1 MeV), epithermal (from 0.4 eV up to 0.1 MeV) and thermal neutrons (E≤ 0.4 eV). For both reactor powers the spectra in the radial beam port have similar features which are different to the neutron spectrum characteristics in the tangential beam port. (Author)

  14. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Aguilar, F.; Paredes, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, radial and tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research. Measurements were carried out with the core with mixed fuel (Leu 8.5/20 and Flip Heu 8.5/70). Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter high density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code; from each spectrum the total neutron flux, the neutron mean energy and the neutron ambient dose equivalent dose were determined. Measured spectra show fission (E≥ 0.1 MeV), epithermal (from 0.4 eV up to 0.1 MeV) and thermal neutrons (E≤ 0.4 eV). For both reactor powers the spectra in the radial beam port have similar features which are different to the neutron spectrum characteristics in the tangential beam port. (Author)

  15. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; El-Guebaly, L.; Engelstad, R.; Hassanein, A.; Klein, A.; Kulcinski, G.; Larsen, E.; Lee, K.; Lovell, E.; Moses, G.

    1981-12-01

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present dessign is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.) [de

  16. Gas utilization in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Jones, T.T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of gas utilization were performed using hydrogen and deuterium beams in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam test beamline to study the feasibility of operating tritium beams with existing ion sources under conditions of minimal tritium consumption. (i) It was found that the fraction of gas molecules introduced into the TFTR long-pulse ion sources that are converted to extracted ions (i.e., the ion source gas efficiency) was higher than with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range 33%--55%, and its effect on neutralization of the extracted ions was studied. At the high end of the gas efficiency range, the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted from room-temperature molecular gas flow (similar to observations at the Joint European Torus). (ii) Beam isotope change studies were performed. No extracted hydrogen ions were observed in the first deuterium beam following a working gas change from H 2 to D 2 . There was no arc conditioning or gas injection preceding the first beam extraction attempt. (iii) Experiments were also performed to determine the reliability of ion source operation during the long waiting periods between pulses that are anticipated during tritium operation. It was found that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV could produce a clean beam pulse after a waiting period of 14 h by preceding the beam extraction with several acceleration voltage/filament warm-up pulses. It can be concluded that the operation of up to six ion sources on tritium gas should be compatible with on-site inventory restrictions established for D--T, Q = 1 experiments on TFTR

  17. Framework for a sustainable development of neutron beam work in the smaller research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.G.; Margaca, F.M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyze the present situation of research reactors for neutron beam work in the light of the changes that took place in the nuclear field during the last decades. Trends in supply and demand of neutron beam time in view of the specific requirements of the techniques and of the user's community are outlined. It is argued that resources, both human and material, should be considered in a global perspective, encompassing the national, regional and international levels, where national facilities, mostly low flux research reactors, should be looked upon as a valuable component of a commonwealth of resources to be usefully exploited for the benefit of the neutron user's community at large. The importance of international cooperation to develop a higher level of research reactor utilization is emphasized while suggestions concerning the role of IAEA are made, particularly, to promote the mobility of scientists and engineers directed from developed to less developed countries (LDC's) where research reactors are in operation. The potential of small research reactors in LDC's as an instrument of the country's general scientific and technological development is pointed out as well as difficulties commonly experienced and essential requirements of a successful performance with emphasis on the importance of establishing close links with the national scientific community and especially with university groups. The scientific and technological relevance of neutron scattering techniques is discussed. Reference is made to the techniques best suited to modest research reactor facilities as well as to the importance of developing a local competence in instrument design, optimization and construction. (author). 12 refs

  18. Neutral beam energy and power requirements for expanding radius and full bore startup of tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1979-09-01

    Natural beam power and energy requirements are compared for full density full bore and expanding radius startup scenarios in an elongated plasma, The Next Step (TNS), as a function of beam pulse time and plasma density. Because of the similarity of parameters, the results should also be applicable to Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) studies. A transport model consisting of neoclassical ion conduction and anomalous electron conduction and diffusion based on ALCATOR scaling leads to average densities in the range approx. 0.8 to 1.2 x 10 14 cm -3 being sufficient for ignition. Neutral deuterium beam energies in the range 120 to 180 keV are adequate for penetration, with the required power injected into the plasma decreasing with increasing beam energy. The neutral beam power decreases strongly with increasing beam pulse length b/sub b/ until t/sub b/ exceeds a few total energy confinement times, yielding b/sub b/ approx. = 4 to 6 s for the TNS plasma

  19. Performance analysis of the intense slow-positron beam at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moxom, J.; Hathaway, A.G.; Bodnaruk, E.W.; Hawari, A.I.; Xu, J.

    2007-01-01

    An intense positron beam, for application in nanophase characterization, is now under construction at the 1 MW PULSTAR nuclear reactor at North Carolina State University (NCSU). A tungsten converter/moderator is used, allowing positrons to be emitted from the surface with energies of a few electron volts. These slow positrons will be extracted from the moderator and formed into a beam by electrostatic lenses and then injected into a solenoidal magnetic field for transport to one of three experimental stations, via a beam switch. To optimize the performance of the beam and to predict the slow-positron intensity, a series of simulations were performed. A specialized Monte-Carlo routine was integrated into the charged-particle transport calculations to allow accounting for the probabilities of positron re-emission and backscattering from multiple-bank moderator/converter configurations. The results indicate that either a two-bank or a four-bank tungsten moderator/converter system is preferred for the final beam design. The predicted slow-positron beam intensities range from nearly 7x10 8 to 9x10 8 e + /s for the two-bank and the four-bank systems, respectively

  20. Proposal for the theoretical investigation of the relativistic beam-plasma interaction with application to the proof-of-principle electron beam-heated linear solenoidal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1978-09-01

    A 36-month program to study the linear relativistic electron beam-plasma interaction is proposed. This program is part of a joint proposal between the Physics International Company (PI) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) that combines the advanced electron beam generator technology at PI with the highly developed computer simulation technology at LASL. The proposed LASL program includes direct support for 1- and 3-m beam-plasma interaction experiments planned at PI and development of theory relevant for design of a 10-m proof-of-principle electron beam-driven linear solenoidal reactor

  1. Opportunities for research using neutron beams at Australia's replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: On July 13th 2000, a contract was signed for construction of Australia's Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights just outside Sydney. This may represent Australia's largest single investment in scientific infrastructure, and it provides researchers in condensed matter physics, chemistry, materials science, and some aspects of engineering, the earth sciences and biology with the 'opportunity of a generation' The replacement reactor, which will commence operation in 2005, will be comparable with the national neutron sources of Japan, France and the U.S.A. Cold and thermal neutron sources are to be installed and supermirror guides will transport cold and thermal neutron beams into a large modern guide hall. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by the Argentinian company INVAP S.E., in collaboration with two Australian firms, in a turnkey contract. The instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations, in consultation with the Australian user community and interested overseas parties. This presentation reviews the planned scientific capabilities and opportunities, gives a description of the facility and a status report on the activities so far

  2. Design of a tokamak fusion reactor first wall armor against neutral beam impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    The maximum temperatures and thermal stresses are calculated for various first wall design proposals, using both analytical solutions and the TRUMP and SAP IV Computer Codes. Beam parameters, such as pulse time, cycle time, and beam power, are varied. It is found that uncooled plates should be adequate for near-term devices, while cooled protection will be necessary for fusion power reactors. Graphite and tungsten are selected for analysis because of their desirable characteristics. Graphite allows for higher heat fluxes compared to tungsten for similar pulse times. Anticipated erosion (due to surface effects) and plasma impurity fraction are estimated. Neutron irradiation damage is also discussed. Neutron irradiation damage (rather than erosion, fatigue, or creep) is estimated to be the lifetime-limiting factor on the lifetime of the component in fusion power reactors. It is found that the use of tungsten in fusion power reactors, when directly exposed to the plasma, will cause serious plasma impurity problems; graphite should not present such an impurity problem

  3. Beam transient analyses of Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors based on neutron transport method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingtao; Wu, Hongchun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Wang, Kunpeng [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, PO Box 8088, Beijing 100082 (China); Li, Xunzhao; Zhou, Shengcheng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A transport-based kinetics code for Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors is developed. • The performance of different kinetics methods adapted to the ADSR is investigated. • The impacts of neutronic parameters deteriorating with fuel depletion are investigated. - Abstract: The Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR) is almost external source dominated since there is no additional reactivity control mechanism in most designs. This paper focuses on beam-induced transients with an in-house developed dynamic analysis code. The performance of different kinetics methods adapted to the ADSR is investigated, including the point kinetics approximation and space–time kinetics methods. Then, the transient responds of beam trip and beam overpower are calculated and analyzed for an ADSR design dedicated for minor actinides transmutation. The impacts of some safety-related neutronics parameters deteriorating with fuel depletion are also investigated. The results show that the power distribution varying with burnup leads to large differences in temperature responds during transients, while the impacts of kinetic parameters and feedback coefficients are not very obvious. Classification: Core physic.

  4. Radiation Dosimetry of the Pressure Vessel Internals of the High Flux Beam Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E.; Reciniello, Richard N.; Hu, Jih-Perng; Rorer, David C.

    2003-06-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex™ polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rates, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup.

  5. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.P.; RORER, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex(trademark) polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup

  6. UCN sources at external beams of thermal neutrons. An example of PIK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lychagin, E.V.; Mityukhlyaev, V.A.; Muzychka, A.Yu.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Onegin, M.S.; Sharapov, E.I.; Strelkov, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium ("4He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of application of this idea, which consists of installing "4He UCN source in the beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with moderator-reflector, which plays the role of cold neutron (CN) source feeding the UCN source. CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator–reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of "4He source with solid methane (CH_4) or/and liquid deuterium (D_2) moderator–reflector. We show that such a source with CH_4 moderator–reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1·10"5 cm"−"3, and the UCN production rate of ~2·10"7 s"−"1. These values are respectively 1000 and 20 times larger than those for the most intense UCN user source. The UCN density in a source with D_2 moderator-reflector would reach the value of ~2·10"5 cm"−"3, and the UCN production rate would be equal ~8·10"7 s"−"1. Installation of such a source in a beam of CNs would slightly increase the density and production rate.

  7. Estimated nuclear effects in the neutral beam injectors of a large fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    Estimates are given for the nuclear heat loads on the cryopanels, radiation damage (energy deposition rate) in ion gun insulators, and dose equivalent rates from induced activity in the components for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) neutral beam injectors. The estimates have been obtained by scaling similar results, obtained by careful neutronics analysis for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The approximate nature of the scaling procedure introduces considerable uncertainty in the results, but they are, hopefully, correct to within an order of magnitude and may be substantially more accurate

  8. Study of the RP-10 reactor neutron beam applied to the neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zegarra, Manuel; Lopez, Alcides

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the RP-10 reactor radial neutron beam No. 3, which is used for neutron radiographies, by comparing radiograph's with and without the inner duct, and neutron flux determination with in flakes along the external duct, being the presence of photons creating signals at comparable levels of neutron effects, which reduce the quality of the analysis, values around 10 6 and 10 4 n/cm 2 s for thermal and epithermal flux were obtained respectively. It is recommended evaluate the design of the internal duct which presents strong photon emission. (authors).

  9. HIBALL-II - an improved conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; Corradini, M.; El-Guebaly, L.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.; Klein, A.; Kulcinski, G.; Larsen, E.; Lovell, E.; Moses, G.; Peterson, R.; Pong, L.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Symon, K.; Vogelsang, W.; White, A.; Wittenberg, L.; Beckert, K.; Bock, R.; Boehne, D.; Hofmann, I.; Keller, R.; Mueller, R.; Bozsik, I.; Jahnke, A.; Brezina, J.; Nestle, H.; Wendel, W.; Wollnik, H.; Lessmann, E.; Froehlich, R.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Kessler, G.; Moellendorff, U. von; Moritz, N.; Plute, K.; Schretzmann, K.; Sze, D.

    1985-07-01

    An improved design of the HIBALL inertial-confinement fusion power station is presented. The new RF-linac based heavy ion driver has improved concepts for beam stacking, bunching and final focusing. The new target design takes into account radiation transport effects in a coarse approximation. The system of four reactors with a net total output of 3.8 GW electric is essentially the same as described earlier, however, progress in the analysis has enhanced its credibility and self-consistency. Considerations of environmental and safety aspects and cost estimates are given. (orig.) [de

  10. Epithermal beam development at the BMRR [Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor]: Dosimetric evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraf, S.K.; Fairchild, R.G.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Laster, B.H.; Fiarman, S.; Ramsey, E.; Ioannina Univ.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of an epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is desirable because of the increased tissue penetration relative to a thermal neutron beam. Over the past few years, modifications have been and continue to be made at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) by changing its filter components to produce an optimal epithermal beam. An optimal epithermal beam should contain a low fast neutron contamination and no thermal neutrons in the incident beam. Recently a new moderator for the epithermal beam has been installed at the epithermal port of the BMRR and has accomplished this task. This new moderator is a combination of alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) bricks and aluminum (Al) plates. A 0.51 mm thick cadmium (Cd) sheet has reduced the thermal neutron intensity drastically. Furthermore, an 11.5 cm thick bismuth (Bi) plate installed at the port surface has reduced the gamma dose component to negligible levels. Foil activation techniques have been employed by using bare gold and cadmium-covered gold foil to determine thermal as well as epithermal neutron fluence. Fast neutron fluence has been determined by indium foil counting. Fast neutron and gamma dose in soft tissue, free in air, is being determined by the paired ionization chamber technique, using tissue equivalent (TE) and graphite chambers. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-700) have also been used to determine the gamma dose independently. This paper describes the methods involved in the measurements of the above mentioned parameters. Formulations have been developed and the various corrections involved have been detailed. 12 refs

  11. Removal of VOCs by hybrid electron beam reactor with catalyst bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinkyu; Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Yuri; Lee, J.H.; Park, C.R.; Kim, J.C.; Kim, J.C.; Kim, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam decomposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied in order to obtain information for developing effective treatment method of off-gases from industries. We have examined the combination of electron beam and catalyst honeycomb which is either 1% platinum based or ceramic honeycomb- based aluminum oxide, using a hybrid reactor in order to improve removal efficiency and CO 2 formation; and to suppress undesirable by-product formation e.g. O 3 , aerosol, H x C y. , and tar. The experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale treatment system (maximum capacity; 1800 N m 3 /h) that fitted the field size to scale up from the traditional laboratory scale system for VOC removal with electron beam irradiation. Toluene was selected as a typical VOC that was irradiated to investigate product formation, effect of ceramic and catalyst, and factors effecting overall efficiency of degradation. Styrene was selected as the most odorous compound among the VOCs of interest. It was found that VOCs could be destroyed more effectively using a hybrid system with catalyst bed than with electron beam irradiation only

  12. Prompt-gamma spectrometry for the optimization of reactor neutron beams in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, G.I.; Komkov, M.M.; Leonov, V.F.

    1988-01-01

    In order to select the optimal spectral composition and size for the reactor neutron beams applied to in vivo analysis and therapy in biomedical research it is necessary to determine the spatial slow-neutron flux distributions produced by the beam in the irradiated object and to calculate or measure the neutron dose equivalents of both the original spectrum and the moderated neutrons. In this study the maximum neutron dose equivalents are found by spectrometry of the prompt-γ emission from the interaction of neutrons with atomic nuclei in the irradiated object. Different spectral distributions were produced by using an unfiltered beam together with filters of quartz, cadmium, 10 B, iron, aluminum, and sulfur. The phantom used was a tank filled with an aqueous solution of urea. Cadmium-containing organs were simulated. For in vivo neutron-activation analysis of human tissues at a depth of 2-5 cm it was found advisable to use neutrons of 20-40 keV mean energy with a beam area of at least 45 cm 2

  13. Multipurpose epithermal neutron beam on new research station at MARIA research reactor in Swierk-Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzinski, M.A.; Maciak, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    MARIA reactor is an open-pool research reactor what gives the chance to install uranium fission converter on the periphery of the core. It could be installed far enough not to induce reactivity of the core but close enough to produce high flux of fast neutrons. Special design of the converter is now under construction. It is planned to set the research stand based on such uranium converter in the near future: in 2015 MARIA reactor infrastructure should be ready (preparation started in 2013), in 2016 the neutron beam starts and in 2017 opening the stand for material and biological research or for medical training concerning BNCT. Unused for many years, horizontal channel number H2 at MARIA research rector in Poland, is going to be prepared as a part of unique stand. The characteristics of the neutron beam will be significant advantage of the facility. High flux of neutrons at the level of 2x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} will be obtainable by uranium neutron converter located 90 cm far from the reactor core fuel elements (still inside reactor core basket between so called core reflectors). Due to reaction of core neutrons with converter U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} material it will produce high flux of fast neutrons. After conversion neutrons will be collimated and moderated in the channel by special set of filters and moderators. At the end of H2 channel i.e. at the entrance to the research room neutron energy will be in the epithermal energy range with neutron intensity at least at the level required for BNCT (2x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). For other purposes density of the neutron flux could be smaller. The possibility to change type and amount of installed filters/moderators which enables getting different properties of the beam (neutron energy spectrum, neutron-gamma ratio and beam profile and shape) is taken into account. H2 channel is located in separate room which is adjacent to two other empty rooms under the preparation for research laboratories (200 m2). It is

  14. A new high resolution neutron powder diffractometer at the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passell, L.; Bar-Ziv, S.; Gardner, D.W.; Cox, D.E.; Axe, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution neutron powder diffractometer under construction at the Brookhaven HFBR is expected to be completed by mid-1991. The new machine will have a Ge (511) monochromator with a take-off angle of 120 o (λ=1.89A) and 64 3 He counters in the detector bank. There will be interchangeable collimators before the monochromator allowing a choice of 5 or 11' horizontal divergence, and 10 cm-high, 5' collimators in front of the detectors. In the higher resolution mode, Δd/d is expected to be about 6x10 -4 at the resolution minimum. The diffractometer is generally similar to D2B at the Institut Laue-Langevin except for the monochromator. This will consist of a vertically focussing array of segments 3x1.27 cm in dimensions cut from stacks of 20 0.43 mm wafers that have been pressed and brazed together. Preliminary measurements indicate that a mosaic width of 0.1-0.15 o and a peak reflectivity of 25% can be achieved in this way. (author) 2 figs., 22 refs

  15. Do existing research reactors teach us all about beam tube optimisation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, Hans-Joachim; Feltes, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The contribution makes the attempt to analyse the data base available in the literature and in Siemens' own projects and to find out potential systematics from the existing research reactors with beam tubes, separated into reactors with different reflectors and distinguished for tangential and radial tubes and cold neutron sources, respectively some generic calculations serve as gauging data. The contribution is not meant as critics on any design. The results might serve supporting designers and operators when evaluating the pros and cons of existing or planned design in terms of the optimum beam tubes. Existing lacks of systematics are evaluated in view of suitable explanations and constraints, which do not allow optimisation. Examples of such constraints are the different material layers between fuel zone and reflector zone which have various reasons. The limited data in the literature plus the numerous lacks of precision of the representation of those data should be an incentive to improve the performed analysis by collecting more exact data and re-doing the evaluation before answering the title question really

  16. Design study of a neutral beam injection system for the JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Design study has been made of a 200 kV, 45 MW D 0 neutral beam injection system for the JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) covering the following: determination of the ion source specifications, design of components such as ion source with extraction electrodes, energy converter, cryopump and cooling system, and estimations of the energy conversion efficiency, overall power efficiency and total power required for operation of the NBI system, and also a hydrogen isotope separation method using cryo-sorption pumps. Optimizations and parameter studies of the neutralizing cell length, gas flow rate, operating pressure of ion sources, total pumping speed and pressure of energy converters are made in the design study based on reactor plasma requirements. Hollow cathode ion sources are proposed because of the extended operation time at low gas pressure (about 4.5 x 10 -3 Torr) and the high gas efficiency (40%). Life of the extraction electrodes is determined by blistering due to deuterium ions. Fast neutron radiation damage is relatively small. In-line direct converters with grounded recovery electrodes and neutralizing cells floated at negative potential -190 kV are used to recover residual deuterium ion energy without interrupting the neutral beam trajectories. Energy conversion efficiency of 80% and overall power efficiency of about 40% are obtained. (auth.)

  17. Do existing research reactors teach us all about beam tube optimization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, Hans Joachim; Feltes, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The contribution makes the attempt to analyse the data base available in the literature and in Siemens' own projects and to find out potential systematics from the existing research reactor with beam tubes, separated into reactors with different reflectors and distinguished for tangential and radial tubes and cold neutron sources, resp. Some generic calculations serve as gauging data. The contribution is not meant as critics on any design.The results might serve supporting designers and operators when evaluating the pros and cons of existing or planned design in terms of the optimum beam tubes. Existing lacks of systematics are evaluated in view of suitable explanations and constraints, which do not allow optimisation. Examples pf such constraints are the different material layers between fuel zone and reflector zone which have various reasons. The limited data in the literature plus the numerous lacks of precision of the representation of those data should be an incentive to improve the performed analysis by collecting more exact data and re-doing the evaluation before answering the title-question really. (author)

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  19. Neutronics shielding analysis of the last mirror-beam duct system for a laser fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.; Klein, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    A Monte Carlo three-dimensional neutronics analysis for the last mirror-beam duct system for the SOLASE conceptual laser-driven fusion power reactor design is presented. Detailed geometric configurations including the reactor cavity, the two last mirrors, and the three-section two-right-angle bends duct are modeled. Measurements are given of the dimensions and compositions of the reactor components, and of neutron scalar fluxes, spatial dependencies and neutron volumetric heating rates for the cases of aluminum or Boral as laser beam duct liners, and ordinary concrete or lead mortar as shield material. A three-dimensional modeling of laser-driven reactor penetrations is employed. The particle leakage is found to be excessively high for the configuration of the conceptual design considered and the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions, such as the use of Boral as a duct liner and the use of lead mortar instead of ordinary concrete as a shield material, are considered

  20. Use of ion beams to simulate reaction of reactor fuels with their cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Baldo, P.

    2006-01-01

    Processes occurring within reactor cores are not amenable to direct experimental observation. Among major concerns are damage, fission gas accumulation and reaction between the fuel and its cladding all of which lead to swelling. These questions can be investigated through simulation with ion beams. As an example, we discuss the irradiation driven interaction of uranium-molybdenum alloys, intended for use as low-enrichment reactor fuels, with aluminum, which is used as fuel cladding. Uranium-molybdenum coated with a 100 nm thin film of aluminum was irradiated with 3 MeV Kr ions to simulate fission fragment damage. Mixing and diffusion of aluminum was followed as a function of irradiation with RBS and nuclear reaction analysis using the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si reaction which occurs at a proton energy of 991.9 keV. During irradiation at 150 deg. C, aluminum diffused into the uranium alloy at a irradiation driven diffusion rate of 30 nm 2 /dpa. At a dose of 90 dpa, uranium diffusion into the aluminum layer resulted in formation of an aluminide phase at the initial interface. The thickness of this phase grew until it consumed the aluminum layer. The rapid diffusion of Al into these reactor fuels may offer explanation of the observation that porosity is not observed in the fuel particles but on their periphery

  1. Optimization of the irradiation beam in the BNCT research facility at IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Vinicius Alexandre de

    2014-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic technique for the treatment of some types of cancer whose useful energy comes from a nuclear reaction that occurs when thermal neutron impinges upon a Boron-10 atom. In Brazil there is a research facility built along the beam hole number 3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN, which was designed to perform BNCT research experiments. For a good performance of the technique, the irradiation beam should be mostly composed of thermal neutrons with a minimum as possible gamma and above thermal neutron components. This work aims to monitor and evaluate the irradiation beam on the sample irradiation position through the use of activation detectors (activation foils) and also to propose, through simulation using the radiation transport code, MCNP, new sets of moderators and filters which shall deliver better irradiation fields at the irradiation sample position In this work, a simulation methodology, based on a MCNP card, known as wwg (weight window generation) was studied, and the neutron energy spectrum has been experimentally discriminated at 5 energy ranges by using a new set o activation foils. It also has been concluded that the BNCT research facility has the required thermal neutron flux to perform studies in the area and it has a great potential for improvement for tailoring the irradiation field. (author)

  2. Electron temperature profiles in high power neutral-beam-heated TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Stauffer, F.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, the maximum neutral beam injection (NBI) power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was increased to 20 MW, with three beams co-parallel and one counter-parallel to I/sub p/. TFTR was operated over a wide range of plasma parameters; 2.5 19 19 m -3 . Data bases have been constructed with over 600 measured electron temperature profiles from multipoint TV Thomson scattering which span much of this parameter space. We have also examined electron temperature profile shapes from electron cyclotron emission at the fundamental ordinary mode and second harmonic extraordinary mode for a subset of these discharges. In the light of recent work on ''profile consistency'' we have analyzed these temperature profiles in the range 0.3 < (r/a) < 0.9 to determine if a profile shape exists which is insensitive to q/sub cyl/ and beam-heating profile. Data from both sides of the temperature profile [T/sub e/(R)] were mapped to magnetic flux surfaces [T/sub e/(r/a)]. Although T/sub e/(r/a), in the region where 0.3 < r/a < 0.9 was found to be slightly broader at lower q/sub cyl/, it was found to be remarkably insensitive to β/sub p/, to the fraction of NBI power injected co-parallel to I/sub p/, and to the heating profile going from peaked on axis, to hollow. 10 refs., 8 figs

  3. Epithermal neutron beam design for neutron capture therapy at the Power Burst Facility and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Parsons, D.K.; Rushton, B.L.; Nigg, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear design studies have been performed for two reactor-based epithermal neutron beams for cancer treatment by neutron capture therapy (NCT). An intermediate-intensity epithermal beam has been designed and implemented at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Measurements show that the BMRR design predictions for the principal characteristics of this beam are accurate. A canine program for research into the biological effects of NCT is now under way at BMRR. The design for a high-intensity epithermal beam with minimal contamination from undesirable radiation components has been finalized for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This design will be implemented when it is determined that human NCT trials are advisable. The PBF beam will exhibit approximately an order of magnitude improvement in absolute epithermal flux intensity over that available in the BMRR, and its angular distribution and spectral characteristics will be more advantageous for NCT. The combined effects of beam intensity, angular distribution, spectrum, and contaminant level allow the desired tumor radiation dose to be delivered in much shorter times than are possible with the currently available BMRR beam, with a significant reduction (factor of 3 to 5) in collateral dose due to beam contaminants

  4. Establishment of the Neutron Beam Research Facility at the OPAL Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.; Robinson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Australia's first research reactor, HIFAR, reached criticality in January 1958. At that time Australia's main agenda was establishment of a nuclear power program. HIFAR operated for nearly 50 years, providing a firm foundation for the establishment of Australia's second generation research Reactor OPAL, which reached criticality in August 006. In HIFAR's early years a neutron beam facility was established for materials characterization, partly in aid of the nuclear energy agenda and partly in response to interest from Australia's scientific community. By the time Australia's nuclear energy program ceased (in the 1970s), radioisotope production and research had also been established at Lucas Heights. Also, by this time the neutron beam facility for scientific research had evolved into a major utilization programme, warranting establishment of an independent body to facilitate scientific access (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering). In HIFAR's lifetime, ANSTO established a radiopharmaceuticals service for the Australian medical community and NDT silicon production was also established and grew to maturity. So when time came to determine the strategy for nuclear research in Australia into the 21st century, it was clear that the replacement for HIFAR should be multipurpose, with major emphases on scientific applications of neutron beams and medical isotope production. With this strategy in mind, ANSTO set about to design and build OPAL with a world-class neutron beam facility, capable of supporting a large and diverse scientific research community. The establishment of the neutron beam facility became the mission of the Bragg Institute management team. This journey began in 1997 with establishment of a working budget, and reached its first major objective when OPAL reached 20 MW thermal power nearly one decade later (in 2006). The first neutron beam instruments began operation soon after (in 2007), and quickly proved themselves to be

  5. Study of filtration of reactor beam of neutrons with cadmium in a multilayer shielding containing boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahid, R.M.; El-Kall, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the effect of cadmium on the distribution and attenuation of reactor thermal neutrons emitted from a reactor core and the new thermal neutrons produced in a heterogeneous shield of water, iron, iron + B 4 C and ordinary concrete. The measurements were made using a reactor beam of neutrons filtered with cadmium emitted from one of the horizontal channels of ET-RR-1. It is found that the presence of cadmium sheet at channel exit causes a marked decrease in the thickness of the shield required to attenuate the thermal neutron flux by a certain factor. 12 refs., 5 figures. (author)

  6. Present status of neutron beam facilities at the research reactor, HANARO, and its future prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Kang, Young-Hwan; Kuk, Il-Hiun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Korea has been operating its new research reactor, HANARO, since its first criticality in 1995. It is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor using LEU fuel with thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10{sup 14} nominally at the nose in the D{sub 2}O reflector having 7 horizontal beam ports and a provision of vertical hole for cold neutron source installation. KAERI has pursued an extensive instrument development program since 1992 by the support of the nuclear long-term development program of the government and there are now 4 working instruments. A high resolution powder diffractometer and a neutron radiography facility has been operational since late 1997 and 1996, respectively. A four-circle diffractometer has been fully working since mid 1999 and a small angle neutron spectrometer is just under commissioning phase. With the development of linear position sensitive detector with delay-line readout electronics, we have developed a residual stress instrument as an optional machine to the HRPD for last two years. Around early 1998 informal users program started with friendly users and it became a formal users support program by the ministry of science and technology. Short description for peer group formation and users activities is given. (author)

  7. Present status of neutron beam facilities at the research reactor, HANARO, and its future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Kang, Young-Hwan; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    2001-01-01

    Korea has been operating its new research reactor, HANARO, since its first criticality in 1995. It is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor using LEU fuel with thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10 14 nominally at the nose in the D 2 O reflector having 7 horizontal beam ports and a provision of vertical hole for cold neutron source installation. KAERI has pursued an extensive instrument development program since 1992 by the support of the nuclear long-term development program of the government and there are now 4 working instruments. A high resolution powder diffractometer and a neutron radiography facility has been operational since late 1997 and 1996, respectively. A four-circle diffractometer has been fully working since mid 1999 and a small angle neutron spectrometer is just under commissioning phase. With the development of linear position sensitive detector with delay-line readout electronics, we have developed a residual stress instrument as an optional machine to the HRPD for last two years. Around early 1998 informal users program started with friendly users and it became a formal users support program by the ministry of science and technology. Short description for peer group formation and users activities is given. (author)

  8. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  9. Installation and testing of an optimized epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Saraf, S.K.; Fiarman, S.; Ramsey, E.; Wielopolski, L.; Laster, B.; Wheeler, F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Ioannina Univ. (Greece); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Health Science Center; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Various calculations indicate that an optimized epithermal neutron beam can be produced by moderating fission neutrons either with a combination of Al and D{sub 2}O, or with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We have designed, installed and tested an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderated epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). The epithermal neutron fluence rate of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec produces a peak thermal neutron fluence rate of 1.9 to 2.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec in a tissue equivalent (TE) phantom head, depending on the configuration. Thus a single therapy treatment of 5 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} can be delivered in 30--45 minutes. All irradiation times are given for a BMRR power of 3 MW, which is the highest power which can be delivered continuously. 18 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 10 8 n/cm 2 · s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n epi and 20 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n epi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power

  11. Stress analysis of neutral beam pivot point bellows for tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.; Benda, B.J.; Tiong, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The neutral beam pivot point bellows serves as an airtight flexible linkage between the torus duct and the neutral beam transition duct in Princeton University's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The bellows considered here is basically rectangular in cross section with rounded corners; a unique shape. Its overall external dimensions are about 28 in. (about 711 mm) X about 35 in. (about 889 mm). The bellows is formed from 18 convolutions and is of the nested ripple type. It is about 11 in. (about 43.3 mm) in length, composed of Inconel 718, and each leaf has a thickness of 0.034 in. (.86 mm). The bellows is subjected to a series of design loading conditions -- vacuum, vacuum + 2 psi (.12 MPa), vacuum + stroke (10,000 cycles), vacuum + temperature increase + extension, extension to a stress of 120 ksi (838 MPa), and a series of rotational loading conditions induced in the bellows by alignment of the neutral beam injector. A stress analysis of the bellows was performed by the finite element method -- locations and magnitude of maximum stresses were calculated for all of the design loading conditions to check with allowable values and help guide placement of strain gauges during proof testing. A typical center convolution and end convolution were analyzed. Loading conditions were separated into symmetric and antisymmetric cases about the planes of symmetry of the cross-section. Iterative linear analyses were performed, i.e. compressive loading conditions led to predicted overlap of the leaves from linear analysis and restraints were added to prevent such overlap. This effect was found to be substantial in stress predicition and necessary to be taken into account. A total of eleven loading conditions and seven models were analyzed. The results showed peak stresses to be within allowable limits and the number of allowable cycles to be greater than the design condition

  12. Design, construction and characterization of a new neutron beam for neutron radiography at the Tehran Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choopan Dastjerdi, M.H., E-mail: mdastjerdi@aeoi.org.ir [Reactor Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, H.; Kasesaz, Y.; Mirvakili, S.M.; Emami, J.; Ghods, H.; Ezzati, A. [Reactor Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-11

    To obtain a thermal neutron beam for neutron radiography applications, a neutron collimator has been designed and implemented at the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). TRR is a 5 MW open pool light water moderated reactor with seven beam tubes. The neutron collimator is implemented in the E beam tube of the TRR. The design of the neutron collimator was performed using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In this work, polycrystalline bismuth and graphite have been used as a gamma filter and an illuminator, respectively. The L/D parameter of the facility was chosen in the range of 150–250. The thermal neutron flux at the image plane can be varied from 2.26×10{sup 6} to 6.5×10{sup 6} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Characterization of the beam was performed by ASTM standard IQI and foil activation technique to determine the quality of neutron beam. The results show that the obtained neutron beam has a good quality for neutron radiography applications.

  13. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  14. Development of the electron beam welding of the aluminium alloy 6061-T6 for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 6061-T6 has been selected for the construction of the Jules Horowitz's reactor vessel. This reactor vessel is pressurized and will be made through butt welding of ∼ 2 cm thick aluminium slabs. The electron beam welding process has been tested and qualified. It appears that this welding process allows: -) welding without pre-heating, -) vacuum welding, -) welding of 100% of the thickness in one passage, -) very low deforming welding process, -) very low density and very low volume of blow holes, -) weak ZAT (Thermal Affected Zones), and -) high reproducibility that permits automation. (A.C.)

  15. Characterization of a Neutron Beam Following Reconfiguration of the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD Core and Addition of New Fuel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Craft

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The neutron radiography reactor (NRAD is a 250 kW Mark-II Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA reactor at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA. The East Radiography Station (ERS is one of two neutron beams at the NRAD used for neutron radiography, which sits beneath a large hot cell and is primarily used for neutron radiography of highly radioactive objects. Additional fuel elements were added to the NRAD core in 2013 to increase the excess reactivity of the reactor, and may have changed some characteristics of the neutron beamline. This report discusses characterization of the neutron beamline following the addition of fuel to the NRAD. This work includes determination of the facility category according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards, and also uses an array of gold foils to determine the neutron beam flux and evaluate the neutron beam profile. The NRAD ERS neutron beam is a Category I neutron radiography facility, the highest possible quality level according to the ASTM. Gold foil activation experiments show that the average neutron flux with length-to-diameter ratio (L/D = 125 is 5.96 × 106 n/cm2/s with a 2σ standard error of 2.90 × 105 n/cm2/s. The neutron beam profile can be considered flat for qualitative neutron radiographic evaluation purposes. However, the neutron beam profile should be taken into account for quantitative evaluation.

  16. On the possible use of the MASURCA reactor as a flexible, high-intensity, fast neutron beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioni, Luca; Jacqmin, Robert; Sumini, Marco; Stout, Brian

    2017-09-01

    In recent work [1, 2], we have shown that the MASURCA research reactor could be used to deliver a fairly-intense continuous fast neutron beam to an experimental room located next to the reactor core. As a consequence of the MASURCA favorable characteristics and diverse material inventories, the neutron beam intensity and spectrum can be further tailored to meet the users' needs, which could be of interest for several applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to characterize in detail the extracted neutron (and photon) beam entering the experimental room. These numerical simulations were done for two different bare cores: A uranium metallic core (˜30% 235U enriched) and a plutonium oxide core (˜25% Pu fraction, ˜78% 239Pu). The results show that the distinctive resonance energy structures of the two core leakage spectra are preserved at the channel exit. As the experimental room is large enough to house a dedicated set of neutron spectrometry instruments, we have investigated several candidate neutron spectrum measurement techniques, which could be implemented to guarantee well-defined, repeatable beam conditions to users. Our investigation also includes considerations regarding the gamma rays in the beams.

  17. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  18. Design of the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) neutral beam system beamline, United States concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purgalis, P.; Anderson, O.A.; Cooper, W.S.; DeVries, G.E.; Lietzke, A.F.; Kunkel, W.B.; Kwan, J.W.; Matuk, C.A.; Nakai, T.; Stearns, J.W.; Soroka, L.; Wells, R.P.; Lindquist, W.B.; Neef, W.S.; Reginato, L.L.; Sedgley, D.W.; Brook, J.W.; Luzzi, T.E.; Myers, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Design of a neutral beamline for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is described. The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D - source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to watercooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules that can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of D degree into three ports with a total of nine modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port. To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW at 1.3 MeV; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is removed from service. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 35 m from the port into the torus. Neutron shielding in the drift duct provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus. Alternative component choices are also discussed for the evolving design. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. A pulsed neutron monochromatic beam at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Eid, Y.; Maayouf, R.M.A.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed neutron monochromatic beam, at the ET-RR-1 reactor, is produced by two 32 cm diameter rotors suspended in magnetic fields, whose centres are 126 cm apart rotating at speeds up to 16,000 rev/min. Each of the rotors has two slots, which are of constant cross-section in area - 7x10mm 2 , and are curved so that they have a maximum transmission for neutrons whose speed is 8.2 times that of the rotor tip. The jitter of the phase between the rotors at different rotation rates is found not to exceed +-1 μs. It has been found that both the observed time distribution and the TOF distribution of the neutrons at different rotation rates are in good agreement with the calculated ones. The observed intensity of the monochromatic neutrons of wavelength 2.74+-0.09 A, obtained by the rotors rotating at a speed of 10,500 rev/min with 864+-1 μs difference in phase between them, is 66.8 n/s. This value is found to be less than the predicted one by a factor of 5.5. (author)

  20. LIBRA - a light ion beam inertial confinement fusion reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Bruggink, D.

    1989-01-01

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4 MJ shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion pulse is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbide tubes with Li 17 Pb 83 flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is a right circular cylinder, 8.7 meters in diameter. The target chamber is 'self-pumped' by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with liquid that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequency without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of LIBRA is estimated to be $2200/kWe. (author)

  1. Behavior of exposed human lymphocytes to a neutron beam of the Reactor TRIGA Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbajal R, M. I.; Arceo M, C.; Aguilar H, F.; Guerrero C, C.

    2012-10-01

    The living beings are permanently exposed to radiations of natural origin: cosmic and geologic, as well as the artificial radiations that come from sources elaborated by the man. The artificial sources have an important use in the medical area. Particularly has been increased the neutrons use due to the effectiveness that they have to damage the cells with regard to other radiation types. The biological indicator of exposition to ionizing radiation more reliable is the chromosomal aberrations study, specifically the dicentrics in human lymphocytes. This test allows, establishing the exposition dose in function of the damage quantity. The dicentrics have a behavior in function of the dose. The calibration curve that describes this behavior is specific for each type of ionizing radiation. In the year 2006 beginning was given to the expositions of human lymphocytes to a neutron beam generated in the reactor TRIGA Mark III of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico. Up to 2008 the response dose curve comprised an interval of exposition time of up to 30 minutes. Moreover, the interval between 10 an 20 minutes is included, since was observed that this last is indispensable for the adjustment waited in a lineal model. (Author)

  2. Leak detection in the primary reactor coolant piping of nuclear power plant by applying beam-microphone technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Shimanskiy, Sergey; Naoi, Yosuke; Kanazawa, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    A microphone leak detection method was applied to the inlet piping of the ATR-prototype reactor, Fugen. Statistical analysis results showed that the cross-correlation method provided the effective results for detection of a small leakage. However, such a technique has limited application due to significant distortion of the signals on the reactor site. As one of the alternative methods, the beam-microphone provides necessary spatial selectivity and its performance is less affected by signal distortion. A prototype of the beam-microphone was developed and then tested at the O-arai Engineering Center of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). On-site testing of the beam-microphone was carried out in the inlet piping room of an RBMK reactor of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) in Russia. A leak sound imitator was used to simulate the leakage sound under the leakage flow condition of 1-3 gpm (0.23-0.7 m 3 /h). Analysis showed that signal distortion does not seriously affect the performance of this method, and that sound reflection may result in the appearance of ghost sound sources. The test results showed that the influences of sound reflection and background noise were smaller at the high frequencies where the leakage location could be estimated with an angular accuracy of 5deg which is the range of localization accuracy required for the leak detection system. (author)

  3. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F.C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schloegl, R.

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000 deg. C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100 μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10 ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20 ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N 2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N 2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250 deg. C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH 3 · radicals is successfully demonstrated

  4. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F. C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schlögl, R.

    2006-05-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000°C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250°C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH3• radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  5. Optimization of Neutron Spectrum in Northwest Beam Tube of Tehran Research Reactor for BNCT, by MCNP Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, M. [National Radiation Protection Department - NRPD, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran - AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); End of North Kargar st, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, P.O. Box: 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Shayesteh, M. [Radiation Application School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    In order to gain the neutron spectrum with proper components specification for BNCT, it is necessary to design a Beam Shape Assembling (BSA), include of moderator, collimator, reflector, gamma filter and thermal neutrons filter, in front of the initial radiation beam from the source. According to the result of MCNP4C simulation, the Northwest beam tube has the most optimized neuron flux between three north beam tubes of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). So, it has been chosen for this purpose. Simulation of the BSA has been done in four above mentioned phases. In each stage, ten best configurations of materials with different length and width were selected as the candidates for the next stage. The last BSA configuration includes of: 78 centimeters of air as an empty space, 40 centimeters of Iron plus 52 centimeters of heavy-water as moderator, 30 centimeters of water or 90 centimeters of Aluminum-Oxide as a reflector, 1 millimeters of lithium (Li) as thermal neutrons filter and finally 3 millimeters of Bismuth (Bi) as a filter of gamma radiation. The result of Calculations shows that if we use this BSA configuration for TRR Northwest beam tube, then the best neutron flux and spectrum will be achieved for BNCT. (authors)

  6. Optimization of Neutron Spectrum in Northwest Beam Tube of Tehran Research Reactor for BNCT, by MCNP Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Shayesteh, M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to gain the neutron spectrum with proper components specification for BNCT, it is necessary to design a Beam Shape Assembling (BSA), include of moderator, collimator, reflector, gamma filter and thermal neutrons filter, in front of the initial radiation beam from the source. According to the result of MCNP4C simulation, the Northwest beam tube has the most optimized neuron flux between three north beam tubes of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). So, it has been chosen for this purpose. Simulation of the BSA has been done in four above mentioned phases. In each stage, ten best configurations of materials with different length and width were selected as the candidates for the next stage. The last BSA configuration includes of: 78 centimeters of air as an empty space, 40 centimeters of Iron plus 52 centimeters of heavy-water as moderator, 30 centimeters of water or 90 centimeters of Aluminum-Oxide as a reflector, 1 millimeters of lithium (Li) as thermal neutrons filter and finally 3 millimeters of Bismuth (Bi) as a filter of gamma radiation. The result of Calculations shows that if we use this BSA configuration for TRR Northwest beam tube, then the best neutron flux and spectrum will be achieved for BNCT. (authors)

  7. Thermo-mechanical analysis of an acceleration grid for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor-neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hanada, Masaya; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2001-01-01

    In the engineering design of a negative-ion beam source for a high-power neutral beam injection (NBI) system, one of the most important issues is thermo-mechanical design of acceleration grids for producing several tens of MW ion beams. An acceleration grid for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor-neutral beam injection (ITER-NBI) system will be subjected to the heat loading as high as 1.5 MW. In the present paper, thermo-mechanical characteristics of the acceleration grid for the ITER-NBI system were analyzed. Numerical simulation indicated that maximum aperture-axis displacement of the acceleration grid due to thermal expansion would be about 0.7 mm for the heat loading of 1.5 MW. From the thin lens theory of beam optics, beamlet deflection angle by the aperture-axis displacement was estimated to be about 2 mrad, which is within the requirement of the engineering design of the ITER-NBI system. Numerical simulation also indicated that no melting on the acceleration grid would occur for a heat loading of 1.5 MW, while local plastic deformation would happen. To avoid the plastic deformation, it is necessary to reduce the heat loading onto the acceleration grid to less than 1 MW

  8. Dependence of neutron rate production with accelerator beam profile and energy range in an ADS-TRIGA RC1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firoozabadi, M.M.; Karimi, J. [Birjand Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Zangian, M. [Shahid Beheshti Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2016-12-15

    Lead, mercury, tantalum and tungsten were used as target material for calculation of spallation processes in an ADS-TRIGA RC1 reactor. The results show that tungsten has the highest neutron production rate. Therefore it was selected as target material for further calculations. The sensitivity of neutron parameters of the ADS reactor core relative to a change of beam profile and proton energy was determined. The core assembly and parameters of the TRIGA RC1 demonstration facility were used for the calculation model. By changing the proton energy from 115 to 1 400 MeV by using the intra-nuclear cascade model of Bertini (INC-Bertini), the quantity of the relative difference in % for energy gain (G) and spallation neutron yield (Y{sub n/p}), increases to 289.99 % and 5199.15 % respectively. These changes also reduce the amount of relative difference for the proton beam current (I{sub p}) and accelerator power (P{sub acc}), 99.81 % and 81.28 % respectively. In addition, the use of a Gaussian distribution instead of a uniform distribution in the accelerator beam profile increases the quantity of relative difference for energy gain (G), net neutron multiplication (M) and spallation neutron yield (Y{sub n/p}), up to 4.93 %, 4.9 % and 5.55 % respectively.

  9. The fast neutron facility at the research reactor Munich. Determination of the beam quality and medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, F. M.; Koester, L.

    1990-01-01

    At the research reactor FRM, fast and epithermal neutron beams are generated by a thermal-to-fast neutron converter and/or near core scatterers. The dosimetry and spectroscopy of the resulting intense mixed beams of neutron and gamma radiation with a wide range of energies set spetial tasks for neutron dosimetry and spectroscopy. The twin chamber method and some others are briefly described. Neutron spectroscopy is performed by a Li-6 sandwich spectrometer covering the full neutron spectrum of a well-collimated mixed beam from about 20 keV to 8 MeV. The data registration is assisted by a microcomputer which generates sum and triton spectra on-line. Sum analysis is applied to neutron energies greater than 0.3 MeV; the intermediate neutron spectrum is evaluated by unfolding of the triton spectrum. Moreover, a brief overview of the reactor neutron therapy (RENT) at the FRM is given. After a number of animal experiments for the determination of the biological effectiveness relative to X-rays, clinical irradiations have been started in 1985. The most important indications for RENT are listed. 140 patients with bad prognoses have been treated since. The average tumour control rate of 60% is surprisingly high. Possibilities for an assisting Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are shown. 8 figs., 23 refs

  10. Conception of electron beam-driven subcritical molten salt ultimate safety reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abalin, S.S.; Alekseev, P.N.; Ignat`ev, V.V. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    This paper is a preliminary sketch of a conception to develop the {open_quotes}ultimate safety reactor{close_quotes} using modern reactor and accelerator technologies. This approach would not require a long-range R&D program. The ultimate safety reactor could produce heat and electric energy, expand the production of fuel, or be used for the transmutation of long-lived wastes. The use of the combined double molten salt reactor system allows adequate neutron multiplication to permit using an electron accelerator for the initial neutron flux. The general parameters of such a system are discussed in this paper.

  11. Larger research programs at the beam holes of the Austrian TRIGA Mark II reactor. Design and construction of a Fourier chopper-selector at the Austrian TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, C.M.

    1970-01-01

    A neutron chopping system utilizing Fourier analysis has great advantages to alternative systems. For this purpose the chopper consists of a disc, opaque to neutrons, rotating on an axis perpendicular to its centre. Around its outside edge a series of uniformly spaced teeth and spaces are formed with neutron transparent gaps extending towards the centre. By using a stationary section having the same pattern of teeth and gaps it is possible to utilize a beam area considerably larger than the area of one tooth. During the last years at the TRIGA Reactor in Vienna a neutron chopping-and selecting-system is developed and in construction, which will not only chop the beam in that way necessary for Fourier analysis but also select the energy. The selection is done by seven discs of the form described above mounted on an axis. The selector is designed for neutron wave lengths between 3 and 30 A. The resolution is constant over the whole range of energy and depends on the beam divergence. Thus the modulation frequency is 10 4 sec -1 and the half-width of the neutron pulse about 50 μsec

  12. A combined system for the generation of an intense cold neutron beam with a medium power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, M.; Okumura, K.

    1989-01-01

    A system consisting of a very cold moderator and a neutron-accelerating high speed turbine is proposed for the intensification of a cold neutron beam in a medium power research reactor up to the level applicable to inelastic neutron scattering spectrometers. A numerical result for 5 cm thick solid ortho-deuterium at a temperature of about 4 K and a turbine with a blade velocity of about 350 m/s gives an output intensity of monochromatic neutrons of about 10 7 n/cm 2 at an energy of about 3.5 meV with an energy width of about 0.2 meV for a typical case of a 5 MW reactor. (orig.)

  13. X-ray and pressure conditions on the first wall of a particle beam inertial confinement reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magelssen, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Because of the presence of a chamber gas in a particle beam reactor cavity, nonneutron target debris created from thermonuclear burn will be modified or stopped before it reaches the first reactor wall. The resulting modified spectra and pulse lengths of the debris need to be calculated to determine first wall effects. Further, the cavity overpressure created by the momentum and energy exchange between the debris and gas must also be calculated to determine its effect. The purpose of this paper is to present results of the debris-background gas problem obtained with a one fluid, two temperature plasma hydrodynamic computer code model which includes multifrequency radiation transport. Spherical symmetry, ideal gas equation of state, and LTE for each radiation frequency group were assumed. The transport of debris ions was not included and all the debris energy was assumed to be in radiation. The calculated x-ray spectra and pulse lengths and the background overpressure are presented

  14. Behavior of exposed human lymphocytes to a neutron beam of the reactor TRIGA Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbajal R, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to ionizing radiation occurs in people who require radiation treatment, also in those for work can come to receive doses above the permitted levels. A third possibility of exposure is the release of radioactive material in which the general population is affected. Most of the time the exhibition is partial and only rarely occurs throughout the body. For various reasons, situations arise where it is impossible to determine by conventional physical methods, the amount of radiation you were exposed to the affected person and in these cases where the option to follow is the Biological Dosimetry, where the analysis of chromosomes dicentrics is used to estimate the dose of ionizing radiation exposure. A calibration curve is generated from in vitro analysis of dicentric chromosome, which are found in human lymphocytes, treated with different types and doses of radiation. The dicentric is formed from two lesions, one on each chromosome and their union results in a structure having two centromeres, acentric fragment with her for the union of several chromosomes leads to more complex structures as tri-centric s, tetra or penta-centric s, which have the same origin. The dose-response curve is estimated by observing the frequency of dicentrics and extrapolated to a dose-effect curve previously established, for which it is necessary that each lab has its own calibration curves, taking into account that for a Let low radiation, dose-effect curve follows a linear-quadratic model Y=C + αD + βD. The production of dicentric chromosomes with a high Let, was studied using a beam of neutrons generated in the reactor TRIGA Mark III with an average energy of 1 MeV, adjusting the linear model Y=αD. The dose-response relationship is established in blood samples from the same donor, the coefficient α of the dose-response is Y = (0.3692 ± 0.011 * D), also shows that saturation is reached in system 4 Gy. (Author)

  15. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  16. Conceptual Design of a Clinical BNCT Beam in an Adjacent Dry Cell of the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maucec, Marko

    2000-01-01

    The MCNP4B Monte Carlo transport code is used in a feasibility study of the epithermal neutron boron neutron capture therapy facility in the thermalizing column of the 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI). To boost the epithermal neutron flux at the reference irradiation point, the efficiency of a fission plate with almost 1.5 kg of 20% enriched uranium and 2.3 kW of thermal power is investigated. With the same purpose in mind, the TRIGA reactor core setup is optimized, and standard fresh fuel elements are concentrated partly in the outermost ring of the core. Further, a detailed parametric study of the materials and dimensions for all the relevant parts of the irradiation facility is carried out. Some of the standard epithermal neutron filter/moderator materials, as well as 'pressed-only' low-density Al 2 O 3 and AlF 3 , are considered. The proposed version of the BNCT facility, with PbF 2 as the epithermal neutron filter/moderator, provides an epithermal neutron flux of ∼1.1 x 10 9 n/cm 2 .s, thus enabling patient irradiation times of nfast /φ epi -13 Gy.cm 2 /n and [overdot]D γ /φ epi -13 Gy.cm 2 /n), the in-air performances of the proposed beam are comparable to all existing epithermal BNCT facilities. The design presents an equally efficient alternative to the BNCT beams in TRIGA reactor thermal columns that are more commonly applied. The cavity of the dry cell, a former JSI TRIGA reactor spent-fuel storage facility, adjacent to the thermalizing column, could rather easily be rearranged into a suitable patient treatment room, which would substantially decrease the overall developmental costs

  17. The use of pulsed power ion/electron beams for studying of units of electronuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, S A; Korenev, A S; Puzynin, I V; Samojlov, V N; Sissakyan, A N [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The problems associated with the use of power pulsed ion beams for studying some units of the model electronuclear installation are considered. This makes it possible to analyze the problem of heating loads on the targets, entrance and exit windows for beams of charged particles. The methods of increasing the life-time of these thin foil based windows by surface modification of the materials by high current pulsed ion beams are considered. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs.

  18. Final design of the neutral beam lines for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.; Valby, L.E.; Stone, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Denhoy, B.; Yoard, R.

    1979-01-01

    Final design of the neutral beam lines for TFTR has been completed. A prototype has been assembled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and is undergoing testing as part of the Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). The final neutral beam line (NBL) configuration differs in several details from that previously reported upon; certain components have been added; and testing of the cryopump system has led to some design simplification. It is these developments which are reported herein

  19. The use of pulsed power ion/electron beams for studying of units of electronuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, S.A.; Korenev, A.S.; Puzynin, I.V.; Samoilov, V.N.; Sissakian, A.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    The questions of using power pulsed ion beams for studying some units of model`s electronuclear installation are considered in this report. It allows to analyze the question of heating loads on the targets, entering and output windows for beams of charge particles. The methods of increasing a life-time of these windows on the basis of thin foils with help of surface modification of materials by high current pulsed ion beams are considered. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  20. The use of pulsed power ion/electron beams for studying of units of electronuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Korenev, A.S.; Puzynin, I.V.; Samojlov, V.N.; Sissakyan, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of power pulsed ion beams for studying some units of the model electronuclear installation are considered. This makes it possible to analyze the problem of heating loads on the targets, entrance and exit windows for beams of charged particles. The methods of increasing the life-time of these thin foil based windows by surface modification of the materials by high current pulsed ion beams are considered. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  1. The use of pulsed power ion/electron beams for studying of units of electronuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Korenev, A.S.; Puzynin, I.V.; Samoilov, V.N.; Sissakian, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    The questions of using power pulsed ion beams for studying some units of model's electronuclear installation are considered in this report. It allows to analyze the question of heating loads on the targets, entering and output windows for beams of charge particles. The methods of increasing a life-time of these windows on the basis of thin foils with help of surface modification of materials by high current pulsed ion beams are considered. 5 refs., 4 figs

  2. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  3. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R S [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  4. Heavy ion inertial fusion: interface between target gain, accelerator phase space and reactor beam transport revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Fawley, W.M.; Judd, D.L.; Mark, J.W.K.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Recently revised estimates of target gain have added additional optimistic inputs to the interface between targets, accelerators and fusion chamber beam transport. But it remains valid that neutralization of the beams in the fusion chamber is useful if ion charge state Z > 1 or if > 1 kA per beamlet is to be propagated. Some engineering and economic considerations favor higher currents

  5. On the utilization of neutron beams of research reactors in research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAYEK, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear research reactors are the most widely available neutron sources, and they are capable of producing very high fluxes of neutrons having a considerable range of energies, from a few MeV to 10 MeV. Therefore, these neutrons can be used in many fields of basic research and for applications in physics, chemistry, medicine, biology, etc. Experiments with research reactors over the last 50 years have laid the foundations of today's nuclear technology. In addition, research reactors continue to be utilized as facilities for testing materials and in training manpower for nuclear programs, because basic training on a research reactor provides an essential understanding of the nuclear process, and personnel become accustomed to work under the special conditions resulting from irradiation and contamination risks

  6. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  7. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-01

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e+-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e+-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  8. Gas utilization in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T 2 allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H 2 to D 2 could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasche, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    A method for recovering energy in an inertial confinement fusion reactor having a reactor chamber and a sphere forming means positioned above an opening in the reactor chamber is described, comprising: embedding a fusion target fuel capsule having a predetermined yield in the center of a hollow solid lithium tube and subsequently embedding the hollow solid lithium tube in a liquid lithium medium; using the sphere forming means for forming the liquid lithium into a spherical shaped liquid lithium mass having a diameter smaller than the length of the hollow solid lithium tube with the hollow solid lithium tube being positioned along a diameter of the spherical shaped mass, providing the spherical shaped liquid lithium mass with the fusion fuel target capsule and hollow solid lithium tube therein as a freestanding liquid lithium shaped spherical shaped mass without any external means for maintaining the spherical shape by dropping the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass from the sphere forming means into the reactor chamber; producing a magnetic field in the reactor chamber; imploding the target capsule in the reactor chamber to produce fusion energy; absorbing fusion energy in the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass to convert substantially all the fusion energy to shock induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass which expands the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass; and compressing the magnetic field by expansion of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass and recovering useful energy

  10. Design of collimator in the radial piercing beam port of Kartini reactor for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M Ilma Muslih A; Andang Widiharto; Yohannes Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    Studies were carried out to design a collimator which results in epithermal neutron beam for in vivo experiment of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the Kartini Research Reactor by means of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) codes. Reactor within 100 kW of thermal power was used as the neutron source. All materials used were varied in size, according to the value of mean free path for each material. MCNP simulations indicated that by using 5 cm thick of Ni (95%) as collimator wall, 15 cm thick of Al as moderator, 1 cm thick of Pb as γ-ray shielding, 1.5 cm thick of Boral as additional material, with 2 cm aperture diameter, epithermal neutron beam with maximum flux of 5.03 x 10 8 n.cm -2 .s -1 could be produced. The beam has minimum fast neutron and γ-ray components of, respectively, 2.17 x 10 -13 Gy.cm 2 .n -1 and 1.16 x 10 -13 Gy.cm 2 .n -l , minimum thermal neutron per epithermal neutron ratio of 0.12, and maximum directionality of 0.835 . It did not fully pass the IAEA's criteria, since the epithermal neutron flux was below the recommended value, 1.0 x 10 9 n.cm -2 .s -l . Nonetheless, it was still usable with epithermal neutron flux exceeding 5.0 x 10 8 n.cm -2 .s -1 and fast neutron flux close to 2 x 10 -13 Gy.cm 2 .n -1 it is still feasible for BNCT in vivo experiment. (author)

  11. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E parallel B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  12. About the possibility of use of different types of targets as a neutron source for subcritical nuclear reactor driven by particle beam accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeev, E.F.; Dorokhovich, S.L.; Chusov, I.A. [Obninsk Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    The schemes of jet gas and liquid targets as well as the gastargets with a solid phase dispersion are introduced to use to receive the neutrons admitted to a subcritical reactor core. The possible variants of target position in the reactor are considered, target characteristics are calculated. The authors pay a great attention to the estimation of radioactive products yield receiving due to the interaction of the beam with the target.

  13. Determination and analysis of neutron flux distribution on radial Piercing beam port for utilization of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widarto

    2002-01-01

    Determination and analysis of neutron flux measurements on radial piercing beam port have been done as completion experimental data document and progressing on utilization of the Kartini research reactor purposes. The analysis and determination of the neutron flux have been carried out by using Au foils detector neutron activation analysis method which put on the radius of cross section (19 cm) and a long of radial piercing beam port (310 cm) Based on the calculation, distribution of the thermal neutron flux is around (8.3 ± 0.9) x 10 5 ncm -2 s -1 to (6.8 ± 0.5) x 10 7 ncm -2 s -1 and fast neutron is (5.0 ± 0.2) x 10 5 ncm -2 s -1 to (1.43 ± 0.6) x 10 7 ncm -2 s -1 . Analyzing by means of curve fitting method could be concluded that the neutron flux distribution on radial piercing beam port has profiled as a polynomial curve. (author)

  14. Proposal for a radiation shielding study aiming the implantation of neutrons beam shutter in the J-9 radiation channel of the Argonauta reactor of the Nuclear Engineering Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Larissa R.P.; Cardoso, Domingos D’Oliveira, E-mail: larissa.xavier@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: domingosoliveiralvr71@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, Francisco José de Oliveira; Voi, Dante Luiz, E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br, E-mail: dante@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Argonauta, the only nuclear research reactor situated in Rio de Janeiro, located at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN), regularly serves a network of users focused on research and development, and also provides its infrastructure for experimental classes and completion work course. Due to increasing demand for non-destructive thermal neutron assays and production of radioisotopes, there is a search for new procedures and/or devices that optimize users' exposure to neutrons. The implementation of mechanisms that allow access to the irradiation channels without the reactor being turned off and with a shielding configuration that limits the occupational doses at this location is very useful for the operation of the reactor. In order to achieve this, the present work proposes the establishment of a neutron beam shutter of the J-9 irradiation channel of the IEN's Argonauta reactor. In a first step, experimental measurements were made in the irradiation channel of the reactor using a BF3 detector, which is coupled to a spectrometer. In this phase, the neutron beam was aligned to the spectrometer, and different materials were used as shields, aiming the attenuation of the beam. To validate and/or change the configuration of the barrier that best meets the material irradiation needs, a second planned phase is involving the neutron flux simulation of the reactor and the various shields with different boundary conditions using the particle transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNP- X). (author)

  15. Proposal for a radiation shielding study aiming the implantation of neutrons beam shutter in the J-9 radiation channel of the Argonauta reactor of the Nuclear Engineering Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, Larissa R.P.; Cardoso, Domingos D’Oliveira; Ferreira, Francisco José de Oliveira; Voi, Dante Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Argonauta, the only nuclear research reactor situated in Rio de Janeiro, located at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN), regularly serves a network of users focused on research and development, and also provides its infrastructure for experimental classes and completion work course. Due to increasing demand for non-destructive thermal neutron assays and production of radioisotopes, there is a search for new procedures and/or devices that optimize users' exposure to neutrons. The implementation of mechanisms that allow access to the irradiation channels without the reactor being turned off and with a shielding configuration that limits the occupational doses at this location is very useful for the operation of the reactor. In order to achieve this, the present work proposes the establishment of a neutron beam shutter of the J-9 irradiation channel of the IEN's Argonauta reactor. In a first step, experimental measurements were made in the irradiation channel of the reactor using a BF3 detector, which is coupled to a spectrometer. In this phase, the neutron beam was aligned to the spectrometer, and different materials were used as shields, aiming the attenuation of the beam. To validate and/or change the configuration of the barrier that best meets the material irradiation needs, a second planned phase is involving the neutron flux simulation of the reactor and the various shields with different boundary conditions using the particle transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNP- X). (author)

  16. The determination of the space distribution, energy spectrum and dose parameters of thermal column beam resulting from swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Xie Jianlun; Leng Ruiping; Song Shushou; Su Jingling

    1991-01-01

    The axial and radial distribution, epithermal energy spectrum and dose equivalent rate of thermal column beam resulting from SPR have been determined in the Institute of Atomic Energy. The results show that the neutron fluence rate along the axial direction decreases as the distance increases outside the thermal column channel, and the trend of fluence rate attenuation follows approximately the inverse square law of a point source. When the reactor thermal power rate is 3 MW, at a distance of 50 cm to the channel, the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate are about 1.61 x 10 7 and 6.1 x 10 4 n/cm 2 · s respectively; dose equivalent rates are some 62 and 2.9 cSv/h respectively. At the end of the chennal, γ dose equivalent rate is 60 cSv/h or so

  17. Saturable reactor-controlled power supply system for TCT/TFTR neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.R.; Hopkins, D.B.; Dexter, W.L.; Kuenning, R.W.; Smith, B.J.

    1975-11-01

    Each neutral beam source requires one major power supply, the acceleration supply, and four auxiliary power supplies. The power supplies are designed to permit independent interruption of current to any source and crowbarring within 20 μsec, in the event of a source spark, while not disturbing the normal pulsing of all other adjacent sources. The sources are described

  18. Implementation of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple for beam heating of tokamak reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Sheffield, G.V.; Towner, H.H.; Weissenburger, D.W.

    1976-10-01

    The neutral-beam energy required for adequate penetration of tokamak plasmas of high opacity can be reduced by a large factor if the beam is injected vertically into a region of large TF (toroidal-field) ripple. Energetic ions are trapped in local magnetic wells and drift vertically toward the midplane (z = 0). If the ripple is made very small on the opposite side of the midplane, drifting ions are detrapped and thermalized in the central plasma region. This paper discusses design considerations for establishing the required vertically asymmetric ripple. Examples are given of special TF-coil configurations, and of the use of auxiliary coil windings to create the prescribed ripple profiles

  19. High intensity multi beam design of SANS instrument for Dhruva reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Sohrab, E-mail: abbas@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Désert, S. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA, Saclay, 91191 (France)

    2016-05-23

    A new and versatile design of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) instrument based on utilization of multi-beam is presented. The multi-pinholes and multi-slits as SANS collimator for medium flux Dhruva rearctor have been proposed and their designs have been validated using McStas simulations. Various instrument configurations to achieve different minimum wave vector transfers in scattering experiments are envisioned. These options enable smooth access to minimum wave vector transfers as low as ~ 6×10{sup −4} Å{sup −1} with a significant improvement in neutron intensity, allowing faster measurements. Such angularly well defined and intense neutron beam will allow faster SANS studies of agglomerates larger than few tens of nm.

  20. Applications of resonance-averaged gamma-ray spectroscopy with tailored beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of techniques based on the direct experimental averaging over compound nuclear capturing states has proved valuable for investigations of nuclear structure. The various methods that have been employed are described, with particular emphasis on the transmission filter, or tailored beam technique. The mathematical limitations on averaging imposed by the filter band pass are discussed. It can readily be demonstrated that a combination of filters at different energies can form a powerful method for spin and parity predictions. Several recent examples from the HFBR program are presented

  1. Applications of resonance-averaged gamma-ray spectroscopy with tailored beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of techniques based on the direct experimental averaging over compound nuclear capturing states has proved valuable for investigations of nuclear structure. The various methods that have been employed are described, with particular emphasis on the transmission filter, or tailored beam technique. The mathematical limitations on averaging imposed by the filtre band pass are discussed. It can readily be demonstrated that a combination of filters at different energies can form a powerful method for spin and parity predictions. Several recent examples from the HFBR program are presented. (author)

  2. New about research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorenkov, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The multi-purpose research reactor MAPLE (Canada) and concept of new reactor MAPLE-CNF as will substitute the known Canadian research reactor NRU are described. New reactor will be used as contributor for investigations into materials, neutron beams and further developments for the CANDU type reactor. The Budapest research reactor (BRR) and its application after the last reconstruction are considered also [ru

  3. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  4. Epithermal neutron beam for BNCT research at the Washington State University TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigg, D.W.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Wheeler, F.J.; Wemple, C.A.; Tripard, G.E.; Gavin, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    A new epithermal-neutron beam facility for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) research and boronated agent screening in animal models is in the final stages of construction at Washington State University (WSU). A key distinguishing feature of the design is the incorporation of a new, high-efficiency, neutron moderating and filtering material, Fluental, developed by the Technical Research Centre of Finland. An additional key feature is the provision for adjustable filter-moderator thickness to systematically explore the radiobiological consequences of increasing the fast-neutron contamination above the nominal value associated with the baseline system. (author)

  5. Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBee, M.R.; Axe, J.D.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-07-01

    For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately

  6. Development of a polarized neutron beam line at Algerian research reactors using McStas software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhloufi, M.; Salah, H.

    2017-02-01

    Unpolarized instrumentation has long been studied and designed using McStas simulation tool. But, only recently new models were developed for McStas to simulate polarized neutron scattering instruments. In the present contribution, we used McStas software to design a polarized neutron beam line, taking advantage of the available spectrometers reflectometer and diffractometer in Algeria. Both thermal and cold neutron was considered. The polarization was made by two types of supermirrors polarizers FeSi and CoCu provided by the HZB institute. For sake of performance and comparison, the polarizers were characterized and their characteristics reproduced. The simulated instruments are reported. Flipper and electromagnets for guide field are developed. Further developments including analyzers and upgrading of the existing spectrometers are underway.

  7. Fan analyzer of neutron beam polarization on REMUR spectrometer at IBR-2 pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Ul'yanov, V.A.; Pusenkov, V.M.; Kozhevnikov, S.V.; Jernenkov, K.N.; Pleshanov, N.K.; Peskov, B.G.; Petrenko, A.V.; Proglyado, V.V.; Syromyatnikov, V.G.; Schebetov, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    The new spectrometer of polarized neutrons REMUR has been created and put in operation in the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna). The spectrometer is dedicated to investigations of multiplayer structures and surfaces by registering the reflection of polarized neutrons and of the inhomogeneous state of solid matter by measuring the small-angle scattering of polarized neutrons. The spectrometer's working range of neutron wavelengths is 1.5-10 A. The spectrometer is equipped with a linear position-sensitive detector and a focused supermirror polarization analyzer (fan-like polarization analyzer) with a solid angle of neutron detection of 2.2x10 -4 rad. This article describes the design and the principle of operation of the fan analyzer of neutron polarization together with the results of its tests on a polarized neutron beam

  8. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilan, N.; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  9. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilan, N., E-mail: nicola.pilan@igi.cnr.it; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E. [Consorzio RFX—Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF{sub 6} instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  10. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Research reactor of the future: The advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.; West, C.

    1994-01-01

    Agents for cancer detection and treatment, stronger materials, better electronic gadgets, and other consumer and industrial products - these are assured benefits of a research reactor project proposed for Oak Ridge. Just as American companies have again assumed world leadership in producing semiconductor chips as well as cars and trucks, the United States is poised to retake the lead in neutron science by building and operating the $2.9 billion Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor by the start of the next century. In 1985, the neutron community, led by ORNL researchers, proposed a pioneering project, later called the ANS. Scheduled to begin operation in 2003, the ANS is seen not only as a replacement for the aging HFIR and HFBR but also as the best laboratory in the world for conducting neutron-based research

  12. Development of a polarized neutron beam line at Algerian research reactors using McStas software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhloufi, M., E-mail: makhloufi_8m@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche Nucléaire de Birine (Algeria); Salah, H. [Centre de Recherche Nucléaire d' Alger (Algeria)

    2017-02-01

    Unpolarized instrumentation has long been studied and designed using McStas simulation tool. But, only recently new models were developed for McStas to simulate polarized neutron scattering instruments. In the present contribution, we used McStas software to design a polarized neutron beam line, taking advantage of the available spectrometers reflectometer and diffractometer in Algeria. Both thermal and cold neutron was considered. The polarization was made by two types of supermirrors polarizers FeSi and CoCu provided by the HZB institute. For sake of performance and comparison, the polarizers were characterized and their characteristics reproduced. The simulated instruments are reported. Flipper and electromagnets for guide field are developed. Further developments including analyzers and upgrading of the existing spectrometers are underway. - Highlights: • Permit to evaluate the feasibility of a polarized neutron scattering instrument prior to its implementation. • Help to understand the origin of instrumental imperfections and offer an optimized set up configuration. • Provide the possibility to use the FeSi and CoCu supermirrors, designed to polarize spin up cold neutron, to polarize thermal neutron.

  13. Development of a polarized neutron beam line at Algerian research reactors using McStas software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhloufi, M.; Salah, H.

    2017-01-01

    Unpolarized instrumentation has long been studied and designed using McStas simulation tool. But, only recently new models were developed for McStas to simulate polarized neutron scattering instruments. In the present contribution, we used McStas software to design a polarized neutron beam line, taking advantage of the available spectrometers reflectometer and diffractometer in Algeria. Both thermal and cold neutron was considered. The polarization was made by two types of supermirrors polarizers FeSi and CoCu provided by the HZB institute. For sake of performance and comparison, the polarizers were characterized and their characteristics reproduced. The simulated instruments are reported. Flipper and electromagnets for guide field are developed. Further developments including analyzers and upgrading of the existing spectrometers are underway. - Highlights: • Permit to evaluate the feasibility of a polarized neutron scattering instrument prior to its implementation. • Help to understand the origin of instrumental imperfections and offer an optimized set up configuration. • Provide the possibility to use the FeSi and CoCu supermirrors, designed to polarize spin up cold neutron, to polarize thermal neutron.

  14. 235U Determination using In-Beam Delayed Neutron Counting Technique at the NRU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bentoumi, G. [Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Corcoran, E. C. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (United States); Dimayuga, I. [Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Kelly, D. G. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (United States); Li, L. [Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Sur, B. [Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Rogge, R. B. [Canadian Nuclear Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-11-17

    This paper describes a collaborative effort that saw the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC)’s delayed neutron and gamma counting apparatus transported to Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) for use in the neutron beamline at the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. Samples containing mg quantities of fissile material were re-interrogated, and their delayed neutron emissions measured. This collaboration offers significant advantages to previous delayed neutron research at both CNL and RMC. This paper details the determination of 235U content in enriched uranium via the assay of in-beam delayed neutron magnitudes and temporal behavior. 235U mass was determined with an average absolute error of ± 2.7 %. This error is lower than that obtained at RMCC for the assay of 235U content in aqueous solutions (3.6 %) using delayed neutron counting. Delayed neutron counting has been demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate, and precise method for special nuclear material detection and identification.

  15. Analysis of the two accelerator concepts foreseen for the neutral beam injector of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fubiani

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Typical high-energy negative ion electrostatic accelerators such as the ones designed for fusion applications produce a significant amount of secondary particles. These particles may originate from coextracted electrons, which flow from the ion source, impacting the accelerator grids or as by-products of collisions between accelerated negative ions and the residual background gas, in the accelerator. Secondary emission particles may carry a non-negligible power and consequently must be precisely studied. The electrostatic-accelerator-Monte-Carlo-simulation code (EAMCC [G. Fubiani et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 014202 (2008PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.11.014202] was developed in order to provide a three-dimensional characterization of power and current deposition on all parts of the accelerator. The code includes all the relevant physics associated with secondary emission processes and consequently may be used as a tool for design improvement. In this paper, the two accelerator designs considered for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, that is, the multiaperture-multigrid and the single gap single aperture (SINGAP designs, are discussed and their predicted performances compared. Simulations have been compared with measurements on prototype accelerators of the SINGAP type. Reasonable agreement between EAMCC calculations and measurements of backstreaming ions and transmitted electrons was found.

  16. Effect of kinetic parameters on simultaneous ramp reactivity insertion plus beam tube flooding accident in a typical low enriched U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel-based material testing reactor-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Rubina; Mirza, Nasir M. [Dept. of, Physics, Air University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Sikander M. [Dept. of, Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Post Office Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    This work looks at the effect of changes in kinetic parameters on simultaneous reactivity insertions and beam tube flooding in a typical material testing reactor-type research reactor with low enriched high density (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) fuel. Using a modified PARET code, various ramp reactivity insertions (from $0.1/0.5 s to $1.3/0.5 s) plus beam tube flooding ($0.5/0.25 s) accidents under uncontrolled conditions were analyzed to find their effects on peak power, net reactivity, and temperature. Then, the effects of changes in kinetic parameters including the Doppler coefficient, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed neutron fractions on simultaneous reactivity insertion and beam tube flooding accidents were analyzed. Results show that the power peak values are significantly sensitive to the Doppler coefficient of the system in coupled accidents. The material testing reactor-type system under such a coupled accident is not very sensitive to changes in the prompt neutron life time; the core under such a coupled transient is not very sensitive to changes in the effective delayed neutron fraction.

  17. Mechanical neutron spectrometer Chopper - Experimental study of the neutron beam topography in the channel C of the 'A' reactor; Neutronski mehanicki spektrometar (coper) - Eksperimentalno odredjivanje topografije neutronskog snopa na kanalu 'C', reaktora 'A'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za reaktorsku i neutronsku fiziku, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The objective of the experiment was to measure the axis of the neutron beam from the reactor channel. The collimator, mechanical spectrometer and detectors are to be placed along this axis. Two points along the channel are determined to be defined as centres of the neutron beam. During this experiments the collimators were placed in the reactor at distance of 100 cm and cross section of 3.5 cm in diameter. BF{sub 3} detectors were used for the experiment.

  18. The role of the neutral beam fueling profile in the performance of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and other tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Scalings for the stored energy and neutron yield, determined from experimental data are applied to both deuterium-only and deuterium-tritium plasmas in different neutral beam heated operational domains in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The domain of the data considered includes the Supershot, High poloidal beta, Low-mode, and limiter High-mode operational regimes, as well as discharges with a reversed magnetic shear configuration. The new important parameter in the present scaling is the peakedness of the heating beam fueling profile shape. Ion energy confinement and neutron production are relatively insensitive to other plasma parameters compared to the beam fueling peakedness parameter and the heating beam power when considering plasmas that are stable to magnetohydrodynamic modes. However, the stored energy of the electrons is independent of the beam fueling peakedness. The implication of the scalings based on this parameter is related to theoretical transport models such as radial electric field shear and Ion Temperature Gradient marginality models. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks

  19. Study on the Applicability of Electron Beam Welding Methods to Assembly a Fuel Compact and Al Cover Plate of Research Reactor Plate Type Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Yoon Sang; Lee, Don Dae; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kwon, Sun Chil; Kim, Soo Sung; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Among the research reactor plate type fuel fabrication processes, there is an assembly process between fuel meat compact and Al cover plates using a welding method prior to rolling process. The assembly process is such as the Al frame and Al cover plate should be welded properly as shown in Fig. 1. For welding, TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding methods has been used conventionally, but in this study an electron beam welding(EB welding) technique which uses the electron beam of a high velocity for joining two materials is introduced to the assembly. The work pieces are melted as the kinetic energy of the electron beam is transformed into heat to join the two parts of the weld. The welding is often done in the conditions in a vacuum to prevent dispersion of the electron beam. The electron beam welding process has many ad-vantages such as contamination of the welds could be prevented, the penetration of the weld is deep, and also the strain of the welding area is less than other methods. In this study, to find optimal condition of the EB welding process, a welding speed, a beam current and an acceleration voltage were changed. To analyzing the welding results, the shape of the beads and defects of welding area was used. The width and depth of the beads were measured as well

  20. Study on the Applicability of Electron Beam Welding Methods to Assembly a Fuel Compact and Al Cover Plate of Research Reactor Plate Type Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Yoon Sang; Lee, Don Dae; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kwon, Sun Chil; Kim, Soo Sung; Park, Jong Man

    2012-01-01

    Among the research reactor plate type fuel fabrication processes, there is an assembly process between fuel meat compact and Al cover plates using a welding method prior to rolling process. The assembly process is such as the Al frame and Al cover plate should be welded properly as shown in Fig. 1. For welding, TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding methods has been used conventionally, but in this study an electron beam welding(EB welding) technique which uses the electron beam of a high velocity for joining two materials is introduced to the assembly. The work pieces are melted as the kinetic energy of the electron beam is transformed into heat to join the two parts of the weld. The welding is often done in the conditions in a vacuum to prevent dispersion of the electron beam. The electron beam welding process has many ad-vantages such as contamination of the welds could be prevented, the penetration of the weld is deep, and also the strain of the welding area is less than other methods. In this study, to find optimal condition of the EB welding process, a welding speed, a beam current and an acceleration voltage were changed. To analyzing the welding results, the shape of the beads and defects of welding area was used. The width and depth of the beads were measured as well

  1. Modification of NUR II neutron beam profile of MINT TRIGA MARK II research reactor for digital neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Rawi Mohamed Zin; Azali Muhammad; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Rafhayudi Jamro; Syed Nasaruddin Syed Idris; Ng Aik Hao; Rosly Jaafar

    2006-01-01

    A cone neutron beam collimated by a 5.4 cm aperture produced in the Neutron Radiography II (NUR II) via a step divergence collimator had to be modified to fulfill 5 cm x 6 cm dimension of the scintillation screen placed in the charge couple device (ccd) camera. The required convergence neutron beam was obtained by a simple collimator-beam plug plugged in front of the NUR II beam port. The calculations involved in designing the collimator-beam plug had to take into account not only the neutron beam profiling but also the neutron and gamma shielding and are discussed in this article. (Author)

  2. Combustion Chemistry of Fuels: Quantitative Speciation Data Obtained from an Atmospheric High-temperature Flow Reactor with Coupled Molecular-beam Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Markus; Oßwald, Patrick; Krueger, Dominik; Whitside, Ryan

    2018-02-19

    This manuscript describes a high-temperature flow reactor experiment coupled to the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique. This flexible tool offers a detailed observation of chemical gas-phase kinetics in reacting flows under well-controlled conditions. The vast range of operating conditions available in a laminar flow reactor enables access to extraordinary combustion applications that are typically not achievable by flame experiments. These include rich conditions at high temperatures relevant for gasification processes, the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime or investigations of complex technical fuels. The presented setup allows measurements of quantitative speciation data for reaction model validation of combustion, gasification and pyrolysis processes, while enabling a systematic general understanding of the reaction chemistry. Validation of kinetic reaction models is generally performed by investigating combustion processes of pure compounds. The flow reactor has been enhanced to be suitable for technical fuels (e.g. multi-component mixtures like Jet A-1) to allow for phenomenological analysis of occurring combustion intermediates like soot precursors or pollutants. The controlled and comparable boundary conditions provided by the experimental design allow for predictions of pollutant formation tendencies. Cold reactants are fed premixed into the reactor that are highly diluted (in around 99 vol% in Ar) in order to suppress self-sustaining combustion reactions. The laminar flowing reactant mixture passes through a known temperature field, while the gas composition is determined at the reactors exhaust as a function of the oven temperature. The flow reactor is operated at atmospheric pressures with temperatures up to 1,800 K. The measurements themselves are performed by decreasing the temperature monotonically at a rate of -200 K/h. With the sensitive MBMS technique, detailed speciation data is acquired and

  3. On the energy gain enhancement of DT+D3He fuel configuration in nuclear fusion reactor driven by heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khoshbinfar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that advanced fuels be employed in the second generation of nuclear fusion reactors. Theoretical calculations show that in such a fuel, a high plasma temperature about 100 keV is a requisite for reaction rate improvement of nuclear fusion. However, creating such a temporal condition requires a more powerful driver than we have today. Here, introducing an optimal fuel configuration consisting of DT and D-3He layers, suitable for inertial fusion reactors and driven by heavy ion beams, the optimal energy gain conditions have been simulated and derived for 1.3 MJ system. It was found that, in this new fuel configuration, the ideal energy gain, is 22 percent more comparing with energy gain in corresponding single DT fuel layer. Moreover, the inner DT fuel layer contributed as an ignition trigger, while the outer D3He fuel acts as particle and radiation shielding as well as fuel layer.

  4. Optimization of a horizontal-flow biofilm reactor for the removal of methane at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, E; Kennelly, C; Walsh, R; Gerrity, S; Reilly, E O; Collins, G

    2012-10-01

    Three pilot-scale, horizontal-flow biofilm reactors (HFBRs 1-3) were used to treat methane (CH4)-contaminated air to assess the potential of this technology to manage emissions from agricultural activities, waste and wastewater treatment facilities, and landfills. The study was conducted over two phases (Phase 1, lasting 90 days and Phase 2, lasting 45 days). The reactors were operated at 10 degrees C (typical of ambient air and wastewater temperatures in northern Europe), and were simultaneously dosed with CH4-contaminated air and a synthetic wastewater (SWW). The influent loading rates to the reactors were 8.6 g CH4/m3/hr (4.3 g CH4/m2 TPSA/hr; where TPSA is top plan surface area). Despite the low operating temperatures, an overall average removal of 4.63 g CH4/m3/day was observed during Phase 2. The maximum removal efficiency (RE) for the trial was 88%. Potential (maximum) rates of methane oxidation were measured and indicated that biofilm samples taken from various regions in the HFBRs had mostly equal CH4 removal potential. In situ activity rates were dependent on which part of the reactor samples were obtained. The results indicate the potential of the HFBR, a simple and robust technology, to biologically treat CH4 emissions. The results of this study indicate that the HFBR technology could be effectively applied to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment plants and agricultural facilities at lower temperatures common to northern Europe. This could reduce the carbon footprint of waste treatment and agricultural livestock facilities. Activity tests indicate that methanotrophic communities can be supported at these temperatures. Furthermore, these data can lead to improved reactor design and optimization by allowing conditions to be engineered to allow for improved removal rates, particularly at lower temperatures. The technology is simple to construct and operate, and with some optimization of the liquid phase to improve mass

  5. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: Radiography and materials characterization. Report of a technical committee held in Vienna, 4-7 May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The present report is the result of the Technical Committee meeting held during 4-7 May 1993 in Vienna, Austria, and includes contributions from the participants. The Physics Section of the Department of Research and Isotopes was responsible for the co-ordination and compilation of the report. The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing their research programmes and industrial applications for neutron radiology, related neutron inspection and analytical techniques and neutron beam irradiation. Refs, figs and tabs.

  6. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: Radiography and materials characterization. Report of a technical committee held in Vienna, 4-7 May 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The present report is the result of the Technical Committee meeting held during 4-7 May 1993 in Vienna, Austria, and includes contributions from the participants. The Physics Section of the Department of Research and Isotopes was responsible for the co-ordination and compilation of the report. The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing their research programmes and industrial applications for neutron radiology, related neutron inspection and analytical techniques and neutron beam irradiation. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Corrosion Induced Leakage Problem of the Radial Beam Port 1 of BAEC Triga Mark-II Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalam, A.; Salam, M. A.; Sarder, M. A.; Rahman, M. M.; Rahman, M.; Rahman, A.; Chowdhury, A. Z.; Uddin, M. S.; Haque, M. M.; Zulquarnain, M.A., E-mail: kalambaec@yahoo.com [Reactor Operation and Maintenance Unit, Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2014-08-15

    The BAEC reactor has so far been operated as per the technical specifications and procedures laid down in the SAR of the research reactor. The BP leakage problem of the BAEC research reactor was an issue that could lead to a situation close to a LOCA. Therefore, the matter was handled carefully, taking all measures so that such an incident could be prevented. Assistance of agencies outside BAEC was taken for solving the problem. It is understood that the silicone rubber lining of the encirclement clamp may become damaged by neutron irradiation. Therefore, while designing the clamp, provisions were kept such that it can be dismantled and reinstalled again following lining replacement. As a moderately aged facility, the ageing management BAEC TRIGA research reactor deserves significant attention. BAEC, together with its strategic partners, are doing what is needed in this regard.

  8. Feasibility study of an optical resonator for applications in neutral-beam injection systems for the next generation of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This work is part of a larger project called SIPHORE (Single gap Photo-neutralizer energy Recovery injector), which aims to enhance the overall efficiency of one of the mechanisms through which the plasma is heated, in a nuclear fusion reactor, i.e. the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system. An important component of a NBI system is the neutralizer of high energetic ion beams. SIPHORE proposes to substitute the gas cell neutralizer, used in the current NBI systems, with a photo-neutralizer exploiting the photo-detachment process within Fabry Perot cavities. This mechanism should allow a relevant NBI global efficiency of η≥ 60%, significantly higher than the one currently possible (η≤25% for ITER). The present work concerns the feasibility study of an optical cavity with suitable properties for applications in NBI systems. Within this context, the issue of the determination of an appropriated optical cavity design has been firstly considered and the theoretical and experimental analysis of a particular optical resonator has been carried on. The problems associated with the high levels of intracavity optical power (∼3 MW) required for an adequate photo-neutralization rate have then been faced. In this respect, we addressed both the problem of the thermal effects on the cavity mirrors due to their absorption of intra-cavity optical power (∼1 W) and the one associated to the necessity of a high powerful input laser beam (∼1 kW) to feed the optical resonator. (author)

  9. Assessment of the relative biological effectiveness of LVR-15 nuclear reactor neutron beam by a simple animal model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Vladislav; Burian, J.; Prokeš, K.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 78, - (2002), s. 5-19 ISSN 1212-3137 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC6473; GA MPO FD-K/048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : effectiveness of LVR-15 nuclear reactor * body irradiation * animal model Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  10. Conceptual design of a clinical BNCT beam in an adjacent dry cell of the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M

    The MCNP4B Monte Carlo transport code is used in a feasibility study of the epithermal neutron boron neutron capture therapy facility in the thermalizing column of the 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI). To boost the epithermal neutron flux at the reference irradiation

  11. Conceptual design of a clinical BNCT beam in an adjacent dry cell of the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M

    2000-01-01

    The MCNP4B Monte Carlo transport code is used in a feasibility study of the epithermal neutron boron neutron capture therapy facility in the thermalizing column of the 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI). To boost the epithermal neutron flux at the reference irradiation

  12. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  13. Evaluation of apoptosis and micronucleation induced by reactor neutron beams with two different cadmium ratios in total and quiescent cell populations within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Takagaki, Masao; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Response of quiescent (Q) and total tumor cells in solid tumors to reactor neutron beam irradiation with two different cadmium (Cd) ratios was examined in terms of micronucleus (MN) frequency and apoptosis frequency, using four different tumor cell lines. Methods and Materials: C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors, C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII or FM3A tumors, and Balb/c mice bearing EMT6/KU tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously for 5 days via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Thirty min after i.p. injection of sodium borocaptate- 10 B (BSH), or 3 h after oral administration of p-boronophenylalanine- 10 B (BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutron beams. The tumors without 10 B-compound administration were irradiated with neutron beams or γ-rays. This neutron beam irradiation was performed using neutrons with two different Cd ratios. The tumors were then excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the MN frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, for apoptosis assay, 6 h after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were fixed, and the apoptosis frequency in Q cells was also determined with immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN and apoptosis frequencies in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Results: Without 10 B-compounds, the sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was reduced by neutron beam irradiation. Under our particular neutron beam irradiation condition, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons was larger in Q cells than in total cells, and the RBE values were larger for low Cd-ratio than high Cd-ratio neutrons. With 10 B-compounds, both frequencies were increased for each cell population, especially for total cells. BPA

  14. Range shortening, radiation transport, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena in ion-beam-driven inertial-fusion-reactor-size targets: Implosion, ignition, and burn phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, K.A.; Tahir, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the theory of the energy deposition of ions in cold materials and hot dense plasmas together with numerical calculations for heavy and light ions of interest to ion-beam fusion. We have used the gorgon computer code of Long, Moritz, and Tahir (which is an extension of the code originally written for protons by Nardi, Peleg, and Zinamon) to carry out these calculations. The energy-deposition data calculated in this manner has been used in the design of heavy-ion-beam-driven fusion targets suitable for a reactor, by its inclusion in the medusa code of Christiansen, Ashby, and Roberts as extended by Tahir and Long. A number of other improvements have been made in this code and these are also discussed. Various aspects of the theoretical analysis of such targets are discussed including the calculation of the hydrodynamic stability, the hydrodynamic efficiency, and the gain. Various different target designs have been used, some of them new. In general these targets are driven by Bi + ions of energy 8--12 GeV, with an input energy of 4--6.5 MJ, with output energies in the range 600--900 MJ, and with gains in the range 120--180. The peak powers are in the range of 500--750 TW. We present detailed calculations of the ablation, compression, ignition, and burn phases. By the application of a new stability analysis which includes ablation and density-gradient effects we show that these targets appear to implode in a stable manner. Thus the targets designed offer working examples suited for use in a future inertial-confinement fusion reactor

  15. [Project for] a high-flux extracted neutron beam reactor [for physicists]; Un [projet de] reacteur a haut flux et faisceaux sortis [pour physiciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageron, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    French requirements in neutron beams of different energies extracted from a reactor are briefly described. The well-known importance of cold neutrons (above 4 Angstrom) is emphasized. The main characteristics of a reactor suitable for physicists are outlined: They are: 1 - A flux of about 7. 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons in the heavy water of the reflector, 2 - Maximum flexibility obtained by: - physical separation of the core and the reflector, - independence of the different experiments, - possibility of modifying physical experiments up to - and including - the nature of the used reflector, without any appreciable interruption in the operation of the reactor, - reduction of fixed shields to a minimum; ample use of liquid shields (water) and fluid shields (sands). 3 - Technological continuity as far as possible with French research reactors (Siloe, Pegase, Osiris) already existing or under construction. 4 - Safety of operation arising from simplicity of conception. 5 - Minimised construction costs. Lowering of the operating costs is looked for indirectly in the simplification of the solutions and the reduction of operating staff, rather than directly by reducing the consumption of fuel elements and energy. The recommended solution can be described as a closed-core non-pressurized swimming-pool reactor, highly under-moderated by the cooling light water. Surrounding the reactor are a number of 'beam tubes-loops' each consisting of: - a part of the reflector (heavy water in the example described), - a part of neutron extraction beam tube, - the circuits required for their cooling, - the inlet systems of suitable fluids to the beam tube nose (liquid hydrogen in the example described), - the necessary outlets for measurement and control system. The whole 'beam tubes loops' is immersed in the water of the metallic self-supporting swimming-pool. The shielding outside the swimming-pool is composed for the most part by heavy sand in which is the rest of the beam extraction

  16. The Design of a Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Beam for BNCT Purpose at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, S.; Bazani, A.; Ballarini, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Section of Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    In preclinical and clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy studies the knowledge of the amount of {sup 10}B in blood and tissues is very important. The boron concentration measurements method used in Pavia (Italy) is based on the charged particles spectrometry of thin tissue cuts irradiated in the Thermal Column of the TRIGA reactor of the University. In order to perform measurements in biological liquids such as blood and urine, or in other tissue that cannot be cut in slices, a Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility is being designed, which measures {sup 10}B concentration detecting the prompt gamma from boron nuclear capture reaction. At the TRIGA reactor in Pavia, there are four horizontal channels, potentially available for PGNAA. The choice of the suitable channel, and the design of its configuration, were achieved using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP4c2. To perform the simulations, an input code already validated, describing the reactor structure and the neutron source, was used. The calculations were implemented applying non-analog techniques for the neutron transport, that are necessary to obtain a sufficient statistic in every positions along the channel and especially at its end. The selection of the channel for PGNAA installation was carried out by comparing the simulated fluxes obtained in the different channels at the present configuration. The channel shielded by the core reflector was chosen, because the graphite lowers the fast component of the neutrons, with no need to insert additional material in the facility. The thermal flux at its end is 1.7 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} s with thermal-to-total neutron flux ratio around 0.8. Subsequently a bismuth block for gamma radiation shielding and blocks of single crystal sapphire as filter for fast neutron component were inserted in the channel. Other components of the facility that are under study are a collimator and the beam catcher. (author)

  17. Mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  18. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 x 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform ''conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Evaluation of beam-line components for use in a large neutral-beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual model of a neutral-beam injector was used to examine the effect of beam-line components on reactor performance. Criteria were established to optimize a reactor's reliability and minimize its cost

  20. Passive vibro-acoustic detection of a sodium-water reaction in a steam generator of a sodium-cooled fast neutrons nuclear reactor by beam forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriot, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with a new method to detect a sodium-water reaction in a steam generator of a fast sodium-cooled nuclear reactor. More precisely, the objective is to detect a micro-leak of water (flow ≤ 1 g/s) in less than 10 seconds by measuring the external shell vibrations of the component. The strong background noise in operation makes impossible the use of a detection system based on a threshold overrun. A beam forming method applied to vibrations measured by a linear array of accelerometers is developed in this thesis to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to detect and locate the leak in the steam generator. A numerical study is first realized. Two models are developed in order to simulate the signals measured by the accelerometers of the array. The performances of the beam forming are then studied in function of several parameters, such as the source location and frequency, the damping factor, the background noise considered. The first model consists in an infinite plate in contact with a heavy fluid, excited by an acoustic monopole located in this fluid. Analyzing the transverse displacements in the wavenumber domain is useful to establish a criterion to sample correctly the vibration field of the plate. A second model, more representative of the system is also proposed. In this model, an elastic infinite cylindrical shell, filled with a heavy fluid is considered. The finite dimensions in the radial and circumferential directions lead to a modal behavior of the system which impacts the beam forming. Finally, the method is tested on an experimental mock-up which consists in a cylindrical pipe made in stainless steel and filled with water connected to hydraulic circuit. The water flow speed can be controlled by varying the speed of the pump. The acoustic source is generated by a hydro-phone. The performances of the beam forming are studied for different water flow speeds and different amplitude and frequencies of the source. (author) [fr

  1. Parameters measurement for the thermal neutron beam in the thermal column hole of Xi’an pulse reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of the neutron spectra in the thermal column hole of Xi’an pulse reactor was measured with the time-of-flight method.Compared with the thermal Maxwellian theory neutron spectra,the thermal neutron spectra measured is a little softer,and the average neutron energy of the experimental spectra is about 0.042±0.01 eV.The thermal neutron fluence rate at the front end of thermal column hole,measured with gold foil activation techniques,is about 1.18×105 cm-2 s-1.The standard uncertainty of the measured thermal neutron fluence is about 3%.The spectra-averaged cross section of 197Au(n,γ) determined by the experimental thermal neutron spectra is(92.8±0.93) ×10-24 cm2.

  2. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173

  3. A fan analyzer of neutron beam polarization on the spectrometer REMUR at the pulsed reactor IBR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.A.; Pusenkov, V.M.; Pleshanov, N.K.

    2004-01-01

    The new spectrometer of polarized neutrons REMUR has been created and put in operation at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna). The spectrometer is dedicated to investigations of multilayer structures and surfaces by registering the reflection of polarized neutrons and of the inhomogeneous state of solid matter by measuring the small-angle scattering of polarized neutrons. The spectrometer's working range of neutron wavelengths is 1.5-10 Angstroem. The spectrometer is equipped with a linear position-sensitive detector and a focused supermirror polarization analyzer (the fan-like polarization analyzer) with a solid angle of polarized neutron detection of 2.2·10 -4 rad. This paper describes the design and the principle of operation of the fan analyzer of neutron polarization together with the results of the fan tests on a polarized neutron beam

  4. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIPR) or underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze; Badlani, Manu

    2009-01-01

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP R) , depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development

  5. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  6. Behavior of exposed human lymphocytes to a neutron beam of the Reactor TRIGA Mark III; Comportamiento de linfocitos humanos expuestos a un haz de neutrones del Reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal R, M. I.; Arceo M, C.; Aguilar H, F.; Guerrero C, C., E-mail: citlali.guerrero@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The living beings are permanently exposed to radiations of natural origin: cosmic and geologic, as well as the artificial radiations that come from sources elaborated by the man. The artificial sources have an important use in the medical area. Particularly has been increased the neutrons use due to the effectiveness that they have to damage the cells with regard to other radiation types. The biological indicator of exposition to ionizing radiation more reliable is the chromosomal aberrations study, specifically the dicentrics in human lymphocytes. This test allows, establishing the exposition dose in function of the damage quantity. The dicentrics have a behavior in function of the dose. The calibration curve that describes this behavior is specific for each type of ionizing radiation. In the year 2006 beginning was given to the expositions of human lymphocytes to a neutron beam generated in the reactor TRIGA Mark III of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico. Up to 2008 the response dose curve comprised an interval of exposition time of up to 30 minutes. Moreover, the interval between 10 an 20 minutes is included, since was observed that this last is indispensable for the adjustment waited in a lineal model. (Author)

  7. Study on neutron capture cross sections using the filtered neutron beams of 55 keV and 144 keV at the Dalat reactor and related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan; Nguyen Canh Hai; Pham Ngoc Son; Tran Tuan Anh

    2007-01-01

    In this fundamental research project on nuclear physics in period of 2006, the neutron capture cross sections for the reactions of 139 La (n,γ) 140 La, 152 Sm (n,γ) 153 Sm, 191 Ir (n,γ) 192 Ir and 193 Ir (n,γ) 194 Ir have been measured at 55 keV and 144 keV by the activation method using the filtered neutron beams of the Dalat nuclear research reactor. The cross sections were determined relative to the standard capture cross sections of 197 Au. The samples and standard were prepaid from high purity (99.99%) foil of Au and natural oxide powders of La 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 and IrO 2 . A high efficient HPGe detector (58%) was used to detect the gamma rays, emitted from the activated samples. The absolute efficiency curve of the detector has been precisely calibrated thanks to a set of standard radioisotope sources and a multi-nuclide standard solution, supported by IAEA. The present results were compared with the previous measurements from EXFOR-2003, and the evaluated values of JENDL 3.3 and ENDF/B-6.8. (author)

  8. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: R and D programmes in materials science. Report of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 29 March - 1 April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing neutron beam based research programmes for solid state studies using neutron scattering techniques. It is expected to benefit ongoing facilities and programmes by encouraging use of improved techniques for detection, signal acquisition, signal processing, etc. and new programmes by assisting in the selection of appropriate equipment, instrument design and research plans. Refs, figs and tabs.

  9. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.

    1999-01-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 250 deg. C. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was take into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 150 deg. C to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to take into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼ 1x10 22 n/cm 2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture

  10. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsmiedl, Erwin

    2001-01-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256degC and 250degC. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was taken into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256degC and 150degC to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to taken into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼1·10 22 n/cm 2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture criteria of

  11. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  12. Behavior of exposed human lymphocytes to a neutron beam of the reactor TRIGA Mark III; Comportamiento de linfocitos humanos expuestos a un haz de neutrones del reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal R, M. I.

    2012-07-01

    Excessive exposure to ionizing radiation occurs in people who require radiation treatment, also in those for work can come to receive doses above the permitted levels. A third possibility of exposure is the release of radioactive material in which the general population is affected. Most of the time the exhibition is partial and only rarely occurs throughout the body. For various reasons, situations arise where it is impossible to determine by conventional physical methods, the amount of radiation you were exposed to the affected person and in these cases where the option to follow is the Biological Dosimetry, where the analysis of chromosomes dicentrics is used to estimate the dose of ionizing radiation exposure. A calibration curve is generated from in vitro analysis of dicentric chromosome, which are found in human lymphocytes, treated with different types and doses of radiation. The dicentric is formed from two lesions, one on each chromosome and their union results in a structure having two centromeres, acentric fragment with her for the union of several chromosomes leads to more complex structures as tri-centric s, tetra or penta-centric s, which have the same origin. The dose-response curve is estimated by observing the frequency of dicentrics and extrapolated to a dose-effect curve previously established, for which it is necessary that each lab has its own calibration curves, taking into account that for a Let low radiation, dose-effect curve follows a linear-quadratic model Y=C + {alpha}D + {beta}D. The production of dicentric chromosomes with a high Let, was studied using a beam of neutrons generated in the reactor TRIGA Mark III with an average energy of 1 MeV, adjusting the linear model Y={alpha}D. The dose-response relationship is established in blood samples from the same donor, the coefficient {alpha} of the dose-response is Y = (0.3692 {+-} 0.011 * D), also shows that saturation is reached in system 4 Gy. (Author)

  13. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser is described comprising: a toroidal fusion reactor, the reactor generating energetic neutrons; an annular gas cell disposed around the outer periphery of the reactor, the cell including an annular reflecting mirror disposed at the bottom of the cell and an annular output window disposed at the top of the cell; a gas lasing medium disposed within the annular cell for generating output laser radiation; neutron reflector material means disposed around the annular cell for reflecting neutrons incident thereon back into the gas cell; neutron moderator material means disposed between the reactor and the gas cell and between the gas cell and the neutron reflector material for moderating the energy of energetic neutrons from the reactor; converting means for converting energy from the moderated neutrons to energy pumping means for pumping the gas lasing medium; and beam compactor means for receiving output laser radiation from the annular output window and generating a single output laser beam therefrom

  14. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  15. Oscillating liquid flow ICF Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Oscillating liquid flow in a falling molten salt inertial confinement fusion reactor is predicted to rapidly clear driver beam paths of residual liquid droplets. Oscillating flow will also provide adequate neutron and x-ray protection for the reactor structure with a short (2-m) fall distance permitting an 8 Hz repetition rate. A reactor chamber configuration is presented with specific features to clear the entire heavy-ion beam path of splashed molten salt. The structural components, including the structure between beam ports, are shielded. 3 refs., 12 figs

  16. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Development Of A Method For Measurement Of Total Neutron Cross Sections Based On The Neutron Transmission Method Using A He-3 Counter On Filtered Neutron Beams At Dalat Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Tuan Anh; Dang Lanh; Nguyen Canh Hai; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Pham Kien; Nguyen Thuy Nham; Pham Ngoc Son; Ho Huu Thang

    2007-01-01

    Determination of total neutron cross sections and average resonance parameters in the energy range from tens keV to hundreds keV is important for fast reactors calculations and designs because this energy range gives the most output of all neutron induced reactions in the spectrum of fast reactors. Besides, the total neutron cross section measurement is also one of the methods for determination of s, p and d-wave neutron strength functions. The purpose of this project is to develop a method for measurement of total neutron cross sections based on the neutron transmission technique using a He-3 counter. The average total neutron cross sections of 238 U were obtained from neutron transmission measurements on filtered neutron beams of 55 keV and 144 keV at the horizontal channel No.4 of the Dalat research reactor. The present results have been compared with the previous measurements, and the evaluated data from ENDF/B-6.8 library. (author)

  18. Neutron beam experiments using nuclear research reactors: honoring the retirement of professor Bernard W. Wehring -II. 3. Preliminary Experiments to Determine Moisture in Carbon Composites Using PGAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, W.S.; Dorsey, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    for moisture measurements in composite materials, in addition to numerous other procedures, consists of detailed descriptions of sample-handling requirements. These requirements are in place because of the sensitivity of the gravimetric techniques to any contamination of the sample. The standard also specifies a 15-min restriction on the time allowed for the sample to be outside of its controlled environment for the measurement to be performed. In this study, we performed moisture uptake experiments using a PGAA technique (with the sample enclosed in a helium-filled chamber) to measure the hydrogen content of two carbon composite samples. The samples (which had been soaking in humid air for an undetermined amount of time) were first measured to determine the hydrogen content. Then, one sample was baked in an oven for 10 days at 100 deg. C to remove any moisture in the sample, and the other sample was soaked in 150 ml of de-ionized water for 10 days. Following this, the samples were re-measured to again determine the hydrogen content. The prompt gamma-ray system used in these experiments consisted of a curved neutron guide at beam port 3 of the UT 1-MW TRIGA reactor, a sample positioning system, and a shielded high-purity germanium detector. Lead and Boral shielding surround the detector except for a 2-in.-diam collimated hole focused on the sample and normal to the plane of the neutron guide. The spectra are collected into 16 000 channels using a Canberra DSA-2000 multichannel analyzer system. Figure 1 plots the prompt gamma-ray spectrum acquired during the measurement of one of the samples. As can be seen, the 15-min time frame allotted for the experiment resulted in a clearly discernable hydrogen peak. In fact, the statistical uncertainty of the hydrogen peaks was generally on the order of ±2% using this measurement time. Also, it was determined through these measurements that there was an ∼17% difference between the hydrogen content of the 'soaked' sample and

  19. Neutral beams for mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An important demonstration of negative ion technology is proposed for FY92 in the MFTF-α+T, an upgrade of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This facility calls for 200-keV negative ions to form neutral beams that generate sloshing ions in the reactor end plugs. Three different beam lines are considered for this application. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  20. 2012 review of French research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Proposed by the French Reactor Operators' Club (CER), the meeting and discussion forum for operators of French research reactors, this report first gives a brief presentation of these reactors and of their scope of application, and a summary of highlights in 2012 for each of them. Then, it proposes more detailed presentations and reviews of characteristics, activities, highlights, objectives and results for the different types of reactors: neutron beam reactors (Orphee, High flux reactor-Laue-Langevin Institute or HFR-ILL), technological irradiation reactors (Osiris and Phenix), training reactors (Isis and Azur), reactors for safety research purposes (Cabri and Phebus), reactors for neutronic studies (Caliban, Prospero, Eole, Minerve and Masurca), and new research reactors (the RES facility and the Jules Horowitz reactor or JHR)

  1. Internal attachment of laser beam welded stainless steel sheathed thermocouples into stainless steel upper end caps in nuclear fuel rods for the LOFT Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, R.K.; Reid, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc., acting as a subcontractor to EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, conducted a laser beam welding study to attach internal stainless steel thermocouples into stainless steel upper end caps in nuclear fuel rods. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of laser welding a single 0.063 inch diameter stainless steel (304) sheathed thermocouple into a stainless steel (316) upper end cap for nuclear fuel rods. A laser beam was selected because of the extremely high energy input in unit volume that can be achieved allowing local fusion of a small area irrespective of the difference in material thickness to be joined. A special weld fixture was designed and fabricated to hold the end cap and the thermocouple with angular and rotational adjustment under the laser beam. A commercial pulsed laser and energy control system was used to make the welds

  2. ITER neutral beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, P.L.; Di Pietro, E.; Bayetti, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Neutral Beam (NB) system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has reached a high degree of integration with the tokamak and with the rest of the plant. Operational requirements and maintainability have been considered in the design. The paper considers the integration with the tokamak, discusses design improvements which appear necessary and finally notes R and D progress in key areas. (author)

  3. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  4. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  5. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  6. Neutral beam system for an ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasolo, J.; Fuja, R.; Jung, J.; Moenich, J.; Norem, J.; Praeg, W.; Stevens, H.

    1978-01-01

    We have attempted to make detailed designs of several neutral beam systems which would be applicable to a large machine, e.g. an ITR (Ignition Test Reactor), EPR (Experimental Power Reactor), or reactor. Detailed studies of beam transport to the reactor and neutron transport from the reactor have been made. We have also considered constraints imposed by the neutron radiation environment in the injectors, and the resulting shielding, radiation-damage, and maintenance problems. The effects of neutron heat loads on cryopanels and ZrAl getter panels have been considered. Design studies of power supplies, vacuum systems, bending magnets, and injector layouts are in progress and will be discussed

  7. Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX): a ''proof-of-principle'' evaluation of the use of electron beam heating to simulate the thermal mechanical environment anticipated for the first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, P.E.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    The results of a ''proof-of-principle'' Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX), designed to simulate the thermal mechanical response of insulator-metal composite first walls anticipated for pulsed high-density fusion reactors, are given. A programmable 10-kV, 1.0-A electron beam was used to pulse repeatedly (0.30-mm)Al 2 O 3 /(1.0-mm) Nb-1Zr composite samples 200 to 300 K, relative to a base-line temperature of 1000 K. The experimental goals of TSEX were established relative to the first-wall environment anticipated for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR). A detailed description of the TSEX ''proof-of-principle'' apparatus, experimental procedure, and diagnostics is given. The results of extensive thermal analyses are given, which are used to estimate the thermal stresses generated. Although little or no control was exercised over the sample fabrication and thermal history, one sample experienced in excess of 800 thermal cycles of approximately 250 K at approximately 1000 K, and the results of optical and SEM examination of this specimen are presented. The resistance of this sample to macroscopic failure was truly impressive. Recommendations for the construction of an apparatus dedicated to extensive testing of first-wall composites are given on the basis of these ''proof-of-principle'' TSEX results

  8. Beam-beam phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    In colliding beam storage rings the beam collision regions are generally so short that the beam-beam interaction can be considered as a series of evenly spaced non-linear kicks superimposed on otherwise stable linear oscillations. Most of the numerical studies on computers were carried out in just this manner. But for some reason this model has not been extensively employed in analytical studies. This is perhaps because all analytical work has so far been done by mathematicians pursuing general transcendental features of non-linear mechanics for whom this specific model of the specific system of colliding beams is too parochial and too repugnantly physical. Be that as it may, this model is of direct interest to accelerator physicists and is amenable to (1) further simplification, (2) physical approximation, and (3) solution by analogy to known phenomena

  9. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-01-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (a...... than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum....

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  11. Design of experiment existing parameter physics for supporting of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) method a t the piercing radial beam port of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indry Septiana Novitasari; Yosaphat Sumardi; Widarto

    2014-01-01

    The experiment existing parameters physics for supporting of in vivo and in vitro test facility of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preliminary study at the piercing radial beam port has been done. The existing experiments is needed for determining that the parameter physics is fulfill the BNCT method requirement. To realize the existing experiment have been done by design analysis, methodology, calculation method and some procedure related with radiation safety analysis and environment. Preparation for existing experiment physics such as foil detector of Gold (Au) should be irradiated for 30 minute, irradiation instrument and procedure related with the experiment for radiation safety. (author)

  12. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, N.G. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Simeoni, G.G., E-mail: ggsimeoni@outlook.com [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) and Physics Department, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lefmann, K. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2016-04-21

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (adjustable supermirror curvature) and the compact size (only 0.5 m long). We have simulated the neutron transport across the entire guide system. We present a detailed computer characterization of the existing device, along with the study of the factors mostly influencing the future improvement. We have optimized the simulated prototype as a function of the neutron wavelength, accounting also for all relevant features of a real instrument like the non-reflecting side edges. The results confirm the “chromatic” displacement of the focal point (flux density maximum) at fixed supermirror curvature, and the ability of a variable curvature to keep the focal point at the sample position. Our simulations are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the experimentally measured beam profile. With respect to the possibility of a further upgrade, we find that supermirror coatings with m-values higher than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  13. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  14. Digital control of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, J.C. III.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Research reactors provide an important service for the nuclear industry. Developments and innovations used for research reactors can be later applied to larger power reactors. Their relatively inexpensive cost allows research reactors to be an excellent testing ground for the reactors of tomorrow. One area of current interest is digital control of research reactor systems. Digital control systems offer the benefits of implementation and superior system response over their analog counterparts. At McClellan Air Force Base in Sacramento, California, the Stationary Neutron Radiography System (SNRS) uses a 1,000-kW TRIGA reactor for neutron radiography and other nuclear research missions. The neutron radiography beams generated by the reactor are used to detect corrosion in aircraft structures. While the use of the reactor to inspect intact F-111 wings is in itself noteworthy, there is another area in which the facility has applied new technology: the instrumentation and control system (ICS). The ICS developed by General Atomics (GA) contains several new and significant items: (a) the ability to servocontrol on three rods, (b) the ability to produce a square wave, and (c) the use of a software configurator to tune parameters affected by the actual reactor core dynamics. These items will probably be present in most, if not all, future research reactors. They were developed with increased control and overall usefulness of the reactor in mind

  15. Feasibility of a laser or charged-particle-beam fusion-reactor concept with direct electric generation by magnetic-flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-06-01

    A new concept for an inertial-confinement fusion reactor is described which, because of its fundamentally different approach to blanket geometry and energy conversion, makes possible a unique combination of high efficiency, high power density, and low radioactivity. The conventional blanket is replaced with a liquid-density mass of lithium contiguously surrounding the fusion yield. This compact blanket configuration produces the maximum shock-induced kinetic energy in liquid metal and the maximum neutron absorption per unit mass. The shock-induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed normal-conducting magnetic field applied to the exterior of the lithium

  16. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  17. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams.

  18. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  19. Important atomic physics issues for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-01-01

    This paper suggests several current atomic physics questions important to ion beam fusion. Among the topics discussed are beam transport, beam-target interaction, and reactor design. The major part of the report is discussion concerning areas of research necessary to better understand beam-target interactions

  20. Particle beam source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Electron beam research directed toward providing improved in-diode pinched beam sources and establishing the efficiency and feasibility for superposition of many beams progressed in three major areas. Focusing stability has been improved from large effective aspect ratio (radius/gap of emitting surface) diodes. Substantial progress toward establishing the feasibility of combining beams guided along ionized current-carrying channels has been made. Two beams have been transported and overlayed on a target. Theoretical and experimental measurements on channel formation have resulted in specifications for the capacitor bank channel initiation system for a 12-beam combination experiment on Proto II. An additional area of beam research has been the development of a small pulsed X-ray source to yield high quality flash X-radiography of pellets. A source yielding approximately 100-μm resolution of objects has been demonstrated and work continues to improve the convenience and reliability of this source. The effort to extend the capability of higher power conventional pulse power generators to accelerate ions (rather than electrons), and assess the feasibility of this technology variation for target experiments and reactors has progressed. Progress toward development of a multistage accelerator for ions with pulse power technology centered on development of a new laboratory facility and design and procurement of hardware for a five-stage test apparatus for the Pulslac concept

  1. Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Program is investigating pulsed electron and light ion beam accelerators, with the goal of demonstrating the practical application of such drivers as igniters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Recent developments in the program are described. Traditionally, two requirements of ICF reactor operation have been the most difficult to satisfy in conceptual designs. Adequate standoff of critical components from damaging pellet emissions must be assured, and the shot repetition rate must be consistent with the desired reactor power level at reasonable pellet gains. Progress in power compression, beam focusing and transport, first-wall protection schemes, and net-energy-gain target design shows how these requirements can be met

  2. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  3. Reactor PIK construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplev, Kir

    2003-01-01

    The construction work at the 100 MW researches reactor PIK in year 2002 was in progress. The main activity was concentrated on mechanical, ventilation and electrical equipment. Some systems and subsystems are under adjustment. Hydraulic driving gear for beam shutters are finished in installation, rinsing, and adjusting. Regulating rods test assembling was done. On the critical assembly the first reactor fueling was tested to evaluate the starting neutron source intensity and a sufficiency of existing control and instrument board. Mainline of the PIK facility design and neutron parameters are presented. (author)

  4. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  5. Diagnosis of electric equipment at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Truong Sinh

    1999-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type of its kind in the world: Soviet-designed core and control system harmoniously integrated into the left-over infrastructure of the former American-made TRIGA MARK II reactor, which includes the reactor tank and shielding, graphite reflector, beam tubes and thermal column. The reactor is mainly used for radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production, elemental analysis using neutron activation techniques, neutron beam exploitation, silicon doping, and reactor physics experimentation. For safe operation of the reactor maintenance work has been carried out for the reactor control and instrumentation, reactor cooling, ventilation, radiomonitoring, mechanical, normal electric supply systems as well as emergency electric diesel generators and the water treatment station. Technical management of the reactor includes periodical maintenance as required by technical specifications, training, re-training and control of knowledge for reactor staff. During recent years, periodic preventive maintenance (PPM) has been carried out for the electric machines of the technological systems. (author)

  6. Studies on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details of laser beam welded thick SS304L plates for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar, E-mail: buddu@ipr.res.in [Fusion Reactor Materials Development and Characterization Division, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M. [Fusion Reactor Materials Development and Characterization Division, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Natu, Harshad [Magod Laser Machining Pvt. Ltd, Jigani, Bengaluru 560105 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • CO{sub 2} laser welding of 8 mm thick SS304L plates has been carried out and full penetration welds fabricated and characterized for mechanical properties and microstructure details. • Welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base indicating good weld quality joints. • Impact fracture tests of weld zone and heat affected zone samples have shown poor toughness compared to the base metal. • SEM analysis of fracture samples of tensile and impact specimens indicated the complex microstructure features in weld zone and combined ductile and brittle fracture features. • Combined features of dendrite and cellular structures are observed in weld microstructures with narrow HAZ and delta ferrite is found in the welds and further confirmed by higher Ferrite Number data. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel is widely used structural material for the fabrication of the fusion reactor components. Laser welding is high power density process which offers several advantages over the other conventional processes like Tungsten Inert Gas welding. The features like low distortion, narrow heat affected zone, deep penetration in single pass, good mechanical properties are some of the advantages of laser welding process. The laser weld process parameters optimization has several challenges in terms of overcoming the weld defects like voids due to lack of penetration over depth, undercuts and porosity. The present paper reports the studies carried out with CO{sub 2} laser welding of 8 mm thick austenitic stainless steel SS304L plates and their characterization of mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details. The weld process parameter optimization towards defect free welds with full penetration welding has been carried out. The welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base metal, bend tests are successfully passed. The hardness measurements have shown slightly higher for weld zone compared to base metal

  7. Studies on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details of laser beam welded thick SS304L plates for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M.; Natu, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CO 2 laser welding of 8 mm thick SS304L plates has been carried out and full penetration welds fabricated and characterized for mechanical properties and microstructure details. • Welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base indicating good weld quality joints. • Impact fracture tests of weld zone and heat affected zone samples have shown poor toughness compared to the base metal. • SEM analysis of fracture samples of tensile and impact specimens indicated the complex microstructure features in weld zone and combined ductile and brittle fracture features. • Combined features of dendrite and cellular structures are observed in weld microstructures with narrow HAZ and delta ferrite is found in the welds and further confirmed by higher Ferrite Number data. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel is widely used structural material for the fabrication of the fusion reactor components. Laser welding is high power density process which offers several advantages over the other conventional processes like Tungsten Inert Gas welding. The features like low distortion, narrow heat affected zone, deep penetration in single pass, good mechanical properties are some of the advantages of laser welding process. The laser weld process parameters optimization has several challenges in terms of overcoming the weld defects like voids due to lack of penetration over depth, undercuts and porosity. The present paper reports the studies carried out with CO 2 laser welding of 8 mm thick austenitic stainless steel SS304L plates and their characterization of mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details. The weld process parameter optimization towards defect free welds with full penetration welding has been carried out. The welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base metal, bend tests are successfully passed. The hardness measurements have shown slightly higher for weld zone compared to base metal and the

  8. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  9. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  10. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  11. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  12. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  13. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  14. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  15. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  16. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Replacement research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Ross

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, the Australian Government commissioned a review into the need for a replacement research reactor. That review concluded that in about years, if certain conditions were met, the Government could make a decision in favour of a replacement reactor. A major milestone was achieved when, on 3 September 1997, the Australian Government announced the construction of a replacement research reactor at the site of Australia's existing research reactor HIFAR, subject to the satisfactory outcome of an environmental assessment process. The reactor will be have the dual purpose of providing a first class facility for neutron beam research as well as providing irradiation facilities for both medical isotope production and commercial irradiations. The project is scheduled for completion before the end of 2005. (author)

  18. The advanced MAPLE reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstone, R.F.; Lee, A.G.; Gillespie, G.E.; Smith, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    High-flux neutron sources are continuing to be of interest both in Canada and internationally to support materials testing for advanced power reactors, new developments in extracted-neutron-beam applications, and commercial production of selected radioisotopes. The advanced MAPLE reactor concept has been developed to meet these needs. The advanced MAPLE reactor is a new tank-type D 2 O reactor that uses rodded low-enrichment uranium fuel in a compact annular core to generate peak thermal-neutron fluxes of 1 x 10 19 n·s -1 in a central irradiation rig with a thermal power output of 50 MW. Capital and incremental development costs are minimized by using MAPLE reactor technology to the greatest extent practicable

  19. Beam loading

    OpenAIRE

    Boussard, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superco...

  20. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  1. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  2. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  4. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device

  5. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500-700 keV are needed for this device

  6. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80 percent. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59 percent and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high recirculating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)

  7. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  8. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  9. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  10. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations. [Laser beaming to airplanes; microwave beaming to ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.; Hertzberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Power beaming from space-based reactor systems is examined using an advanced compact, lightweight Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR). Closed Brayton power conversion efficiencies in the range of 30 to 40% can be achieved with turbines, with reactor exit temperatures on the order of 2000/sup 0/K and a liquid drop radiator to reject heat at temperatures of approx. 500/sup 0/K. Higher RBR coolant temperatures (up to approx. 3000/sup 0/K) are possible, but gains in power conversion efficiency are minimal, due to lower expander efficiency (e.g., a MHD generator). Two power beaming applications are examined - laser beaming to airplanes and microwave beaming to fixed ground receivers. Use of the RBR greatly reduces system weight and cost, as compared to solar power sources. Payback times are a few years at present prices for power and airplane fuel.

  11. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  12. Light ion driven inertial fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.; Sweeney, M.A.; Buttram, M.T.; Prestwich, K.R.; Moses, G.A.; peterson, R.R.; Lovell, E.G.; Englestad, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of designing fusion reactor systems using intense beams of light ions has been investigated. concepts for beam production, transport, and focusing on target have been analyzed in light of more conservative target performance estimates. Analyses of the major criteria which govern the design of the beam-target-cavity tried indicate the feasibility of designing power systems at the few hundred megawatt (electric) level. This paper discusses light ion fusion reactor (LIFR) concepts and presents an assessment of the design limitations through quantitative examples

  13. Control of colliding ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salisbury, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and system for enhancing the power-producing capability of a nuclear fusion reactor, and more specifically to methods and structure for enhancing the ion density in a directed particle fusion reactor. In accordance with the invention, oppositely directed ion beams constrained to helical paths pass through an annular reaction zone. The object is to produce fusion reactions due to collisions between the ion beams. The reaction zone is an annulus as between an inner-cylindrical electrode and an outer-cylindrical coaxial electrode. The beams are enhanced in ion density at spaced points along the paths by providing spline structures protruding from the walls of the electrodes into the reaction zone. This structure causes variations in the electric field along the paths followed by the ion beams. Such fields cause the beams to be successively more and less concentrated as the beams traverse the reaction zone. Points of high concentration are the points at which fusion-producing collisions are most likely to take place

  14. Research reactor`s role in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C-O [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    After a TRIGA MARK-II was constructed in 1962, new research activity of a general nature, utilizing neutrons, prevailed in Korea. Radioisotopes produced from the MARK-II played a good role in the 1960`s in educating people as to what could be achieved by a neutron source. Because the research reactor had implanted neutron science in the country, another TRIGA MARK-III had to be constructed within 10 years after importing the first reactor, due to increased neutron demand from the nuclear community. With the sudden growth of nuclear power, however, the emphasis of research changed. For a while research activities were almost all oriented to nuclear power plant technology. However, the specifics of nuclear power plant technology created a need for a more highly capable research reactor like HANARO 30MWt. HANARO will perform well with irradiation testing and other nuclear programs in the future, including: production of key radioisotopes, doping of silicon by transmutation, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiments, cold neutron source. 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  16. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  18. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  19. Beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Opportunities for TRIGA reactors in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, John P.

    1978-01-01

    In this country the two most recent installations of TRIGA reactors have both been for neutron radiography, one at HEDL and the other at ANL. Meanwhile, a major portion of the commercial neutron radiography is performed on a TRIGA fueled reactor at Aerotest. Each of these installations has different primary objectives and some comparative observations can be drawn. Another interesting comparison is between the TRIGA reactors for neutron radiography and other small reactors that are being installed for this purpose such as the MIRENE slow pulse reactors in France, a U-233 fueled reactor for neutron radiography in India and the L88 solution reactor in Denmark. At Monsanto Laboratory, in Ohio, a subcritical reactor based on MTR-type fuel has recently been purchased for neutron radiography. Such systems, when driven by a Van de Graaff neutron source, will be compared with the standard TRIGA reactor. Future demands on TRIGA or competitive systems for neutron radiography are likely to include the pulsing capability of the reactor, and also the extraction of cold neutron beams and resonance energy beams. Experiments recently performed on the Oregon State TRIGA Reactor provide information in each of these categories. A point of particular current concern is a comparison made between the resonance energy beam intensity extracted from the edge of the TRIGA core and from a slot which penetrated to the center of the TREAT reactor. These results indicate that by using such slots on a TRIGA, resonance energy intensities could be extracted that are much higher than previously predicted. (author)

  2. Australia needs to replace the HIFAR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, Helen

    1993-01-01

    Central to the execution of ANSTO's objectives has been the operation since 1958 of the multipurpose HIFAR research reactor and related infrastructure. However, HIFAR's irradiation facilities, which are used for the provision of radiopharmaceuticals essential for nuclear medicine in Australia, have a limited capacity. The author stated that HIFAR's neutron beam facilities, which are needed by Australian scientists to undertake basic structural studies on a wide range of materials, are unable to provide the resolution and information required to keep Australia in the league of technologically advanced nations. The neutron flux and design limitations of older reactors such as HIFAR inhibit the upgrading of neutron beam facilities to modern standards. It is emphasised that while the cost of the new reactor is a vital issue, what is a prevailing importance is analyses of the cost-benefit and effectiveness of the new reactor, which will be undertaken by the Research Reactor Review. Some of these benefits are briefly outlined. ills

  3. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  4. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  5. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  6. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  7. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of a Gaussian beam (GB) into a symmetrical higher order TEMp0 Laguerre Gaussian beam (LGB) intensity distribution of which is further rectified and transformed into a Gaussian intensity distribution in the plane of a converging...

  8. Sandia's recent results in particle beam research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results in the Sandia particle beam fusion research program are briefly discussed. Ignition of pellet fusion targets by both electron and ion beams are under study. Power concentration, dielectric breakdown, diode optimization, and beam-target interaction experiments are briefly described. Magnetic insulation considerations are discussed. Efforts to utilize higher impedance diode sources and reduce minimum power pulse widths are described. Analyses indicate that particle beam ignition systems might yield pellet gains greater than 10 in hybrid and approximately 100 in pure fusion reactors. A bibliography of 23 references is included

  9. Slurry reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  10. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  12. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masami; Nishio, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the rupture of the dry well even when the melted reactor core drops into a reactor pedestal cavity. Constitution: In a reactor container in which a dry well disposed above the reactor pedestal cavity for containing the reactor pressure vessel and a torus type suppression chamber for containing pressure suppression water are connected with each other, the pedestal cavity and the suppression chamber are disposed such that the flow level of the pedestal cavity is lower than the level of the pressure suppression water. Further, a pressure suppression water introduction pipeway for introducing the pressure suppression water into the reactor pedestal cavity is disposed by way of an ON-OFF valve. In case if the melted reactor core should fall into the pedestal cavity, the ON-OFF valve for the pressure suppression water introduction pipeway is opened to introduce the pressure suppression water in the suppression chamber into the pedestal cavity to cool the melted reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  13. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This chapter includes the following: General description of the RA reactor, organization of work, responsibilities of leadership and operators team, regulations concerning operation and behaviour in the reactor building, regulations for performing experiments, regulations and instructions for inserting samples into experimental channels [sr

  14. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  15. Improvements in streaking nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    In this type of reactor atomic nuclei are stripped of their electron shells by heating to form a very high temperature plasma which is passed at high speed through a chamber in which they are forced into contact with a 'wall' formed by a unidirectional stream of photons from continuous laser beams. In this way it should be possible to brush off from the surface of the nuclei protons and neutrons, with release of their binding energy. The energy thus produced can be subjected to much more gentle control than with a fission or fusion reactor. Furthermore, if this concept can be successfully applied to elements of high atomic number which are normally regarded as stable and unfissionable, a vast new source of nuclear energy release will have been made available. It also seems possible that an atomic nucleus might be spun sufficiently in such a reactor to disintegrate it completely into nucleons by simple centrifugal action, with great release of binding energy. The reactor described has a central body with radial ducts through which the nuclei are passed, and a number of lasers are provided whose beams are arranged so that the nuclei are discharged at the cross-over point of two or more laser beams which form a corner at the junction of two or more photon walls. (U.K.)

  16. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  17. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A system for controlling combustible gases, it has been constituted at present such that the combustible gases are controlled by exhausting them to the wet well of a reactor container. In this system, however, there has been a problem, in a reactor container having plenums in addition to the wet well and the dry well, that the combustible gases in such plenums can not be controlled. In view of the above, in the present invention, suction ports or exhaust ports of the combustible gas control system are disposed to the wet well, the dry well and the plenums to control the combustible gases in the reactor container. Since this can control the combustible gases in the entire reactor container, the integrity of the reactor container can be ensured. (T.M.)

  18. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hosomi, Kenji; Otonari, Jun-ichiro.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen to be disposed in a reactor container upon rupture of pipelines of a reactor primary coolant system is prevented from deposition of water droplets formed from a reactor container spray to suppress elevation of hydrogen concentration in the reactor container. Namely, a catalytic combustion gas concentration control system comprises a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen and a support thereof. In addition, there is also disposed a water droplet deposition-preventing means for preventing deposition of water droplets in a reactor pressure vessel on the catalyst. Then, the effect of the catalyst upon catalytic oxidation reaction of hydrogen can be kept high. The local elevation of hydrogen concentration can be prevented even upon occurrence of such a phenomenon that various kinds of mobile forces in the container such as dry well cooling system are lost. (I.S.)

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  20. ORNL 150 keV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Kim, J.; Menon, M.M.; Schilling, G.

    1977-01-01

    The 150 keV neutral beam test facility provides for the testing and development of neutral beam injectors and beam systems of the class that will be needed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and The Next Step (TNS). The test facility can simulate a complete beam line injection system and can provide a wide range of experimental operating conditions. Herein is offered a general description of the facility's capabilities and a discussion of present system performance

  1. Physics and safety of advanced research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Hardt, P. von der

    1987-01-01

    Advanced research reactor concepts are presently being developed in order to meet the neutron-based research needs of the nineties. Among these research reactors, which are characterized by an average power density of 1-10 MW per liter, highest priority is now generally given to the 'beam tube reactors'. These provide very high values of the thermal neutron flux (10 14 -10 16 cm -2 s -1 ) in a large volume outside of the reactor core, which can be used for sample irradiations and, in particular, for neutron scattering experiments. The paper first discusses the 'inverse flux trap concept' and the main physical aspects of the design and optimization of beam tube reactors. After that two examples of advanced research reactor projects are described which may be considered as two opposite extremes with respect to the physical optimization principle just mentioned. The present situation concerning cross section libraries and neutronic computer codes is more or less satisfactory. The safety analyses of advanced research reactors can largely be updated from those of current new designs, partially taking advantage of the immense volume of work done for power reactors. The paper indicates a few areas where generic problems for advanced research reactor safety are to be solved. (orig.)

  2. Sciences with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Yoichi

    1992-01-01

    The unstable nuclei which are produced with accelerators and nuclear reactors and are far apart from the stability line have been used mainly in nuclear physics field as the object of the systematic research on atomic nucleus structure. Recently, the projects for developing the advanced research in many fields by accelerating the obtained unstable nuclei have been proposed. The unstable nucleus beam which was accelerated to high energy and controlled precisely keeps the possibility of qualitatively improve further conventional ion beam science, and it is expected as the breakthrough in the interdisciplinary basic research related to atomic energy, therefore, its recent trend in the world is explained, hoping for the new development. The stable isotopes existing naturally distribute along the N-Z straight line, and as they are apart from the natural stability line, they become unstable to beta decay, and their life becomes short exponentially. The significance of unstable nucleus beam science and its recent trend, the production of unstable nucleus beam, the interdisciplinary research using unstable nucleus beam, and the present state and future plan in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Neutron Beam Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of filters is to transmit neutrons with selected energy, while remove unwanted ones from the incident neutron beam. This reduces the background, and the number of spurious. The types of commonly used now-a-day neutron filters and their properties are discussed in the present work. There are three major types of neutron filters. The first type is filter of selective thermal neutron. It transmits the main reflected neutrons from a crystal monochromate, while reject the higher order contaminations accompanying the main one. Beams coming from the moderator always contain unwanted radiation like fast neutrons and gamma-rays which contribute to experimental background and to the biological hazard potential. Such filter type is called filter of whole thermal neutron spectrum. The third filter type is it transmits neutrons with energies in the resonance energy range (En . 1 KeV). The main idea of such neutron filter technique is the use of large quantities of a certain material which have the deep interference minima in its total neutron cross-section. By transmitting reactor neutrons through bulk layer of such material, one can obtain the quasimonochromatic neutron lines instead of white reactor spectrum.

  5. Heavy-atom neutral beams for tandem-mirror end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Santarius, J.F.; Emmert, G.A.

    1981-05-01

    The advantages of neutral beams with Z greater than or equal to 3 formed from negative ions, accelerated to 0.5 to 1.0 MeV/amu, and neutralized with high efficiency, are investigated for use in tandem mirror reactor end plugs. These beams can produce Q's of 20 to 30, and thus can replace the currently proposed 200 to 500 keV neutral proton beams presently planned for tandem mirror reactors. Thus, these Z greater than or equal to 3 neutral beams increase the potential attractiveness of tandem mirror reactors by offering a substitute for difficult high energy neutral hydrogen end plug beams

  6. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Satoru; Kawashima, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the temperature distribution of the reactor container so as to moderate the thermal stress distribution on the reactor wall of LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: A good heat conductor (made of Al or Cu) is appended on the outer side of the reactor container wall from below the liquid level to the lower face of a deck plate. Further, heat insulators are disposed to the outside of the good heat conductor. Furthermore, a gas-cooling duct is circumferentially disposed at the contact portion between the good heat conductor and the deck plate around the reactor container. This enables to flow the cold heat from the liquid metal rapidly through the good heat conductor to the cooling duct and allows to maintain the temperature distribution on the reactor wall substantially linear even with the abrupt temperature change in the liquid metal. Further, by appending the good heat conductor covered with inactive metals not only on the outer side but also on the inside of the reactor wall to introduce the heat near the liquid level to the upper portion and escape the same to the cooling layer below the roof slab, the effect can be improved further. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection

  9. The tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.; Rose, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    At a time when the potential benefits of various energy options are being seriously evaluated in many countries through-out the world, it is both timely and important to evaluate the practical application of fusion reactors for their economical production of nuclear fissile fuels from fertile fuels. The fusion hybrid reactor represents a concept that could assure the availability of adequate fuel supplies for a proven nuclear technology and have the potential of being an electrical energy source as opposed to an energy consumer as are the present fuel enrichment processes. Westinghouse Fusion Power Systems Department, under Contract No. EG-77-C-02-4544 with the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, has developed a preliminary conceptual design for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) Plants. To the depth this study has been performed, no insurmountable technical problems have been identified. The study has provided a basis for reasonable cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources. A nearer-term concept is also defined using a beam driven fusion driver in lieu of the longer term ignited operating mode. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  11. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  12. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  14. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshihito; Sano, Tamotsu; Ueda, Sabuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the liquid surface disturbance in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A horizontal flow suppressing mechanism mainly comprising vertical members is suspended near the free liquid surface of coolants in the upper plenum. The horizontal flow of coolants near the free liquid surface is reduced by the suppressing mechanism to effectively reduce the surface disturbance. The reduction in the liquid surface disturbance further prevails to the entire surface region with no particular vertical variations to the free liquid surface to remarkably improve the preventive performance for the liquid surface disturbance. Accordingly, it is also possible to attain the advantageous effects such as prevention for the thermal fatigue in reactor vessel walls, reactor upper mechanisms, etc. and prevention of burning damage to the reactor core due to the reduction of envolved Ar gas. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  17. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollion, H.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components [fr

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  19. Reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdoes, P.

    1977-01-01

    This is one of a series of articles discussing aspects of nuclear engineering ranging from a survey of various reactor types for static and mobile use to mention of atomic thermo-electric batteries of atomic thermo-electric batteries for cardiac pacemakers. Various statistics are presented on power generation in Europe and U.S.A. and economics are discussed in some detail. Molten salt reactors and research machines are also described. (G.M.E.)

  20. Filamentation of a converging heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Buchanan, H.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A major concern in the use of heavy ion beams as igniters in pellet fusion systems is the vulnerability of the beam to the transverse flamentation instability. The undesirable consequence of this mode is the transverse heating of the beam to the extent that convergence on the pellet becomes impossible. This work considers the case of a beam injected into a gas filled reactor vessel, where finite pulse length and propagation distance play an important role in limiting growth. Two geometries are analyzed: a nonconverging case where the radius at injection is nearly equal to the desired radius at the pellet, and a converging case in which the injection radius is large and the beam is pre-focused to converge at the target. It is found that a cold beam will be severely disrupted if the product of the magnetic plasma frequency and the propagation distance is much larger than unity

  1. Ballistic-neutralized chamber transport of intense heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.; Clark, R.E.; Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor chamber are presented. The ballistic-neutralized transport scheme studied uses 4 GeV Pb +1 ion beams injected into a low-density, gas-filled reactor chamber and the beam is ballistically focused onto an ICF target before entering the chamber. Charge and current neutralization of the beam is provided by the low-density background gas. The ballistic-neutralized simulations include stripping of the beam ions as the beam traverses the chamber as well as ionization of the background plasma. In addition, a series of simulations are presented that explore the charge and current neutralization of the ion beam in an evacuated chamber. For this vacuum transport mode, neutralizing electrons are only drawn from sources near the chamber entrance

  2. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  3. Fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fast reactors have capacities to spare uranium natural resources by their breeding property and to propose solutions to the management of radioactive wastes by limiting the inventory of heavy nuclei. This article highlights the role that fast reactors could play for reducing the radiotoxicity of wastes. The conversion of 238 U into 239 Pu by neutron capture is more efficient in fast reactors than in light water reactors. In fast reactors multi-recycling of U + Pu leads to fissioning up to 95% of the initial fuel ( 238 U + 235 U). 2 strategies have been studied to burn actinides: - the multi-recycling of heavy nuclei is made inside the fuel element (homogeneous option); - the unique recycling is made in special irradiation targets placed inside the core or at its surroundings (heterogeneous option). Simulations have shown that, for the same amount of energy produced (400 TWhe), the mass of transuranium elements (Pu + Np + Am + Cm) sent to waste disposal is 60,9 Kg in the homogeneous option and 204.4 Kg in the heterogeneous option. Experimental programs are carried out in Phenix and BOR60 reactors in order to study the feasibility of such strategies. (A.C.)

  4. Sodium leak detection system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, D.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a device for detecting sodium leaks from a reactor vessel of a liquid sodium cooled nuclear reactor the reactor vessel being concentrically surrounded by a a containment vessel so as to define an airtight gap containing argon. It comprises: a light source for generating a first light beam, the first light beam having first and second predominant wavelengths, the first wavelength being substantially equal to an absorption line of sodium and the second wavelength being chosen such that it is not absorbed by sodium and argon; an optical multiplexer optically coupled to the light source; optically coupled to the multiplexer, each of the sensors being embedded in the containment vessel of the reactor, each of the sensors projecting the first light beam into the gap and collecting the first light beam after it has reflected off of a surface of the reactor vessel; a beam splitter optically coupled to each of the sensors through the multiplexer, the beam splitter splitting the first light beam into second and third light beams of substantially equal intensities; a first filter dispersed within a path of second light beam for filtering the second wavelength out of the third light beam; first and second detector beams disposed with in the paths of the second and third light beams so as to detect the intensities of the second and third light beams, respectively; and processing means connected to the first and second detector means for calculating the amount of the first wavelength which is absorbed when passing through the argon

  5. Brazilian multipurpose reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) Project is an action of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (MCTI) and has its execution under the responsibility of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Within the CNEN, the project is coordinated by the Research and Development Directorate (DPD) and developed through research units of this board: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (IPEN); Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN); Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN); Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE); and Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). The Navy Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP) and also the participation of other research centers, universities, laboratories and companies in the nuclear sector are important and strategic partnerships. The conceptual design and the safety analysis of the reactor and main facilities, related to nuclear and environmental licensing, are performed by technicians of the research units of DPD / CNEN. The basic design was contracted to engineering companies as INTERTHECNE from Brazil and INVAP from Argentine. The research units from DPD/CNEN are also responsible for the design verification on all engineering documents developed by the contracted companies. The construction and installation should be performed by specific national companies and international partnerships. The Nuclear Reactor RMB will be a open pool type reactor with maximum power of 30 MW and have the OPAL nuclear reactor of 20 MW, built in Australia and designed by INVAP, as reference. The RMB reactor core will have a 5x5 configuration, consisting of 23 elements fuels (EC) of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion-type Al having a density of up to 3.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and enrichment of 19.75% by weight of {sup 23{sup 5}}U. Two positions will be available in the core for materials irradiation devices. The main objectives of the RMB Reactor and the other nuclear and radioactive

  6. Brazilian multipurpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) Project is an action of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (MCTI) and has its execution under the responsibility of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Within the CNEN, the project is coordinated by the Research and Development Directorate (DPD) and developed through research units of this board: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (IPEN); Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN); Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN); Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE); and Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). The Navy Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP) and also the participation of other research centers, universities, laboratories and companies in the nuclear sector are important and strategic partnerships. The conceptual design and the safety analysis of the reactor and main facilities, related to nuclear and environmental licensing, are performed by technicians of the research units of DPD / CNEN. The basic design was contracted to engineering companies as INTERTHECNE from Brazil and INVAP from Argentine. The research units from DPD/CNEN are also responsible for the design verification on all engineering documents developed by the contracted companies. The construction and installation should be performed by specific national companies and international partnerships. The Nuclear Reactor RMB will be a open pool type reactor with maximum power of 30 MW and have the OPAL nuclear reactor of 20 MW, built in Australia and designed by INVAP, as reference. The RMB reactor core will have a 5x5 configuration, consisting of 23 elements fuels (EC) of U 3 Si 2 dispersion-type Al having a density of up to 3.5 gU/cm 3 and enrichment of 19.75% by weight of 23 5 U. Two positions will be available in the core for materials irradiation devices. The main objectives of the RMB Reactor and the other nuclear and radioactive facilities are

  7. A method of installing a reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kenji; Murakawa, Hisao.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To achieve exact installation of a reactor container at a site. Structure: A pole is set upright at the center of a cylindrical base portion, a plurality of beams are disposed around the pole in a radial fashion to form a cone, a plurality of steel plates are mounted successively around the cone through a ring, and the steel plates are welded to each other to assemble and install a reactor container at the same time. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  9. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  10. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration

  12. Importance of beam-beam tune spread to collective beam-beam instability in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Lihui; Shi Jicong

    2004-01-01

    In hadron colliders, electron-beam compensation of beam-beam tune spread has been explored for a reduction of beam-beam effects. In this paper, effects of the tune-spread compensation on beam-beam instabilities were studied with a self-consistent beam-beam simulation in model lattices of Tevatron and Large Hodron Collider. It was found that the reduction of the tune spread with the electron-beam compensation could induce a coherent beam-beam instability. The merit of the compensation with different degrees of tune-spread reduction was evaluated based on beam-size growth. When two beams have a same betatron tune, the compensation could do more harm than good to the beams when only beam-beam effects are considered. If a tune split between two beams is large enough, the compensation with a small reduction of the tune spread could benefit beams as Landau damping suppresses the coherent beam-beam instability. The result indicates that nonlinear (nonintegrable) beam-beam effects could dominate beam dynamics and a reduction of beam-beam tune spread by introducing additional beam-beam interactions and reducing Landau damping may not improve the stability of beams

  13. Beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Dragt, A; Mottershead, C; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Ryne, R; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe some of the accomplishments of the Beam Dynamics portion of the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology project. During the course of the project, our beam dynamics software has evolved from the era of different codes for each physical effect to the era of hybrid codes combining start-of-the-art implementations for multiple physical effects to the beginning of the era of true multi-physics frameworks. We describe some of the infrastructure that has been developed over the course of the project and advanced features of the most recent developments, the interplay betwen beam studies and simulations and applications to current machines at Fermilab. Finally we discuss current and future plans for simulations of the International Linear Collider

  14. Characterization of electron beam welded Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishetty, Sharath; Manna, I.; Majumdar, J. Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr) alloys are the backbone materials for thermal reactors because of their low neutron absorption cross section and in addition have suitable properties like high temperature mechanical and corrosion properties. For various structural applications, different Zirconium based alloys are used. Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) is most commonly used as channel boxes in boiling water reactors (BWRs), intermediate grid applications in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and in fuel cladding. Zircaloy cladding acts as a barrier between the radioactive fuel and exterior coolants. Therefore, the structural integrity of the cladding tube is extremely important in the safe operation of reactors. Efforts are being made to produce Zircaloy-4 products with better mechanical properties. Different routes of processing are involved like forging, pilgering and extrusion are developed over years in fabricating components to improve in-reactor performance. In this study, microstructure and hardness properties of electron beam welded Zr-4 was evaluated

  15. Report of the ad hoc committee 'medium-flux reactor' of the Federal Minister for Research and Technology. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts for a new jet nozzle reactor as a thermal neutron source for beam tube experiments in fundamental and applied research in West Germany (reactor and infrastructure, organisation criteria, siting). (HP) [de

  16. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  17. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  18. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  19. Second preliminary design of JAERI experimental fusion reactor (JXFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Kiyoshi; Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa; Yamato, Harumi

    1979-06-01

    Second preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future has been performed. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics radiation shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel recirculating system, reactor cooling and tritium recovery systems and maintenance scheme. Safety analyses of the reactor system have been also performed. This paper gives a brief description of the design as of January, 1979. The feasibility study of raising the power density has been also studied and is shown as appendix. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  2. Thermal self-focusing with multiple beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.; McCrory, R.L.

    1986-07-01

    Self-focusing in underdense plasmas in the presence of overlapping beams is of interest for multibeam laser-irradiation systems. The hydrodynamics/ray-tracing simulation code SAGE is used to model thermal self-focusing in two-dimensional line-focus geometry with beams incident obliquely at different angles. The conjecture that multiple overlapping beams may suppress self-focusing is investigated for parameters appropriate to reactor-sized targets; in particular, the dependence upon intensity, scale length and pulse width is examined. While the full problem is three-dimensional, insight may be gained from two-dimensional simulations

  3. Research reactors; Les piles de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarski, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; [Organisation europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1955-07-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  4. Research reactors; Les piles de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarski, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires]|[Organisation europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1955-07-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  5. Present status and future prospect of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemi, Hirokatsu

    1996-01-01

    The present status of research reactors more than MW class reactor in JAERI and the Kyoto University and the small reactors in the Musashi Institute of Technology, the Rikkyo University, the Tokyo University, the Kinki University and other countries are explained in the paper. The present status of researches are reported by the topics in each field. The future researches of the beam reactor and the irradiation reactor are reviewed. On various kinds of use of research reactor and demands of neutron field of a high order, new type research reactors under investigation are explained. Recently, the reactors are used in many fields such as the basic science: the basic physics, the material science, the nuclear physics, and the nuclear chemistry and the applied science; the earth and environmental science, the biology and the medical science. (S.Y.)

  6. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  7. Reactor application of an improved bundle divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Ruck, G.W.; Lee, A.Y.; Smeltzer, G.; Prevenslik, T.

    1978-11-01

    A Bundle Divertor was chosen as the impurity control and plasma exhaust system for the beam driven Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor - DTHR. In the context of a preconceptual design study of the reactor and associated facility a bundle divertor concept was developed and integrated into the reactor system. The overall system was found feasible and scalable for reactors with intermediate torodial field strengths on axis. The important design characteristics are: the overall average current density of the divertor coils is 0.73 kA for each tesla of toroidal field on axis; the divertor windings are made from super-conducting cables supported by steel structures and are designed to be maintainable; the particle collection assembly and auxiliary cryosorption vacuum pump are dual systems designed such that they can be reactivated alterntively to allow for continuous reactor operation; and the power requirement for energizing and operating the divertor is about 5 MW

  8. Some electron beam welding equipments for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.; Rodier, R.; Sayegh, G.

    1978-01-01

    Results of various electron beam welding equipment developed for the nuclear industry obtained from a 100 kW electron beam machine to weld thick plates made of stainless steel and reactor steel, and from some equipment with local vacuum to weld pipes onto a pipe wall. (orig.) [de

  9. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  10. The state of the PIK reactor construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplev, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    Principle concepts of the PIK reactor project were stated late in the 60's but its construction was started in 1976. By the year 1986 the initial project was realised by approximately 70% but then, after Chernobyl accident the construction was essentially frozen to adjust the project to the revised nuclear safety regulations. The revised project was approved only in 1990 when the country was on the threshold of serious economic problems. The PIK reactor is a source of neutrons placed in the heavy water reflector. The fuel is uranium-235 (90% enrichment) of total weight 27 kg. Light water is used as moderator and coolant. Design parameters: thermal power is 100 W; thermal neutron flux in the reflector is 1.2x10 15 n/cm 2 s; in the central vertical beam tube is 5x10 15 n/cm 2 s; number of horizontal beam tubes is 10; diameter of beam tubes is 10 cm, with the possibility of replacement with beam tubes up to 25 cm in diameter. The reactor will be equipped with sources of hot, cold, and ultracold neutrons to obtain beams in different intervals of energy spectrum. The low temperature circuit will enable to irradiate samples at helium temperatures. The reactor has three series cooling circuits. Emergency core cooling systems in LOCA are double and in emergency power supply system is triple. The PIK reactor has no single common containment but four separate systems: for pipelines and units of the first circuit, for heavy water reflector, for operating hall, and for experimental beam tubes hall

  11. Upgrade for the epithermal neutron beam at NRI Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, M.; Flibor, S.; Viererbl, L.; Burian, J.; Rejchrt, J.; Klupak, V.; Gambarini, G.; Vanossi, E.

    2006-01-01

    The epithermal neutron beam facility designed for pre-clinical neutron capture therapy research has been operated at LVR-15 reactor for more than ten years. The construction of the beam filter has been recently modified especially for the shielding quality of the beam shutter to be improved. The parameters of the upgraded beam were calculated with the MCNP code and a new source term for the NCTPLAN treatment planning software was evaluated. The calculated source term was consequently scaled according to the results of measurements in the free beam and in the 50x50x25 cm 3 water phantom. (author)

  12. Design of a negative ion neutral beam system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easoz, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A conceptual design of a neutral beam line based on the neutralization of negative deuterium ions is presented. This work is a detailed design of a complete neutral beam line based on using negative ions from a direct extraction source. Anticipating major technological advancements, beam line components have been scaled including the negative ion sources and components for the direct energy recovery of charged beams and high speed cryogenic pumping. With application to the next step in experimental fusion reactors (TNS), the neutral beam injector system that has been designed provides 10 MW of 200 keV neutral deuterium atoms. Several arms are required for plasma ignition

  13. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  14. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  15. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  17. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Narabayashi, Naoshi.

    1990-01-01

    The represent invention concerns a reactor system with improved water injection means to a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. A steam pump is connected to a heat removing system pipeline, a high pressure water injection system pipeline and a low pressure water injection system pipeline for injecting water into the pressure vessel. A pump actuation pipeline is disposed being branched from a main steam pump or a steam relieaf pipeline system, through which steams are supplied to actuate the steam pump and supply cooling water into the pressure vessel thereby cooling the reactor core. The steam pump converts the heat energy into the kinetic energy and elevates the pressure of water to a level higher than the pressure of the steams supplied by way of a pressure-elevating diffuser. Cooling water can be supplied to the pressure vessel by the pressure elevation. This can surely inject cooling water into the pressure vessel upon loss of coolant accident or in a case if reactor scram is necessary, without using an additional power source. (I.N.)

  20. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  1. Engineering problems of future neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.

    1977-01-01

    Because there is no limit to the energy or power that can be delivered by a neutral-beam injector, its use will be restricted by either its cost, size, or reliability. Studies show that these factors can be improved by the injector design, and several examples, taken from mirror reactor studies, are given

  2. Horizontal beam tubes in FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coors, D.; Vanvor, D.

    2001-01-01

    The new research reactor in Garching FRM-II is equipped with 10 leak tight horizontal beam tubes (BT1 - BT10), each of them consisting of a beam tube structure taking an insert with neutron channels. The design of all beam tube structures is similar whereas the inserts are adapted to the special requirements of the using of each beam tube. Inside the reflector tank the beam tube structures are shaped by the inner cones which are made of Al-alloy with circular and rectangular cross sections. They are located in the region of maximum neutron flux (exception BT10), they are directly connected to the flanges of the reflector tank, their lengths are about 1.5 m (exception BT10) and their axes are directed tagentially to the core centre thus contributing to a low γ-noise at the experiments. (orig.)

  3. Pulsed power particle beam fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    1979-01-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in the last few years in developing the technology of intense particle beam drivers, there are still several unanswered questions which will determine their ultimate feasibility as fusion ignition systems. The questions of efficiency, cost, and single pulse scalability appear to have been answered affirmatively but repetitive pulse technology is still in its infancy. The allowable relatively low pellet gains and high available beam energies should greatly ease questions of pellet implosion physics. Insofar as beam-target coupling is concerned, ion deposition is thought to be understood and our measurements of enhanced electron deposition agree with theory. With the development of plasma discharges for intense beam transport and concentration it appears that light ion beams will be the preferred approach for reactors

  4. New research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.

    1992-01-01

    HIFAR, Australia's major research reactor was commissioned in 1958 to test materials for an envisaged indigenous nuclear power industry. HIFAR is a Dido type reactor which is operated at 10 MW. With the decision in the early 1970's not to proceed to nuclear power, HIFAR was adapted to other uses and has served Australia well as a base for national nuclear competence; as a national facility for neutron scattering/beam research; as a source of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment; and as a source of export revenue from the neutron transmutation doping of silicon for the semiconductor industry. However, all of HIFAR's capabilities are becoming less than optimum by world and regional standards. Neutron beam facilities have been overtaken on the world scene by research reactors with increased neutron fluxes, cold sources, and improved beams and neutron guides. Radioisotope production capabilities, while adequate to meet Australia's needs, cannot be easily expanded to tap the growing world market in radiopharmaceuticals. Similarly, neutron transmutation doped silicon production, and export income from it, is limited at a time when the world market for this material is expanding. ANSTO has therefore embarked on a program to replace HIFAR with a new multi-purpose national facility for nuclear research and technology in the form of a reactor: a) for neutron beam research, - with a peak thermal flux of the order of three times higher than that from HIFAR, - with a cold neutron source, guides and beam hall, b) that has radioisotope production facilities that are as good as, or better than, those in HIFAR, c) that maximizes the potential for commercial irradiations to offset facility operating costs, d) that maximizes flexibility to accommodate variations in user requirements during the life of the facility. ANSTO's case for the new research reactor received significant support earlier this month with the tabling in Parliament of a report by the Australian Science

  5. ITER Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Akiba, Masato

    1991-03-01

    A Japanese design proposal of the ITER Neutral Beam Injection System (NBS) which is consistent with the ITER common design requirements is described. The injection system is required to deliver a neutral deuterium beam of 75MW at 1.3MeV to the reactor plasma and utilized not only for plasma heating but also for current drive and current profile control. The injection system is composed of 9 modules, each of which is designed so as to inject a 1.3MeV, 10MW neutral beam. The most important point in the design is that the injection system is based on the utilization of a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source which can produce an intense negative ion beam with high current density at a low source operating pressure. The design value of the source is based on the experimental values achieved at JAERI. The utilization of the cesium-seeded volume source is essential to the design of an efficient and compact neutral beam injection system which satisfies the ITER common design requirements. The critical components to realize this design are the 1.3MeV, 17A electrostatic accelerator and the high voltage DC acceleration power supply, whose performances must be demonstrated prior to the construction of ITER NBI system. (author)

  6. Anomalous x-ray radiation of beam plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, S.K.; Zavyalov, M.A.; Mikhin, S.G.; Tarasenkov, V.A.; Telkovskij, V.G.; Khrabrov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of non-equilibrium stationary plasma under the conditions of the planned plasma-chemical reactors based on beam-plasma discharge were investigated. The x-ray spectrum of the beam-plasma was measured and anomalous spectral properties were analyzed. Starting with some critical pressure the anomalous radiation was added to the classical bremsstrahlung spectrum. The occurrence of anomalous radiation can be used to diagnose the condition of beam transportation in such systems. (D.Gy.)

  7. Fuel transfer manipulator for liquid metal nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturges, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    A manipulator for transferring fuel assemblies between inclined fuel chutes of a liquid metal nuclear reactor installation. Hoisting means are mounted on a mount supported by beams pivotably attached by pins to the mount and to the floor in such a manner that pivoting of the beams causes movement and tilting of a hoist tube between positions of alignment with the inclined chutes. (author)

  8. RMB: the new Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrotta, Jose Augusto, E-mail: perrotta@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The Brazilian research reactors have a limited capacity for radioisotopes production, leading to a high dependence on external supply for radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine. In order to overcome this condition and due to the old age of these research reactors, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission decided, in 2008, to construct a new research reactor. The new reactor named RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) will be part of a new nuclear research center, to be built on a site about 100 kilometers from São Paulo city, in the southern part of Brazil. The new nuclear research center will have a 30 MW open pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel, and several associated laboratories in order to produce radioisotopes for medical and industrial use, to use neutron beams in scientific and technological research; to perform neutron activation analysis; and to perform materials and fuels irradiation tests. Regarding the neutron beams use, the RMB design provides thermal and cold neutron beams. From one side of the reactor, the neutron guides will extend to an experimental hall of instruments named Neutron Guide Hall where it will be installed the scattering instruments. In the initial stage of the reactor operation, the intent is to implement two neutron guides for thermal neutrons and another two for cold neutrons. The 2015 SBPMAT symposium has presented the technical overview of the RMB project and its main buildings, structures and components. At this year symposium, the RMB presentation updates some technical information and the development status of the project, discussing the negative results of the Brazilian political and economic crisis to the project development and its future perspectives. (author)

  9. Neutral helium beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rezwanul

    1999-10-01

    This article discusses the development of a code where diagnostic neutral helium beam can be used as a probe. The code solves numerically the evolution of the population densities of helium atoms at their several different energy levels as the beam propagates through the plasma. The collisional radiative model has been utilized in this numerical calculation. The spatial dependence of the metastable states of neutral helium atom, as obtained in this numerical analysis, offers a possible diagnostic tool for tokamak plasma. The spatial evolution for several hypothetical plasma conditions was tested. Simulation routines were also run with the plasma parameters (density and temperature profiles) similar to a shot in the Princeton beta experiment modified (PBX-M) tokamak and a shot in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak. A comparison between the simulation result and the experimentally obtained data (for each of these two shots) is presented. A good correlation in such comparisons for a number of such shots can establish the accurateness and usefulness of this probe. The result can possibly be extended for other plasma machines and for various plasma conditions in those machines.

  10. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Tsukada, Kineo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Oomichi, Toshihiko; Oono, Hideo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure, as well as improve the technical reliability and safety by the elimination of a proton beam entering window. Constitution: The nuclear reactor container main body is made of Hastelloy N and provided at the inner surface with two layers of graphite shields except for openings. An aperture was formed in the upper surface of the container, through which protons accelerated by a linear accelerator are directly entered to the liquid surface of molten salts such as 7LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 , 7LiF-NaF-ThF 4 , 7LiF-Rb-UF 4 , NaF-KF-UF 4 and the like. The heated molten salts are introduced by way of a pipeway into a heat exchanger where the heat is transferred to coolant salts and electric generation is conducted by way of heated steams. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhorev, Yu.V.; Biryukov, G.I.; Kirilyuk, N.A.; Lobanov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel assembly is proposed for nuclear reactors allowing remote replacement of control rod bundles or their shifting from one assembly to another, i.e., their multipurpose use. This leads to a significant increase in fuel assembly usability. In the fuel assembly the control rod bundle is placed in guide tube channels to which baffles are attached for fuel element spacing. The remote handling of control rods is provided by a hollow cylinder with openings in its lower bottom through which the control rods pass. All control rods in a bundle are mounted to a cross beam which in turn is mounted in the cylinder and is designed for grasping the whole rod bundle by a remotely controlled telescopic mechanism in bundle replacement or shifting. (Z.M.)

  12. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. It should be noted that merely placing a slab of polypropylene in the beam will not yield significant multiplication as neutrons are primarily scattered away

  13. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  14. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  15. Design Study for Pulsed Proton Beam Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Sung Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fast neutrons with a broad energy spectrum, with which it is possible to evaluate nuclear data for various research fields such as medical applications and the development of fusion reactors, can be generated by irradiating proton beams on target materials such as beryllium. To generate short-pulse proton beam, we adopted a deflector and slit system. In a simple deflector with slit system, most of the proton beam is blocked by the slit, especially when the beam pulse width is short. Therefore, the available beam current is very low, which results in low neutron flux. In this study, we proposed beam modulation using a buncher cavity to increase the available beam current. The ideal field pattern for the buncher cavity is sawtooth. To make the field pattern similar to a sawtooth waveform, a multiharmonic buncher was adopted. The design process for the multiharmonic buncher includes a beam dynamics calculation and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation. In addition to the system design for pulsed proton generation, a test bench with a microwave ion source is under preparation to test the performance of the system. The design study results concerning the pulsed proton beam generation and the test bench preparation with some preliminary test results are presented in this paper.

  16. Isochronous cyclotron for thermonuclear reactors driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenitskij, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    The main requirements to an accelerator as a part of an electronuclear power plant are considered. The range of the parameters of the accelerated proton and deuteron beams, for which the isochronous cyclotron is the most profitable, is proposed. An opportunity of using the cyclotron to drive the research reactors of various types is considered

  17. Neutral-beam-heating applications and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of heating the plasma in magnetically confined fusion devices by the injection of intense beams of neutral atoms is described. The basic principles governing the physics of neutral beam heating and considerations involved in determining the injection energy, power, and pulse length required for a fusion reactor are discussed. The pertinent experimental results from various fusion devices are surveyed to illustrate the efficacy of this technique. The second part of the paper is devoted to the technology of producing the neutral beams. A state-of-the-art account o the development of neutral injectors is presented, and the prospects for utilizing neutral injection to heat the plasma in a fusion reactor are examined

  18. Activation analysis opportunities using cold neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, R M; Zeisler, R; Rossbach, M

    1987-05-01

    Guided beams of cold neutrons being installed at a number of research reactors may become increasingly available for analytical research. A guided cold beam will provide higher neutron fluence rates and lower background interferences than in present facilities. In an optimized facility, fluence rates of 10/sup 9/ nxcm/sup -2/xs/sup -1/ are obtainable. Focusing a large area beam onto a small target will further increase the neutron intensity. In addition, the shift to lower neutron energy increases the effective cross sections. The absence of fast neutrons and gamma rays permits detectors to be placed near the sample without intolerable background, and thus the efficiency for counting prompt gamma rays can be much higher than in present systems. Measurements made at the hydrogen cold source of the FRJ-2 (DIDO) reactor at the KFA provide a numerical evaluation of the improvements in PGAA with respect to signal-to-background ratios of important elements and matrices. (author) 15 refs.

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  3. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Osamu; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the position of an intermediate slab within a reactor container and fitting a heat insulating material to the inner wall of said intermediate slab, whereby a space for a control rod exchanging device and thermal stresses of the inner peripheral wall are lowered. Constitution: In the pedestal at the lower part of a reactor pressure vessel there is formed an intermediate slab at a position lower than diaphragm floor slab of the outer periphery of the pedestal thereby to secure a space for providing automatic exchanging device of a control rod driving device. Futhermore, a heat insulating material is fitted to the inner peripheral wall at the upper side of the intermediate slab part, and the temperature gradient in the wall thickness direction at the time of a piping rupture trouble is made gentle, and thermal stresses at the inner peripheral wall are lowered. (Sekiya, K.)

  4. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  5. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels

  6. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  8. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Sakae.

    1990-01-01

    At least one valve rack is disposed in a reactor building, on which pipeways to a main closure valve, valves and bypasses of turbines are placed and contained. The valve rack is fixed to the main body of the building or to a base mat. Since the reactor building is designed as class A earthquake-proofness and for maintaining the S 1 function, the valve rack can be fixed to the building main body or to the base mat. With such a constitution, the portions for maintaining the S 1 function are concentrated to the reactor building. As a result, the dispersion of structures of earthquake-proof portion corresponding to the reference earthquake vibration S 1 can be prevented. Accordingly, the conditions for the earthquake-proof design of the turbine building and the turbine/electric generator supporting rack are defined as only the class B earthquake-proof design conditions. In view of the above, the amount of building materials can be saved and the time for construction can be shortened. (I.S.)

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. MLR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.; Smimov, A.M.; Taliev, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Kousin, V.V.; Lantsov, M.N.; Radchenko, V.P.; Sharapov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The Material Testing Loop Reactor (MLR) development was commenced in 1991 with the aim of updating and widening Russia's experimental base to validate the selected directions of further progress of the nuclear power industry in Russia and to enhance its reliability and safety. The MLR reactor is the pool-type one. As coolant it applies light water and as side reflector beryllium. The direction of water circulation in the core is upward. The core comprises 30 FA arranged as hexagonal lattice with the 90-95 mm pitch. The central materials channel and six loop channels are sited in the core. The reflector includes up to 11 loop channels. The reactor power is 100 MW. The average power density of the core is 0.4 MW/I (maximal value 1.0 MW/l). The maximum neutron flux density is 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the core (E>0.1 MeV), and 5.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector (E<0.625 eV). In 1995 due to the lack of funding the MLR designing was suspended. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Hatamiya, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Terufumi; Fukui, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Ryuhei; Murase, Michio; Naito, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    In order to suppress the pressure elevation in a reactor container due to high temperature and high pressure steams jetted out upon pipeway rupture accidents in the reactor container, the steams are introduced to a pressure suppression chamber for condensating them in stored coolants. However, the ability for suppressing the pressure elevation and steam coagulation are deteriorated due to the presence of inactive incondensible gases. Then, there are disposed a vent channel for introducing the steams in a dry well to a pressure suppression chamber in the reactor pressure vessel, a closed space disposed at the position lower than a usual liquid level, a first channel having an inlet in the pressure suppression chamber and an exit in the closed space and a second means connected by way of a backflow checking means for preventing the flow directing to the closed space. The first paths are present by plurality, a portion of which constitutes a syphon. The incondensible gases and the steams are discharged to the dry well at high pressure by using the difference of the water head for a long cooling time after the pipeway rupture accident. Then, safety can be improved without using dynamic equipments as driving source. (N.H.)

  13. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  14. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  15. Dynamical chaos and beam-beam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izrailev, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    Some aspects of the nonlinear dynamics of beam-beam interaction for simple one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of round and flat beams are discussed. The main attention is paid to the stochasticity threshold due to the overlapping of nonlinear resonances. The peculiarities of a round beam are investigated in view of using the round beams in storage rings to get high luminosity. 16 refs.; 7 figs

  16. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  17. Review of the current status of linear hybrid reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1977-07-01

    A review was made of the current status of linear fusion-fission hybrid reactor design studies in the USA. The linear hybrid reactor concepts reviewed include the linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor being studied at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, the electron beam-heated solenoid hybrid reactor under development at Physics International Co., the laser-heated solenoid hybrid reactor being investigated at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., and the linear fusion waste burning reactor being studied at General Atomic Company. The discussion addresses confinement and heating mechanisms for each concept, as well as the hybrid blanket designs. The current state of the four reactor designs is summarized and the performance of the various concepts compared

  18. Increased SRP reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAfee, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    Major changes in the current reactor hydraulic systems could be made to achieve a total of about 1500 MW increase of reactor power for P, K, and C reactors. The changes would be to install new, larger heat exchangers in the reactor buildings to increase heat transfer area about 24%, to increase H 2 O flow about 30% per reactor, to increase D 2 O flow 15 to 18% per reactor, and increase reactor blanket gas pressure from 5 psig to 10 psig. The increased reactor power is possible because of reduced inlet temperature of reactor coolant, increased heat removal capacity, and increased operating pressure (larger margin from boiling). The 23% reactor power increase, after adjustment for increased off-line time for reactor reloading, will provide a 15% increase of production from P, K, and C reactors. Restart of L Reactor would increase SRP production 33%

  19. Beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The main part of this thesis consists of 15 published papers, in which the numerical Beam Propagating Method (BPM) is investigated, verified and used in a number of applications. In the introduction a derivation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is presented to connect the beginning of the soliton papers with Maxwell's equations including a nonlinear polarization. This thesis focuses on the wide use of the BPM for numerical simulations of propagating light and particle beams through different types of structures such as waveguides, fibers, tapers, Y-junctions, laser arrays and crystalline solids. We verify the BPM in the above listed problems against other numerical methods for example the Finite-element Method, perturbation methods and Runge-Kutta integration. Further, the BPM is shown to be a simple and effective way to numerically set up the Green's function in matrix form for periodic structures. The Green's function matrix can then be diagonalized with matrix methods yielding the eigensolutions of the structure. The BPM inherent transverse periodicity can be untied, if desired, by for example including an absorptive refractive index at the computational window edges. The interaction of two first-order soliton pulses is strongly dependent on the phase relationship between the individual solitons. When optical phase shift keying is used in coherent one-carrier wavelength communication, the fiber attenuation will suppress or delay the nonlinear instability. (orig.)

  20. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  1. Neutron beam instruments at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, A.H.; Harris, D.H.C.

    1978-11-01

    A list and brief descriptions are given of the neutron beam facilities for U.K. scientists at Harwell and in academic institutions, available under an agreement between the Science Research Council and AERE (Harwell). The list falls under the following headings: reactor instruments (single crystal diffractometers, powder diffractometers, triple axis spectrometers, time-of-flight cold neutron twin rotor spectrometer, beryllium filter spectrometer, MARX spectrometer, Harwell small-angle scattering spectrometer); LINAC instruments (total scattering spectrometer, back scattering spectrometer, active sample spectrometer, inelastic rotor spectrometer, constant Q spectrometer); ancillary equipment (cryostats, superconducting magnets, electromagnets, furnaces). (U.K.)

  2. Double beam neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    The DR1 reactor at Risoe is used as a neutron source for neutron radiography. In the double-beam neutron radiography facility a neutron flux of an intensity of 1.4 and 1.8 x 10 6 n. cm -2 . s -1 reaches the object to be radiographed. The transport and exposure container used for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel rods is described, and the exposure technique and procedure are reviewed. The mode by which single neutron radiographs are assembled and assessed is described. This report will be published in the ''Neutron Radiography Newsletter''. (author)

  3. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  4. Microdosimetry of high LET therapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Akira

    1980-01-01

    Experimental microdosimetry of high LET therapeutic beams were presented. The cyclotron produced fast neutron beams at IMS, TAMVEC and NRL, a reactor fast neutron at YAYOI, a proctor beam at Harvard and a pion beam at TRIUMF are included. Measurements were performed with a conventional tissue equivalent spherical proportional counter with a logarithmic amplifier which made the recording and analysis quite simple. All the energy deposition spectra were analysed in the conventional manner and anti y F, anti y D as well as anti y D* were calculated. The spectra and their mean lineal energies showed wide variations, depending on the particle type, energy, position in phantom. Fractional contribution of elemental particles ( electron, muon, pion, proton, alpha and so on) to the total dose were analysed. For fast neutron beams, the y spectra stayed almost constant at any depth along the central axis in the phantom. The y spectra of proton beam changed slightly along the depth. On the other side, the y spectra of pion beam change drastically in the phantom between plateau and dose peak region. A novel technique of time-of-flight microdosimetry was employed, which made it possible to separate the fractional contribution of contaminant electrons and muons out of pions. Finally, a map of the radiation quality for all the beams is presented and its significances are discussed. (author)

  5. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  6. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N. [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z. [Jozef Stefan Institute Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1972-07-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  7. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N.; Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z.

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  8. Large area negative ion source for high voltage neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, P.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1979-11-01

    A source of negative deuterium ions in the multi-ampere range is described that is readily extrapolated to reactor size, 10 amp or more of neutral beam, that is of interest in future experiments and reactors. The negative ion source is based upon the double charge exchange process. A beam of positive ions is created and accelerated to an energy at which the attachment process D + M → D - + M + proceeds efficiently. The positive ions are atomically neutralized either in D 2 or in the charge exchange medium M. Atomic species make a second charge exchange collision in the charge target to form D - . For a sufficiently thick target, the beam reaches an equilibrium fraction of negative ions. For reasons of efficiency, the target is typically alkali metal vapor; this experiment uses sodium. The beam of negative ions can be accelerated to high (>200 keV) energy, the electrons stripped from the ions, and a high energy neutral beam formed

  9. Preliminary analysis of beam trip and beam jump events in an ADS prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, A.; Bianchini, G.; Carta, M.

    2001-01-01

    A core dynamics analysis relevant to some typical current transient events has been carried out on an 80 MW energy amplifier prototype (EAP) fuelled by mixed oxides and cooled by lead-bismuth. Fuel and coolant temperature trends relevant to recovered beam trip and beam jump events have been preliminary investigated. Beam trip results show that the drop in temperature of the core outlet coolant would be reduced a fair amount if the beam intensity could be recovered within few seconds. Due to the low power density in the EAP fuel, the beam jump from 50% of the nominal power transient evolves benignly. The worst thinkable current transient, beam jump with cold reactor, mainly depends on the coolant flow conditions. In the EAP design, the primary loop coolant flow is assured by natural convection and is enhanced by a particular system of cover gas injection into the bottom part of the riser. If this system of coolant flow enhancement is assumed in function, even the beam jump with cold reactor event evolves without severe consequences. (authors)

  10. Research Reactors Types and Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, I.D.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, in gross terms, is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate. The nuclei of fuel heavy atoms (mostly 235 U or 239 Pu), when struck by a slow neutron, may split into two or more smaller nuclei as fission products,releasing energy and neutrons in a process called nuclear fission. These newly-born fast neutrons then undergo several successive collisions with relatively low atomic mass material, the moderator, to become thermalized or slow. Normal water, heavy water, graphite and beryllium are typical moderators. These neutrons then trigger further fissions, and so on. When this nuclear chain reaction is controlled, the energy released can be used to heat water, produce steam and drive a turbine that generates electricity. The fission process, and hence the energy release, are controlled by the insertion (or extraction) of control rods through the reactor. These rods are strongly neutron absorbents, and thus only enough neutrons to sustain the chain reaction are left in the core. The energy released, mostly in the form of heat, should be continuously removed, to protect the core from damage. The most significant use of nuclear reactors is as an energy source for the generation of electrical power and for power in some military ships. This is usually accomplished by methods that involve using heat from the nuclear reaction to power steam turbines. Research reactors are used for radioisotope production and for beam experiments with free neutrons. Historically, the first use of nuclear reactors was the production of weapons grade plutonium for nuclear weapons. Currently all commercial nuclear reactors are based on nuclear fission. Fusion power is an experimental technology based on nuclear fusion instead of fission.

  11. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. The experiments have contributed to the design of a flux trap in which a thermal flux of nearly 10 9 was obtained, with an enhancement of 6.61

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  14. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (10 14 particles/cm 3 ) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  15. Experimental investigations of plasma lens focusing and plasma channel transport of heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauschwitz, T.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Reginato, L.; Leemans, W.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1995-04-01

    Final focusing of ion beams and propagation in a reactor chamber are crucial questions for heavy ion beam driven Fusion. An alternative solution to ballistic quadrupole focusing, as it is proposed in most reactor studies today, is the utilization of the magnetic field produced by a high current plasma discharge. This plasma lens focusing concept relaxes the requirements for low emittance and energy spread of the driver beam significantly and allows to separate the issues of focusing, which can be accomplished outside the reactor chamber, and of beam transport inside the reactor. For focusing a tapered wall-stabilized discharge is proposed, a concept successfully demonstrated at GSI, Germany. For beam transport a laser pre-ionized channel can be used

  16. Survey of fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Oh, Y.K.; Lee, K.W.; In, S.Y.; Kim, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    The present object of the fusion research is to accomplish the scientific break even by the year of 1986. In view of current progress in the field of Fusion reactor development, we decided to carry out the conceptual design of Tokamak-type fusion reactor during the year of 82-86 in order to acquire the principles of the fusion devices, find the engineering problems and establish the basic capabilities to develop the key techniques with originality. In this year the methods for calculating the locations of the poloidal coils and distribution of the magnetic field, which is one of the most essential and complicated task in the fusion reactor design works, were established. Study on the optimization of the design method of toroidal field coil was also done. Through this work, we established the logic for the design of the toroidal field coil in tokamak and utilize this technique to the design of small compact tokamak. Apart from the development work as to the design technology of tokamak, accelerating column and high voltage power supply (200 KVDC, 100 mA) for intense D-T neutron generator were constructed and now beam transport systems are under construction. This device will be used to develop the materials and the components for the tokamak fusion reactor. (Author)

  17. Activation analysis with small mobile reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.

    1990-01-01

    A small nuclear reactor (a low-power reactor without heat removal devices) usually has thermal power output under 100 W and an average in-core thermal neutron flux below 10 9 n/cm 2 s. Conventional activation analysis is restricted to determination of specific elements with large neutron capture cross sections in sizable samples. In-vivo prompt gamma activation analysis (IVPGAA) can be used for diagnosis of elemental composition of the human body, particularly the essential elements Ca, Cl, N, and P in the whole body, and toxic Cd and Hg in contaminated organs. In this chapter, activation analysis using an external neutron beam from the Tsing Hua Mobile Educational Reactor (THMER) for in vivo activation is described. Characteristics of the mobile reactor, in-vivo medical diagnosis, and radiation safety are emphasized. 17 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: (1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, (2) operating experiences, (3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, (4) irradiation studies, (5) irradiation facilities, (6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and (7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Symbiosis of near breeder HTR's with hybrid fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1978-07-01

    In this contribution to INFCE a symbiotic fusion/fission reactor system, consisting of a hybrid beam-driven micro-explosion fusion reactor (HMER) and associated high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) with a coupled fuel cycle, is proposed. This system is similar to the well known Fast Breeder/Near Breeder HTR symbiosis except that the fast fission breeder - running on the U/Pu-cycle in the core and the axial blankets and breeding the surplus fissile material as U-233 in its radial thorium metal or thorium oxide blankets - is replaced by a hybrid micro-explosion DT fusion reactor

  20. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: 1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, 2) operating experiences, 3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, 4) irradiation studies, 5) irradiation facilities, 6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and 7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Simple beam profile monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  2. Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Ions in a storage ring are confined to a mean orbit by focusing elements. To a first approximation these may be described by a constant harmonic restoring force: F = -Kr. If the particles in the frame moving along with the beam have small random thermal energies, then they will occupy a cylindrical volume around the mean orbit and the focusing force will be balanced by that from the mutual repulsion of the particles. Inside the cylinder only residual two-particle interactions will play a significant role and some form of ordering might be expected to take place. The results of some of the first MD calculations showed a surprising result: not only were the particles arranged in the form of a tube, but they formed well-defined layers: concentric shells, with the particles in each shell arranged in a hexagonal lattice that is characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb systems. This paper discusses the condense layer structure

  3. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  4. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-01-01

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.)

  5. Reactor monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tamotsu.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors a reactor so that each of the operations for the relocation of fuel assemblies and the withdrawal and the insertion of control rods upon exchange of fuel assemblies and control rods in the reactor. That is, when an operator conducts relocating operation by way of a fuel assembly operation section, the device of the present invention judges whether the operation indication is adequate or not, based on the information of control rod arrangement in a control rod memory section. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to a fuel assembly relocating device. Further, when the operator conducts control rod operation by way of a control rod operation section, the device of the present invention judges in the control rod withdrawal judging section, as to whether the operation indication given by the operator is adequate or not by comparing it with fuel assembly arrangement information. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to control rod drives. With such procedures, increase of nuclear heating upon occurrence of erroneous operation can be prevented. (I.S.)

  6. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  7. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  8. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  9. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-11-01

    This single page document is the November 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the production reactor.

  10. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-01

    This single page document is the October 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  11. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-15

    This single page document is the October 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  12. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-09-15

    This single page document is the September 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  13. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-15

    This single page document is the December 16, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  14. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-01

    This single page document is the December 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  15. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  16. Near spherical illumination of ion-beam and laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is developed for reducing energy-deposition asymmetry in spherical targets driven directly by ion or laser beams. This work is part of a strategy for achieving illumination symmetry in such targets, which is proposed as an alternative to those in the literature. This strategy allows an axially symmetric placement of beamlets, which would be convenient for some driven or reactor scenarios. It also allows the use of beam currents or energy fluxes and beam transverse profiles to help reduce deposition asymmetry with fewer beamlets. In the ideal limit of thin deposition layers and controlled beam profiles, at most six beamlets are needed for target symmetry

  17. The CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Two main research reactors, specifically designed, PEGASE reactor and Laue-Langevin high flux reactor, are presented. The PEGASE reactor was designed at the end of the 50s for the study of the gas cooled reactor fuel element behaviour under irradiation; the HFR reactor, was designed in the late 60s to serve as a high yield and high level neutron source. Historical backgrounds, core and fuel characteristics and design, flux characteristics, etc., are presented. 5 figs

  18. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  19. Beam-Beam Interaction Studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela; Alemany Fernandez, R

    2011-01-01

    The beam-beam force is one of the most important limiting factors in the performance of a collider, mainly in the delivered luminosity. Therefore, it is essential to measure the effects in LHC. Moreover, adequate understanding of LHC beam-beam interaction is of crucial importance in the design phases of the LHC luminosity upgrade. Due to the complexity of this topic the work presented in this thesis concentrates on the beam-beam tune shift and orbit effects. The study of the Linear Coherent Beam-Beam Parameter at the LHC has been determined with head-on collisions with small number of bunches at injection energy (450 GeV). For high bunch intensities the beam-beam force is strong enough to expect orbit effects if the two beams do not collide head-on but with a crossing angle or with a given offset. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are as well ...

  20. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Status report of Indonesian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbie, B.; Supadi, S.

    1992-01-01

    A general description of three Indonesian research reactor, its irradiation facilities and its future prospect are described. Since 1965 Triga Mark II 250 KW Bandung, has been in operation and in 1972 the design powers were increased to 1000 KW. Using core grid form Triga 250 KW BATAN has designed and constructed Kartini Reactor in Yogyakarta which started its operation in 1979. Both of this Triga type reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as training manpower in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production and beam research in solid state physics. Each of this reactor have strong cooperation with Bandung Institute of Technology at Bandung and Gajah Mada University at Yogyakarta which has a faculty of Nuclear Engineering. Since 1976 the idea to have high flux reactor has been foreseen appropriate to Indonesian intention to prepare infrastructure for nuclear industry for both energy and non-energy related activities. The idea come to realization with the first criticality of RSG-GAS (Multipurpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy) in July 1987 at PUSPIPTEK Serpong area. It is expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reached its full power of 30 MW and by end 1992 its expected that irradiation facilities will be utilized in the future for nuclear scientific and engineering work. (author)

  2. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  3. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e + - e - colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II)

  4. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Hideyasu; Oyamada, Osamu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a container for a reactor provided with a pressure suppressing chamber pool which can prevent bubble vibrating load, particularly negative pressure generated at the time of starting to release exhaust from a main steam escape-safety valve from being transmitted to a lower liner plate of the container. Constitution: This arrangement is characterized in that a safety valve exhaust pool for main steam escape, in which a pressure suppressing chamber pool is separated and intercepted from pool water in the pressure suppressing chamber pool, a safety valve exhaust pipe is open into said safety valve exhaust pool, and an isolator member, which isolates the bottom liner plate in the pressure suppressing chamber pool from the pool water, is disposed on the bottom of the safety valve exhaust pool. (Nakamura, S.)

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  9. Preliminary design of a tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmayer, J.N.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the TARA mirror experiment as a possible tandem mirror reactor configuration. This is a preliminary study to size the coil structure based on using the smallest end cell axial length that physics and engineering allow, zeroing the central cell parallel currents and having interchange stability. The input powers are estimated for the final reactor design so a Q value may be estimated. The Q value is defined as the fusion power divided by the total injected power absorbed by the plasma. A computer study was performed on the effect of the transition size, the transition vertical spacing and transition current. These parameters affect the central cell parallel currents, the recircularization of the flux tube and the ratio of central cell beta to anchor beta needed for marginal stability. Two designs were identified. The first uses 100 keV and 13 keV neutral beams to pump the ions that trap in the thermal barrier. The Q value of this reactor is 11.3. The second reactor uses a pump beam at 40 keV. This energy is chosen because there is a resonance for the charge exchange cross section between D 0 and He 2+ at this energy, thus the alpha ash will be pumped along with the deuterium and tritium. The Q value of this reactor is 11.6

  10. A low background pulsed neutron polyenergetic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdelkawy, A.; Habib, N.; abuelela, M.; Wahba, M.; kilany, M.; Kalebebin, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    A low background pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-R R-1 is produced by a rotor and rotating collimator suspended in magnetic fields. Each of them is mounted on its mobile platform and whose centres are 66 cm apart, rotating synchronously at speeds up to 16000 rpm. It was found that the neutron burst produced by the rotor with almost 100% transmission passes through the collimator, when the rotation phase between them is 28.8 degree Moreover the background level achieved at the detector position is low, constant and free from peaks due to gamma rays and fast neutrons accompanying the reactor thermal beam.3 fig

  11. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  12. Spatial distribution of reactor radiation around the horizontal experimental hole of the RA Reactor at Vinca; Prostorna raspodela reaktorskog zracenja oko horizontalnog eksperimentalnog kanala reaktora RA u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkovic, M; Paligoric, D; Vujisic, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-10-15

    A survey is given of the measurement of the spatial distribution of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiations inside and around the reactor radiation beam which is carried through the experimental channel outside the reactor biological shield thus being a potential danger for the personnel in the reactor hall. The results obtained are used to determine the optimal distribution of the shielding elements around the free radiation beam. The activation method was used to determine the distribution of slow and fast neutrons. The detectors were Au{sup 197} and In {sup 115} for slow, and the S{sup 32} (n,p) P{sup 32} reaction for fast neutrons. The relative distribution of slow and fast neutrons along the beam axis in the space outside the reactor, and evaluation of the absolute value of the flux at the place where the beam comes out from the biological shield are given (author)

  13. Future view of total energy system and reactor engineering and reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, T.

    1974-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of fission reactors and fusion reactors. The conversion ratio of light water reactors is 0.5, and the efficiency is 32% because of relatively low temperature. Both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors are technically well developed, their performances are well known, and the fuel cycle is well developed, so that both reactors have monopolized power reactor market. But the reprocessing of spent fuel and the treatment of their hazards are inevitable, and the construction and enlargement of reprocessing facilities are indispensable. In LMFBR's tight sealing is easy because they are non-pressurized, and the efficiency is 41%. But liquid sodium is strongly activated and recirculated, so that chemical obstruction due to the breakage of recirculating pumps, pipings, and heat exchangers may occur, and the hazard of plutonium is large. Regarding controlled thermo-nuclear fusion reactors, because Lawson criterion must be satisfied, two methods of plasma confinement are now experimented. One is the plasma confinement by strong magnetic field of 50 KG to 100 KG, and the other is the confinement by the implosion method with high-power laser beam. The latter has much more uncertainties than the former, but recently both methods have made much progress. (Tai, I)

  14. Toroidal electron beam energy storage for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.; Korn, P.; Mondelli, A.; Rostoker, N.

    1976-01-01

    In the presence of an external magnetic field stable equilibria exist for an unneutralized electron beam with ν/γ >1. As a result, it is in principle, possible to store very large quantities of energy in relatively small volumes by confining an unneutralized electron beam in a Tokamak-like device. The energy is stored principally in the electrostatic and self-magnetic fields associated with the beam and is available for rapid heating of pellets for controlled fusion. The large electrostatic potential well in such a device would be sufficient to contain energetic alpha particles, thereby reducing reactor wall bombardment. This approach also avoids plasma loss and wall bombardment by charge exchange neutrals. The conceptual design of an electrostatic Tokamak fusion reactor (ETFR) is discussed. A small toroidal device (the STP machine) has been constructed to test the principles involved. Preliminary experiments on this device have produced electron densities approximately 10% of those required in a reactor

  15. Cryopump behavior in the presence of beam or nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, P.K.

    1977-12-01

    Cryocondensation pumping has been proposed to be the method of gas removal for neutral-beam refueled fusion reactors. A cryocondensation pumping unit has been constructed to test design concepts and compatibility with conditions under actual beam operation and nuclear radiation environment. Various operating parameters for this test pumping unit have been measured, including pumping speeds for various gases and beam desorption effects. An experiment has been planned at the Berkeley Research Reactor to measure the desorption effects of high energy neutrons and gamma radiation. A foil activation method has been devised to accurately assess the energy spectrum of this neutron source, which is expected to be comparable to that of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  16. Decommissioning of TRIGA Mark II type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Jeong, Gyeonghwan; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The first research reactor in Korea, KRR 1, is a TRIGA Mark II type with open pool and fixed core. Its power was 100 kWth at its construction and it was upgraded to 250 kWth. Its construction was started in 1957. The first criticality was reached in 1962 and it had been operated for 36,000 hours. The second reactor, KRR 2, is a TRIGA Mark III type with open pool and movable core. These reactors were shut down in 1995, and the decision was made to decommission both reactors. The aim of the decommissioning activities is to decommission the KRR 2 reactor and decontaminate the residual building structures and site, and to release them as unrestricted areas. The KRR 1 reactor was decided to be preserve as a historical monument. A project was launched for the decommissioning of these reactors in 1997, and approved by the regulatory body in 2000. A total budget for the project was 20.0 million US dollars. It was anticipated that this project would be completed and the site turned over to KEPCO by 2010. However, it was discovered that the pool water of the KRR 1 reactor was leaked into the environment in 2009. As a result, preservation of the KRR 1 reactor as a monument had to be reviewed, and it was decided to fully decommission the KRR 1 reactor. Dismantling of the KRR 1 reactor takes place from 2011 to 2014 with a budget of 3.25 million US dollars. The scope of the work includes licensing of the decommissioning plan change, removal of pool internals including the reactor core, removal of the thermal and thermalizing columns, removal of beam port tubes and the aluminum liner in the reactor tank, removal of the radioactive concrete (the entire concrete structure will not be demolished), sorting the radioactive waste (concrete and soil) and conditioning the radioactive waste for final disposal, and final statuses of the survey and free release of the site and building, and turning over the site to KEPCO. In this paper, the current status of the TRIGA Mark-II type reactor

  17. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source

  18. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    2000-07-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

  19. Mixed deuterium-tritium neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, L.; Lewis, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    An alternative mixed beam neutral beam injector (MNBI) for fusion reactors is proposed that eliminates the conventional isotope separation system (ISS) in the fuel cycle. The principal advantage of the alternative system is a capital and operating cost savings in the fuel cycle, as the ISS employs cryogenic distillation at liquid-hydrogen temperatures to effect a separation of hydrogen isotopes and to eliminate a buildup of normal hydrogen in the recycled fuel. Possible additional advantages of the alternative method involve an improvement in overall safety and a reduction of the amount of tritium in the fuel cycle. The alternative heating system uses an electromagnetic separation in the MNBI to limit the buildup of normal hydrogen. Calculations indicate that an MNBI can be reasonably optimized in the case of an upgraded injection system for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  20. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs