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Sample records for beam reactor hfbr

  1. HFBR handbook, 1992: High flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcome to the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), one of the world premier neutron research facilities. This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users (and new Brookhaven staff members) with (almost) everything they need to know to work at the HFBR and to help make the stay at Brookhaven pleasant as well as profitable. Safety Training Programs to comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates are in progress at BNL. There are several safety training requirements which must be met before users can obtain unescorted access to the HFBR. The Reactor Division has prepared specific safety training manuals which are to be sent to experimenters well in advance of their expected arrival at BNL to conduct experiments. Please familiarize yourself with this material and carefully pay strict attention to all the safety and security procedures that are in force at the HFBR. Not only your safety, but the continued operation of the facility, depends upon compliance

  2. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (KI) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with Kmax values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Assessment of similarity of HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] with separate effects test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Separate Effects Test (SET) facility was constructed in 1963 to demonstrate the feasibility of the HFBR design and to determine the core power limits for a safe flow reversal event. The objective of the task reported here is to review the capability of the test to scale the dominant phenomena in the HFBR during a flow reversal event and the applicability of the range of the power level obtained from the test to the HFBR. The conclusion of this report was that the flow during the flow reversal event will not be similar in the two facilities. The causes of the dissimilarity are the differences in the core inlet friction, bypass path friction, the absence of the check valve in the test, and the materials used to represent the fuel plates. The impact of these differences is that the HFBR will undergo flow reversal sooner than the test and will have a higher flow rate in the final Natural Circulation Period. The shorter duration of the flow reversal event will allow less time for the plate to heat up and the larger flow in the Natural Circulation Period will lead to higher critical heat flux limits in the HFBR than in the test. Based on these observations, it was concluded that the HFBR can undergo flow reversal safely for heat fluxes up to 46,700 (BTU/hr ft2), the heat flux limit obtained from the 1963 test

  4. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor

  5. RELAP5/MOD2.5 analysis of the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] for a loss of power and coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  6. HFBR handbook. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, S.; Rorer, D.C.; Kuper, H. (eds.)

    1983-08-01

    This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users and new Brookhaven staff members with the research facilities available at the HFBR. In addition to describing the beam lines and major instruments, general information is also provided on the reactor and on services available at the Laboratory.

  7. HFBR handbook. Revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users and new Brookhaven staff members with the research facilities available at the HFBR. In addition to describing the beam lines and major instruments, general information is also provided on the reactor and on services available at the Laboratory

  8. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW

  9. Aircraft impact analysis for the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an analysis performed to determine the annual frequency at which aircraft are expected to strike the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) complex, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Since the HFBR is not hardened against light aircraft, this report considers the impact of military, commercial, twin engine and single engine aircraft operating in the vicinity of the HFBR. The large volume of light aircraft operating in this area contributes heavily to the estimated annual impact frequency of 3.54E-05 impacts per year. There are two chapters and seven appendices in this report. The first chapter describes the airspace in the vicinity of the HFBR. This includes five airports, two major airways, one standard arrival route, as well as a significant volume of radar vectored and air-taxi traffic. The second chapter of this report presents the calculations by which the expected impact frequency was derived, and an assessment of the uncertainty in those calculations. The calculations were performed using the method outlined in the NRC Standard Review Plan. A separate set of calculations is presented for each of three sources of aircraft: airway traffic, Brookhaven Airport, and Calverton Airport. The appendices contain discussions and side calculations ancillary to the presentation in the second section. This includes a discussion of the data used to estimate traffic counts, information on accident rates, and several other points which would have only been distracting if included in the main discussion

  10. Job and Task Analysis project at Brookhaven National Laboratory's high flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presenter discussed the Job and Task Analysis (JTA) project conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). The project's goal was to provide JTA guidelines for use by DOE contractors, then, using the guidelines conduct a JTA for the reactor operator and supervisor positions at the HFBR. Details of the job analysis and job description preparation as well as details of the task selection and task analysis were given. Post JTA improvements to the HFBR training programs were covered. The presentation concluded with a listing of the costs and impacts of the project

  11. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  12. Analysis of the light-water flooding of the HFBR thimble tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel elements surrounding the central vertical thimble tubes in the Brookhaven National Laboratory High-Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) are highly undermoderated, and light-water flooding of these irradiation thimbles results in a positive core reactivity insertion. The light-water contamination of the D2O thimble tube coolant is the result of a postulated double-ended guillotine break of a U tube in the experimental facilities heat exchanger during the HFBR light-water flooding (LWF) event. While this event has a low probability (1.3 x 10-4/yr), the HFBR protection system must ensure adequate thermal margin during the power transient. This paper summarizes the analysis of the HFBR thimble-tube LWF event

  13. Aircraft impact analysis for the HFBR. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an analysis performed to determine the annual frequency at which aircraft are expected to strike the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) complex, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Since the HFBR is not hardened against light aircraft, this report considers the impact of military, commercial, twin engine and knee engine aircraft operating in the vicinity of the HFBR. The large volume of light aircraft operating in this area contributes heavily to the estimated annual impact frequency of 3.54E-05 impacts per year. There are two chapters and seven appendices in this report. The first chapter describes the airspace in the vicinity of the HFBR. This includes five airports, two major airways, one standard arrival route, as well as a significant volume of radar vectored and air-taxi traffic. The second chapter of this report presents the calculations by which the expected impact frequency was derived, and an assessment of the uncertainty in those calculations. The calculations were performed using the method outlined in the NRC Standard Review Plan. A separate set of calculations is presented for each of three sources of aircraft: airway traffic, Brookhaven Airport, and Calverton Airport. The appendices contain discussions and side calculations ancillary to the presentation in the second section. This includes a discussion of the data used to estimate traffic counts, information on accident rates, and several other points which would have only been distracting if included in the main discussion

  14. HFBR: Review of the technical specifications against the FSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to determine the adequacy of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Technical Specifications for 40 MW operation by comparison with the HFBR Final Safety Analysis Report, particularly the accident analyses chapter. Specifically, the Technical Specifications were compared against the Design Basis Accident (DBA) Analyses presented in the Addendum to the HFBR FSAR for 60 MW Operation. The 60 MW DBA analyses was used since it is more current and complete than the analyses presented in the original FSAR which is considered obsolete. A listing of the required systems and equipment was made for each of the accidents analyzed. Additionally, the Technical Specification instrument setpoints were compared to the DBA analyses parametric values. Also included in this review was a comparison of the Technical Specification Bases against the FSAR and the identification of any differences. The HFBR Operations Procedures Manual (OPM) was also reviewed for any inconsistencies between the FSAR or the Technical Specifications. Upon completion of this review it was determined that the Technical Specifications are well written and the items commented on should not delay the low power restart (40 MW). Additionally, the OPM is also well written and does not require further modification before restart

  15. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  16. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions

  17. Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world's premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR's value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory's scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor's research capabilities

  18. Current and prospective safety issues at the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was designed primarily to produce external neutron beams for experimental research. It is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water and uses MTR-ETR type fuel elements containing enriched uranium. The reactor power when operation began in 19965 was 40 MW, was raised to 60 MW in 1982 after a number of plant modifications, and operated at that level until 1989. Since that time safety questions have been raised which resulted in extended shutdowns and a reduction in operating power to 30 MW. This paper will discuss the principle safety issues, plans for their resolution and return to 60 MW operation. In addition, radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel and thermal shield and its affect on the life of the facility will be briefly discussed

  19. Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

  20. Technical Safety Requirement Violation at the High Flux Beam Reactor Decommissioning Project, Brookhaven, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on 6 July 2009, a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation was declared at the high flux beam reactor (HFBR) project, which was a limited scope decontamination and decommissioning project associated with the permanently shutdown reactor. The violation extended from performing decommissioning activities within the facility under the incorrect mode. The draining of the spent fuel pool was performed in the warm standby mode when it should have been in the operation mode. The TSR was developed contrary to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) TSR guidance, which recommends that facility operations should only be carried out in the operation mode. The facility TSR allowed operations to be carried out in both modes. The HFBR operation mode focused on the removal of a small number of highly irradiated components with associated limited conditions of operation (LCO), while the warm standby mode focused on all other tasks in the facility and did not require entry into the LCO

  1. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  2. Type A Verification Report For The High Flux Beam Reactor Stack And Grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York DCN: 5098-SR-08-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  3. Integrity evaluation of lower thermal shield under exposure to HFBR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassir, M.; Weeks, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Shewmon, P. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exposure to the HFBR environment on the carbon steel in the HFBR lower thermal shield were evaluated. Corrosion was found to be a non-significant degradation process. Radiation embrittlement has occurred; portions of the plate closest to the reactor are currently operating in the lower-shelf region of the Charpy impact curve (i.e., below the fracture toughness transition temperature). In this region, the effects of radiation on the mechanical properties of carbon steel are believed to have been saturated, so that no further deterioration is anticipated. A fracture toughness analysis shows that a large factor of safety (> 1.5) exists against propagation of credible hypothetical flaws. Therefore, the existing lower thermal shield structure is suitable for continued operation of the HFBR.

  4. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  5. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  6. Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske's CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation

  7. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  8. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted

  9. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The project characterized the beam at the Neutron Radiography Reactor. • Experiments indicate that the neutron energy spectrum model may not be accurate. • The facility is a category I radiography facility. • The beam divergence and effective collimation ratio are 0.3 ± 0.1° and >125. • The predicted total neutron flux at the image plane is 5.54 × 106 n/cm2 s. -- Abstract: The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 ± 0.1°, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum

  10. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 5 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the concrete duct from Trench 5 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 5 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, and 4, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch pipe from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 5. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that resolved each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised HFBR Underground Utilities FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification

  11. Reactor - and accelerator-based filtered beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrons produced in high flux nuclear reactors and in accelerator, induced fission and spallation reactions, represent the most intense sources of neutrons available for research. However, the neutrons from these sources are not monoenergetic, covering the broad range extending from 10-3 eV up to 107 eV or so. In order to make quantitative measurements of the effects of neutrons and their dependence on neutron energy it is desirable to have mono-energetic neutron sources. The paper describes briefly methods of obtaining mono-energetic neutrons and different methods of filtration. This is followed by more detailed discussion of neutron window filters and a summary of the filtered beam facilities using this technique. The review concludes with a discussion of the main applications of filtered beams and their present and future importance

  12. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed that includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures that minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in a reactor the size of the International Tokamak Reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T /SUB e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T /SUB i/ approx. = 17 to 21 keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E /SUB b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E /SUB b/ about 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  13. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed which includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures which minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in an INTOR-sized reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T/sub e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T/sub i/ approx. = keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E/sub b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E/sub b/ approx. 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  14. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 106-109 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, Isp~106 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameter×10-meters length, magnetic field ~7 Tesla, ion beam current ~10 A, and fuels of either D-He3,P-B11,P-Li6,D-Li6, etc. .

  15. Seismic fragility analysis of structural components for HFBR facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a summary of recently completed seismic fragility analyses of the HFBR facilities. Based on a detailed review of past PRA studies, various refinements were made regarding the strength and ductility evaluation of structural components. Available laboratory test data were analysed to evaluate the formulations used to predict the ultimate strength and deformation capacities of steel, reinforced concrete and masonry structures. The biasness and uncertainties were evaluated within the framework of the fragility evaluation methods widely accepted in the nuclear industry. A few examples of fragility calculations are also included to illustrate the use of the presented formulations

  16. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 D/F WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 2; the D/F Waste Line removal at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed the final status survey (FSS) of the D/F Waste Line that provided the conduit for pumping waste from Building 750 to Building 801. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goals of 15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years have been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to final status survey (FSS), were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decomissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task at the HFBR. ORISE together with DOE determined that a Type A verification of the D/F Waste Line was appropriate based on its method of construction and upon the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages in the process to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 2 of this project included the grouting and removal of 1100 feet of 2-inch pipe and 640 feet of 4-inch pipe that served as the D/F Waste Line. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that addressed each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised Phase 2 D/F Waste Line removal FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification and determine whether the intent odf

  17. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetti, T. E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technically or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming.

  18. Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) Neutron Beam Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Neutron beam tube of neutron radiography facility at Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (public organization) is a divergent beam. The rectangular open-end of the beam tube is 16 cm x 17 cm while the inner-end is closed to the reactor core. The neutron beam size was measured using 20 cm x 40 cm neutron imaging plate. The measurement at the position 100 cm from the end of the collimator has shown that the beam size was 18.2 cm x 19.0 cm. Gamma ray in neutron the beam was also measured by the identical position using industrial X ray film. The area of gamma ray was 27.8 cm x 31.1 cm with the highest intensity found to be along the neutron beam circumference

  19. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 1014 n/cm2/sec and a liquid D2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  20. A high energy neutral beam system for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy neutral beams provide a promising method of heating and driving current in steady-stage tokamak fusion reactors. As an example, we have made a conceptual design of a neutral beam system for current drive on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The system, based on electrostatic acceleration of Dions, can deliver up to 100 MW of 1.6 MeV Do neutrals through three ports. Radiation protection is provided by locating sensitive beamlime components 35 to 50 m from the reactor. In an application to a 3300 MW power reactor, a system delivering 120 MW of 2-2.4 MeV deuterium beams assisted by 21 MW of lower hybrid wave power drives 25 MA provides an adequate plasma power again (Q = 24) for a commercial fusion power plant. (author). 8 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  1. Neutron beam facilities at the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exciting development for Australia is the construction of a modern state-of-the-art 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor which is currently under construction to replace the aging reactor (HIFAR) at ANSTO in 2006. To cater for advanced scientific applications, the replacement reactor will provide not only thermal neutron beams but also a modern cold-neutron source moderated by liquid deuterium at approximately -250 deg C, complete with provision for installation of a hot-neutron source at a later stage. The latest 'supermirror' guides will be used to transport the neutrons to the Reactor Hall and its adjoining Neutron Guide Hall where a suite of neutron beam instruments will be installed. These new facilities will expand and enhance ANSTO's capabilities and performance in neutron beam science compared with what is possible with the existing HIFAR facilities, and will make ANSTO/Australia competitive with the best neutron facilities in the world. Eight 'leading-edge' neutron beam instruments are planned for the Replacement Research Reactor when it goes critical in 2006, followed by more instruments by 2010 and beyond. Up to 18 neutron beam instruments can be accommodated at the Replacement Research Reactor, however, it has the capacity for further expansion, including potential for a second Neutron Guide Hall. The first batch of eight instruments has been carefully selected in conjunction with a user group representing various scientific interests in Australia. A team of scientists, engineers, drafting officers and technicians has been assembled to carry out the Neutron Beam Instrument Project to successful completion. Today, most of the planned instruments have conceptual designs and are now being engineered in detail prior to construction and procurement. A suite of ancillary equipment will also be provided to enable scientific experiments at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields. This paper describes the Neutron Beam Instrument Project and gives

  2. Final beam transport in the reactor chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam transport in heavy ion fusion (HIF) accelerators is discussed. The qualitative features of transport effects are presented. The basic transport effects associated with HIF beam are space charge effects, atomic physics effects, zero-order plasma effects, and plasma instabilities. In the case of HIF, very high intensity of HIF beam is required, and its own electric repulsion does not keep the beam converging. The number of beams required for supplying the demand power at a target can be estimated. The beam charge deposited on a target pellet produces electrostatic potential, and the electrostatic repulsion prevents the beam to reach on the target. The upper limit of the gas pressure is determined by small angle Coulomb scattering. Since unneutralized beam has the pinching force, the electrostatic kink mode (wiggle mode) should be considered in the pressure region where beam neutralization does not occur. Two-stream instability, filamentation instability and self-pinched transport are considered. As a conclusion of this paper, the new first choice for HIF transport is to use ballistic transport in moderate vacuum. (Kato, T.)

  3. Materials research with neutron beams from a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the unique ways that neutrons interact with matter, neutron beams from a research reactor can reveal knowledge about materials that cannot be obtained as easily with other scientific methods. Neutron beams are suitable for imaging methods (radiography or tomography), for scattering methods (diffraction, spectroscopy, and reflectometry) and for other possibilities. Neutron-beam methods are applied by students and researchers from academia, industry and government to support their materials research programs in several disciplines: physics, chemistry, materials science and life science. The arising knowledge about materials has been applied to advance technologies that appear in everyday life: transportation, communication, energy, environment and health. This paper illustrates the broad spectrum of materials research with neutron beams, by presenting examples from the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the NRU research reactor in Chalk River. (author)

  4. Materials research with neutron beams from a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, J.; Banks, D. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Because of the unique ways that neutrons interact with matter, neutron beams from a research reactor can reveal knowledge about materials that cannot be obtained as easily with other scientific methods. Neutron beams are suitable for imaging methods (radiography or tomography), for scattering methods (diffraction, spectroscopy, and reflectometry) and for other possibilities. Neutron-beam methods are applied by students and researchers from academia, industry and government to support their materials research programs in several disciplines: physics, chemistry, materials science and life science. The arising knowledge about materials has been applied to advance technologies that appear in everyday life: transportation, communication, energy, environment and health. This paper illustrates the broad spectrum of materials research with neutron beams, by presenting examples from the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the NRU research reactor in Chalk River. (author)

  5. Neutron beam applications using low power research reactor Malaysia perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA MARK II Research reactor at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Research (MINT) was commissioned in July 1982. Since then various works have been performed to utilise the neutrons produced from this steady state reactor. One area currently focussed on is the utilisation of neutron beam ports available at this 1MW reactor. Projects undertaken are the development and utilisation of the Neutron Radiography (myNR), Small Angle Neutron Scattering (mySANS) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) - preliminary study. In order to implement active research programmes, a group comprised of researcher from research institutes and academic institutions, has formed: known as Malaysian Reactor Interest Group (MRIG). This paper describes the recent status the above neutron beam facilities and their application in industrial, health and material technology research and education. The related activities of MRIG are also highlighted. (author)

  6. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 1 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the 42-inch duct and 14-inch line in Trench 1 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 1 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, 4, and 5, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities has been performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch duct from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 1. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the gamma spectroscopy results for 14 FSS soil samples, four core samples, and one duplicate sample collected from Trench 1. Sample results for the radionuclides of concern were below the established cleanup goals. However, in sample PH-3

  7. Dhruva reactor -- a high flux facility for neutron beam research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhruva reactor, the highest flux thermal neutron source in India has been operating at full power of 100 MW over the past two years. Several advanced facilities like the cold source, guides, etc. are being installed for neutron beam research in condensed matter. A large number and variety of neutron spectrometers are operational. This paper deals with the basic advantages that one can derive from neutron scattering investigations and gives a brief description of the instruments that are developed and commissioned at Dhruva for neutron beam research. (author). 3 figs

  8. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an

  9. Heavy ion beam transport through liquid lithium first wall ICF reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis addresses the critical issue of the final transport of a heavy ion beam in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The beam must traverse the reaction chamber from the final focusing lens to the target without being disrupted. This requirement has a strong impact on the reactor design. It is essential to the development of ICF fusion reactor technology, that the restrictions placed on the reactor engineering parameters by final beam transport consideration be understood early on

  10. Beam removal block and shielding resign for the MARS neutron therapy reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam removal block and shielding design for the MARS neutron therapy reactor are described. The requirements to the beams' characteristics, filters, collimator and reactor shielding are formulated. Radiation field levels in medical box are analyzed for beams' different operation conditions. It is stated that the removal block and shutter compositions meet necessary conditions in radiation treatment and emergency evacuation

  11. Epithermal BNCT neutron beam design for a TRIGA II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Finland a collaborative effort by Helsinki University Central Hospital, MAP Medical Technologies Inc. and VTT Reactor Laboratory has started aiming at BNCT of glioma patients. For this the capabilities of the FiR-1 TRIGA II 250 kW research reactor have been evaluated. The FiR-1 is located in the middle of the Otaniemi campus eight kilometers from the center of Helsinki and four kilometers from the Central Hospital. The power of the reactor was increased in 1965 to 250 kW and the instrumentation modernised in 1981. It is a pool reactor with graphite reflector and a core loading of 3 kg 20w% 235U in the special TRIGA uranium-zirconium hydride fuel (8-12 w% U, 91% Zr, 1% H). The advantages of using a TRIGA reactor for BNCT have already been pointed out earlier by Whittemore and have been verified in practice by the thermal neutron treatment work done at the Musashi 100 kW reactor. The advantages include a wide core face area and a wide spatial angle covered by the thermal-epithermal column system, large flux-per-Watt feature and inherent safety of the TRIGA fuel. Because of its wider applicability and less stringent requirements for clinical operation conditions, an epithermal neutron beam has been selected as the design goal. The epithermal flux should be sufficient for glioblastoma patient treatment: 109 epithermal neutrons/cm2/s with low enough fast neutron (-13Gy/epithermal n/cm2) and gamma contamination

  12. Prompt gamma activation analysis using mobile reactor neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the nuclear analytical methods that have proved very useful in biological and medical analyses is the in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGAA). In this work, an IVPGAA facility was assembled on a zero-power mobile nuclear reactor and has demonstrated its versatility for in vivo medical diagnosis. Absolute measurements of some environmental contaminants such as Cd, Hg, and Si in organs can be determined rapidly by partial body scan of IVPGAA, while assessment of vital constituents such as Ca, Cl, N, and P in either whole body or body part can be scanned by IVPGAA technique effectively. The in vivo clinical application using mobile reactor neutron beam are reviewed in detail. The IVPGAA scan provides unique insight into elemental concentration purpose. The IVPGAA scan can be performed on a regular basis without discomfort and radiation risk for patients. (author)

  13. Effects of Collisional Dissipation on the "Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor "

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Martin; Manheimer, Wallace M.

    1998-11-01

    Rostoker, Binderbauer and Monkhorst have recently proposed a "colliding beam fusion reactor" (CBFR) for use with the p-B11 reaction. We have examined the various dissipative processes resulting from Coulomb collisions, and have concluded that the CBFR equilibrium cannot be sustained for long enough to permit net fusion gain. There are many collisional processes which occur considerably faster than fusion, and result in particle loss, energy loss, or detuning of the resonant energy for the p-B reaction. Pitch-angle scattering of protons off the boron beam, which occurs 100 times faster than fusion, isotropizes the proton beam and results in proton loss. Energy exchange between protons and boron, which is 20 times faster than fusion, detunes the resonance. Proton-proton scattering, which is faster than fusion for all CBFR scenarios, Maxwellianizes the protons and thus detunes the resonance. Ion-electron collisions lead indirectly to a friction between the two ion beams, which is typically fast compared to the fusion process. Results of Fokker-Planck analyses of each process will be shown.

  14. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of ORR, NBS, and HFBR fuel element shipping package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel element shipping package employing a borated-phenolic foam as a thermal insulating material is designed to transport as many as seven fuel elements for use in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Brookhaven Fast Beam Reactor, or the National Bureau of Standards Reactor. This report presents the criticality safety evaluation and demonstrates that the requirements for a Fissile Class I package are satisfied by the design.

  15. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of ORR, NBS, and HFBR fuel element shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel element shipping package employing a borated-phenolic foam as a thermal insulating material is designed to transport as many as seven fuel elements for use in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Brookhaven Fast Beam Reactor, or the National Bureau of Standards Reactor. This report presents the criticality safety evaluation and demonstrates that the requirements for a Fissile Class I package are satisfied by the design

  16. Comparison of depth-dose distributions between reactor and accelerator neutron beams proposed by design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator epithermal neutron beams produced by 7Li(p,n)7Be reactions were compared with reactor neutron beams using a fission converter (20% enriched 235U 5mm-thick plate) from view points of neutron spectrum and depth-dose distributions in a phantom. It is possible to design accelerator epithermal neutron beams having better depth-dose distributions than reactor neutron beams. (author)

  17. Focal spot size predictions for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from calculations of focal spot size for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor are summarized. In the converging beam mode, we find an enlargement of the focal spot due to multiple scattering and zeroth order self-field effects. This enlargement can be minimized by maintaining small reactors together with a careful choice of the gaseous medium. The self-focused mode, on the other hand, is relatively insensitive to the reactor environment, but is critically dependent upon initial beam quality. This requirement on beam quality can be significantly eased by the injection of an electron beam of modest current from the opposite wall

  18. Conceptual design of light ion beam inertia nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light ion beam, inertia nuclear fusion system drew attention recently as one of the nuclear fusion systems for power reactors in the history of the research on nuclear fusion. Its beginning seemed to be the judgement that the implosion of fusion fuel pellets with light ions can be realized with the light ions which can be obtained in view of accelerator techniques. Of course, in order to generate practically usable nuclear fusion reaction by this system and maintain it, many technical difficulties must be overcome. This research was carried out for the purpose of discovering such technical problems and searching for their solution. At the time of doing the works, the following policy was adopted. Though their is the difference of fine and rough, the design of a whole reactor system is performed conformably. In order to make comparison with other reactor types and nuclear fusion systems, the design is carried out as the power plant of about one million kWe output. As the extent of the design, the works at conceptual design stage are performed to present the concept of design which satisfies the required function. Basically, the design is made from conservative standpoint. This research of design was started in 1981, and in fiscal 1982, the mutual adjustment among the design of respective parts was performed on the basis of the results in 1981, and the possible revision and new proposal were investigated. (Kako, I.)

  19. Process for servicing a jet pump hold down beam in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for remotely removing a jet pump hold down beam mounted between opposed members in a nuclear reactor, the hold down beam having a beam body, a pair of opposed beam tabs extending outwardly from the beam body, a pair of positioning trunnions, and a threaded beam bolt received within a correspondingly-threaded channel extending through the beam body, a lower end of the beam bolt extending through an aperture formed in a beam bolt retainer plate, the retainer plate being coupled by a connecting member to the jet pump, the beam bolt being rotatably adjusted within the beam channel so as to urge the beam tabs against the opposed reactor members. It comprises grasping the beam trunnions; depressing the beam tabs; rotating the beam approximately 90 about the beam bolt so as to remove the beam tabs from the opposed reactor members; removing the retainer plate connecting member in its entirety from the jet pump; and removing the entire hold down beam, retainer plate, and retainer plate connecting member from the jet pump

  20. Neutron spectra at two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor loaded with HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, one radial and another tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. Measurements were carried out with the reactor core loaded with high enriched uranium fuel. Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter high-density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code. For each spectrum total flux, mean energy and ambient dose equivalent were determined. Measured spectra show fission, epithermal and thermal neutrons, being harder in the radial beam port. - Highlights: • Neutron spectra of a TRIGA reactor were measured. • The reactor core is loaded with HEU. • The spectra were measured at two reactor beam ports. • Measurements were carried out at 5 and 10 W

  1. Vietnam Project For Production Of Radioactive Beam Based On ISOL Technique With The Dalat Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence in Vietnam of Dalat nuclear reactor dedicated to fundamental studies is a unique opportunity to produce Radioactive Ion (RI) Beams with the fission of a 235U induced by the thermal neutrons produced by the reactor. We propose to produce RI beams at the Dalat nuclear reactor using ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) technique. This project should be a unique opportunity for Vietnamese nuclear physics community to use its own facilities to produce RI beams for studying nuclear physics at an international level. (author)

  2. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  3. LIBRA - a light ion beam fusion conceptual reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4 MJ shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion pulse is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbind tubes with Li17Pb83 flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is 'self-pumped' by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with Li17Pb83 that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequently without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of a 331 MWe LIBRA design is estimated to be 2843 Dollar/kWe while a 1200 MWe LIBRA design will cost approximately 1300 Dollar/kWe. (orig.)

  4. Apparatus for servicing a jet pump hold down beam in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an apparatus for replacing the hold down beam of a fluid circulating jet pump mounted in a nuclear reactor, the hold down beam having a beam body, a pair of opposed beam tabs and a pair of opposed beam positioning trunnions extending outwardly from the beam body. It comprises a housing having a lower surface configured to be positionable over the body of the hold down beam; means coupled to the housing for engaging the beam trunnions and securing the beam body against the lower surface of the housing; means coupled to the housing for depressing the beam tabs while the beam body is secured against the lower surface of the housing; means coupled to the trunnion engaging means and the beam tab depressing means for selectively actuating the trunnion engaging means and the beam tab depressing means from a position remote from the nuclear reactor; and means connectable to the housing for selectively changing the directional orientation of the beam

  5. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR [University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reactors in the US are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, ideal beams of 1, 35, and 1,000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive Al, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube

  6. Changes in epithermal neutron beam parameters with changing reactor core configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in epithermal neutron beam characteristics accompanying changes in the LVR-15 reactor core configuration were examined. The properties measured included the neutron spectrum, neutron fluence rate, and absorbed dose rate at the neutron beam outlet in air and in a thermalisation block. (orig.)

  7. Conceptual design of epithermal neutron beam for BNCT in the thermalizing column of TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of the epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials in thermalising column (TC) of TRIGA reactor is presented. The investigation of the possible use of fission converter as well as the set-up of TRIGA reactor core is performed. The optimization of the irradiation facility components is carried out and the configuration with the most favorable cost/performance ratio is proposed. The results prove, that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beams throughout the world, could be installed in TC/DC of the TRIGA reactor, quite suitable for the clinical treatments of human patients.(author)

  8. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed. PMID:24593596

  9. Status report of the program on neutron beam utilization at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal reactor is an intense source not only of thermal neutron, but also intermediate as well as fast neutrons. Using the filtered neutron beam technique at steady state atomic reactor allows receiving the neutrons in the intermediate energy region with the most available intense flux at present. In the near time at the Dalat reactor the filtered neutron beam technique has been applied. Utilization of the filtered neutron beams in basic and applied researches has been a important activity of the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI). This report presents some relevant characteristics of the filtered neutron beams and their utilization in nuclear data measurements, neutron capture gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron radiography, neutron dose calibration and other applications. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs

  10. Estimation of impact pressure due to rupture in beam-tube for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrons have been used for studies in material sciences of physics, chemistry, metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers, and biological sciences. This application leads to build up research reactor all over the world. JRTR (Jordan Research and Training Reactor) which plans to build up in Jordan is multipurpose research reactor which is developed entirely with domestic technology to overseas. Thermal power is 5MW upgradable 10MW. JRTR have four horizontal beam tubes, 3 ST(Standard) and 1NR (Neutron radiography). The beam tube's cavities are filled with helium, purged regularly to prevent a build-up of radioactive gases and moisture. They are highly reliable because they have no moving parts. The beam tube embedded part is aligned with its corresponding beam tube in the reflector. Objective of this study is to describe water hammer phenomenon in beam tube and determine an impact pressure charged in end film of beam tube for accomplishing nuclear safety function of research reactor while beam tube is ruptured due to some accident such as earthquake. The water hammer was experimentally and analytically studied by Lai, Saruba, Ballanco, and Watters

  11. Beam characteristics of mixed gamma-neutron radiation from IBR 30 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements were carried out in the pulsed fast reactor IBR-30 experimental channels aimed at verifying the properties of different types of detectors in the mixed gamma-neutron field and obtaining information on neutron beam, such as the neutron beam homogeneity, thermal neutron fluence, neutron beam dosimetric characteristic and the relative proportion of gamma rays in the mixed gamma and neutron radiation. The information on gamma radiation and thermal neutron fluence were obtained using different thermoluminescent materials. Several solid state track detectors were used as fast neutron dosemeters. The results show that the properties of the detectors described permit their application in finding the characteristics of the individual components of mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. It was found that the neutron component prevailed in the IBR-30 reactor neutron beam and that the beam was homogeneous along the entire channel cross section. (J.B.)

  12. Modification of the radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to describe the modification of the radial beam port of ITU (İstanbul Technical University) TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications. Radial beam port is modified with Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators. Neutron flux values are measured by neutron activation analysis (Au–Cd foils). Experimental results are verified with Monte Carlo results. The results of neutron/photon spectrum, thermal/epithermal neutron flux, fast group photon fluence and change of the neutron fluxes with the beam port length are presented. - Highlights: • Using MCNP5, radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor is modified. • Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators are used to modify the beam port. • Results of two-group neutron/photon flux are presented. • Monte Carlo results are compared with experimental results

  13. An innovative approach to reactor operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As with any approach, the goals or terminal objectives must be clearly set before beginning. Just like the electric utilities, whose training programs are structured around the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations guidelines, (INPO), the Department of Energy, (DOE), has now imposed its own accreditation order. The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), Reactor Operator Training Program must conform with DOE Order 548.18A, which specifies accreditation criteria. In short, the existing training program had to be upgraded to demonstrate the systematic approach to analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation per adopted Performance-Based Training (PBT) guidelines. The expense of manpower, facilities and equipment demands an optimal return by improving not only the training program, but also the methods employed in this Training Plan Model rely on the evaluation of both the trainees' and the training system's performance. The results of these evaluations are immediately used to revise the program design, keeping the evaluation instruments up-to-date. Necessary revisions to training materials are completed before the next scheduled presentation or planned used by trainers and trainees in self-study

  14. Fuel cladding integrity analysis during beam trip transients for China lead-based demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Beam trip effect on Accelerator Driven sub-critical System (ADS) is remained a critical issue on ADS reactor technology. • The CFD model of fuel pin of China Lead-based Demonstration Reactor (CLEAR-III) was established. • The thermal hydraulic behaviors of fuel pin during beam trip transient of CLEAR-III were studied. • The thermal stress variation of fuel cladding during beam trip transient of CLEAR-III was evaluated. • Results reveal that beam trip effect on fuel cladding is so small that can be neglected. - Abstract: Frequent beam trips as experienced in the existing high-power proton accelerators may cause thermal fatigue in Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) components, which may lead to degradation of their structural integrity and reduction of their lifetime. In this paper, we focus on the strength and integrity of fuel cladding during the beam trip transients of China Lead-based Demonstration Reactor (CLEAR-III). Typical frequent beam trips and fuel burn-up are addressed to investigate the acceptable beam trip frequency limitation. Correspondingly, the variation magnitude of temperature and thermal stress of fuel cladding are simulated by ANSYS code. Besides, the behavior of cladding material T91 under irradiation, creep and Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) corrosion conditions has been discussed. It shows that beam trips have little influence on the cladding integrity and the acceptable beam trip frequency of the fuel cladding within 10 s of the beam trip time duration is more than 2.5 × 105 times per year, consequently the CLEAR-III’s fuel claddings are expected to have a good resistance to the thermal–mechanical effects induced by beam trips

  15. LETTER REPORT - INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 17 through August 23, 2010 to perform visual inspections and conduct independent measurement and sampling of the 'Outside Areas' at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) decommissioning project. During this visit, ORISE was also able to evaluate Fan House, Building 704 survey units (SUs) 4 and 5, which are part of the Underground Utilities portion of the HFBR decommissioning project. ORISE performed limited alpha plus beta scans of the remaining Fan House foundation lower walls and remaining pedestals while collecting static measurements. Scans were performed using gas proportional detectors coupled to ratemeter-scalers with audible output and encompassed an area of approximately 1 square meter around the static measurement location. Alpha plus beta scans ranged from 120 to 460 cpm. Twenty smears for gross alpha and beta activity and tritium were collected at judgmentally selected locations on the walls and pedestals of the Fan House foundation. Attention was given to joints, cracks, and penetrations when determining each sample location. Removable concentrations ranged from -0.43 to 1.73 dpm/100 cm2 for alpha and -3.64 to 7.80 dpm/100 cm2 for beta. Tritium results for smears ranged from -1.9 to 9.0 pCi/g. On the concrete pad, 100% of accessible area was scanned using a large area alpha plus beta gas proportional detector coupled to a ratemeter-scaler. Gross scan count rates ranged from 800 to 1500 cpm using the large area detector. Three concrete samples were collected from the pad primarily for tritium analysis. Tritium concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 53.3 to 127.5 pCi/g. Gamma spectroscopy results of radionuclide concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 pCi/g for Cs-137 and 0.19 to 0.22 pCi/g for Ra-226. High density scans for gamma radiation levels were performed in accessible areas in each SU, Fan House

  16. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor with HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before to change the HEU for Leu fuel of the ININ's TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor the neutron spectra were measured in two beam ports using 5 and 10 W. Measurements were carried out in a tangential and a radial beam port using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. It was found that neutron spectra are different in the beam ports, in radial beam port the amplitude of thermal and fast neutrons are approximately the same while, in the tangential beam port thermal neutron peak is dominant. In the radial beam port the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent factors are 131±11 and 124±10 p Sv-cm2 for 5 and 10 W respectively while in the tangential beam port the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent factor is 55±4 p Sv-cm2 for 10 W. (Author)

  17. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  18. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  19. Design of epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT treatment at Slovenian TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials on Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI) TRIGA reactor is presented. The investigation of the possible use of fission converter for the purpose of enhancement of neutron beam, as well as the set-up of TRIGA reactor core is performed. The optimization of the irradiation facility components is carried out and the configuration with the most favorable cost/performance ratio is proposed. The simulation results prove that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beams throughout the world, could be installed in the thermalizing column of the TRIGA reactor, quite suitable for the clinical treatments of human patients. (author)

  20. Design of epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT treatment at Slovenian TRIGA research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maucec, Marko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division, Lubljana (Slovenia). E-mail: marko.mauce@ijs.si

    1999-07-01

    The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials on Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI) TRIGA reactor is presented. The investigation of the possible use of fission converter for the purpose of enhancement of neutron beam, as well as the set-up of TRIGA reactor core is performed. The optimization of the irradiation facility components is carried out and the configuration with the most favorable cost/performance ratio is proposed. The simulation results prove that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beams throughout the world, could be installed in the thermalizing column of the TRIGA reactor, quite suitable for the clinical treatments of human patients. (author)

  1. Development of neutron beam projects at the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the UT-TRIGA research reactor was licensed and has become fully operational. This reactor, the first new US university reactor in 17 years, is the focus of a new reactor laboratory facility which is located on the Balcones Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. The TRIGA Mark II reactor is licensed for 1.1 MW steady power operation, 3 dollar pulsing, and includes five beam ports. Various neutron beam-line projects have been assigned to each beam port. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) and the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) are close to completion and will be operational in the near future. The design of the NDP instrument has been completed, a target chamber has been built, and the thermal neutron collimator, detectors, data acquisition electronics, and data processing computers have been acquired. The target chamber accommodates wafers up to 12'' in diameter and provides remote positioning of these wafers. The design and construction of the TCNS has been completed. The TCNS consists of a moderator (mesitylene), a neon heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and neutron guide tubes. In addition, fission-fragment research (HIAWATHA), Neutron Capture Therapy, and Neutron Radiography are being pursued as projects for the other three beam ports. (author)

  2. Decomposition of chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes in an electron beam generated plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    An electron beam generated plasma reactor (EBGPR) is used to determine the plasma chemistry kinetics, energetics and decomposition pathways of six chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, ethyl chloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. A traditional chemical kinetic and chemical engineering analysis of the data from the EBGPR is performed, and the following hypothesis was verified: The specific energy required for chlorinated VOC decomposition in the electron beam generated plasma reactor is determined by the electron attachment coefficient of the VOC and the susceptibility of the molecule to radical attack. The technology was demonstrated at the Hanford Reservation to remove VOCs from soils.

  3. Neutron Beam Characterization for Neutron Radiography Facility at the Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research is to characterize the present status of neutron beam coming out from the reactor core of Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1 through neutron radiography facility. In this study, the neutron beam profiles at different positions along the beam exit were recorded using digital imaging devices. In addition, thin foil activation technique, with and without cadmium cover, was employed to determine thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio. An acrylic step wedge was exposed to neutron at different time. In parallel to image construction, neutron detection was carried out using a BF3 gas-filled detector. Then, the image intensities at particular thicknesses were normalized by neutron counts from the BF3 detector to determine relative neutron intensity. The obtained information of neutron beam characterization will be useful not only for monitoring the present status of neutron radiography facility but also for determining the optimum exposure conditions for particular samples in the future.

  4. Study of neutron beam silhouette at tangential-through-tube of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) provides facilities to conduct experiments of vital importance using thermal neutron beams derived from the reactor core. One tangential-through-tube and several neutron beam tubes are available around the reactor for researchers. At the tangential-through-tube of PARR-1, experimental facilities for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activities Analysis (PGNAA) have been indigenously established. While designing the collimator it was imperative to ensure a proper collimation of thermal neutron beam on the target being exposed. It was, therefore, required to observe the neutron beam silhouette at various sections of the tangential-through-tube. In a series of experiments, CR-39 track detectors were exposed with neutrons at various sections of tangential-through-tube for about an hour while thermal neutron flux was measured in the range (1.8 x 10 /sup 7/ to 3.2 x 10 /sup 8/ neutrons cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/. Optimum etching conditions were experimentally obtained to provide the best neutron beam profiles. The icon of the beam silhouette on the detectors can easily be observed with the naked eyes. However, innovative attempts have been made to reproduce the neutron silhouette onto paper by scanning these detectors using Laser jet scanner-4. This paper displays several scanned photographs of thermal neutron beam silhouette. In one of the neutron beam silhouettes, the neutron flux cut-off was successfully recognized. The neutron beam size was determined as -3.0 cm in diameter. This type of neutron beam silhouette study is not readily possible by other techniques. (author)

  5. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  6. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5–133 keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named “QMNB” was developed in the “MATLAB” programming language to perform the required calculations. - Highlights: • Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in energy range from (1.5–133) keV. • Interference between the resonance and potential scattering amplitudes. • Epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT

  7. Calculation of dose distribution in reactor for flue gas desulfurization and denitrification by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose distribution in reactor for flue gas desulfurization and denitrification by 0.8 MeV electron beam irradiation has been simulated using EGSnrcMP Monte-Carlo program. The simulated results are carefully analyzed by utilizing MATLAB. To validate the reliability of the results, simulations with 0.5 MeV electron beam have been conducted, and the results are compared with experiment data from literatures, which shows a good agreement. (authors)

  8. TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injected power measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  9. Utilization of the low-power Musashi reactor: Multi-purpose beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Musashi reactor is a low-power reactor of 100 kW, multi-purpose beam experiments have been proceeding for the last ten years. Medical irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is the most unique utilization of the reactor. Eighty-two patients had been treated in the reactor up to the end of August 1987. One of the horizontal beam ports has been in use for a time-of-flight experiment with a slow chopper since 1977. The authors measured the total neutron cross sections of Mg, Al, Si, Zr, Nb and Mo in the energy range from 0.001 to 0.3 eV. A neutron radiography facility was designed and installed at another beam port in 1984. A real-time neutron TV system has also been installed for investigation of moving objects and for a neutron computed tomography study. A third beam port has been used for a filtered beam experiment and a capture γ-ray measurement. An Fe-filter for 24 keV neutrons and a Si-filter for 54 and 144 keV neutrons are available for generating monochromatic neutrons. These beams have been used for the precise measurement of total neutron cross sections. The capture γ-ray measurements have been applied for the measurement of boron concentration in tissue in connection with BNCT. The reactor has a Joint Use Program for university researchers in Japan under a grant-in-aid by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. (author). 10 refs, 9 figs

  10. Modernized IBR-2 reactor and first experiments at its neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IBR-2 reactor is the main basic facility at JINR dedicated to condensed matter research. The IBR-2 operates as a fast pulsed reactor. Its main distinctive property, which makes it differ from other nuclear reactors, is the mechanical modulation of the reactivity by means of a movable reflector. Producing a record neutron flux of 1016 n/cm2/s in the pulse, the IBR-2 reactor is also an economical and relatively inexpensive facility. The IBR-2 reactor is mainly used for investigations in the fields of condensed matter physics (solids and liquids), biology, chemistry, earth and materials science. Operating experience has shown that it is a very effective neutron source; in most areas of application it compares well with the best neutron sources based on proton accelerators. At present, this experience is of special importance in connection with the increasing interest in long-pulsed neutron sources. IBR-2 operated successfully from 1984 until 2006. On December 18, 2006 reactor was shut down for modernization. Main directions of reactor modernization include: 1. A compact reactor core. 2. Lower speed of rotation of the main movable reflector, counter rotation of rotors, use of a nickel alloy as a reflector material. 3. Use fuel pellets configuration that will allow increasing the depth of fuel burn up to 9%. 4. New design of safety system which improves its parameters. 5. Creation of easily replaceable moderators, their optimization for each neutron beam. Development of the cryogenic moderators with palletized moderator material. Dismantling of the old reactor parts and installation of the new equipment was completed in 2010. Brief history of the work will be outlined in the report. In February 2011 loading of fresh fuel to the reactor core was completed and physical start-up has begun. After successful realization of this stage in June, the power start-up program was fulfilled resulting in increase of the mean reactor power to the design value of 2 MW (peak power of

  11. Modification of the radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akan, Zafer; Türkmen, Mehmet; Çakir, Tahir; Reyhancan, İskender A; Çolak, Üner; Okka, Muhittin; Kiziltaş, Sahip

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to describe the modification of the radial beam port of ITU (İstanbul Technical University) TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications. Radial beam port is modified with Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators. Neutron flux values are measured by neutron activation analysis (Au-Cd foils). Experimental results are verified with Monte Carlo results. The results of neutron/photon spectrum, thermal/epithermal neutron flux, fast group photon fluence and change of the neutron fluxes with the beam port length are presented. PMID:25746919

  12. SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT - INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on September 7 through September 10, 2010, and September 20 through Seeptember 24, 2010. ORISE performed visual inspections, conducted independent measurement, and sampling of Trenches 2, 3, and 4, which are part of Phase 3 for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities Removal Project. Trenches 2 and 3 were addressed during the first visit and Trench 4 during the second visit to BNL. Spatial orientation to Building 801 and minimal survey area inside Trenches 2 and 3 limited satellite reception and the ability to utilize a global positioning system (GPS) as real-time data capture for the gamma scan surveys in these trenches. However, Trench 4 provided suitable conditions in which gamma scan data could be collected using the GPS. ORISE performed high-density gamma scans of accessible surface areas using shielded sodium iodide detectors coupled to ratemeter-scalers with audible output. Scans for Trench 2 ranged from 4,000 to 22,000 gross counts per minute (cpm); Trench 3 from 3,000 to 5,000 gross cpm and Trench 4 from 2,600 to 9,500 gross cpm. ORISE personnel flagged the area where the elevated counts were observed in Trench 2 for further investigation. Additional scane valuations were performed on remaining pipes and associated end-caps in the trenches with no elevated activity detected. Eleven judgemental soil samples (5098M0041 through 5098M0051) were obtained throughout Trenches 2, 3, and 4. The sample locations were selected based on count rates observed during the scan survey or because of contamination potential from pipeline removal activities. ORISE personnel judgmentally selected the location for sample M0043 in response to the 22,000 cpm observed during the scan survey, and to ascertain whether the elevataed counts were a result of soil contamination or radioactive shine from the trench's spatial orientation to the Target Room in

  13. Direct energy conversion and neutral beam injection for catalyzed D and D-3He tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculated performance of single stage and Venetian blind direct energy converters for Catalyzed D and D-3He Tokamak reactors are discussed. Preliminary results on He pumping are outlined. The efficiency of D and T neutral beam injection is reviewed

  14. Spectral characterization of the epithermal-neutron beam at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power burst facility boron neutron capture therapy (PBF/BNCT) program schedule required the use of an epithermal-neutron beam before the PBF would be available. The beam was needed to carry out the acute, dose-tolerance study on healthy canines and the treatment protocol on spontaneous tumor canines. Calculations on available U.S. test reactors confirmed that the Brookhaven medical research reactor (BMRR) would be capable of providing an epithermal-neutron beam with sufficient intensity while limiting the fast-neutron and gamma dose contamination to acceptable levels for the canine irradiation studies. A joint Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program was instituted to design, construct, install, and measure the performance of an epithermal-neutron beam filter for the BMRR. Aluminum oxide was selected as the filter material because it provided the desired neutron spectrum characteristics given the physical constraints of the available BMRR irradiation beam port. Neutron spectrum measurements of the exit beam were undertaken by INEL as a means to evaluate the performance of the new filter and the validity of neutron transport calculations. The preliminary data from activation measurements were presented at the Neutron Beam Design Workshop at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in March 1989. The updated activation results and the proton-recoil measurements are presented in this paper and are compared with predictions derived from a two-dimensional transport calculation

  15. Neutron spectra at two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor loaded with HEU fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Hernández-Dávila, V M; Aguilar, F; Paredes, L; Rivera, T

    2014-01-01

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, one radial and another tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. Measurements were carried out with the reactor core loaded with high enriched uranium fuel. Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a (6)LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter high-density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code. For each spectrum total flux, mean energy and ambient dose equivalent were determined. Measured spectra show fission, epithermal and thermal neutrons, being harder in the radial beam port. PMID:23746708

  16. Design of neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) technique makes use of thermal or epithermal neutrons to irradiate tumours previously loaded with 10B. Reactors are currently seen as a suitable neutron source for BNCT implementation, due to the high intensity of the flux they can provide. The TAPIRO reactor, that is located at the ENEA Casaccia Centre near Rome, is a low-power fast-flux research reactor that can be usefully employed for this application. In this work computer simulations were carried out on this reactor to obtain epithermal and thermal neutron beams for the application of BNCT in Italy in the framework of a specific research program. Comparisons with measurements are also reported. Using the MCNP-4B code, Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine the materials suitable for the design of the thermal and epithermal columns. Various arrangements of reflector and moderator materials have been investigated to achieve the desired experimental constraints. On the basis of these calculations, a thermal column was designed and installed in the TAPIRO reactor to perform preliminary experiments on small laboratory animals. For the planning of a therapy treatment of gliomas on larger size animals, several material configurations were investigated in the search for an optimal epithermal facility. The aim of the present study is to indicate how a fast research reactor can be successfully modified for generating neutron beams suitable for BNCT applications. (author)

  17. The mechanical integrity of fuel pin cladding in a pulsed-beam accelerator driven subcritical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We develop the PTS-ADS code to study transients in ADSR cladding. ► We study thermal response in an ADSR cladding to pulsed beam operation. ► We perform thermal fatigue analysis. ► The cladding mechanical integrity can be assumed unaffected by repetitive temperature variations due to pulsed beam operation. - Abstract: The Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR) is one of the reactor designs proposed for future nuclear energy production. Interest in the ADSR arises from its enhanced and intrinsic safety characteristics, as well as its potential ability to utilize the large global reserves of thorium and to burn legacy actinide waste from other reactors and decommissioned nuclear weapons. The ADSR concept is based on the coupling of a particle accelerator and a subcritical core by means of a neutron spallation target interface. One of the candidate accelerator technologies receiving increasing attention, the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator, generates a pulsed proton beam. This paper investigates the impact of pulsed proton beam operation on the mechanical integrity of the fuel pin cladding. A pulsed beam induces repetitive temperature changes in the reactor core which lead to cyclic thermal stresses in the cladding. To perform the thermal analysis aspects of this study a code that couples the neutron kinetics of a subcritical core to a cylindrical geometry heat transfer model was developed. This code, named PTS-ADS, enables temperature variations in the cladding to be calculated. These results are then used to perform thermal fatigue analysis and to predict the stress-life behaviour of the cladding.

  18. Beam tube experiments and correlated research projects at the TRIGA reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four beam tubes and the thermal column at the TRIGA reactor Vienna were used intensively during the reporting period. Three of the beam tubes are mainly used for neutron spectroscopy such as small angle scattering, neutron interferometry and polarized neutrons where now investigations of magnetic structures in pulsed high magnetic fields (25 T) synchronized with the pulsed mode of the reactor have been started. The thermalizing column will be modified from the present cold neutron source to a comfortable neutron radiography installation which allows investigations of objects of a size up to 30 cm diameters. The thermal column is also used for neutron radiography and as a strong gamma source to investigate gamma irradiation effects on various materials such as glass fiber cables. In view of flexible utilization of the thermal column a movable shielding construction has been designed which is simple rolled away on the rails of the thermal column doors when access to the thermal column in necessary. (orig.)

  19. Application of CO2 laser beam weld for repair of fuel element of nuclear reactor 'YAYOI'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies are to develop CO2 laser beam welding techniques in order to apply for repoint of nuclear reactor fuel of Fast Neutron Source Reactor YAYOI. For that purpos, many experiments were conduted to obtain various effects of laser welding variables with use of SUS 304 plates, pipes and simulated dumy fuels. These experiments provided us an optimal welding condition through metallurgical observations, non-destructive and mechanical tests. It was found that the laser welds exhibited properties equivalent to those of the base metal, in addition they provided us a favorable system than that of electron beam welds against a cladding of radioactive nuclear fuel in a hot cell. The present paper reports on the characteristics of laser welds, structural analysis of fuel element and a system design of remotely operated devices setting in a hot cell. (author)

  20. Heat transfer phenomena in gas protected particle beam fusion reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of the fireball produced in particle beam fusion reactor cavities as the cavity gas near the target absorbs the X-rays and ionic debris emanating from the microexplosion is examined. Thermal response of the first wall to the radiative heat flux from the gas is examined parametrically. Criteria for the suitability of different cavity fill gases based on their ability to protect the first wall from excessive surface heating and ablation are discussed. 9 refs

  1. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present design is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.)

  2. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present dessign is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.)

  3. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, radial and tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research. Measurements were carried out with the core with mixed fuel (Leu 8.5/20 and Flip Heu 8.5/70). Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter high density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code; from each spectrum the total neutron flux, the neutron mean energy and the neutron ambient dose equivalent dose were determined. Measured spectra show fission (E≥ 0.1 MeV), epithermal (from 0.4 eV up to 0.1 MeV) and thermal neutrons (E≤ 0.4 eV). For both reactor powers the spectra in the radial beam port have similar features which are different to the neutron spectrum characteristics in the tangential beam port. (Author)

  4. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Aguilar, F.; Paredes, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, radial and tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research. Measurements were carried out with the core with mixed fuel (Leu 8.5/20 and Flip Heu 8.5/70). Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter high density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code; from each spectrum the total neutron flux, the neutron mean energy and the neutron ambient dose equivalent dose were determined. Measured spectra show fission (E≥ 0.1 MeV), epithermal (from 0.4 eV up to 0.1 MeV) and thermal neutrons (E≤ 0.4 eV). For both reactor powers the spectra in the radial beam port have similar features which are different to the neutron spectrum characteristics in the tangential beam port. (Author)

  5. UCN sources at external beams of thermal neutrons. An example of PIK reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychagin, E. V.; Mityukhlyaev, V. A.; Muzychka, A. Yu.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Onegin, M. S.; Sharapov, E. I.; Strelkov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium (4He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of application of this idea, which consists of installing 4He UCN source in the beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with moderator-reflector, which plays the role of cold neutron (CN) source feeding the UCN source. CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator-reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of 4He source with solid methane (CH4) or/and liquid deuterium (D2) moderator-reflector. We show that such a source with CH4 moderator-reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1·105 cm-3, and the UCN production rate of ~2·107 s-1. These values are respectively 1000 and 20 times larger than those for the most intense UCN user source. The UCN density in a source with D2 moderator-reflector would reach the value of ~2·105 cm-3, and the UCN production rate would be equal ~8·107 s-1. Installation of such a source in a beam of CNs would slightly increase the density and production rate.

  6. Framework for a sustainable development of neutron beam work in the smaller research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyze the present situation of research reactors for neutron beam work in the light of the changes that took place in the nuclear field during the last decades. Trends in supply and demand of neutron beam time in view of the specific requirements of the techniques and of the user's community are outlined. It is argued that resources, both human and material, should be considered in a global perspective, encompassing the national, regional and international levels, where national facilities, mostly low flux research reactors, should be looked upon as a valuable component of a commonwealth of resources to be usefully exploited for the benefit of the neutron user's community at large. The importance of international cooperation to develop a higher level of research reactor utilization is emphasized while suggestions concerning the role of IAEA are made, particularly, to promote the mobility of scientists and engineers directed from developed to less developed countries (LDC's) where research reactors are in operation. The potential of small research reactors in LDC's as an instrument of the country's general scientific and technological development is pointed out as well as difficulties commonly experienced and essential requirements of a successful performance with emphasis on the importance of establishing close links with the national scientific community and especially with university groups. The scientific and technological relevance of neutron scattering techniques is discussed. Reference is made to the techniques best suited to modest research reactor facilities as well as to the importance of developing a local competence in instrument design, optimization and construction. (author). 12 refs

  7. Error analysis in reactor-core neutron beam density measurements by gold-foil activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokof' ev, Y.A.; Bondarenko, L.N.; Rogok, E.V.; Spivak, P.E.

    1986-09-01

    The most accurate method for neutron density measurements, where the spectrum cut-off energy is appreciably lower than the gold cross-section resonance energy, is by gold-foil activation. The authors show that this method also makes it possible to measure core-beam neutron densities with high accuracy, even though this requires taking into account the gold-activation contribution of epithermal neutrons from 3.10/sup 4 -/b neutron capture at 4.8 eV and inserting the appropriate corrections in the measurement results. The activation method was experimentally used for precision measurement of the reactor-core beam density in the study of the beam neutron half-life. Data are presented which show that the additive error is within the +/-0.5 measurement error.

  8. Dosimetric characteristics of the thermal neutron beam facility for neutron capture therapy at Hanaro reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal neutron beam facility utilizing a typical tangential beam port for Neutron Capture Therapy was installed at the Hanaro, 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor. In order to determine the different dose components in phantoms irradiated with a mixed thermal neutron beam and gamma-ray for clinical applications, various techniques were applied including the use of activation foils, TLDs and ionization chambers. The water phantom was utilized in the measurement. The results of the measurement were compared with MCNP4B calculations. The thermal neutron fluxes were 1.02E9 and 6.07E8/cm2·s at 10 and 20 mm depth in water, respectively. The gamma-ray dose rate was 5.10 Gy/hr at 20 mm depth in water. The result of this study can be used as basic data for subsequent BNCT clinical application. (author)

  9. Design of a medical reactor generating high quality neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron, B-10, that are capable of preferentially accumulating in the tumor, which is then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The interaction of the B-10 with a thermal neutron causes the B-10 nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the boron neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells but have a path length in tissue of approximately 14 micrometers, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to B-10-loaded cells. Since the early 1980s, there have been considerable improvements in boron compounds and neutron beams. More is known now about the radiation biology of BNCT, which has reemerged as a potentially useful method for preferential irradiation of tumors. Clinical trials have been initiated at BNL and MIT, with an improved boron compound and epithermal neutrons. At this time, nuclear reactors are the only demonstrated satisfactory sources of epithermal neutrons. While some reactors are available and within reach of cancer treatment centers, a question arises as to the feasibility and practicality of placing new epithermal neutron sources in hospitals. In this thesis, we design a square reactor (that can easily be reconfigured into polygonal reactors as the need arises) with four slab type assemblies to produce two epithermal neutron beams and two thermal neutron beams for use in neutron capture therapy. This square reactor with four large-area faces consists of 1056 U3Si-Al fuel elements and 36 B4C control rods. The proposed facility, based on this square reactor core with a maximum operating power of 300kW, provides an epithermal neutron beam of 3.2x109 nepi/cm2 · s intensity with low contamination by fast neutrons (<1.6x10-13 Gy · cm2/nepi) and gamma rays (<1.0x10-13 Gy · cm2/nepi

  10. Neutron Beam Analysis on Materials for Nuclear Applications, Being Irradiated in Fission Reactors and Having Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive supports are given from the public sectors to the neutron beam analysis on advanced materials developed mainly in the framework of fundamental solid state physics, through the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the Institute for Solid State physics in University of Tokyo. However, the related activities are mainly on non-radioactive materials with some limited exceptions, though the facilities for the neutron beam analysis are installed in the radiation controlled areas. Research activities in the field of nuclear related materials have concentrated their efforts for nano structural analysis into the other techniques of the post irradiation examinations, such as the high resolution transmission microscopy, the three dimensional atom probe tomography, and the positron annihilation techniques, than the neutron beam analysis. In the meantime, more detailed analysis on the radiation induced nanostructures are becoming more and more essential for the further understanding of the radiation effects in the materials which will be used in the advanced nuclear systems, such as the nuclear fusion reactors and the generation-IV nuclear fission reactors. Utilizing of the cutting edge techniques for the nanostructural analysis on materials irradiated by neutrons, all of which cannot be installed in the limited area of available hot laboratories, is urgently demanded, of course, satisfying the related legal restrictions and the safety demands. The present study was focused on as the realization of the neutron beam analysis on the nanostructural evolutions of the superconductive materials, which will be used in the ITER, the international thermonuclear experimental reactor, being under construction in Cadarache, France, and the glassy metals, which have some unique and advantageous features for the nuclear applications. (author)

  11. Materials R and D with neutron beams - how the NRU reactor serves Canada further as a unique resource for science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses the use of NRU reactor for materials research and development with neutron beams at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the Chalk River Laboratories. The facility has 5 beams for research and development on hard materials, 1 beam for research and development on nano-film and 1 beam for research and development on nano-solution, still under development.

  12. Materials R and D with neutron beams - how the NRU reactor serves Canada further as a unique resource for science and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, J. [National Research Council Canada, Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discusses the use of NRU reactor for materials research and development with neutron beams at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the Chalk River Laboratories. The facility has 5 beams for research and development on hard materials, 1 beam for research and development on nano-film and 1 beam for research and development on nano-solution, still under development.

  13. Beam steering technique of ultrasonic waveguide sensor for under-sodium inspection of sodium fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor core and internal structures of a sodium fast reactor can not be visually examined due to the opaque sodium. The under sodium inspection technique using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the in-service inspection of the reactor internals. Immersion sensor and waveguide sensor have been utilized for the under-sodium viewing application. The immersion sensor has a precise imaging capability, but may have high temperature restrictions and an uncertain life. The waveguide sensor has the advantages of simplicity and reliability, but limits in its movement. In this study, new ultrasonic techniques are being developed to overcome the scanning limitation of a waveguide sensor. A new technique is presented which is capable of steering an ultrasonic beam of an waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the sensor assembly. The steering function of the ultrasonic radiation beam can be achieved by a frequency tuning method of the excitation pulse in the dispersive low frequency range of the A0 Lamb wave. (authors)

  14. Characterization and Application of the Thermal Neutron Radiography Beam in the Egyptian Second Experimental and Training Research Reactor (ETRR-2)

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Abou Mandour; R. M. Megahid; Hassan, M.H.; T. M. Abd El Salam

    2007-01-01

    The Experimental, Training, Research Reactor (ETRR-2) is an open-pool multipurpose reactor (MPR) with a core power of 22 MWth cooled and moderated by light water and reflected with beryllium. It has four neutron beams and a thermal column as the main experimental devices. The neutron radiography facility unit utilizes one of the radial beam tubes. The track-etch technique using nitrocellulose films and converter screen is applied. In this work, the radial neutron beam for the thermal neutron ...

  15. Characterization and Application of the Thermal Neutron Radiography Beam in the Egyptian Second Experimental and Training Research Reactor (ETRR-2)

    OpenAIRE

    Abd El Salam, T. M.; Hassan, M.H.; Megahid, R. M.; M. A. Abou Mandour

    2008-01-01

    The Experimental, Training, Research Reactor (ETRR-2) is an open-pool multipurpose reactor (MPR) with a core power of 22 MWth cooled and moderated by light water and reflected with beryllium. It has four neutron beams and a thermal column as the main experimental devices. The neutron radiography facility unit utilizes one of the radial beam tubes. The track-etch technique using nitrocellulose films and converter screen is applied. In this work, the radial neutron beam for the thermal ...

  16. UCN sources at external beams of thermal neutrons. An example of PIK reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lychagin, E V; Muzychka, A Yu; Nekhaev, G V; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Onegin, M S; Sharapov, E I; Strelkov, A V

    2015-01-01

    We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium (4He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of the application of this idea, which consists of installing a 4He UCN source in a beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with a moderator-reflector, which plays the role of a source of cold neutrons (CNs) feeding the UCN source. The CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator-reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of a 4He source with solid methane (CH4) or/and liquid deuterium (D2) moderator-reflector. We show that such a source with CH4 moderator-reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1x10^5 1/cm^3, and the UCN production rate of ~2x10^7 1/s. These values are resp...

  17. Nuclear analysis of the heavy-ion-beam-driven fusion reactor HIBALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed three-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear analysis is presented for the heavy-ion-beam-driven reactor HIBALL. Neutron target interactions leading to neutron multiplication, spectrum softening, and gamma production are included in the model. A 0.66m-thick blanket cooleb by Pb83 Li 17 reduces the radiation damage in the HT-9 ferritic steel first wall to 2.7 dpa/full power year, allowing it to last the whole life of the plant. The overall tritium breeding ratio and the overall energy multiplication are 1.25 and 1.27, respectively. The four reactor cavities in the HIBALL power plant yield a total thermal power of 10 200 MW(thermal)

  18. HIBALL-II - an improved conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved design of the HIBALL inertial-confinement fusion power station is presented. The new RF-linac based heavy ion driver has improved concepts for beam stacking, bunching and final focusing. The new target design takes into account radiation transport effects in a coarse approximation. The system of four reactors with a net total output of 3.8 GW electric is essentially the same as described earlier, however, progress in the analysis has enhanced its credibility and self-consistency. Considerations of environmental and safety aspects and cost estimates are given. (orig.)

  19. Study of the RP-10 reactor neutron beam applied to the neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the RP-10 reactor radial neutron beam No. 3, which is used for neutron radiographies, by comparing radiograph's with and without the inner duct, and neutron flux determination with in flakes along the external duct, being the presence of photons creating signals at comparable levels of neutron effects, which reduce the quality of the analysis, values around 106 and 104 n/cm2s for thermal and epithermal flux were obtained respectively. It is recommended evaluate the design of the internal duct which presents strong photon emission. (authors).

  20. Estimated nuclear effects in the neutral beam injectors of a large fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are given for the nuclear heat loads on the cryopanels, radiation damage (energy deposition rate) in ion gun insulators, and dose equivalent rates from induced activity in the components for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) neutral beam injectors. The estimates have been obtained by scaling similar results, obtained by careful neutronics analysis for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The approximate nature of the scaling procedure introduces considerable uncertainty in the results, but they are, hopefully, correct to within an order of magnitude and may be substantially more accurate

  1. Shielding calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed, one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and wall of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m is sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/D-T pulse

  2. Epithermal beam development at the BMRR [Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor]: Dosimetric evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of an epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is desirable because of the increased tissue penetration relative to a thermal neutron beam. Over the past few years, modifications have been and continue to be made at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) by changing its filter components to produce an optimal epithermal beam. An optimal epithermal beam should contain a low fast neutron contamination and no thermal neutrons in the incident beam. Recently a new moderator for the epithermal beam has been installed at the epithermal port of the BMRR and has accomplished this task. This new moderator is a combination of alumina (Al2O3) bricks and aluminum (Al) plates. A 0.51 mm thick cadmium (Cd) sheet has reduced the thermal neutron intensity drastically. Furthermore, an 11.5 cm thick bismuth (Bi) plate installed at the port surface has reduced the gamma dose component to negligible levels. Foil activation techniques have been employed by using bare gold and cadmium-covered gold foil to determine thermal as well as epithermal neutron fluence. Fast neutron fluence has been determined by indium foil counting. Fast neutron and gamma dose in soft tissue, free in air, is being determined by the paired ionization chamber technique, using tissue equivalent (TE) and graphite chambers. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-700) have also been used to determine the gamma dose independently. This paper describes the methods involved in the measurements of the above mentioned parameters. Formulations have been developed and the various corrections involved have been detailed. 12 refs

  3. Analyses of the reflector tank, cold source, and beam tube cooling for ANS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes my work as an intern with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in the summer of 1991. I was assigned to the Reactor Technology Engineering Department, working on the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). My first project was to select and analyze sealing systems for the top of the diverter/reflector tank. This involved investigating various metal seals and calculating the forces necessary to maintain an adequate seal. The force calculations led to an analysis of several bolt patterns and lockring concepts that could be used to maintain a seal on the vessel. Another project involved some pressure vessel stress calculations and the calculation of the center of gravity for the cold source assembly. I also completed some sketches of possible cooling channel patterns for the inner vessel of the cold source. In addition, I worked on some thermal design analyses for the reflector tank and beam tubes, including heat transfer calculations and assisting in Patran and Pthermal analyses. To supplement the ANS work, I worked on other projects. I completed some stress/deflection analyses on several different beams. These analyses were done with the aid of CAASE, a beam-analysis software package. An additional project involved bending analysis on a carbon removal system. This study was done to find the deflection of a complex-shaped beam when loaded with a full waste can

  4. Do existing research reactors teach us all about beam tube optimization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution makes the attempt to analyse the data base available in the literature and in Siemens' own projects and to find out potential systematics from the existing research reactor with beam tubes, separated into reactors with different reflectors and distinguished for tangential and radial tubes and cold neutron sources, resp. Some generic calculations serve as gauging data. The contribution is not meant as critics on any design.The results might serve supporting designers and operators when evaluating the pros and cons of existing or planned design in terms of the optimum beam tubes. Existing lacks of systematics are evaluated in view of suitable explanations and constraints, which do not allow optimisation. Examples pf such constraints are the different material layers between fuel zone and reflector zone which have various reasons. The limited data in the literature plus the numerous lacks of precision of the representation of those data should be an incentive to improve the performed analysis by collecting more exact data and re-doing the evaluation before answering the title-question really. (author)

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use

  6. Spectrum and density of neutron flux in the irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalin, E. P.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Bulavin, M. V.; Rogov, A. D.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kulikov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Methodology and results of measuring the differential density of the neutron flux in irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor using neutron activation analysis (NAA) are presented in the paper. The results are compared to the calculation performed on the basis of the 3D MCNP model. The data that are obtained are required to determine the integrated radiation dose of the studied samples at various distances from the reactor.

  7. Optimization of the irradiation beam in the BNCT research facility at IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic technique for the treatment of some types of cancer whose useful energy comes from a nuclear reaction that occurs when thermal neutron impinges upon a Boron-10 atom. In Brazil there is a research facility built along the beam hole number 3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN, which was designed to perform BNCT research experiments. For a good performance of the technique, the irradiation beam should be mostly composed of thermal neutrons with a minimum as possible gamma and above thermal neutron components. This work aims to monitor and evaluate the irradiation beam on the sample irradiation position through the use of activation detectors (activation foils) and also to propose, through simulation using the radiation transport code, MCNP, new sets of moderators and filters which shall deliver better irradiation fields at the irradiation sample position In this work, a simulation methodology, based on a MCNP card, known as wwg (weight window generation) was studied, and the neutron energy spectrum has been experimentally discriminated at 5 energy ranges by using a new set o activation foils. It also has been concluded that the BNCT research facility has the required thermal neutron flux to perform studies in the area and it has a great potential for improvement for tailoring the irradiation field. (author)

  8. Present and future beam tube experiments at the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor Wien

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four beam tubes and the thermal column at the TRIGA reactor Wien were well used in the reporting period. Since the thermal column is used as a gamma source for different irradiation experiments and as a neutron source for radiography, the other facilities are mainly used for neutron spectroscopy experiments: polarized neutrons, neutron interferometry, small angle scattering and neutron choppers, In the piercing beam tube a fast rabbit system is installed which is mainly used for high precision activation analysis. (author)

  9. Establishment of the Neutron Beam Research Facility at the OPAL Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Australia's first research reactor, HIFAR, reached criticality in January 1958. At that time Australia's main agenda was establishment of a nuclear power program. HIFAR operated for nearly 50 years, providing a firm foundation for the establishment of Australia's second generation research Reactor OPAL, which reached criticality in August 006. In HIFAR's early years a neutron beam facility was established for materials characterization, partly in aid of the nuclear energy agenda and partly in response to interest from Australia's scientific community. By the time Australia's nuclear energy program ceased (in the 1970s), radioisotope production and research had also been established at Lucas Heights. Also, by this time the neutron beam facility for scientific research had evolved into a major utilization programme, warranting establishment of an independent body to facilitate scientific access (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering). In HIFAR's lifetime, ANSTO established a radiopharmaceuticals service for the Australian medical community and NDT silicon production was also established and grew to maturity. So when time came to determine the strategy for nuclear research in Australia into the 21st century, it was clear that the replacement for HIFAR should be multipurpose, with major emphases on scientific applications of neutron beams and medical isotope production. With this strategy in mind, ANSTO set about to design and build OPAL with a world-class neutron beam facility, capable of supporting a large and diverse scientific research community. The establishment of the neutron beam facility became the mission of the Bragg Institute management team. This journey began in 1997 with establishment of a working budget, and reached its first major objective when OPAL reached 20 MW thermal power nearly one decade later (in 2006). The first neutron beam instruments began operation soon after (in 2007), and quickly proved themselves to be

  10. The Biological Efficiency of the Petten Research Reactor Beam on Human Lymphocytes (Methodological Approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present preliminary results of examination of the biological efficiency of the Petten Research Reactor mixed beam with respect to 250 kV X-rays for the induction of DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated by the beam from Research Reactor in ECN Petten, Netherlands and dose response relationships for the level of damage induced were investigated. In order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture, chemical pretreatment with boric acid or mercaptoborane (containing boron-10 ions) was done. The estimation of the DNA damage was done with the use of a single cell gel-electrophoresis method (SCGE), to asses the frequency of chromosomal aberrations culturing of lymphocytes for the evaluation of cytogenetic damage was performed. Abnormal behavior of blood samples during a culture procedure and abnormally low metaphases frequency was noticed. During the analysis of DNA damage by SCGE assay we have also found the abnormalities in shapes and brightness of investigated comets. Part of the studied lymphocytes was bigger than others and had much bigger fraction of the DNA in tail. Very poor dose response relationship was observed in those results. From this reason, our paper presents the methodological approach and discussion of the results obtained and also studies on the parameters reflecting the level of the DNA in human lymphocytes. In order to eliminate outstanding comets (fluffy) we measured for all our results the relation of the fraction of DNA in tail to the length of the comet tail. The value of this ratio usually fluctuated in range of 0.1 to 0.70. For the fluffy comets mentioned before the tDNA/TL ratio was generally about 0.9, or even more than 1.0 that means that the percentage of fraction of DNA in tail was higher than in usually seen comets with such a tail length. After analysis of distribution of frequency cells with various t

  11. DIN spectrometers in the IBR-2 and IBR-30 reactor beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main characteristics and experimental capabilities of the DIN-1M, DIN-2PI and DIN-2PR slow neutron spectrometer complex, created on the IBR-30 and IBR-2 reactor beams are described. The spectrometers are used to obtain nuclear-physical data in the field of slow neutrons and basic and applied investigations into condenced state physics. Each of the spectrometers described has its own advantages and peculiarities directed to the solution of specific tasks. Main trends in investigations conducted using the spectrometers are illustrated by results concerning the Bose-condensate density temperature dependence in liquid helium, ternary correlation effects in water, atom oscillation frequency spectra in zirconium hydrates, alloys with introduction of transition metals with oxugen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ion-exchange resins and superion conductor - cesium hydrosulfate

  12. Estimation of reactivity effect of neutron beam tube in research reactor through two-dimensional transport calculation. Comparison of radial and tangential beam tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1988-12-01

    The reactivity effects of neutron beam tubes in a research reactor were investigated with the two-dimensional transport code DORT. The core model for the calculation was a two-dimensional cylinder. The reactivity effects of one radial and two tangential beam tubes were estimated through the results of the two-dimensional calculation using the space-dependent weight function which is as defined a product of the macroscopic scattering cross section, the forward neutron flux, the adjoint neutron flux and the volume. The reactivity effect of the tangential beam tube is larger than that of the radial tube. An aluminum wall of a beam tube decreases the reactivity of the core due to the neutron absorption.

  13. Reactivity measurement of the lead fast subcritical VENUS-F reactor using beam interruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to incinerate minor actinides and thus to reduce the issues linked to nuclear waste management, Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) are being under study. An ADS consists in the coupling of a particle accelerator with a sub-critical fast reactor. The on-line reactivity monitoring is a serious issue regarding safety, therefore several methods to estimate the reactivity of such sub-critical systems have to be investigated. Here, we present one method based on the study of the neutron population evolution during beam interruption experiments carried out in the framework of the FREYA FP7 program at the GUINEVERE facility, which couples the fast lead sub-critical reactor VENUS-F with the deuteron accelerator GENEPI-3C at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. After describing the facility, the analysis based on point kinetics theory and preliminary results of the reactivity measurements will be presented. Then, spatial effects that are not taken into account by point kinetics theory will be highlighted using MCNP simulations, and correction factors to raw results will be calculated. In the end, final results will be compared to reference reactivity values obtained with the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method. (author)

  14. Present status of neutron beam facilities at the research reactor, HANARO, and its future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea has been operating its new research reactor, HANARO, since its first criticality in 1995. It is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor using LEU fuel with thermal neutron flux of 2 x 1014 nominally at the nose in the D2O reflector having 7 horizontal beam ports and a provision of vertical hole for cold neutron source installation. KAERI has pursued an extensive instrument development program since 1992 by the support of the nuclear long-term development program of the government and there are now 4 working instruments. A high resolution powder diffractometer and a neutron radiography facility has been operational since late 1997 and 1996, respectively. A four-circle diffractometer has been fully working since mid 1999 and a small angle neutron spectrometer is just under commissioning phase. With the development of linear position sensitive detector with delay-line readout electronics, we have developed a residual stress instrument as an optional machine to the HRPD for last two years. Around early 1998 informal users program started with friendly users and it became a formal users support program by the ministry of science and technology. Short description for peer group formation and users activities is given. (author)

  15. Present status of neutron beam facilities at the research reactor, HANARO, and its future prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Kang, Young-Hwan; Kuk, Il-Hiun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Korea has been operating its new research reactor, HANARO, since its first criticality in 1995. It is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor using LEU fuel with thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10{sup 14} nominally at the nose in the D{sub 2}O reflector having 7 horizontal beam ports and a provision of vertical hole for cold neutron source installation. KAERI has pursued an extensive instrument development program since 1992 by the support of the nuclear long-term development program of the government and there are now 4 working instruments. A high resolution powder diffractometer and a neutron radiography facility has been operational since late 1997 and 1996, respectively. A four-circle diffractometer has been fully working since mid 1999 and a small angle neutron spectrometer is just under commissioning phase. With the development of linear position sensitive detector with delay-line readout electronics, we have developed a residual stress instrument as an optional machine to the HRPD for last two years. Around early 1998 informal users program started with friendly users and it became a formal users support program by the ministry of science and technology. Short description for peer group formation and users activities is given. (author)

  16. Modelling collimator of radial beam port Kartini reactor for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the cancer therapy methods is BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). BNCT utilizes neutron nature by 10B deposited on cancer cells. The superiority of BNCT compared to the radiation therapy is the high level of selectivity since its level is within cell. This study was carried out on collimator modelling in radial beam port of reactor Kartini for BNCT. The modelling was conducted by simulation using software of Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP 5). MCNP5 is a package of the programs for both simulating and calculating the problem of particle transport by following the life cycle of a neutron since its birth from fission reaction, transport on materials, until eventually lost due to the absorption reaction or out from the system. The collimator modelling used materials which varied in size in order to generate the value of each of the parameters in accordance with the recommendation of the IAEA, the epithermal neutron flux (ϕepi) > 1.0 x 109n.cm-2s-1, the ratio between the neutron dose rate fast and epithermal neutron flux (Df/ϕepi) < 2.0 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, the ratio of gamma dose rate and epithermal neutron flux (Dγ/ϕepi) < 2.0 X10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, the ratio between the thermal and epithermal neutron flux (ϕTh/ϕepi)< 0.05 and the ratio between the current and flux of the epithermal neutron (J/ϕepi) > 0.7. Based on the results of the optimization of the modeling, the materials and sizes of the collimator construction obtained were 0.75 cm Ni as collimator wall, 22 cm Al as a moderator and 4.5 cm Bi as a gamma shield. The outputs of the radiation beam generated from collimator modeling of the radial beam port were ϕepi = 5.25 x 106 n.cm-2.s-1, Df/ϕepi = 1.17 x 10-13Gy.cm2.n-1, Dγ/ϕepi = 1.70 x 10-12 Gy.cm2.n-1, ϕTh/ϕepi = 1.51 and J/ϕepi = 0.731. Based on this study, the result of the beam radiation coming out of the radial beam port dis not fully meet the criteria recommended by IAEA so need to continue this study to get the criteria of IAEA

  17. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 · s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy·cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nepi, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power

  18. Design, construction and characterization of a new neutron beam for neutron radiography at the Tehran Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choopan Dastjerdi, M. H.; Khalafi, H.; Kasesaz, Y.; Mirvakili, S. M.; Emami, J.; Ghods, H.; Ezzati, A.

    2016-05-01

    To obtain a thermal neutron beam for neutron radiography applications, a neutron collimator has been designed and implemented at the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). TRR is a 5 MW open pool light water moderated reactor with seven beam tubes. The neutron collimator is implemented in the E beam tube of the TRR. The design of the neutron collimator was performed using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In this work, polycrystalline bismuth and graphite have been used as a gamma filter and an illuminator, respectively. The L/D parameter of the facility was chosen in the range of 150-250. The thermal neutron flux at the image plane can be varied from 2.26×106 to 6.5×106 n cm-2 s-1. Characterization of the beam was performed by ASTM standard IQI and foil activation technique to determine the quality of neutron beam. The results show that the obtained neutron beam has a good quality for neutron radiography applications.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column and beam tube of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R., E-mail: rustamzia@yahoo.com [Atominstitute (ATI), Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Stadion allee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Karimzadeh, S.; Stummer, T.; Boeck, H. [Atominstitute (ATI), Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Stadion allee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Neutronics parameters of the reactor shielding. > Biological shielding of the TRIGA reactor. > Thermal flux measurement in the thermal column and BT-A. > MCNP model validation. - Abstract: The Monet Carlo simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor core has been performed employing the radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The model has been confirmed experimentally in the PhD research work at the Atominstitute (ATI) of the Vienna University of Technology. The MCNP model has been extended to complete biological shielding of the reactor including the thermal column, radiographic collimator and four beam tubes. This paper presents the MCNP simulated results in the thermal column and one of the beam tubes (beam tube A) of the reactor. To validate these theoretical results, thermal neutron flux density measurements using the gold foil activation method have been performed in the thermal column and beam tube A (BT-A). In the thermal column, the theoretical and experimental results are in fairly good agreement i.e. maximum thermal flux density in the centre decreases in radial direction. Further, it is also agreed that thermal flux densities in the lower part is greater than the upper part of the thermal column. In the BT-A experiment, the thermal flux density distribution is measured using gold foil. The experimental and theoretical diffusion lengths have been determined as 10.77 cm and 9.36 cm respectively with only 13% difference, reflecting good agreement between the experimental and simulated results. To save the computational cost and to incorporate the accurate and complete information of each individual Monte Carlo MC particle tracks, the surface source writing capability of MCNP has been utilized to the TRIGA shielding model. The variance reduction techniques have been applied to improve the statistics of the problem and to save computational efforts.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column and beam tube of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Neutronics parameters of the reactor shielding. → Biological shielding of the TRIGA reactor. → Thermal flux measurement in the thermal column and BT-A. → MCNP model validation. - Abstract: The Monet Carlo simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor core has been performed employing the radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The model has been confirmed experimentally in the PhD research work at the Atominstitute (ATI) of the Vienna University of Technology. The MCNP model has been extended to complete biological shielding of the reactor including the thermal column, radiographic collimator and four beam tubes. This paper presents the MCNP simulated results in the thermal column and one of the beam tubes (beam tube A) of the reactor. To validate these theoretical results, thermal neutron flux density measurements using the gold foil activation method have been performed in the thermal column and beam tube A (BT-A). In the thermal column, the theoretical and experimental results are in fairly good agreement i.e. maximum thermal flux density in the centre decreases in radial direction. Further, it is also agreed that thermal flux densities in the lower part is greater than the upper part of the thermal column. In the BT-A experiment, the thermal flux density distribution is measured using gold foil. The experimental and theoretical diffusion lengths have been determined as 10.77 cm and 9.36 cm respectively with only 13% difference, reflecting good agreement between the experimental and simulated results. To save the computational cost and to incorporate the accurate and complete information of each individual Monte Carlo MC particle tracks, the surface source writing capability of MCNP has been utilized to the TRIGA shielding model. The variance reduction techniques have been applied to improve the statistics of the problem and to save computational efforts.

  1. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)3He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3He(d,p)4He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  2. Neutronic designs and analyses of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new core-moderator assembly and five new neutron beam ports are modeled and designed for the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is an open pool, light water cooled, and moderated 1-MW research reactor with seven neutron beam ports. The existing core-moderator assembly design does not allow simultaneous utilization of all the available beam ports; only two beam ports, namely no.4 and no.7, are currently in use for research and education in the facility. Moreover, the prompt gamma-rays produced at the back side of the heavy water moderator tank shine into neutron beam tube no.4. Subsequently that is hampering the quality of the experimental data at the existing beam port facilities. The proposed design eliminates all the limitations of the existing design and provides multiple high-intensity and clean neutron beams to a new and expanded beam hall utilizing various instruments and techniques. The new design features a crescent-shaped moderator tank, which couples the reactor core to four thermal ports and one cold neutron beam port with three curved guide tubes for various cold neutron beam techniques. The modeling of the new PSBR design was achieved with highly detailed neutronics simulations using several stochastic simulation tools developed for the PSBR. The simulation results revealed the optimal design parameters and neutronics performance of the new beam ports, such that the thermal neutron beam intensity was significantly increased and the total prompt gamma dose was drastically decreased in the new beam port facilities. (author)

  3. Development of the electron beam welding of the aluminium alloy 6061-T6 for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aluminium alloy 6061-T6 has been selected for the construction of the Jules Horowitz's reactor vessel. This reactor vessel is pressurized and will be made through butt welding of ∼ 2 cm thick aluminium slabs. The electron beam welding process has been tested and qualified. It appears that this welding process allows: -) welding without pre-heating, -) vacuum welding, -) welding of 100% of the thickness in one passage, -) very low deforming welding process, -) very low density and very low volume of blow holes, -) weak ZAT (Thermal Affected Zones), and -) high reproducibility that permits automation. (A.C.)

  4. Studying the measurement errors for the density of neutron beam from a reactor core by the gold foil activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applicability of the gold foil activation method for precise measurements of density of a neutron beam extracted from the reactor core is investigated experimentally. Comparison of density ratios of cold and hot beams is carried out to determine the error of measurements conducted with the use of gold foils and the detector with 6LiF target. Based on the analysis of the data obtained it is concluded that the total error of measurements using the activation method, comprising errors of determining cross section of gold activation Δσ=+-0.3% and absolute value of foil activity (also +- 0.3%) makes up +-0.7%

  5. Nuclear structure research at the High Flux Beam Reactor: Progress report for the period February 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clark University research program in nuclear structure is a collaborative effort involving Clark University personnel, staff members from Brookhaven National Laboratory and from Ames Laboratory (Iowa State University), and an active participation of foreign scientists. The TRISTAN on-line isotope separator and the capture γ-ray facility at the HFBR are the experimental foci of the program which has four principal research themes, three involving nuclear structure physics and one directed towards astrophysics. These themes are: the manifestation of the proton-neutron interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure and its relation to collectivity, the appearance and the role of symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclei, the study of new regions of magic nuclei, and the characterization of nuclei important in r-process stellar nucleosynthesis. The activities involving Clark personnel during the eight month period, February 1, 1988 -- September 30, 1988, are summarized below

  6. Real time, in-reactor monitoring of double cantilever beam crack growth sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precracked, double cantilever beam sensors of stainless steels in various heat treated conditions were inserted into the core and recirculation water system of a BWR to obtain information on crack growth propensity within these local environments. Monitoring, in real time, of sensor precracks was achieved by means of on-line electrical potential measurements, and crack length changes of the order of 0.001 in. (0.0254 mm) could be readily measured. All DCB sensors were wedge-loaded to K=25 Ksi-√in. (27.5 MPa-√m) at the crack tip. The furnace sensitized, in-core sensor exhibited substantial crack growth, whereas the identical sensor in the recirculation system showed modest crack propagation. After several months of exposure, the two in-core, solution annealed sensors of Type 304 stainless steel also showed substantial crack length extension. Crack growth did not occur in annealed sensors emplaced within the recirculation water system. The data showed good agreement with a model for stress corrosion cracking: in-reactor measurements of electrochemical potential and conductivity of the BWR coolant allowed for prediction of crack growth rates, and these predictions agreed with the measured crack growth rates

  7. Neutron spectrum measurements in the aluminum oxide filtered beam facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectrum measurements were performed on the aluminum oxide filter installed in the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). For these measurements, activation foils were irradiated at the exit port of the beam facility. A technique based on dominant resonances in selected activation reactions was used to measure the epithermal neutron spectrum. The fast and intermediate-energy ranges of the neutron spectrum were measured by threshold reactions and 10B-shielded 235U fission reactions. Neutron spectral data were derived from the activation data by two approaches: (1) a short analysis which yields neutron flux values at the energies of the dominant or primary resonances in the epithermal activation reactions and integral flux data for neutrons above corresponding threshold or pseudo-threshold energies, and (2) the longer analysis which utilized all the activation data in a full-spectrum, unfolding process using the FERRET spectrum adjustment code. This paper gives a brief description of the measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the results obtained

  8. Slow positron beam and nanoindentation study of irradiation-related defects in reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the nature of the hardening after radiation in reactor vessel steels, China A508-3 steels were implanted by proton with an energy of 240 keV up to 2.5 × 1016, 5.5 × 1016, 1.1 × 1017, and 2.5 × 1017 ions cm−2, respectively. Vacancy type defects were detected by energy-variable positron beam Doppler broadening technique and then nanoindentation measurements were performed to investigate proton-induced hardening effects. The results showed that S-parameter increased as a function of positron incident energy after irradiation, and the increasing rate of the S-parameter near the surface was larger than that in the bulk due to radiation damage. The size of vacancy type defects increased with dose. Irradiation induced hardening was shown that the average hardness increased with dose. Moreover a direct correlation between positron annihilation parameter and hardness was found based on Kasada method

  9. Slow positron beam and nanoindentation study of irradiation-related defects in reactor vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Yichu; Zhang, Chonghong; Ren, Ai; Xu, Chaoliang; Qian, Wangjie

    2014-08-01

    In order to understand the nature of the hardening after radiation in reactor vessel steels, China A508-3 steels were implanted by proton with an energy of 240 keV up to 2.5 × 1016, 5.5 × 1016, 1.1 × 1017, and 2.5 × 1017 ions cm-2, respectively. Vacancy type defects were detected by energy-variable positron beam Doppler broadening technique and then nanoindentation measurements were performed to investigate proton-induced hardening effects. The results showed that S-parameter increased as a function of positron incident energy after irradiation, and the increasing rate of the S-parameter near the surface was larger than that in the bulk due to radiation damage. The size of vacancy type defects increased with dose. Irradiation induced hardening was shown that the average hardness increased with dose. Moreover a direct correlation between positron annihilation parameter and hardness was found based on Kasada method.

  10. Trends and techniques in neutron beam research for medium and low flux research reactors. Report of a consultants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote R and D programmes for neutron beam research to assist the developing Member States in better utilization of their research reactors. A consultants meeting was organized on 16-19 March 1996 to review the current status and deliberate on the future trends in neutron beam based research using low and medium flux research reactors with the flux range of the order of up to 1013-1014 n/cm2/s, particularly in the light of recent advances in electronics and instrumentation. The participants focused on five specific topics: triple axis spectrometry, neutron depolarization studies, capillary optics, spin-echo spectrometry and small-angle neutron spectrometry. This TECDOC details the highlights of the discussions in the meeting along with the papers presented

  11. Utilisation and Upgrading of the Neutron Beam Lines Facilities at the SAFARI-1 Nuclear Research Reactor in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) owns and operates the SAFARI-1 20 MW Research Reactor located near Pretoria. In the last two decades the SAFARI-1 research reactor has been successfully utilized for the production of radio-isotopes and the neutron transmutation doping of silicon. At the same time, various developments have been undertaken at the horizontal thermal neutron beam line ports. In fulfilling its statuary mandate to apply radiation technology for scientific purposes, Necsa is constantly exploring opportunities to employ the neutrons from its beam line facilities to benefit both academia and industry in research and technological development. This paper outlines the facilities available at SAFARI-1, the current initiatives to establish state-of-the-art user facilities and their application to various fields of material research. (author)

  12. Ageing Management and Preventice Measures for Reactor Pool Liners, Beam Tubes and Spent Fuel Storage Tank at the Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, Nguyen Nhi; Dien, Nguyen Minh; Su, Trang Cao [Nuclear Research Institute, Henoi (Viet Nam)

    2013-07-01

    The 500-kw Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was reconstructed from the original 250-kW TRIGA Mark II as named of VN-001. In the framework of the reconstruction project during the 1982-1984 period, some structures of the TRIGA reactor constructed in the early sixties, such as the aluminum tank, graphite reflector, thermal column, four horizontal beam tubes, etc. have been remained. It means, such components are more than 50 years old and are facing with ageing issues. The structural materials of the pool liner and other components of TRIGA were made of aluminum alloy 6061 and aluminum cladding fuel assemblies. Some other parts, such as reactor core, irradiation rotary rack around the core, vertical irradiation facilities, etc. were replaced by the former Soviet Union's design with structural materials of aluminum alloy CAV-1. The reactor core has been loaded with HEU VVR-M2 fuel assemblies of 36% enrichment alloy CAV-1. The reactor core has been loaded with HEU VVR-M2 fuel assemblies of U-Al alloy 36% and of UO{sub 2} 19.75% enrichment used aluminum as fuel cladding. For ageing management and preventive measures of corrosion, an underwater high-resolution video camera system had been designed for visual inspections. A home-made cleaning system was also designed for cleaning the pool and other components. Water chemistry of the reactor pool and spent fuel storage was monitored regularly. In September-November 2011, all four horizontal channels were cleaned inside and visual inspection was done using special camera system. It was the first time from 1963 such activity could be done. Based on results obtained we could convince that inside all horizontal channels are in good condition and leakage could not be occurred. All 106 HEU spent fuel assemblies stored in the spent fuel pool in good condition. The visual inspection was done using under water camera too. The results obtained show that the surface of all HEU SFA is good and leakage was not occurred. The

  13. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  14. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  15. Optical alignment and characterization of the radial neutron beam duct number 4 of de RP-10 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show the process of optical axis alignment of the neutrography device and the optical axis of the neutron beam from the radial duct number 4 of the RP-10 Nuclear Reactor, using optical methods, assisted by radiography, which facilitates the location of the optical axis of the neutron beam by the photographic recording of the space, allowing the alignment of the neutrography plate later. In the process, the location and orientation of the source depends on the placement of the fuel elements immersed inside the duct and between the core and the collimator in the Nuclear Reactor wall. This part of the process depends on the reactor operating personnel who calculate optimally the fuel burn and perform the analysis of the spatial distribution of radiation. The power measurement and the final adjustment of the optical axis of the neutron beam with the optical axis of the instrument are shown in this paper, which will make possible neutrography experiments, as well as neutron diffraction, neutron spectroscopy and neutron optics among others. (orig.)

  16. Leak detection in the primary reactor coolant piping of nuclear power plant by applying beam-microphone technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microphone leak detection method was applied to the inlet piping of the ATR-prototype reactor, Fugen. Statistical analysis results showed that the cross-correlation method provided the effective results for detection of a small leakage. However, such a technique has limited application due to significant distortion of the signals on the reactor site. As one of the alternative methods, the beam-microphone provides necessary spatial selectivity and its performance is less affected by signal distortion. A prototype of the beam-microphone was developed and then tested at the O-arai Engineering Center of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). On-site testing of the beam-microphone was carried out in the inlet piping room of an RBMK reactor of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) in Russia. A leak sound imitator was used to simulate the leakage sound under the leakage flow condition of 1-3 gpm (0.23-0.7 m3/h). Analysis showed that signal distortion does not seriously affect the performance of this method, and that sound reflection may result in the appearance of ghost sound sources. The test results showed that the influences of sound reflection and background noise were smaller at the high frequencies where the leakage location could be estimated with an angular accuracy of 5deg which is the range of localization accuracy required for the leak detection system. (author)

  17. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  18. Design of a high-flux epithermal neutron beam using 235U fission plates at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H B; Brugger, R M; Rorer, D C; Tichler, P R; Hu, J P

    1994-10-01

    Beams of epithermal neutrons are being used in the development of boron neutron capture therapy for cancer. This report describes a design study in which 235U fission plates and moderators are used to produce an epithermal neutron beam with higher intensity and better quality than the beam currently in use at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Monte Carlo calculations are used to predict the neutron and gamma fluxes and absorbed doses produced by the proposed design. Neutron flux measurements at the present epithermal treatment facility (ETF) were made to verify and compare with the computed results where feasible. The calculations indicate that an epithermal neutron beam produced by a fission-plate converter could have an epithermal neutron intensity of 1.2 x 10(10) n/cm2.s and a fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10(-11) cGy.cm2/nepi plus being forward directed. This beam would be built into the beam shutter of the ETF at the BMRR. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed. PMID:7869995

  19. On The Deign And Construction Of A Radiation Shielding System For Development Of Neutron Beams Based On The Horizontal Channel No.2 Of Dalat Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimal structural system of filtered neutron beam and radiation shielding has been designed and calculated using the Monte-Carlo code MCNP5. The system was constructed and installed into the horizontal channel No. 2 of the Dalat reactor. The neutron beam is applied for experimental studies on nuclear physics, nuclear data measurements, and personal training. (author)

  20. Fracture behaviour of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data. (author) 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Reduction in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] fusion reaction rate by unbalanced beam injection and rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In TFTR plasmas at low to moderate density, the highest fusion energy gain Q/sub dd/ (D-D fusion power/injected power P/sub b/) is obtained with nearly balanced co- and counter-injection of neutral beams. For a given beam power, significantly unbalanced injection reduces Q/sub dd/ because the accompanying plasma rotation reduces the beam-target fusion reactivity, the fast-ion slowing-down time, and the beam-beam reaction rate, while and decrease from their maximum values. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. The fast neutron facility at the research reactor Munich. Determination of the beam quality and medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the research reactor FRM, fast and epithermal neutron beams are generated by a thermal-to-fast neutron converter and/or near core scatterers. The dosimetry and spectroscopy of the resulting intense mixed beams of neutron and gamma radiation with a wide range of energies set spetial tasks for neutron dosimetry and spectroscopy. The twin chamber method and some others are briefly described. Neutron spectroscopy is performed by a Li-6 sandwich spectrometer covering the full neutron spectrum of a well-collimated mixed beam from about 20 keV to 8 MeV. The data registration is assisted by a microcomputer which generates sum and triton spectra on-line. Sum analysis is applied to neutron energies greater than 0.3 MeV; the intermediate neutron spectrum is evaluated by unfolding of the triton spectrum. Moreover, a brief overview of the reactor neutron therapy (RENT) at the FRM is given. After a number of animal experiments for the determination of the biological effectiveness relative to X-rays, clinical irradiations have been started in 1985. The most important indications for RENT are listed. 140 patients with bad prognoses have been treated since. The average tumour control rate of 60% is surprisingly high. Possibilities for an assisting Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are shown. 8 figs., 23 refs

  3. Characterization and Application of the Thermal Neutron Radiography Beam in the Egyptian Second Experimental and Training Research Reactor (ETRR-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental, Training, Research Reactor (ETRR-2) is an open-pool multipurpose reactor (MPR) with a core power of 22 MWth cooled and moderated by light water and reflected with beryllium. It has four neutron beams and a thermal column as the main experimental devices. The neutron radiography facility unit utilizes one of the radial beam tubes. The track-etch technique using nitrocellulose films and converter screen is applied. In this work, the radial neutron beam for the thermal neutron radiography facility has been characterized and the following values were determined: thermal flux of 1.5 @ 107 π/cm2 s, πth/ ratio of 0.1@106π cm-2@ mR-1; a Cd ratio of 10.26, a resolution of 0.188 mm, and L/D ratio of 117.3. This characterization verifies the design parameters of the unit. Various radiographs were taken and results indicate that the neutron radiography facility of the ETRR-2 holds promising opportunities for nuclear as well as nonnuclear applications.

  4. SIPHORE: Conceptual Study of a High Efficiency Neutral Beam Injector Based on Photo-detachment for Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative high efficiency neutral beam injector concept for future fusion reactors is under investigation (simulation and R and D) between several laboratories in France, the goal being to perform a feasibility study for the neutralization of intense high energy (1 MeV) negative ion (NI) beams by photo-detachment.The objective of the proposed project is to put together the expertise of three leading groups in negative ion quantum physics, high power stabilized lasers and neutral beam injectors to perform studies of a new injector concept called SIPHORE (SIngle gap PHOto-neutralizer energy REcovery injector), based on the photo-detachment of negative ions and energy recovery of unneutralised ions; the main feature of SIPHORE being the relevance for the future Fusion reactors (DEMO), where high injector efficiency (up to 70-80%), technological simplicity and cost reduction are key issues to be addressed.The paper presents the on-going developments and simulations around this project, such as, a new concept of ion source which would fit with this injector topology and which could solve the remaining uniformity issue of the large size ion source, and, finally, the presentation of the R and D program in the laboratories (LAC, ARTEMIS) around the photo-neutralization for Siphore.

  5. Larger research programs at the beam holes of the Austrian TRIGA Mark II reactor. Design and construction of a Fourier chopper-selector at the Austrian TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron chopping system utilizing Fourier analysis has great advantages to alternative systems. For this purpose the chopper consists of a disc, opaque to neutrons, rotating on an axis perpendicular to its centre. Around its outside edge a series of uniformly spaced teeth and spaces are formed with neutron transparent gaps extending towards the centre. By using a stationary section having the same pattern of teeth and gaps it is possible to utilize a beam area considerably larger than the area of one tooth. During the last years at the TRIGA Reactor in Vienna a neutron chopping-and selecting-system is developed and in construction, which will not only chop the beam in that way necessary for Fourier analysis but also select the energy. The selection is done by seven discs of the form described above mounted on an axis. The selector is designed for neutron wave lengths between 3 and 30 A. The resolution is constant over the whole range of energy and depends on the beam divergence. Thus the modulation frequency is 104 sec-1 and the half-width of the neutron pulse about 50 μsec

  6. Behavior of exposed human lymphocytes to a neutron beam of the reactor TRIGA Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excessive exposure to ionizing radiation occurs in people who require radiation treatment, also in those for work can come to receive doses above the permitted levels. A third possibility of exposure is the release of radioactive material in which the general population is affected. Most of the time the exhibition is partial and only rarely occurs throughout the body. For various reasons, situations arise where it is impossible to determine by conventional physical methods, the amount of radiation you were exposed to the affected person and in these cases where the option to follow is the Biological Dosimetry, where the analysis of chromosomes dicentrics is used to estimate the dose of ionizing radiation exposure. A calibration curve is generated from in vitro analysis of dicentric chromosome, which are found in human lymphocytes, treated with different types and doses of radiation. The dicentric is formed from two lesions, one on each chromosome and their union results in a structure having two centromeres, acentric fragment with her for the union of several chromosomes leads to more complex structures as tri-centric s, tetra or penta-centric s, which have the same origin. The dose-response curve is estimated by observing the frequency of dicentrics and extrapolated to a dose-effect curve previously established, for which it is necessary that each lab has its own calibration curves, taking into account that for a Let low radiation, dose-effect curve follows a linear-quadratic model Y=C + αD + βD. The production of dicentric chromosomes with a high Let, was studied using a beam of neutrons generated in the reactor TRIGA Mark III with an average energy of 1 MeV, adjusting the linear model Y=αD. The dose-response relationship is established in blood samples from the same donor, the coefficient α of the dose-response is Y = (0.3692 ± 0.011 * D), also shows that saturation is reached in system 4 Gy. (Author)

  7. X-ray and pressure conditions on the first wall of a particle beam inertial confinement reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the presence of a chamber gas in a particle beam reactor cavity, nonneutron target debris created from thermonuclear burn will be modified or stopped before it reaches the first reactor wall. The resulting modified spectra and pulse lengths of the debris need to be calculated to determine first wall effects. Further, the cavity overpressure created by the momentum and energy exchange between the debris and gas must also be calculated to determine its effect. The purpose of this paper is to present results of the debris-background gas problem obtained with a one fluid, two temperature plasma hydrodynamic computer code model which includes multifrequency radiation transport. Spherical symmetry, ideal gas equation of state, and LTE for each radiation frequency group were assumed. The transport of debris ions was not included and all the debris energy was assumed to be in radiation. The calculated x-ray spectra and pulse lengths and the background overpressure are presented

  8. The use of beam neutron of TRIGA IPR-R1 (Mark 1) reactor for general applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, there are four devices in the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor at the CDTN for sample irradiation, but in these irradiators the mass and form of the sample are limited to the standardized dimensions of the irradiation receivers. Besides, the irradiation is made under, approximately, 5 meters of water, complicating the access. However, through an beam neutron extractor arrangement, it is possible to irradiate larger samples, in a local more accessible and with minimum interference of fast neutrons facilitating to measure neutronic parameters, to do crystals neutron diffraction, to obtain neutron radiographs, among other applications. This work presents results of the experimental Neutron Extractor arrangement in TRIGA reactor at CDTN. (author)

  9. Neutron spectrum measurements at a radial beam port of the NUR research reactor using a Bonner spheres spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazrou, H; Nedjar, A; Seguini, T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the measurement campaign held around the neutron radiography (NR) facility of the Algerian 1MW NUR research reactor. The main objective of this work is to characterize accurately the neutron beam provided at one of the radial channels of the NUR research reactor taking benefit of the acquired CRNA Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). The specific objective was to improve the image quality of the NR facility. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter combined with high density polyethylene spheres of different diameters ranging from 3 to 12in. This counting system has good gamma ray discrimination and is able to cover an energy range from thermal to 20MeV. The measurements were performed at the sample distance of 0.6m from the beam port and at a height of 1.2m from the facility floor. During the BSS measurements, the reactor was operating at low power (100W) to avoid large dead times, pulse pileup and high level radiation exposures, in particular, during spheres handling. Thereafter, the neutron spectrum at the sample position was unfolded by means of GRAVEL and MAXED computer codes. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, the total neutron flux, the mean energy and the Cadmium ratio (RCd) were provided. A sensitivity analysis was performed taking into account various defaults spectra and ultimately a different response functions in the unfolding procedure. Overall, from the obtained results it reveals, unexpectedly, that the measured neutron spectrum at the sample position of the neutron radiography of the NUR reactor is being harder with a predominance of fast neutrons (>100keV) by about 60%. Finally, those results were compared to previous and more recent measurements obtained by activation foils detectors. The agreement was fairly good highlighting thereby the consistency of our findings. PMID:27203706

  10. Control of power characteristics of ion flow in plasma-etching reactor based on beam-plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that on the basis of the earlier revealed effect of generating the ion flow in the beam-plasma discharge from the discharge axis, a plasma processing reactor can be created for low-energy etching of semiconductor structures. The possibility of easily controlling the density and energy of ion flow by means of varying the potential of the discharge collector is demonstrated. The charge compensation of the ion flow incident on the nonconducting surface is implemented using the modulation of the potential of the substrate holder as well as the plasma-potential modulation.

  11. Studies of the behavior of a reactor neutron beam at the sample position of a diffractometer using silicon monochromators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, F. U.; Ahsan, M. H.; Khan, Aysha A.; Kamal, I.; Awal, M. A.; Ahmad, A. A. Z.

    1992-02-01

    A computer program TISTA has been developed for calculation of different aspects of designing a double axis neutron spectrometer at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The mathematical algorithms used in this program are based on the formalisms used by Fischer, Sabine and Bacon. Angle and energy resolutions and flux density as functions of neutron wave length, beam collimation, crystal asymmetry and deviation from zero-Bragg-angle position for different silicon crystal planes (111, 220, 311) have been calculated.

  12. Final design of the neutral beam lines for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Final design of the neutral beam lines for TFTR has been completed. A prototype has been assembled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and is undergoing testing as part of the Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). The final neutral beam line (NBL) configuration differs in several details from that previously reported upon; certain components have been added; and testing of the cryopump system has led to some design simplification. It is these developments which are reported herein

  13. TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor] parameters with neutral beams at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The baseline neutral beam energy for TIBER II was chosen to be 500 keV consistent with the use of near term dc acceleration technology. Adequate penetration to the axis for core current drive in larger ETR devices requires higher beam energies. However, beam instabilities may limit the current drive efficiency at high energy to lower values than predicted classically. The characteristics of TIBER II and a device with 4.5 m major radius as functions of beam energy are presented. 11 refs

  14. Design, construction and installation of an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT at the High Flux Reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the formation in 1987, of both the European Collaboration group on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and the Petten BNCT group, steps were taken to design and implement an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT applications at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten. The installation would serve as a European facility, while once the modality of BNCT is proven would be the pathfinder for implementation of BNCT at other European nuclear sites. Due to its favorable nuclear and geometric characteristics, the beam tube HB11 was chosen as the candidate beam tube for BNCT applications. To reconfigure the beam tube to produce the required epithermal neutrons, it was first necessary to remove the existing mirror system and then to install the appropriate filter materials. Due to the fixed operating schedule of the HFR, with only one long shut-down period per year during the summer weeks for maintenance and upgrading actions, installation of the new facility was planned for the summer stop period in 1990

  15. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R.S. [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  16. On the utilization of neutron beams of research reactors in research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research reactors are the most widely available neutron sources, and they are capable of producing very high fluxes of neutrons having a considerable range of energies, from a few MeV to 10 MeV. Therefore, these neutrons can be used in many fields of basic research and for applications in physics, chemistry, medicine, biology, etc. Experiments with research reactors over the last 50 years have laid the foundations of today's nuclear technology. In addition, research reactors continue to be utilized as facilities for testing materials and in training manpower for nuclear programs, because basic training on a research reactor provides an essential understanding of the nuclear process, and personnel become accustomed to work under the special conditions resulting from irradiation and contamination risks

  17. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the verification survey was to obtain evidence by means of measurements and sampling to confirm that the final radiological conditions meet the established cleanup goals. This objective was achieved via multiple verification components including document reviews, instrument scans, and sample analysis to determine the accuracy and adequacy of FSS documentation. During the period between August 18 to 25 and September 24 to 29, 2010, ORISE conducted measurements and sampling of the HFBR 'Outside Areas' at the BNL site. ORISE performed gamma walkover scans in all eight SUs with SUs 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8 receiving high density scans of accessible areas. The remainder of SUs received low density scans. While scanning, ORISE team members observed a significant spike in count rate activity in SU 8. Just as quickly as the count rate increased the count rate decreased. A previous pass in the area did not identify any activity associated with soil contamination. The team determined that both detector instrument electronics functioned normally, and that the increased activity was due to a site activity. All individual sample concentrations and corresponding mean concentrations evaluated were determined to be below the established cleanup goal. A review of the data collected by ORISE has not identified any areas of contamination exceeding cleanup goals.

  18. IBR-2 reactor power start-up and first physical experiments on its beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design is described of the IBR-2 pulse fast reactor designated for investigations into nuclear physics, condensed medium physics, molecular biology, elementary particle physics (fundamental properties of the neutron) as well as for solving various applied problems. The IBR-2 core is loaded with plutonium dioxide fuel of about 90 kg total mass. The fuel elements are sodium, cooled with a 300 deg C inlet temperature. The cooling system is two-circuit, two-loop with the 100 m3/h sodium flow rate. The reactor is surrounded by water neutron moderators which are ''scanned'' by 14 horizontal channels. The power pulse is formed by the reactivity modulator in the form of two coaxially positioned mobile neutron reflectors - the basic one (BR) and additional one (AR). The BR rotation frequency equals 1500 min-1. The pulse frequency is varied discretely by the AR, being at rest or rotating at a lower rate. In 1982 the IBR-2 attained the average power 2 MW at a BR rotation frequency equal to 1500 mm-1 and a pulse frequency equal to 25 Hz, which corresponds to pulse reactor power of 270 MW. The reactor main frequency mode 5 Hz at 2 MW power was realized in 1984, the reactor peak power achieved 1350 MW. Results of first physical studies conducted during the reactor power start-up are presented

  19. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e+-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e+-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  20. Albedo neutron dosimetry and monitoring around the RECH-1 reactor neutron radiographic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the neutrons and gamma monitoring and albedo neutron dosimetry in a field around the RECH-1 neutron beam. Two kind of albedo dosimeters were used: Hankins and KfK Alnor. The calibration procedures and comparison of these albedo dosimeters performance were done. The dose equivalent results agree between 28%. The neutron dose distribution for person working near the beam, was obtained by routine monitoring with albedo dosimeter developed by Hankins. A monthly neutron dose with a maximum of 0,8 mSv and arithmetic mean of 0,4 mSv were found. The beam's gamma energy spectrum and its related dose were also studied. (author)

  1. Dose measurements and calculations in the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam at BMRR were measured, calculated, and reported by R.G. Fairchild. This beam has already been used for animal irradiations. The authors anticipate that it will be used for clinical trials. Thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities distributions, and dose rate distributions, as a function of depth were measured in a lucite dog-head phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed and compared with the measured values

  2. Extracted neutron beams experimental facilities and program of the first experiments at the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural specific features of the IBR-2 pulse research biological hidered reactor. The characteristics of spectrometer for investigating the small angle neutron scattering and the CORA facility intended for investigating the structure and dynamics of condensed media by means of the therrol neutron scattering as well as the DN-2 diffractometer for investigating the atomic structure and crystallographic characteristics of monocrystals, having large (>10 A) elementary cell size and the equipment of the ultracold neutron channel are given. Biological shields of the reactor and experimental facilities are assembled of concrete blocks and standard building constructions and attains in the most dangerous regions 1 m. The shield ensures for the personnel a safety level of ionizing radiations and effectively shields the facilities from mutual effects caused by scattered radiation. The program of physical investigations planned at the IBR-2 continues the investigations started at the IBR-30 reactor

  3. The Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Spectra for Nuclear Data Measurements on Filtered Neutron Beams at Dalat Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron filter technique was applied for extracting quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the horizontal neutron channel No. 4 of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. Neutron spectra of 24 keV, 54 keV, 59 keV, 133 keV and 148 keV have been simulated by MCNP code and measured based a gas-filled proton-recoil spectrometer. The total neutron cross sections for 12C and 238U and capture cross sections for 185Re and 187Re have been measured on those filtered neutron beams. The obtained results are in good agreement with the evaluated data of ENDF/BVII.0 and previous measurement values. (author)

  4. A composite beam element for the structural analysis of magnet pancakes for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A composite beam element for D-shaped or ring-shaped super-conducting coils developed by the authors is briefly described. It was applied to several test cases to show its performance. The coils are made up of the parallel conductors bonded with glass fiber-reinforced, vacuum/pressure impregnated epoxy resin. Each conductor itself is composed of a stainless steel jacket containing a bundle of superconductors. The finite element developed is explained. The stiffness matrix of the conductor was derived by using exponential shape functions which are equivalent to the Hermitian polynomials in ordinary beam theory. The stiffness matrix for a winding pack was obtained by assembling the conductor stiffness matrices. The use of the superconductors with strand transposition can be taken into account in the assembling procedure. The conductor beam stiffness matrix, shape functions, stiffness coefficients, the winding pack stiffness matrix, and a number of the numerical applications carried out for the comparison with the laboratory tests on circular coils and straight beams are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Electron beam welding and laser welding of control rods for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical and economical comparison of electron beam (6 KW-60 KV) and laser (400 W pulsed YAG) welding processes applied on a same fabrication. This fabrication concerns a nuclear core component, made of more than 220 pieces, jointed by more than a thousand welds

  6. Dosimetric measurements on beams of Soviet reactors IBR-2 and IBR-30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are summed up of dosimetric experiments made by Czechoslovak specialists on pulsed reactors IBR-2 and IBR-30 at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research in Dubna. In the experiments, thermoluminescent detectors were used in form of LiF and 7LiF tablets of French make as well as silicon diodes of Czechoslovak make. Irradiation took place in the longest channel (no.6) of the IBR-30 reactor and in the biological channel (no.11) of the IBR-2 reactor. The values were determined of tissue kerma from neutrons and gamma radiation for 8 types of neutron spectra developed by various combinations of filters in channel no.11. In channel no.6 silicon diodes were used to determine the depth distribution in a phantom of tissue kerma from neutrons. The experiments confirmed the suitability of using the dosimetric combination of thermoluminescent detector and silicon diode for determining tissue kerma from the two components in a mixed radiation field of neutrons and gamma radiation. Good agreement was achieved of measured values with data obtained in previous experiments with ionization chambers. (Z.M.)

  7. Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Determination and validation of prompt k0-factors with a monochromatic neutron beam at the Dhruva reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, A. G. C.; Acharya, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Tripathi, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Goswami, A.

    2006-08-01

    Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) was carried out using a reflected neutron beam of 0.018 eV energy at the Dhruva research reactor, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. The neutron beam characteristics, such as dimension, homogeneity and thermal equivalent flux were evaluated. The prompt k0-factors of about 15 elements were determined versus the 1951.1 keV gamma-ray of the 35Cl(n,γ) reaction. These prompt k0-factors are compared with the recommended k0-values for thermal neutrons and were found to be in good agreement, except for Gd, Cd and Hg. The internal mono-standard method was applied to analyze a meteorite and a stainless steel alloy (SS 316 M) using the recommended k0-values from the literature. As to the alloy, the measured concentrations were in good agreement with the nominal composition. For the meteorite sample, the concentrations of the major elements were in good agreement with the values determined using conventional neutron activation analysis.

  9. Adapting the reactors Melusine and Siloe to the needs of basic research on exit beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report shows how CENG swimming pools can be adapted to meet developing needs of basic research on exit beams. The experimental facilities offered are: two radial channels on Siloe and three radial and two tangential channels on Melusine. The use of various channels is outlined and modifications made to the channels described. Improvements involved the socks, protective shielding systems and collimator plugs and at Melusine, the installation of a heavy water tank. Some future trends are outlined

  10. Fuel ion ratio measurements in reactor relevant neutral beam heated fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C; Eriksson, J; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Skiba, M; Weiszflog, M

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method to derive n(t)/n(d) using the ratio of the thermonuclear neutron emission to the beam-target neutron emission. We apply it to neutron spectroscopy data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer taken during the deuterium tritium experiment at JET. n(t)/n(d)-values obtained using neutron spectroscopy are in qualitative agreement with those from other diagnostics measuring the isotopic composition of the exhaust in the divertor. PMID:23130799

  11. Electron beam welding application to sodium valve fabrication of Superphenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EB process has been used to assemble the welded-in seat rings of AISI 316 L valve bodies for the sodium secondary circuit of Superphenix reactor (BOUVIER DARLING valves). The requirements in respect of accuracy and reliability are very stringent for these high temperature service components. (5500C). The weldability studies, the welding, welding repair and control qualifications are presented. 126 valve bodies have been welded and controled. The EB process and the shielded metal arc process are compared in respect of preparation of the parts to be joined, welding and control time, reliability

  12. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouardi, A., E-mail: ouardi@cnesten.org.ma [Centre National de l' Energie, des Science et des Techniques Nucleaire, B.P. 1382 R.P. 10001 (Morocco); Machmach, A. [Physics Department, University Hassan II faculte des Science of Ain Chock, Casablanca 5366 (Morocco); Alami, R.; Bensitel, A. [Centre National de l' Energie, des Science et des Techniques Nucleaire, B.P. 1382 R.P. 10001 (Morocco); Hommada, A. [Physics Department, University Hassan II faculte des Science of Ain Chock, Casablanca 5366 (Morocco)

    2011-09-21

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 ; de Menezes et al., 2003 ; Deinert et al., 2005 ). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3x10{sup 11} ncm{sup 2}/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( (http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html)). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4

  13. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 ; de Menezes et al., 2003 ; Deinert et al., 2005 ). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3x1011 ncm2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( (http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html)). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al2O3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al2O3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to define the design

  14. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouardi, A.; Machmach, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A.; Hommada, A.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 [1]; de Menezes et al., 2003 [2]; Deinert et al., 2005 [3]). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3×10 11 ncm 2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html[4]). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to

  15. Fan analyzer of neutron beam polarization on REMUR spectrometer at IBR-2 pulsed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, Yu. V.; Ul'yanov, V. A.; Pusenkov, V. M.; Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Jernenkov, K. N.; Pleshanov, N. K.; Peskov, B. G.; Petrenko, A. V.; Proglyado, V. V.; Syromyatnikov, V. G.; Schebetov, A. F.

    2006-08-01

    The new spectrometer of polarized neutrons REMUR has been created and put in operation in the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna). The spectrometer is dedicated to investigations of multiplayer structures and surfaces by registering the reflection of polarized neutrons and of the inhomogeneous state of solid matter by measuring the small-angle scattering of polarized neutrons. The spectrometer's working range of neutron wavelengths is 1.5-10 Å. The spectrometer is equipped with a linear position-sensitive detector and a focused supermirror polarization analyzer (fan-like polarization analyzer) with a solid angle of neutron detection of 2.2×10 -4 rad. This article describes the design and the principle of operation of the fan analyzer of neutron polarization together with the results of its tests on a polarized neutron beam.

  16. Collisional mechanisms in D- beam sources for MFE experiments and reactors. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially, this work was directed toward predicting the angular scattering in D- beams produced from D+ charge-transfer in alkali targets. However, the work has now been redirected to provide information on the mechanisms that govern the behavior of direct extraction D- ion sources, with immediate emphasis on the very promising Ehlers-Leung source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The controlling mechanisms in these sources and some aspects of their behavior are only vaguely understood, and this work is intended to answer many of these questions. Included in these are problems related to both the surface production of negative ions and electrons, as well as processes within the source plasma region that determine the characteristics of the ions and neutrals that bombard the converter surface

  17. Neutron beam experiments using nuclear research reactors: honoring the retirement of professor Bernard W. Wehring -I. 3. A Comparison of Neutron Beams for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the potential of the Ohio State University (OSU) Research Reactor (OSURR) with a fission convertor plate (FCP) for clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The evaluation uses design methods that were developed for the analysis of the OSU design of an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT (hereafter called the OSU-ABNS); namely, the in-phantom neutron field assessment parameters, the treatment time (T) and the high-LET absorbed-dose to the tumor (DTumor), were calculated using MCNP. The paper compares an FCP epithermal neutron beam, which is based on the OSURR (hereafter called the OSURR-FCP) with the OSU-ABNS. For completeness, the comparison includes an alternative ABNS design, which was taken from the literature (hereafter called the 7LiF-Al2O3 ABNS), and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal neutron beam for BNCT (hereafter called the BMRR-ENB). The OSURR-FCP design consists of the OSURR, a fission plate, and a moderator/filter assembly. These components were modeled in MCNP. The OSURR is a 500-kW pool-type light water-cooled and moderated reactor that is reflected on two sides with graphite and uses a U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel. The fission plate and moderator/filter assembly, which were modeled, were identical to those specified by Liu. The goal of our analysis was not to perfect an FCP and moderator/filter assembly for the OSURR-FCP. Rather, the intent of our analysis was to determine if, using the FCP and moderator/filter assembly designed by Liu, the OSURR, operating at 100% power, could produce a beam of sufficient intensity to treat human patients with BNCT in a reasonable treatment time. T is the total time required for a BNCT treatment, including all treatment fractions. Since the total dose delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue, T is defined as the time required to escalate the normal tissue RBE-dose to the tolerance of the normal brain. DTumor is the

  18. Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately

  19. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilan, N.; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  20. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilan, N., E-mail: nicola.pilan@igi.cnr.it; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E. [Consorzio RFX—Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF{sub 6} instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  1. Progress of Filtered Neutron Beams Development and Applications at the Horizontal Channels No.2 and No.4 of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron filter technique has been applied to create mono-energetic neutron beams with high intensity, at the horizontal channels No.2 and No.4 of the Dalat nuclear research reactor. The mono-energetic neutron beams that have been developed for researches and applications are thermal (0.025 eV), 24 keV, 54 keV, 59 keV, 133 keV and 148 keV. The relative intensities of main peak in filtered neutron energy spectra and the collimated neutron fluxes at the sample irradiation positions are 90 - 96% and 2.8×105 - 7.8×106 n/cm2.s, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations and transmission calculations were performed to each neutron energy beam for optimal design of geometrical structure and neutron filter materials. These filtered neutron beams have been applied efficiently for experimental researches on neutron total and capture cross sections measurements, and elemental analysis in various kinds of samples based on the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis method. This paper reviews the progress of filtered neutron beams development and its applications for past many years at the Dalat nuclear research reactor. (author)

  2. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming

  3. Impact property at cryogenic temperature of candidate materials for fusion reactor and their electron beam welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impact properties at cryogenic temperature of candidate materials for fusion reactor and their electron beam welded joints are investigated by using instrumented Charpy impact testing apparatus. Material used are aluminum alloys (A7N01, A5083, A6061), JFMS (Japanese Ferritic Martensitic Steel) and two kinds of high manganese steels. Although JFMS is a steel for high temperature use, the impact test is conducted at low temperature same as the cases of the other materials. Testing results are obtained as follows. 1. Base metals and welded joint of aluminum alloys exhibit high absorbed energy at low temperature. Ductility of each base metal and welded joint gradually decreases with decreasing of testing temperature. 2. Base metal and welded joint of JFMS exhibit an absorbed energy transition temperature at near a room temperature. 3. Base metal and welded joint of high manganese steel A-T (18Mn) exhibit abrupt decreasing of absorbed energy at 77K, but base metal and welded joint of high manganese steel B-T (22Mn-0.2N) exhibit gradual increasing of maximum strength and decreasing of ductility with decreasing of testing temperature. (author)

  4. Investigations of Interaction of Laser Radiation and Plasma Beams with Materials of Reactor Chamber for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the project was to experimentally analyze some the processes which take place during the interaction of laser radiation and plasma beams with the materials of reactor chamber for the Inertial Confinement Fusion. First, we studied the effect of target nature on the laser ablation process and on the properties of laser-generated plasma ions. As an example we considered porous targets having different densities and showed how the charge state, the energy and the intensity of the plasma ions depend on the target density. We also studied the effect of laser frequency on the properties of plasma ions generated at the surface of such porous targets. We considered possibilities of controlling the intensity and the energy of the ions by changing the frequency of the laser and the density of the target because of the change in laser ablation process. Then we investigated the changes in the properties of laser-produced plasma ions after the ablation process, during the plasma expansion, due to the mutual interaction between the ions of different mass. For this purpose we studied two- element plasma ions generated from (Sc2O3, Ce2O3, Lu2O3) targets. Experiments have shown that structural defects caused by the neutron irradiation, influence not only on the efficiency of the process of material evaporation and emission of plasma, but also on the ionization and recombination processes taking place at the initial stage of the plasma formation and expansion. (author)

  5. 235U Determination using In-Beam Delayed Neutron Counting Technique at the NRU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bentoumi, G. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories; Corcoran, E. C. [Royal Military College of Canada; Dimayuga, I. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories; Kelly, D. G. [Royal Military College of Canada; Li, L. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories; Sur, B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories; Rogge, R. B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories

    2015-11-17

    This paper describes a collaborative effort that saw the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC)’s delayed neutron and gamma counting apparatus transported to Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) for use in the neutron beamline at the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. Samples containing mg quantities of fissile material were re-interrogated, and their delayed neutron emissions measured. This collaboration offers significant advantages to previous delayed neutron research at both CNL and RMC. This paper details the determination of 235U content in enriched uranium via the assay of in-beam delayed neutron magnitudes and temporal behavior. 235U mass was determined with an average absolute error of ± 2.7 %. This error is lower than that obtained at RMCC for the assay of 235U content in aqueous solutions (3.6 %) using delayed neutron counting. Delayed neutron counting has been demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate, and precise method for special nuclear material detection and identification.

  6. Combined reactor neutron beam and {sup 60}Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Chen, Wei; Sheng, Jiangkun; Liu, Yan; Xiao, Zhigang; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710024 China (China)

    2015-02-15

    The combined reactor neutron beam and {sup 60}Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID) level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si)/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence). One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence), and then exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si)/s. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), and the noise (V{sub N}) versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage.

  7. Combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zujun Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS active pixel sensors (APS have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID level of 200 krad(Si at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence. One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence, and then exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si/s. The mean dark signal (KD, the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU, and the noise (VN versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage.

  8. Combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID) level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si)/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence). One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence), and then exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si)/s. The mean dark signal (KD), the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), and the noise (VN) versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage

  9. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Dundar

    This study is for modeling and designing a new reactor core-moderator assembly and new neutron beam ports that aimed to expand utilization of a new beam hall of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is a part of the Radiation Science and Engineering Facility (RSEC) and is a TRIGA MARK III type research reactor with a movable core placed in a large pool and is capable to produce 1MW output. This reactor is a pool-type reactor with pulsing capability up to 2000 MW for 10-20 msec. There are seven beam ports currently installed to the reactor. The PSBR's existing core design limits the experimental capability of the facility, as only two of the seven available neutron beam ports are usable. The finalized design features an optimized result in light of the data obtained from neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses as well as geometrical constraints. A new core-moderator assembly was introduced to overcome the limitations of the existing PSBR design, specifically maximizing number of available neutron beam ports and mitigating the hydrogen gamma contamination of the neutron beam channeled in the beam ports. A crescent-shaped moderator is favored in the new PSBR design since it enables simultaneous use of five new neutron beam ports in the facility. Furthermore, the crescent shape sanctions a coupling of the core and moderator, which reduces the hydrogen gamma contamination significantly in the new beam ports. A coupled MURE and MCNP5 code optimization analysis was performed to calculate the optimum design parameters for the new PSBR. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of the new design was achieved using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. In the current form, the PSBR is cooled by natural convection of the pool water. The driving force for the natural circulation of the fluid is the heat generation within the fuel rods. The convective heat data was generated at the reactor's different operating powers by using TRIGSIMS, the fuel management code of the PSBR core. In the CFD

  11. The role of the neutral beam fueling profile in the performance of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and other tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalings for the stored energy and neutron yield, determined from experimental data are applied to both deuterium-only and deuterium-tritium plasmas in different neutral beam heated operational domains in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The domain of the data considered includes the Supershot, High poloidal beta, Low-mode, and limiter High-mode operational regimes, as well as discharges with a reversed magnetic shear configuration. The new important parameter in the present scaling is the peakedness of the heating beam fueling profile shape. Ion energy confinement and neutron production are relatively insensitive to other plasma parameters compared to the beam fueling peakedness parameter and the heating beam power when considering plasmas that are stable to magnetohydrodynamic modes. However, the stored energy of the electrons is independent of the beam fueling peakedness. The implication of the scalings based on this parameter is related to theoretical transport models such as radial electric field shear and Ion Temperature Gradient marginality models. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks

  12. Modification of NUR II neutron beam profile of MINT TRIGA MARK II research reactor for digital neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cone neutron beam collimated by a 5.4 cm aperture produced in the Neutron Radiography II (NUR II) via a step divergence collimator had to be modified to fulfill 5 cm x 6 cm dimension of the scintillation screen placed in the charge couple device (ccd) camera. The required convergence neutron beam was obtained by a simple collimator-beam plug plugged in front of the NUR II beam port. The calculations involved in designing the collimator-beam plug had to take into account not only the neutron beam profiling but also the neutron and gamma shielding and are discussed in this article. (Author)

  13. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: Radiography and materials characterization. Report of a technical committee held in Vienna, 4-7 May 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report is the result of the Technical Committee meeting held during 4-7 May 1993 in Vienna, Austria, and includes contributions from the participants. The Physics Section of the Department of Research and Isotopes was responsible for the co-ordination and compilation of the report. The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing their research programmes and industrial applications for neutron radiology, related neutron inspection and analytical techniques and neutron beam irradiation. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Calculation of the dose distribution of reactor for technology of flue gas desulfurization and denitrification by irradiation of electron beam using EGSnrcMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the simulations of dose distribution of reactor for technology of flue gas desulfurization and denitrification by irradiation of electron beam are carried out using EGSnrcMP Monte-Carlo program. The simulated results are carefully analyzed by utilizing MATLAB. It is shown that a good agreement is reached by comparing the calculated results with experiment data from the literatures. Thus EGSnrcMP program will be a powerful simulation tools to the design and appraisement for dealing with the similar problem. (authors)

  15. Optimization of a moderator-neutron guide system for diffractometers of beam line 7A of the IBR-2M reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoshin, S. A.; Belushkin, A. V.; Kulikov, S. A.; Shabalin, E. P.; Walther, K.; Scheffzuek, C.; Zhuravlev, V. V.

    2009-09-01

    Neutron guides are widely used to transport the neutrons from the moderator to the sample. Due to the constructive features of the ring corridor of the fast pulsed reactor IBR-2, the minimal distance between the moderator and the guide entrance is around 6 m. The main goal of the paper is to optimize the neutron optical system between the moderator and the entrance of the new neutron guides. Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate the possible best gain of the neutron flux density at the guide exit. After the described optimization process, the optimal system is obtained. The recommendations for construction of the new beam line are provided too. Similar technique and the proposed system could be easily adapted for another similar beam line at the neutron sources.

  16. Extraction of pure thermal neutron beam for the proposed PGNAA facility at the TRIGA research reactor of AERE, Savar, Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, S. (Physics Dept., Jahangirnagar Univ., Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)); Zaman, M.A. (Physics Dept., Jahangirnagar Univ., Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)); Islam, S.M.A. (Physics Dept., Jahangirnagar Univ., Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)); Ahsan, M.H. (Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology (INST), AERE, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh))

    1993-10-01

    A study on collimators and filters for the design of a spectrometer for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) at one of the radial beamports of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at AERE, Savar has been carried out. On the basis of this study a collimator and a filter have been designed for the proposed PGNAA facility. Calculations have been done for measuring neutron flux at various positions of the core of the reactor using the computer code TRIGAP. Gamma dose in the core of the reactor has also been measured experimentally using TLD technique in the present work. (orig.)

  17. Extraction of pure thermal neutron beam for the proposed PGNAA facility at the TRIGA research reactor of AERE, Savar, Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on collimators and filters for the design of a spectrometer for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) at one of the radial beamports of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at AERE, Savar has been carried out. On the basis of this study a collimator and a filter have been designed for the proposed PGNAA facility. Calculations have been done for measuring neutron flux at various positions of the core of the reactor using the computer code TRIGAP. Gamma dose in the core of the reactor has also been measured experimentally using TLD technique in the present work. (orig.)

  18. Extraction of pure thermal neutron beam for the proposed PGNAA facility at the TRIGA research reactor of AERE, Savar, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sabina; Zaman, M. A.; Islam, S. M. A.; Ahsan, M. H.

    1993-10-01

    A study on collimators and filters for the design of a spectrometer for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) at one of the radial beamports of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at AERE, Savar has been carried out. On the basis of this study a collimator and a filter have been designed for the proposed PGNAA facility. Calculations have been done for measuring neutron flux at various positions of the core of the reactor using the computer code TRIGAP. Gamma dose in the core of the reactor has also been measured experimentally using TLD technique in the present work.

  19. Corrosion Induced Leakage Problem of the Radial Beam Port 1 of BAEC Triga Mark-II Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BAEC reactor has so far been operated as per the technical specifications and procedures laid down in the SAR of the research reactor. The BP leakage problem of the BAEC research reactor was an issue that could lead to a situation close to a LOCA. Therefore, the matter was handled carefully, taking all measures so that such an incident could be prevented. Assistance of agencies outside BAEC was taken for solving the problem. It is understood that the silicone rubber lining of the encirclement clamp may become damaged by neutron irradiation. Therefore, while designing the clamp, provisions were kept such that it can be dismantled and reinstalled again following lining replacement. As a moderately aged facility, the ageing management BAEC TRIGA research reactor deserves significant attention. BAEC, together with its strategic partners, are doing what is needed in this regard

  20. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leplat, N; Rossi, M J

    2013-11-01

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300-630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C4H10 at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10(11) and 5.0 × 10(11) molecule s(-1) cm(-3) of C2H5(●) (ethyl) and t-C4H9(●) (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K. PMID:24289411

  1. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300–630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C4H10 at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 1011 and 5.0 × 1011 molecule s−1 cm−3 of C2H5• (ethyl) and t-C4H9• (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K

  2. Feasibility study of an optical resonator for applications in neutral-beam injection systems for the next generation of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of a larger project called SIPHORE (Single gap Photo-neutralizer energy Recovery injector), which aims to enhance the overall efficiency of one of the mechanisms through which the plasma is heated, in a nuclear fusion reactor, i.e. the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system. An important component of a NBI system is the neutralizer of high energetic ion beams. SIPHORE proposes to substitute the gas cell neutralizer, used in the current NBI systems, with a photo-neutralizer exploiting the photo-detachment process within Fabry Perot cavities. This mechanism should allow a relevant NBI global efficiency of η≥ 60%, significantly higher than the one currently possible (η≤25% for ITER). The present work concerns the feasibility study of an optical cavity with suitable properties for applications in NBI systems. Within this context, the issue of the determination of an appropriated optical cavity design has been firstly considered and the theoretical and experimental analysis of a particular optical resonator has been carried on. The problems associated with the high levels of intracavity optical power (∼3 MW) required for an adequate photo-neutralization rate have then been faced. In this respect, we addressed both the problem of the thermal effects on the cavity mirrors due to their absorption of intra-cavity optical power (∼1 W) and the one associated to the necessity of a high powerful input laser beam (∼1 kW) to feed the optical resonator. (author)

  3. Study on neutron capture cross sections using the filtered neutron beams of 55 keV and 144 keV at the Dalat reactor and related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this fundamental research project on nuclear physics in period of 2007, the neutron capture cross sections for the reactions of 146Nd (n,γ) 147Nd, 148Nd (n,γ) 149Nd, 150Nd (n,γ) 151Nd, 154Sm(n,γ) 155Sm, 181Ta (n,γ) 182Ta and total neutron cross section of 181Ta have been measured at the filtered neutron beams of 54 keV and 148 keV of the Dalat nuclear research reactor. The present results were compared with the previous measurements from EXFOR-2003, and the evaluated values of JENDL 3.3 and ENDF/B-6.8. Beside that development computer codes for exact analysis of the buildup and decay of fission products for time following a fission burst, for determination of correction parameters to improve the accuracy in measurements of the neutron capture cross-section on filtered neutron beams and for determination of characteristic parameters of monoenergetic neutron beams were also carried out. (author)

  4. Assessment of the relative biological effectiveness of LVR-15 nuclear reactor neutron beam by a simple animal model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Vladislav; Burian, J.; Prokeš, K.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 78, - (2002), s. 5-19. ISSN 1212-3137 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC6473; GA MPO FD-K/048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : effectiveness of LVR-15 nuclear reactor * body irradiation * animal model Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  5. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H- accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  6. Biological efficiency of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor mixed neutron beam estimated from gene mutations in Tradescantia stamen hair cells assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low energy neutrons for the induction of various abnormalities in Tradescantia stamen hair mutation (Trad-SH) assay was studied using two clones (T-4430 and T-02), heterozygous for flower color. Dose response relationship for gene mutations induced in somatic cells of Trad-SH were investigated after irradiation with a mixed neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), currently used in a clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma. To establish the RBE of the BMRR beam in the induction of various biological end-points in Tradescantia, irradiation with various doses of γ-rays was also performed. After irradiation all plants were cultivated several days at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), then transported to Poland for screening the biological end-points. Due to the post-exposure treatment, all plants showed high levels of lethal events and alteration of the cell cycle. Plants of clone 4430 were more reactive to post-treatment conditions, resulting in decreased blooming efficiency that affected the statistics. Slope coefficients estimated from the dose response curves for gene mutation frequencies allowed the evaluation of ranges for the maximal RBE values of the applied beam vs. γ rays as 6.0 and 5.4 for the cells of T-02 and T-4430, respectively. Estimated fraction of doses from neutrons and corresponding biological effects for the clones T-02 and T-4430 allowed to evaluate the RBE values for neutrons part in the beam as 32.3 and 45.4, respectively. (author)

  7. Particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor with a beam-down solar concentrating optics: 30-kWth performance test using a big sun-simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Cho, Hyun Seok; Matsubara, Koji; Etori, Tetsuro; Takeuchi, Akane; Yokota, Shin-nosuke; Ito, Sumie

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept of particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor with a beam-down solar concentrating optics was performed using a 30-kWth window type receiver by a big sun-simulator. A fluidized bed of quartz sand particles was created by passing air from the bottom distributor of the receiver, and about 30 kWth of high flux visible light from 19 xenon-arc lamps of the sun-simulator was directly irradiated on the top of the fluidized bed in the receiver through a quartz window. The particle bed temperature at the center position of the fluidized bed went up to a temperature range from 1050 to 1200°C by the visible light irradiation with the average heat flux of about 950 kW/m2, depending on the air flow rate. The output air temperature from the receiver reached 1000 - 1060°C.

  8. Evaluation of apoptosis and micronucleation induced by reactor neutron beams with two different cadmium ratios in total and quiescent cell populations within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Response of quiescent (Q) and total tumor cells in solid tumors to reactor neutron beam irradiation with two different cadmium (Cd) ratios was examined in terms of micronucleus (MN) frequency and apoptosis frequency, using four different tumor cell lines. Methods and Materials: C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors, C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII or FM3A tumors, and Balb/c mice bearing EMT6/KU tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously for 5 days via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Thirty min after i.p. injection of sodium borocaptate-10B (BSH), or 3 h after oral administration of p-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutron beams. The tumors without 10B-compound administration were irradiated with neutron beams or γ-rays. This neutron beam irradiation was performed using neutrons with two different Cd ratios. The tumors were then excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the MN frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, for apoptosis assay, 6 h after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were fixed, and the apoptosis frequency in Q cells was also determined with immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN and apoptosis frequencies in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Results: Without 10B-compounds, the sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was reduced by neutron beam irradiation. Under our particular neutron beam irradiation condition, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons was larger in Q cells than in total cells, and the RBE values were larger for low Cd-ratio than high Cd-ratio neutrons. With 10B-compounds, both frequencies were increased for each cell population, especially for total cells. BPA

  9. The Design of a Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Beam for BNCT Purpose at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, S.; Bazani, A.; Ballarini, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Section of Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    In preclinical and clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy studies the knowledge of the amount of {sup 10}B in blood and tissues is very important. The boron concentration measurements method used in Pavia (Italy) is based on the charged particles spectrometry of thin tissue cuts irradiated in the Thermal Column of the TRIGA reactor of the University. In order to perform measurements in biological liquids such as blood and urine, or in other tissue that cannot be cut in slices, a Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility is being designed, which measures {sup 10}B concentration detecting the prompt gamma from boron nuclear capture reaction. At the TRIGA reactor in Pavia, there are four horizontal channels, potentially available for PGNAA. The choice of the suitable channel, and the design of its configuration, were achieved using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP4c2. To perform the simulations, an input code already validated, describing the reactor structure and the neutron source, was used. The calculations were implemented applying non-analog techniques for the neutron transport, that are necessary to obtain a sufficient statistic in every positions along the channel and especially at its end. The selection of the channel for PGNAA installation was carried out by comparing the simulated fluxes obtained in the different channels at the present configuration. The channel shielded by the core reflector was chosen, because the graphite lowers the fast component of the neutrons, with no need to insert additional material in the facility. The thermal flux at its end is 1.7 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} s with thermal-to-total neutron flux ratio around 0.8. Subsequently a bismuth block for gamma radiation shielding and blocks of single crystal sapphire as filter for fast neutron component were inserted in the channel. Other components of the facility that are under study are a collimator and the beam catcher. (author)

  10. Note: Ion-induced secondary electron emission from oxidized metal surfaces measured in a particle beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcak, Adrian; Corbella, Carles, E-mail: carles.corbella@rub.de; Keudell, Achim von [Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Arcos, Teresa de los [Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, Paderborn University, 33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The secondary electron emission of metals induced by slow ions is characterized in a beam chamber by means of two coaxial semi-cylindrical electrodes with different apertures. The voltages of the outer electrode (screening), inner electrode (collector), and sample holder (target) were set independently in order to measure the effective yield of potential and kinetic electron emissions during ion bombardment. Aluminum samples were exposed to quantified beams of argon ions up to 2000 eV and to oxygen atoms and molecules in order to mimic the plasma-surface interactions on metallic targets during reactive sputtering. The variation of electron emission yield was correlated to the ion energy and to the oxidation state of Al surfaces. This system provides reliable measurements of the electron yields in real time and is of great utility to explore the fundamental surface processes during target poisoning occurring in reactive magnetron sputtering applications.

  11. Note: Ion-induced secondary electron emission from oxidized metal surfaces measured in a particle beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The secondary electron emission of metals induced by slow ions is characterized in a beam chamber by means of two coaxial semi-cylindrical electrodes with different apertures. The voltages of the outer electrode (screening), inner electrode (collector), and sample holder (target) were set independently in order to measure the effective yield of potential and kinetic electron emissions during ion bombardment. Aluminum samples were exposed to quantified beams of argon ions up to 2000 eV and to oxygen atoms and molecules in order to mimic the plasma-surface interactions on metallic targets during reactive sputtering. The variation of electron emission yield was correlated to the ion energy and to the oxidation state of Al surfaces. This system provides reliable measurements of the electron yields in real time and is of great utility to explore the fundamental surface processes during target poisoning occurring in reactive magnetron sputtering applications

  12. Note: Ion-induced secondary electron emission from oxidized metal surfaces measured in a particle beam reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcak, Adrian; Corbella, Carles; de los Arcos, Teresa; von Keudell, Achim

    2015-10-01

    The secondary electron emission of metals induced by slow ions is characterized in a beam chamber by means of two coaxial semi-cylindrical electrodes with different apertures. The voltages of the outer electrode (screening), inner electrode (collector), and sample holder (target) were set independently in order to measure the effective yield of potential and kinetic electron emissions during ion bombardment. Aluminum samples were exposed to quantified beams of argon ions up to 2000 eV and to oxygen atoms and molecules in order to mimic the plasma-surface interactions on metallic targets during reactive sputtering. The variation of electron emission yield was correlated to the ion energy and to the oxidation state of Al surfaces. This system provides reliable measurements of the electron yields in real time and is of great utility to explore the fundamental surface processes during target poisoning occurring in reactive magnetron sputtering applications.

  13. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 x 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform ''conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Neutral-beam-injection fueling for a small, D-3He burning, field-reversed-configuration reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttolph, Michael; Stotler, Daren; Cohen, Samuel

    2013-10-01

    Rocket propulsion powered by the D-3He fusion reaction in a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) has been proposed for a variety of solar-system missions. Two key unique features of this concept are a relatively small, 25-cm-radius, plasma core and a relatively thick (10 cm), dense (1e14 cm3), and cool (100 eV electron temperature) scrape-off layer (SOL). The SOL contains the heated propellant - likely hydrogen, deuterium or helium - and also fusion reaction products at a lower density (ca. 1e12 cm-3). A critical design question is the refueling of the fusion reactants. A moderate energy neutral-beam method is considered. It must be able to penetrate the SOL without significant losses but must be stopped in the core. DEGAS 2, a Monte-Carlo code designed to model neutral transport, was implemented to simulate beam-plasma interactions including ionization and charge exchange of the neutral beam's helium-3 and deuterium atoms by impact in the SOL and core plasma with thermal plasma constituents and fusion reaction products. Operational methods to alleviate the effects deleterious reactions such as deuterium charge-exchange in the SOL are described.

  15. Dose imaging in a thorax phantom with lung-equivalent volume at the epithermal neutron beam of LVR-15 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics, University of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy)], E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it; Vanossi, E. [Department of Energy, Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy); Bartesaghi, G. [Department of Physics, University of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Milan (Italy); Mariani, M. [Department of Energy, Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); Negri, A. [Department of Physics, University of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy); Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V.; Rejchrt, J. [Department of Reactor Physics, NRI Rez, plc (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-15

    A thorax phantom has been designed, consisting of PMMA and PE plates containing a cavity filled with a laboratory-made lung-substitute. Fricke-gel dosimeters have been placed in the lung-substitute volume, and the phantom has been irradiated at the epithermal column of LVR-15 reactor. Absorbed dose images have been obtained for both gamma radiation and charged particles emitted in the {sup 10}B reactions with thermal neutrons. Measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations have been performed too, in order to attain inter-comparison of results.

  16. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  17. Parameters measurement for the thermal neutron beam in the thermal column hole of Xi’an pulse reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of the neutron spectra in the thermal column hole of Xi’an pulse reactor was measured with the time-of-flight method.Compared with the thermal Maxwellian theory neutron spectra,the thermal neutron spectra measured is a little softer,and the average neutron energy of the experimental spectra is about 0.042±0.01 eV.The thermal neutron fluence rate at the front end of thermal column hole,measured with gold foil activation techniques,is about 1.18×105 cm-2 s-1.The standard uncertainty of the measured thermal neutron fluence is about 3%.The spectra-averaged cross section of 197Au(n,γ) determined by the experimental thermal neutron spectra is(92.8±0.93) ×10-24 cm2.

  18. Passive vibro-acoustic detection of a sodium-water reaction in a steam generator of a sodium-cooled fast neutrons nuclear reactor by beam forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with a new method to detect a sodium-water reaction in a steam generator of a fast sodium-cooled nuclear reactor. More precisely, the objective is to detect a micro-leak of water (flow ≤ 1 g/s) in less than 10 seconds by measuring the external shell vibrations of the component. The strong background noise in operation makes impossible the use of a detection system based on a threshold overrun. A beam forming method applied to vibrations measured by a linear array of accelerometers is developed in this thesis to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to detect and locate the leak in the steam generator. A numerical study is first realized. Two models are developed in order to simulate the signals measured by the accelerometers of the array. The performances of the beam forming are then studied in function of several parameters, such as the source location and frequency, the damping factor, the background noise considered. The first model consists in an infinite plate in contact with a heavy fluid, excited by an acoustic monopole located in this fluid. Analyzing the transverse displacements in the wavenumber domain is useful to establish a criterion to sample correctly the vibration field of the plate. A second model, more representative of the system is also proposed. In this model, an elastic infinite cylindrical shell, filled with a heavy fluid is considered. The finite dimensions in the radial and circumferential directions lead to a modal behavior of the system which impacts the beam forming. Finally, the method is tested on an experimental mock-up which consists in a cylindrical pipe made in stainless steel and filled with water connected to hydraulic circuit. The water flow speed can be controlled by varying the speed of the pump. The acoustic source is generated by a hydro-phone. The performances of the beam forming are studied for different water flow speeds and different amplitude and frequencies of the source. (author)

  19. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea in horizontal flow biofilm reactors treating ammonia-contaminated air at 10 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, Seán; Clifford, Eoghan; Kennelly, Colm; Collins, Gavin

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of novel, Horizontal Flow Biofilm Reactor (HFBR) technology for the treatment of ammonia (NH3)-contaminated airstreams. Three laboratory-scale HFBRs were used for remediation of an NH3-containing airstream at 10 °C during a 90-d trial to test the efficacy of low-temperature treatment. Average ammonia removal efficiencies of 99.7 % were achieved at maximum loading rates of 4.8 g NH3 m(3) h(-1). Biological nitrification of ammonia to nitrite (NO2 (-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) was mediated by nitrifying bacterial and archaeal biofilm populations. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) vertically at each of seven sampling zones along the vertical HFBRs. Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira, were the two most dominant bacterial genera detected in the HFBRs, while an uncultured archaeal clone dominated the AOA community. The bacterial community composition across the three HFBRs was highly conserved, although variations occurred between HFBR zones and were driven by physicochemical variables. The study demonstrates the feasibility of HFBRs for the treatment of ammonia-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures; identifies key nitrifying microorganisms driving the removal process; and provides insights for process optimisation and control. The findings are significant for industrial applications of gas oxidation technology in temperate climates. PMID:26879980

  20. A fan analyzer of neutron beam polarization on the spectrometer REMUR at the pulsed reactor IBR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new spectrometer of polarized neutrons REMUR has been created and put in operation at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna). The spectrometer is dedicated to investigations of multilayer structures and surfaces by registering the reflection of polarized neutrons and of the inhomogeneous state of solid matter by measuring the small-angle scattering of polarized neutrons. The spectrometer's working range of neutron wavelengths is 1.5-10 Angstroem. The spectrometer is equipped with a linear position-sensitive detector and a focused supermirror polarization analyzer (the fan-like polarization analyzer) with a solid angle of polarized neutron detection of 2.2·10-4 rad. This paper describes the design and the principle of operation of the fan analyzer of neutron polarization together with the results of the fan tests on a polarized neutron beam

  1. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIPR) or underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIPR), depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development

  2. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  3. Investigation of the nuclear data on the neutron beam of the IBR-30 and IBR-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodical aspects and results of the measurements, conducted on reactors IBR-30 and IBR-2 are presented. Measurements of the multiplicity spectra of gamma-quanta from the neutron capture reaction on the isotopes 48Ti, 113,115In, 117Sn, 127J, 149Sm, 165Ho, 175Lu, 177Hf, 178Hf, 185Re, 187Re, and 232Th have been done. These spectra were used for determination of the capture cross-section and according resonance parameters in the fission of 235U, 239Pu. The measurements were performed of resonance spins of isotopes 113,115In, 117Sn, 185,187Re, and 235U by the low-lying level population method in the thermal neutron energy area. The transmission and self-indication functions of filter samples 232Th, 237Np, and 238U were measured with different temperatures for determination the neutron cross-sections in the neutron energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. The fission cross-section measurements of the minor actinides 234U, 237Np, and 243Am by the neutrons with energy below the fission barrier were carried out. The measurements of total yields and decay curve of the delayed neutrons from fission of 233,235U, 237Np by thermal and cold neutrons were performed

  4. Study of the oxide layer formed on stainless steel exposed to boiling water reactor conditions by ion beam techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, C.; Buckley, D.; Dran, J. C.; Schenker, E.

    1998-01-01

    The build-up of the oxide layer on austenitic steel under boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions was studied by macro- and micro-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and sputtered neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS). RBS is applicable when the oxide thickness is larger than 20 nm and yields both the layer thickness and its stoichiometry. SNMS provides elemental depth profiles and the oxide thickness when combined with profilometry. Stainless steel strip samples pre-treated (electro- or mechanically polished) or not, exposed in a loop simulating the BWR-conditions for periods ranging from 31 to 291 days and with a low water flow velocity show oxide layers with a thickness of about 300 to 600 nm. There is no significant increase of the oxide layer thickness after 31 days of exposure. The paper confirms the presence of inner and outer oxide layers and also confirms the stoichiometry M 2O 3 in the external part in contact with the oxygenated water. The oxide layer consists not only of an outer layer and an inner layer but also of a deep apparent oxide/metal interface that is attributed to oxide formation through the steel grain boundaries.

  5. Impact of the p53 status of the tumor cells on the effect of reactor neutron beam irradiation, with emphasis on the response of intratumor quiescent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Toru; Kinashi, Yuko [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Inst., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan); Takagaki, Masao [Aino Junior Coll., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan). Hospital

    2002-12-01

    Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells transfected with mutant p53 (SAS/mp53) or with neo vector as a control (SAS/neo) were inoculated subcutaneously into both the hind legs of Balb/cA nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all proliferating (P) cells in the tumors. After administration of sodium borocaptate-{sup 10}B (BSH) or p-boronophenylalanine-{sup 10}B(BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutron beams. The tumors not treated with {sup 10}B-compound were irradiated with neutron beams or {gamma}-rays. The tumors were then excised, minced and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with a cytokinesis blocker, and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=quiescent (Q) cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, 6 h after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were used for determining the frequency of apoptosis in Q cells. The MN and apoptosis frequencies in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Without {sup 10}B-carriers, in both tumors, the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons was greater in Q cells than in total cells, and larger for low than high cadmium ratio neutrons. With {sup 10}B-carriers, the sensitivity was increased for each cell population, especially for total cells. BPA increased both frequencies for total cells more than BSH. Nevertheless, the sensitivity of Q cells treated with BPA was lower than that of BSH-treated Q cells. These sensitization patterns in combination with {sup 10}B-carriers were clearer in SAS/neo than in SAS/mp53 tumors. The p53 status of the tumor cells had the potential to affect the response to reactor neutron beam irradiation following {sup 10}B-carrier administration. (author)

  6. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173

  7. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  8. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: R and D programmes in materials science. Report of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 29 March - 1 April 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing neutron beam based research programmes for solid state studies using neutron scattering techniques. It is expected to benefit ongoing facilities and programmes by encouraging use of improved techniques for detection, signal acquisition, signal processing, etc. and new programmes by assisting in the selection of appropriate equipment, instrument design and research plans. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Progress activities of reactor utilization in 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoen, Sakda [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2003-03-01

    Thai Research Reactor - 1/Modification 1(TRR-1/M1) is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 2 MW. The reactor is a swimming pool type, cooled and moderate with light water, using the LEU-fuel. The reactor has been utilized for radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments and reactor physic experiments. The reactor operation data and reactor utilization in 2000 are presented. (author)

  10. Progress activities of reactor utilization in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai Research Reactor - 1/Modification 1(TRR-1/M1) is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 2 MW. The reactor is a swimming pool type, cooled and moderate with light water, using the LEU-fuel. The reactor has been utilized for radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments and reactor physic experiments. The reactor operation data and reactor utilization in 2000 are presented. (author)

  11. Beam-Beam Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  12. Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  13. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256degC and 250degC. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was taken into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256degC and 150degC to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to taken into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼1·1022 n/cm2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture criteria of the

  14. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 250 deg. C. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was take into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 150 deg. C to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to take into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼ 1x1022 n/cm2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture

  15. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  16. Development of the epithermal neutron beam and its clinical application for boron neutron capture therapy at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The failures of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) trials conducted between 1951 and 1961 were attributed to inadequate penetration of the thermal neutron beams and poor localization of boron compound in the tumour. The epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR was designed and installed to improve the penetration of the neutron beam. The use of this epithermal neutron beam for the clinical trial initiated in 1994 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was preceded by the neutron beam optimization and characterization, the validation of the treatment planning software and the establishment of a procedure for treatment plan evaluation and dose reporting and recording. To date, a total of 54 patients have been treated. Our experience in the development of the epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT at the BMRR may be useful to other investigators desirous of developing similar programs for cancer therapy. (author)

  17. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C+5 n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with Ip = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Zeff and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of ne, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with Ip and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of Ip and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  20. 2012 review of French research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed by the French Reactor Operators' Club (CER), the meeting and discussion forum for operators of French research reactors, this report first gives a brief presentation of these reactors and of their scope of application, and a summary of highlights in 2012 for each of them. Then, it proposes more detailed presentations and reviews of characteristics, activities, highlights, objectives and results for the different types of reactors: neutron beam reactors (Orphee, High flux reactor-Laue-Langevin Institute or HFR-ILL), technological irradiation reactors (Osiris and Phenix), training reactors (Isis and Azur), reactors for safety research purposes (Cabri and Phebus), reactors for neutronic studies (Caliban, Prospero, Eole, Minerve and Masurca), and new research reactors (the RES facility and the Jules Horowitz reactor or JHR)

  1. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors results of forming the material and welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube no. 6. For fabrication of the vessels and piping parts it was necessary to form the base material and calibrate the sheets or welded parts with necessary heat treatments. Additional to the technical specifications preliminary material investigations and production test of welded and unwelded material were carried out of the formed parts up to a cold work of 5%. Further one with respect to the material thickness of 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm of the used sheets, welding procedure test before the fabrication and welding production tests during fabrication were carried out of the base material combination sheet/sheet and sheet/forging. Electronic beam welding was used for the welding process. Material tests as tensile tests, charpy-V-tests, bend tests, metallographic tests, hardness tests, radiographic tests a.s.o. were carried out. The results of the examinations confirm the specified requirements. For the material forming process an optimization was necessary after the preliminary results to get final sufficient material behaviour results. (orig.)

  2. First Algerian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, both the Algerian Commissariat of New Energies and the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission plus the firm INVAP S.E., started a series of mutual visits aimed at defining the mechanisms for cooperation in the nuclear field. Within this framework, a commercial contract was undersigned covering the supply of a low-power reactor (RUN), designed for basic and applied research in the fields of reactor physics and nuclear engineering. The reactor may also be used for performing experiences with neutron beams, for the irradiation of several materials and for the training of technicians, scientists and operators

  3. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  4. The IR-8 reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Yashin, A.F. [Reactor Technology and Materials Research Inst. of RRC ' KI' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-07-01

    At the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (RRC 'KI') the IR-8 reactor commissioning was carried out in 1981. The reactor was developed in return for earlier existing at RRC 'KI' of the IRT-M reactor (modernized IRT reactor, constructed in 1957). The IRT-M reactor was used for investigations in nuclear physics, solid state physics, radiation chemistry, biology as well as to produce isotopes. Under developing the IR-8 reactor the IRT biological shielding with beam tubes and its process systems were used. The IR-8 reactor creation was founded on application developed by then new fuel assemblies (FA) of IRT-3M type, having two times as great surface of heat transfer and 1.75 times higher U-235 load than the FA of the IRT-2M type, which were used in IRT-M reactor. (author)

  5. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  6. Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

  7. Development of electron beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminium alloy for the Jules Horowitz Reactor - Development of the electron beam welding of the 6061-T6 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a text and in a Power Point presentation, the author first evokes the interesting properties of the 6061-T6 aluminium alloy and the problems its raises as far as welding is concerned. He also evokes that hundreds of tests and characterizations (destructive and non destructive testing) of TIG, MIG and EB (electron beam) welding processes have been performed before the selection of the electron beam welding process. The author discusses the weldability of aluminium alloys, and more particularly that of the 6061-T6 alloy (control of mechanical properties of the welded joint, hot cracking during welding, solidification or liquation)

  8. Internal attachment of laser beam welded stainless steel sheathed thermocouples into stainless steel upper end caps in nuclear fuel rods for the LOFT Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc., acting as a subcontractor to EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, conducted a laser beam welding study to attach internal stainless steel thermocouples into stainless steel upper end caps in nuclear fuel rods. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of laser welding a single 0.063 inch diameter stainless steel (304) sheathed thermocouple into a stainless steel (316) upper end cap for nuclear fuel rods. A laser beam was selected because of the extremely high energy input in unit volume that can be achieved allowing local fusion of a small area irrespective of the difference in material thickness to be joined. A special weld fixture was designed and fabricated to hold the end cap and the thermocouple with angular and rotational adjustment under the laser beam. A commercial pulsed laser and energy control system was used to make the welds

  9. Neutral beams for mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important demonstration of negative ion technology is proposed for FY92 in the MFTF-α+T, an upgrade of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This facility calls for 200-keV negative ions to form neutral beams that generate sloshing ions in the reactor end plugs. Three different beam lines are considered for this application. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  10. Opal neutron beams shutters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Opal Reactor has five beam tubes for neutron beams. Of these 5 tubes, two come from a cold neutron source, another two from thermal sources, and a fifth is ready for a future hot neutron source. Neutron guides come from the cold and thermal beam tubes. Neutron beams are enabled/disabled through shutters located inside the reactor pool's radial shield. These shutters were specially designed by INVAP for the OPAL reactor. They comprise fixed and movable shields. The movable part allows neutron beam enabling or disabling. The design of these shutters demanded the construction of prototypes that were further submitted to comprehensive tests to be qualified in light of the strict movement precision and high reliability requirements involved. The shielding material - a plastic and steel mix - was also specifically designed for this facility. The design required great efforts as to shield calculation and energy deposition. A heat removal system was designed to dissipate the energy absorbed by the shields. The cold and thermal beam shutters are built following a single vertical axis design. The hot shutter, due to different requirements, was designed with a horizontal axis

  11. Fueling of tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the fueling requirements for experimental and demonstration tandem mirror reactors (TMRs), reviews the status of conventional pellet injectors, and identifies some candidate accelerators that may be needed for fueling tandem mirror reactors. Characteristics and limitations of three types of accelerators are described; neutral beam injectors, electromagnetic rail guns, and laser beam drivers. Based on these characteristics and limitations, a computer module was developed for the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (TMRSC) to select the pellet injector/accelerator combination which most nearly satisfies the fueling requirements for a given machine design

  12. Design of the experimental apparatus to obtain a thermal neutron beam, intermediate-energy neutrons (2-144 keV) and high-energy photons (6 MeV) by means of the TRIGA reactor at the ENEA Casaccia center

    CERN Document Server

    Laitano, R F

    1987-01-01

    Design of the experimental apparatus to obtain a thermal neutron beam, intermediate-energy neutrons (2-144 keV) and high-energy photons (6 MeV) by means of the TRIGA reactor at the ENEA Casaccia center

  13. Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX): a ''proof-of-principle'' evaluation of the use of electron beam heating to simulate the thermal mechanical environment anticipated for the first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a ''proof-of-principle'' Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX), designed to simulate the thermal mechanical response of insulator-metal composite first walls anticipated for pulsed high-density fusion reactors, are given. A programmable 10-kV, 1.0-A electron beam was used to pulse repeatedly (0.30-mm)Al2O3/(1.0-mm) Nb-1Zr composite samples 200 to 300 K, relative to a base-line temperature of 1000 K. The experimental goals of TSEX were established relative to the first-wall environment anticipated for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR). A detailed description of the TSEX ''proof-of-principle'' apparatus, experimental procedure, and diagnostics is given. The results of extensive thermal analyses are given, which are used to estimate the thermal stresses generated. Although little or no control was exercised over the sample fabrication and thermal history, one sample experienced in excess of 800 thermal cycles of approximately 250 K at approximately 1000 K, and the results of optical and SEM examination of this specimen are presented. The resistance of this sample to macroscopic failure was truly impressive. Recommendations for the construction of an apparatus dedicated to extensive testing of first-wall composites are given on the basis of these ''proof-of-principle'' TSEX results

  14. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  15. ITER neutral beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Beam (NB) system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has reached a high degree of integration with the tokamak and with the rest of the plant. Operational requirements and maintainability have been considered in the design. The paper considers the integration with the tokamak, discusses design improvements which appear necessary and finally notes R and D progress in key areas. (author)

  16. Experience with Kamini reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamini is a 233U fuelled, 30 kW(th) research reactor. It is one of the best neutron source facility with a core average flux of 1012 n/cm2/s in IGCAR used for neutron radiography of active and nonradioactive objects, activation analysis and radiation physics research. The core consists of nine plate type fuel elements with a total fuel inventory of 590 g of 233U. Two safety control plates made of cadmium are used for start up and shutdown of the reactor. Three beam tubes, two-thimble irradiation site outside reflector and one irradiation site nearer to the core constitute the testing facilities of Kamini. Kamini attained first criticality on 29th October 96 and nominal power of 30 kW in September 1997. This paper covers the design features of the reactor, irradiation facilities and their utilities and operating experience of the reactor. (author)

  17. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  18. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  19. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-04-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (adjustable supermirror curvature) and the compact size (only 0.5 m long). We have simulated the neutron transport across the entire guide system. We present a detailed computer characterization of the existing device, along with the study of the factors mostly influencing the future improvement. We have optimized the simulated prototype as a function of the neutron wavelength, accounting also for all relevant features of a real instrument like the non-reflecting side edges. The results confirm the "chromatic" displacement of the focal point (flux density maximum) at fixed supermirror curvature, and the ability of a variable curvature to keep the focal point at the sample position. Our simulations are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the experimentally measured beam profile. With respect to the possibility of a further upgrade, we find that supermirror coatings with m-values higher than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  20. Feasibility of a laser or charged-particle-beam fusion-reactor concept with direct electric generation by magnetic-flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept for an inertial-confinement fusion reactor is described which, because of its fundamentally different approach to blanket geometry and energy conversion, makes possible a unique combination of high efficiency, high power density, and low radioactivity. The conventional blanket is replaced with a liquid-density mass of lithium contiguously surrounding the fusion yield. This compact blanket configuration produces the maximum shock-induced kinetic energy in liquid metal and the maximum neutron absorption per unit mass. The shock-induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed normal-conducting magnetic field applied to the exterior of the lithium

  1. Neutron beam experiments using nuclear research reactors: honoring the retirement of professor Bernard W. Wehring -II. 7. Redesign of the University of Texas Thermal Neutron Imaging Facility Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal neutron imaging facility (TNIF) was developed at the University of Texas Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory from 1994 to 1998 using a 1-MW TRIGA reactor. Currently, neutron radiography is being investigated as a method to detect flaws in large carbon composite flywheels using the TNIF. Thermal neutrons have successfully been used to detect flaws in thin carbon composites (60% of the neutrons that enter the shield walls are reflected back into the experimental area. MCNP calculations indicate that the addition of a 1.25-cm Boral liner on the inner wall is sufficient to lower the external dose to acceptable levels and reduce the percentage of neutrons reflected back into the experimental area to <2%. MCNP simulations have been a valuable tool to test shielding configurations before construction. The redesigned shutter is composed of aluminum, lead, and boron carbide. MCNP simulations for the external shielding have shown that the addition of a Boral liner on the inner shield wall is sufficient to reduce external radiation exposure to acceptable levels. The Boral liner also greatly reduces the amount of neutrons reflected back into the experimental region. The implementation of the redesigned neutron shutter and external shielding should greatly enhance the TNIF capabilities and overall usability. The new neutron shutter will allow work to be performed inside the shielding cave while the reactor is at power. The improved external shielding will enable radiographs to be taken at higher flux levels, which will be beneficial when imaging thick carbon composites. The reduction of neutron scattering within the experimental area will also enhance image quality and improve the TNIF resolution. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams. PMID:26829048

  3. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  4. Reactor PIK construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction work at the 100 MW researches reactor PIK in year 2002 was in progress. The main activity was concentrated on mechanical, ventilation and electrical equipment. Some systems and subsystems are under adjustment. Hydraulic driving gear for beam shutters are finished in installation, rinsing, and adjusting. Regulating rods test assembling was done. On the critical assembly the first reactor fueling was tested to evaluate the starting neutron source intensity and a sufficiency of existing control and instrument board. Mainline of the PIK facility design and neutron parameters are presented. (author)

  5. Usage of a single TLD-700 for gamma dose measurement in a water phantom irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam at the thor research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two groups of data that need to be compared in the water phantom irradiated with an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT: (1) the thermal neutron flux, and (2) the gamma dose rate. The comparisons of gamma dose rates between MCNP calculation and TLD measurement are more complex than thermal neutron flux comparison, because of the gamma dose rate can not be taken from TLD-700 readings directly. TLD-700 dose rates contain gamma dose rate, neutron dose rate, and neutron-6Li reaction dose rate. In this article, the responses of TLD-700 to different radiation components were investigated. The results were used for modification to the TLD-700 readings. By this way, the gamma dose rates show a good agreement between the simulation results and experimental data. (author)

  6. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  7. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper dwells upon the design and the operation of one of the German test reactors, namely, the TRIGA Mainz one (TRIGA: Training Research Isotope Production General Atomic). The TRIGA reactor is a pool test reactor the core of which contains a graphite reflector and is placed into 2 m diameter and 6.25 m height aluminum vessel. There are 75 fuel elements in the reactor core, and any of them contains about 36 g of 235U. The TRIGA reactors under the stable operation enjoy wide application to ensure tests and irradiation, namely: neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, application of a neutron beam to ensure the physical, the chemical and the medical research efforts. Paper presents the reactor basic experimental program lines

  8. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  9. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  10. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  11. Nonlinear beam-beam resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head-on collisions of bunched beams are considered, assuming the two colliding beams have opposite charges. A few experimental observations are described. The single resonance analysis is developed that is applicable to the strong-weak case of the beam-beam interaction. In this case, the strong beam is unperturbed by the beam-beam interaction; motions of the weak beam particles are then analyzed in the presence of the nonlinear electromagnetic force produced by the strong beam at the collision points. The coherent motions of the two coupled strong beams are shown to exhibit distinct nonlinear resonance behavior. 16 refs., 22 figs

  12. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  13. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  14. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  15. Studies on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details of laser beam welded thick SS304L plates for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar, E-mail: buddu@ipr.res.in [Fusion Reactor Materials Development and Characterization Division, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M. [Fusion Reactor Materials Development and Characterization Division, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Natu, Harshad [Magod Laser Machining Pvt. Ltd, Jigani, Bengaluru 560105 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • CO{sub 2} laser welding of 8 mm thick SS304L plates has been carried out and full penetration welds fabricated and characterized for mechanical properties and microstructure details. • Welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base indicating good weld quality joints. • Impact fracture tests of weld zone and heat affected zone samples have shown poor toughness compared to the base metal. • SEM analysis of fracture samples of tensile and impact specimens indicated the complex microstructure features in weld zone and combined ductile and brittle fracture features. • Combined features of dendrite and cellular structures are observed in weld microstructures with narrow HAZ and delta ferrite is found in the welds and further confirmed by higher Ferrite Number data. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel is widely used structural material for the fabrication of the fusion reactor components. Laser welding is high power density process which offers several advantages over the other conventional processes like Tungsten Inert Gas welding. The features like low distortion, narrow heat affected zone, deep penetration in single pass, good mechanical properties are some of the advantages of laser welding process. The laser weld process parameters optimization has several challenges in terms of overcoming the weld defects like voids due to lack of penetration over depth, undercuts and porosity. The present paper reports the studies carried out with CO{sub 2} laser welding of 8 mm thick austenitic stainless steel SS304L plates and their characterization of mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details. The weld process parameter optimization towards defect free welds with full penetration welding has been carried out. The welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base metal, bend tests are successfully passed. The hardness measurements have shown slightly higher for weld zone compared to base metal

  16. Studies on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details of laser beam welded thick SS304L plates for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CO2 laser welding of 8 mm thick SS304L plates has been carried out and full penetration welds fabricated and characterized for mechanical properties and microstructure details. • Welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base indicating good weld quality joints. • Impact fracture tests of weld zone and heat affected zone samples have shown poor toughness compared to the base metal. • SEM analysis of fracture samples of tensile and impact specimens indicated the complex microstructure features in weld zone and combined ductile and brittle fracture features. • Combined features of dendrite and cellular structures are observed in weld microstructures with narrow HAZ and delta ferrite is found in the welds and further confirmed by higher Ferrite Number data. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel is widely used structural material for the fabrication of the fusion reactor components. Laser welding is high power density process which offers several advantages over the other conventional processes like Tungsten Inert Gas welding. The features like low distortion, narrow heat affected zone, deep penetration in single pass, good mechanical properties are some of the advantages of laser welding process. The laser weld process parameters optimization has several challenges in terms of overcoming the weld defects like voids due to lack of penetration over depth, undercuts and porosity. The present paper reports the studies carried out with CO2 laser welding of 8 mm thick austenitic stainless steel SS304L plates and their characterization of mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details. The weld process parameter optimization towards defect free welds with full penetration welding has been carried out. The welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base metal, bend tests are successfully passed. The hardness measurements have shown slightly higher for weld zone compared to base metal and the

  17. Important atomic physics issues for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper suggests several current atomic physics questions important to ion beam fusion. Among the topics discussed are beam transport, beam-target interaction, and reactor design. The major part of the report is discussion concerning areas of research necessary to better understand beam-target interactions

  18. BNCT activities at Slovenian TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that satisfactory thermal/epithermal neutron beams for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) could be designed at TRIGA research reactors These reactors are generally perceived as being safe to install and operate in populated areas. This contribution presents the most recent BNCT research activities on the 'Jozef Stefan' Institute, where epithermal neutron beam for 'in-vitro' irradiation has been developed and experimentally verified. Furthermore, The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of the epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials of human patients in thermalising column (TC) of TRIGA reactor has been carried out. The simulation results prove, that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beam throughout the world, could be installed in TC of the TRIGA reactor. (author)

  19. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  20. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  1. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  2. Recent activities on neutron beam utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the utilization of neutron beam brought out in research reactors had mainly been carried out in KUR of Kyoto University and JRR-2 of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in the fields of neutron scattering experiment, neutron radiography, neutron induced prompt-gamma ray analysis, medical and biological irradiation and so on. After the completion of upgrading work of JRR-3 in JAERI in 1990 (JRR-3M), the quality and quantity for the neutron beam experiments are extremely improved by means of its high intensity of neutron flux and high signal-to-noise ratio of cold and thermal neutron beams at more than twenty neutron beam ports. Especially, the cold neutron beam has brought the field of the utilization expanded and the neutron guide tubes have increased the number of neutron beam facilities as if there are three research reactors. These facilities induced to more active use of research reactors and increased the researchers in the many fields. At present, research reactors are utilized widely in various fields of not only nuclear researches but also non-nuclear researches and industrial uses. The JRR-3M has been operated only for about three years, however, interesting results have already been obtained using cold and thermal neutron beams. The current status of the neutron beam utilization using the research reactors in JAERI is reported and also several research topics obtained at JRR-3M are introduced in this presentation. (author)

  3. Replacement research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, the Australian Government commissioned a review into the need for a replacement research reactor. That review concluded that in about years, if certain conditions were met, the Government could make a decision in favour of a replacement reactor. A major milestone was achieved when, on 3 September 1997, the Australian Government announced the construction of a replacement research reactor at the site of Australia's existing research reactor HIFAR, subject to the satisfactory outcome of an environmental assessment process. The reactor will be have the dual purpose of providing a first class facility for neutron beam research as well as providing irradiation facilities for both medical isotope production and commercial irradiations. The project is scheduled for completion before the end of 2005. (author)

  4. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests

  5. Research reactors and alternative devices for research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes papers on research reactors and alternatives to the research reactors - radioisotopic neutron sources, cyclotrons, D-T neutron generators and small accelerators, used for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, material science, applied and basic research using neutron beams. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 papers

  6. Bessel Beams

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kirk T

    2000-01-01

    Scalar Bessel beams are derived both via the wave equation and via diffraction theory. While such beams have a group velocity that exceeds the speed of light, this is a manifestation of the "scissors paradox" of special relativty. The signal velocity of a modulated Bessel beam is less than the speed of light. Forms of Bessel beams that satisfy Maxwell's equations are also given.

  7. The Australian nuclear reactor, HIFAR, its past present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the AAEC's reactor, HIFAR has changed from support for the development of an indigenous power reactor to radioisotope producer and neutron beam source. An account is given of the last twenty-four years' operating experience. A brief review of modernisation programs for reactors of the DIDO class is followed by details of the current HIFAR refurbishing program

  8. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  9. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author)

  10. Effects of high thermal and high fast fluences on the mechanical properties of Type 6061 aluminum on the HRBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is an epithermal, externally moderated (by D2O) facility designed to produce neutron beams for research. Type 6061 T-6 aluminum was used for the beam tubes pressure vessel, fuel cladding, and most other components in the high flux area. The HFBR has operated since 1965. The epithermal, external moderation of the HFBR means that materials irradiated in different areas of the facility receive widely different flux spectra. Thus, specimens from a control rod drive follower tube (CRDF) have received 1.5 x 1022n/cm2(E > 0.1 MeV) and 3.2 x 1023n/cm2 thermal fluence, while those from a vertical thimble flow shroud received 1.9 x 1023n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.0 x 1023n/cm2 thermal. These numbers correspond to fast to thermal fluence ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.9. Irradiations are occurring at approximately 333 K. The data indicate that the increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility result primarily from the thermal fluence, that is, transmutation of aluminum to silicon

  11. The Berkeley TRIGA Mark III research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Research Reactor went critical on August 10, 1966, and achieved licensed operating power of 1000 kW shortly thereafter. Since then, the reactor has operated, by and large, trouble free on a one-shift basis. The major use of the reactor is in service irradiations, and many scientific programs are accommodated, both on and off campus. The principal off-campus user is the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. The reactor is also an important instructional tool in the Nuclear Engineering Department reactor experiments laboratory course, and as a source of radioisotopes for two other laboratory courses given by the Department. Finally, the reactor is used in several research programs conducted within the Department, involving studies with neutron beams and in reactor kinetics

  12. Plasma reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Bertrán Serra, Enric

    2008-01-01

    [EN] A plasma reactor that can operate in a wide pressure range, from vacuum and low pressures to atmospheric pressure and higher pressures. The plasma reactor is also able to regulate other important settings and can be used for processing a wide range of different samples, such as relatively large samples or samples with rough surfaces.

  13. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  14. Nuclear reactor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  15. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations. [Laser beaming to airplanes; microwave beaming to ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.; Hertzberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Power beaming from space-based reactor systems is examined using an advanced compact, lightweight Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR). Closed Brayton power conversion efficiencies in the range of 30 to 40% can be achieved with turbines, with reactor exit temperatures on the order of 2000/sup 0/K and a liquid drop radiator to reject heat at temperatures of approx. 500/sup 0/K. Higher RBR coolant temperatures (up to approx. 3000/sup 0/K) are possible, but gains in power conversion efficiency are minimal, due to lower expander efficiency (e.g., a MHD generator). Two power beaming applications are examined - laser beaming to airplanes and microwave beaming to fixed ground receivers. Use of the RBR greatly reduces system weight and cost, as compared to solar power sources. Payback times are a few years at present prices for power and airplane fuel.

  16. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  17. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  18. Overview of neutral beam injector technology developments at universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of universities on the neutral beam injector developments have been overviewed. The subjects consist of NBI construction, components developments and system analyses, which are intensively studied at universities. Although neutral beam injector technologies are present day top topics, however, still a lot of efforts with flexible ideas are necessary to realize reactor relevant neutral beam injector system. (author)

  19. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  2. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This draft chart contains graphical symbols from which the type of (nuclear) reactor can be seen. They will serve as illustrations for graphical sketches. Important features of the individual reactor types are marked out graphically. The user can combine these symbols to characterize a specific reactor type. The basic graphical symbol is a square with a point in the centre. Functional groups can be depicted for closer specification. If two functional groups are not clearly separated, this is symbolized by a dotted line or a channel. Supply and discharge lines for coolant, moderator and fuel are specified in accordance with DIN 2481 and can be further specified by additional symbols if necessary. The examples in the paper show several different reactor types. (orig./AK)

  3. Multifunctional reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much emphasis in research in the last decade. A survey is given of modern developments and the first successful applications on a large scale. It is explained why their application in many instances is ...

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  6. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components

  7. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection

  8. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  9. Frozen Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    In general, the temperature of a charged particle beam traveling in an accelerator is very high. Seen from the rest frame of the beam, individual particles randomly oscillate about the reference orbit at high speed. This internal kinetic energy can, however, be removed by introducing dissipative interactions into the system. As a dissipative process advances, the beam becomes denser in phase space or, in other words, the emittance is more diminished. Ideally, it is possible to reach a "zero-emittance" state where the beam is Coulomb crystallized. The space-charge repulsion of a crystalline beam just balances the external restoring force provided by artificial electromagnetic elements. In this talk, general discussion is made of coasting and bunched crystalline beams circulating in a storage ring. Results of molecular dynamics simulations are presented to demonstrate the dynamic nature of various crystalline states. A possible method to approach such an ultimate state of matter is also discussed.

  10. The epithermal neutron beam for BNCT under construction at TAPIRO: Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A column to provide an epithermal neutron beam suitable for experimental and clinical BNCT is nearing completion at the TAPIRO reactor (ENEA Casaccia, Rome). TAPIRO is a compact, low power (5 kW), helium-cooled, fast reactor. It has a hard neutron spectrum relative even to other fast reactors. In this paper some of the basic physics aspects of designing an epithermal neutron beam are considered, with reference to the TAPIRO beam

  11. Handling installation for a fast neutron nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation comprises inside the reactor vessel, a beam able to rotate unscotch about the vertical axis of the reactor core, a movable trolley on the beam carrying a guide tube. A fixed beam is placed in a handling room above the reactor closure head and fuel causes with another trolley carrying another guide tube. The transfer of an assembly between the core to one of the causes is made by a gripper suspended from a cable wound on a winch placed at the end of the handling room

  12. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  13. Research reactors - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (1014 particles/cm3) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  15. The conceptual calculation for the neutron beam device at Mark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal neutron beam device, epithermal neutron beam device and test duct experiment device are designed by using Monte Carlo method at 30 kW Mark 1(-1). The compared calculation for transverse cross section dimension, moderator, reflector and others of neutron filter device are studied in this paper. The three optimized neutron beams including thermal neutron beam, epithermal neutron beam and the beam for measuring blood boron density, whose neutron flux density per reactor power are rather high, are also introduced. The results show that the BNCT neutron beam can be designed by using 30kW -1 reactor. (author)

  16. Reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1962, the RA reactor was operated almost three times more than in 1961, producing total of 25 555 MWh. Diagram containing comparative data about reactor operation for 1960, 1961, and 1962, percent of fuel used and U-235 burnup shows increase in reactor operation. Number of samples irradiated was 659, number of experiments done was 16. mean powered level was 5.93 MW. Fuel was added into the core twice during the reporting year. In fact the core was increased from 56 to 68 fuel channels and later to 84 fuel channels. Fuel was added to the core when the reactivity worth decreased to the minimum operation level due to burnup. In addition to this 5 central fuel channels were exchanged with fresh fuel in february for the purpose of irradiation in the VISA-2 channel

  17. Reactor Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  18. Beam Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2014-01-01

    When a beam propagates in an accelerator, it interacts with both the external fields and the self-generated electromagnetic fields. If the latter are strong enough, the interplay between them and a perturbation in the beam distribution function can lead to an enhancement of the initial perturbation, resulting in what we call a beam instability. This unstable motion can be controlled with a feedback system, if available, or it grows, causing beam degradation and loss. Beam instabilities in particle accelerators have been studied and analysed in detail since the late 1950s. The subject owes its relevance to the fact that the onset of instabilities usually determines the performance of an accelerator. Understanding and suppressing the underlying sources and mechanisms is therefore the key to overcoming intensity limitations, thereby pushing forward the performance reach of a machine.

  19. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. A reactor core assembly of a plurality of fluid-tight fuel elements is located within a water-filled tank. Each fuel element contains a solid homogeneous mixture of 50-79 w/o zirconium hydride, 20-50 w/o uranium and 0.5-1.5 W erbium. The uranium is not more than 20 percent enriched, and the ratio of hydrogen atoms to zirconium atoms is between 1.5:1 and 7:1. The core has a long lifetime, E.G., at least about 1200 days

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a liquid cooled nuclear reactor, the combination is described for a single-walled vessel containing liquid coolant in which the reactor core is submerged, and a containment structure, primarily of material for shielding against radioactivity, surrounding at least the liquid-containing part of the vessel with clearance therebetween and having that surface thereof which faces the vessel make compatible with the liquid, thereby providing a leak jacket for the vessel. The structure is preferably a metal-lined concrete vault, and cooling means are provided for protecting the concrete against reaching a temperature at which damage would occur. (U.S.)

  1. Present status of reactor PIK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation shows the present status pf the Pressurized Beam Research reactor PIK, located at Gatchina near St.Petersburg. The construction started in 1976 with the aim to provide a useful experimental facility at lowest cost. It is 100 MW, water cooled and water moderated reactor with a heavy water reflector. The possibility of changing the dimensions and composition of the core is planned. Control system will have 2 absorbing rods for rapid control, 8 safety rods made of europium plates; and gadolinium nitrate dissolved in water for smooth reactivity control. A 3-circuit cooling system is planned to prevent air contamination in case of damage of the heat exchanger in the primary loop. Reactor shield will consist of 1 m thick reflector, with additional 0.5 m of heterogeneous iron-water shield, 0.9 m of heavy concrete; and 1 m of moveable shield. A comparison of PIK and Grenoble reactor shows some advantages of PIK: three time higher neutron beam intensity, three times higher thermal neutron flux in the neutron trap (existing only in PIK) than in the reflector; PIK has a moveable shield for special precise measurements

  2. A new reactor for Zaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-help was the successful theme of the Republic of Zaire in the construction of its new TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Regional Centre for Nuclear Studies (CREN-K) in Kinshasa. Construction of this reactor was begun in February 1970 and was carried out entirely by a team from the Nuclear Sciences Commission of the Republic of Zaire. t was completed last year with an output of 1 MW in steady operation, and is capable of reaching 1600 MW in pulsed operation. he main components of the reactor were supplied by Gulf Energy and Environmental Systems of San Diego, California. All the auxiliary systems of the reactor were designed and built at Kinshasa by the local team of the Nuclear Sciences Commission. The Republic of Zaire was helped in its project by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and by a number of countries, in particular the United States of America and Belgium. he United States supplied the enriched uranium which was used for the fabrication of fuel elements. The reactor control desk, the construction of which had been started at Kinshasa, was completed by Belgium, which also supervised the criticality tests on the reactor. he new reactor is being used, in particular, for the production of isotopes. It includes a number of experimental facilities, among them four beam tubes and a thermal column, which can be used for sophisticated studies in physics. In pulsed operation, the available flux is approximately 1017 n/cm2.sec. With these characteristics, it will be possible to consider using the reactor for materials testing studies, for example, on the resistance of fuel cladding to intense neutron fluxes. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an improved reactor core for a high conversion BWR reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type rector, FEBR type reactor, etc., two types of fuel assemblies are loaded such that fuel assemblies using a channel box of a smaller irradiation deformation ratio are loaded in a high conversion region, while other fuel assemblies are loaded in a burner region. This enables to suppress the irradiation deformation within an allowable limit in the high conversion region where the fast neutron flux is high and the load weight from the inside of the channel box due to the pressure loss is large. At the same time, the irradiation deformation can be restricted within an allowable limit without deteriorating the neutron economy in the burner region in which fast neutron flux is low and the load weight from the inside of the channel box is small since a channel box with smaller neutron absorption cross section or reduced wall thickness is charged. As a result, it is possible to prevent structural deformations such as swelling of the channel box, bending of the entire assemblies, bending of fuel rods, etc. (K.M.)

  4. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration

  5. IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube optimization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimization study of IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube is presented. In the study we used the MIT/FCB experience. The enlarging of filter/moderator cross section dimensions and the decreasing of collimator length within the limits of the IRT-Sofia reactor design were analyzed. The influence of beam and reactor core axes non-coincidence on the beam properties was also evaluated. The irradiation resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon®) was also evaluated. The results provide information for making decisions on the IRT-Sofia BNCT beam construction.

  6. IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube optimization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, S., E-mail: belousov@inrne.bas.bg [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko 72, Sofia (Bulgaria); Mitev, M.; Ilieva, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko 72, Sofia (Bulgaria); Riley, K. [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA (United States); Harling, O. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    An optimization study of IRT-Sofia BNCT beam tube is presented. In the study we used the MIT/FCB experience. The enlarging of filter/moderator cross section dimensions and the decreasing of collimator length within the limits of the IRT-Sofia reactor design were analyzed. The influence of beam and reactor core axes non-coincidence on the beam properties was also evaluated. The irradiation resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{sup Registered-Sign }) was also evaluated. The results provide information for making decisions on the IRT-Sofia BNCT beam construction.

  7. Second preliminary design of JAERI experimental fusion reactor (JXFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Second preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future has been performed. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics radiation shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel recirculating system, reactor cooling and tritium recovery systems and maintenance scheme. Safety analyses of the reactor system have been also performed. This paper gives a brief description of the design as of January, 1979. The feasibility study of raising the power density has been also studied and is shown as appendix. (author)

  8. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  9. Reactor application of an improved bundle divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Bundle Divertor was chosen as the impurity control and plasma exhaust system for the beam driven Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor - DTHR. In the context of a preconceptual design study of the reactor and associated facility a bundle divertor concept was developed and integrated into the reactor system. The overall system was found feasible and scalable for reactors with intermediate torodial field strengths on axis. The important design characteristics are: the overall average current density of the divertor coils is 0.73 kA for each tesla of toroidal field on axis; the divertor windings are made from super-conducting cables supported by steel structures and are designed to be maintainable; the particle collection assembly and auxiliary cryosorption vacuum pump are dual systems designed such that they can be reactivated alterntively to allow for continuous reactor operation; and the power requirement for energizing and operating the divertor is about 5 MW

  10. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li2O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  11. Ballistic-neutralized chamber transport of intense heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor chamber are presented. The ballistic-neutralized transport scheme studied uses 4 GeV Pb+1 ion beams injected into a low-density, gas-filled reactor chamber and the beam is ballistically focused onto an ICF target before entering the chamber. Charge and current neutralization of the beam is provided by the low-density background gas. The ballistic-neutralized simulations include stripping of the beam ions as the beam traverses the chamber as well as ionization of the background plasma. In addition, a series of simulations are presented that explore the charge and current neutralization of the ion beam in an evacuated chamber. For this vacuum transport mode, neutralizing electrons are only drawn from sources near the chamber entrance

  12. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor container has a suppression chamber partitioned by concrete side walls, a reactor pedestal and a diaphragm floor. A plurality of partitioning walls are disposed in circumferential direction each at an interval inside the suppression chamber, so that independent chambers in a state being divided into plurality are formed inside the suppression chamber. The partition walls are formed from the bottom portion of the suppression chamber up to the diaphragm floor to isolate pool water in a divided state. Operation platforms are formed above the suppression chamber and connected to an access port. Upon conducting maintenance, inspection or repairing, a pump is disposed in the independent chamber to transfer pool water therein to one or a plurality of other independent chambers to make it vacant. (I.N.)

  13. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a structure of ABWR-type reactor buildings, which can increase the capacity of a spent fuel storage area at a low cost and improved earthquake proofness. In the reactor building, the floor of a spent fuel pool is made flat, and a depth of the pool water satisfying requirement for shielding is ensured. In addition, a depth of pool water is also maintained for a equipment provisionally storing pool for storing spent fuels, and a capacity for a spent fuel storage area is increased by utilizing surplus space of the equipment provisionally storing pool. Since the flattened floor of the spent fuel pool is flushed with the floor of the equipment provisionally storing pool, transfer of horizontal loads applied to the building upon occurrence of earthquakes is made smooth, to improve earthquake proofness of the building. (T.M.)

  14. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor cooled by a freezable liquid has a vessel for containing said liquid and comprising a structure shaped as a container, and cooling means in the region of the surface of said structure for effecting freezing of said liquid coolant at and for a finite distance from said surface for providing a layer of frozen coolant on and supported by said surface for containing said liquid coolant. In a specific example, where the reactor is sodium-cooled, the said structure is a metal-lined concrete vault, cooling is effected by closed cooling loops containing NaK, the loops extending over the lined surface of the concrete vault with outward and reverse pipe runs of each loop separated by thermal insulation, and air is flowed through cooling pipes embedded in the concrete behind the metal lining. 7 claims, 3 figures

  15. New research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIFAR, Australia's major research reactor was commissioned in 1958 to test materials for an envisaged indigenous nuclear power industry. HIFAR is a Dido type reactor which is operated at 10 MW. With the decision in the early 1970's not to proceed to nuclear power, HIFAR was adapted to other uses and has served Australia well as a base for national nuclear competence; as a national facility for neutron scattering/beam research; as a source of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment; and as a source of export revenue from the neutron transmutation doping of silicon for the semiconductor industry. However, all of HIFAR's capabilities are becoming less than optimum by world and regional standards. Neutron beam facilities have been overtaken on the world scene by research reactors with increased neutron fluxes, cold sources, and improved beams and neutron guides. Radioisotope production capabilities, while adequate to meet Australia's needs, cannot be easily expanded to tap the growing world market in radiopharmaceuticals. Similarly, neutron transmutation doped silicon production, and export income from it, is limited at a time when the world market for this material is expanding. ANSTO has therefore embarked on a program to replace HIFAR with a new multi-purpose national facility for nuclear research and technology in the form of a reactor: a) for neutron beam research, - with a peak thermal flux of the order of three times higher than that from HIFAR, - with a cold neutron source, guides and beam hall, b) that has radioisotope production facilities that are as good as, or better than, those in HIFAR, c) that maximizes the potential for commercial irradiations to offset facility operating costs, d) that maximizes flexibility to accommodate variations in user requirements during the life of the facility. ANSTO's case for the new research reactor received significant support earlier this month with the tabling in Parliament of a report by the Australian Science

  16. Utilization of the low power Musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Musashi reactor is a low-power reactor of 100 kW, multi-purpose beam-experiments have been performed for the last ten years. Medical irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is the most unique utilization of the reactor. Eighty-two patients had been treated in the reactor up to the end of August 1987. One of the horizontal beam ports has been used for a time-of-flight experiment by using a slow-chopper since 1977. The authors measured the total neutron cross sections of Mg, Al, Si, Zr, Nb and Mo in the energy range from 0.001 to 0.3 eV. A neutron radiography facility was designed and installed at another beam port in 1984. A real-time neutron TV system has been also installed for investigation of moving objects and for a neutron computed tomography study. A third beam port has been used for a filtered beam experiment and a capture γ-ray measurement. An Fe-filter for 24 keV neutrons and Si-filter for 54 and 144 keV neutrons are available for generating monochromatic neutrons. These beams have been used for the precise measurement of total neutron cross sections. The capture γ-ray measurements have been applied for the measurement of boron concentration in tissue in connection with the BNCT. The reactor has a Joint Use Program for university researchers in Japan under a grant-in-aid by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. (author)

  17. The state of the PIK reactor construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle concepts of the PIK reactor project were stated late in the 60's but its construction was started in 1976. By the year 1986 the initial project was realised by approximately 70% but then, after Chernobyl accident the construction was essentially frozen to adjust the project to the revised nuclear safety regulations. The revised project was approved only in 1990 when the country was on the threshold of serious economic problems. The PIK reactor is a source of neutrons placed in the heavy water reflector. The fuel is uranium-235 (90% enrichment) of total weight 27 kg. Light water is used as moderator and coolant. Design parameters: thermal power is 100 W; thermal neutron flux in the reflector is 1.2x1015n/cm2s; in the central vertical beam tube is 5x1015n/cm2s; number of horizontal beam tubes is 10; diameter of beam tubes is 10 cm, with the possibility of replacement with beam tubes up to 25 cm in diameter. The reactor will be equipped with sources of hot, cold, and ultracold neutrons to obtain beams in different intervals of energy spectrum. The low temperature circuit will enable to irradiate samples at helium temperatures. The reactor has three series cooling circuits. Emergency core cooling systems in LOCA are double and in emergency power supply system is triple. The PIK reactor has no single common containment but four separate systems: for pipelines and units of the first circuit, for heavy water reflector, for operating hall, and for experimental beam tubes hall

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactor has got fuel subassemblies which are bundled and enclosed by a common can. In order to reduce bending of the sides of the can because of the load caused by the coolant pressure the can has got a dodecagon-shaped crosssection. The surfaces of the can may be of equal width. One out of two surfaces may also be convex towards the center. (RW)

  20. Design study of a beam energy recovery system for a negative-ion-based neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam energy recovery system for future neutral beam injectors based on negative ions has been designed. Residual negative ions are recovered electrically, while residual positive ions are decelerated on a soft-landing beam dump. This design simplifies the beam energy recovery power supply system an reduces the heat flux on the beam dump. Residual ions are separated into negative and positive ions by the stray magnetic field from the Fusion Engineering Reactor (FER). The next Japanese tokamak reactor. Each ion beam is also guided to the collector electrode and the soft-landing beam dump by the stray magnetic field. In the 500-keV/20-MW injector designed for FER, the total power efficiency can be improved from 46 to 59% by recovering the negative ions

  1. Beam emittance and beam disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam disruption during the collision of intense relativistic bunches has been studied by R. Hollebeek. In the case of oppositely charged bunches, focussing effects occur causing a decrease in the effective bunch cross section, and thereby an increase of luminosity by an enhancement factor H. The term disruption derives from the fact that the beam emittance changes markedly during the collision. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector having high sensitivity to fast neutrons and having low sensitivity to thermal neutrons is disposed for reducing influences of neutron detector signals on detection values of neutron fluxes when the upper end of control rod pass in the vicinity of the neutron flux detector. Namely, the change of the neutron fluxes is greater in the thermal neutron energy region while it is smaller in the fast neutron energy region. This is because the neutron absorbing cross section of B-10 used as neutron absorbers of control rods is greater in the thermal neutron region and it is smaller in the fast neutron region. As a result, increase of the neutron detection signals along with the local neutron flux change can be reduced, and detection signals corresponding to the reactor power can be obtained. Even when gang withdrawal of operating a plurality of control rods at the same time is performed, the reactor operation cycle can be measured accurately, thereby enabling to shorten the reactor startup time. (N.H.)

  3. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  4. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  5. Types of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation is based on the following areas: Types of Nuclear Reactors, coolant, moderator, neutron spectrum, fuel type, pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor pressurized heavy water (PHWR), gas-cooled reactor, RBMK , Nuclear Electricity Generation,Challenges in Nuclear Technology Deployment,EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR.

  6. Summary of the investigation of low temperature, low dose radiation effects on the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.; Alexander, D.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Robertson, J.P.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Experimental details, raw data, method of analysis and results are presented for the low-temperature, low-dose HFBR-V1 through V4 irradiation experiments conducted at ORNL on V-4Cr-4Ti specimens (US Fusion Program Heat No. 832665). Four separate capsules were irradiated in the V-15 and V-16 In-Core Thimbles of the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to doses of 0.1 or 0.5 dpa at temperatures between 100 and 505 C. Testing included microhardness, electrical resistivity, tensile properties, and Charpy impact properties.

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  8. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  9. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  10. Canada's Neutron Beam Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the current and planned activities of Canada's Neutron Beam Laboratory which is managed by the National Research Council of Canada. In 1994, Professor Bertram Brockhouse shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for his pioneering work carried out in this laboratory. He developed neutron scattering as a powerful and versatile tool for investigating materials at the level of molecules and nano structures. The neutron source for this work is Canada's NRU reactor located at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. This neutron source is also used for the production of medical isotopes, testing of components for the nuclear power stations and neutron scattering experiments on materials

  11. Reactor Physics and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Minhaj Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Questions regarding the feasibility of fusion power are examined, taking into account fuel cycles and breeding reactions, energy balance and reactor conditions, approaches to fusion, magnetic confinement, magneto hydro dynamic instabilities, micro instabilities, and the main technological problems which have to be solved. Basic processes and balances in fusion reactors are considered along with some aspects of the neutronics in fusion reactors, the physics of neutral beam heating, plasma heating by relativistic electrons, radiofrequency heating of fusion plasmas, adiabatic compression and ignition of fusion reactors, dynamics and control of fusion reactors, and aspects of thermal efficiency and waste heat. Attention is also given to fission-fusion hybrid systems, inertial-confinement fusion systems, the radiological aspects of fusion reactors, design considerations of fusion reactors, and a comparative study of the approaches to fusion power. The nuclear fuel cycle, also called nuclear fuel chain, is the progression of nuclear fuel through a series of differing stages. It consists of steps in the front end, which are the preparation of the fuel, steps in the service period in which the fuel is used during reactor operation, and steps in the back end, which are necessary to safely manage, contain, and either reprocess or dispose of spent nuclear fuel. If spent fuel is not reprocessed, the fuel cycle is referred to as an open fuel cycle (or a once-through fuel cycle; if the spent fuel is reprocessed, it is referred to as a closed fuel cycle..

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover gas spaces for primary coolant vessel, such as a reactor container, a pump vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger vessel are in communication with each other by an inverted U-shaped pressure conduit. A transmitter and a receiver are disposed to the pressure conduit at appropriate positions. If vibration frequencies (pressure vibration) from low frequency to high frequency are generated continuously from the transmitter to the inside of the communication pipe, a resonance phenomenon (air-column resonance oscillation) is caused by the inherent frequency or the like of the communication pipe. The frequency of the air-column resonance oscillation is changed by the inner diameter and the clogged state of the pipelines. Accordingly, by detecting the change of the air-column oscillation characteristics by the receiver, the clogged state of the flow channels in the pipelines can be detected even during the reactor operation. With such procedures, steams of coolants flowing entrained by the cover gases can be prevented from condensation and coagulation at a low temperature portion of the pipelines, otherwise it would lead clogging in the pipelines. (I.N.)

  13. Review of the current status of linear hybrid reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review was made of the current status of linear fusion-fission hybrid reactor design studies in the USA. The linear hybrid reactor concepts reviewed include the linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor being studied at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, the electron beam-heated solenoid hybrid reactor under development at Physics International Co., the laser-heated solenoid hybrid reactor being investigated at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., and the linear fusion waste burning reactor being studied at General Atomic Company. The discussion addresses confinement and heating mechanisms for each concept, as well as the hybrid blanket designs. The current state of the four reactor designs is summarized and the performance of the various concepts compared

  14. Research Reactors Types and Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor, in gross terms, is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate. The nuclei of fuel heavy atoms (mostly 235U or 239Pu), when struck by a slow neutron, may split into two or more smaller nuclei as fission products,releasing energy and neutrons in a process called nuclear fission. These newly-born fast neutrons then undergo several successive collisions with relatively low atomic mass material, the moderator, to become thermalized or slow. Normal water, heavy water, graphite and beryllium are typical moderators. These neutrons then trigger further fissions, and so on. When this nuclear chain reaction is controlled, the energy released can be used to heat water, produce steam and drive a turbine that generates electricity. The fission process, and hence the energy release, are controlled by the insertion (or extraction) of control rods through the reactor. These rods are strongly neutron absorbents, and thus only enough neutrons to sustain the chain reaction are left in the core. The energy released, mostly in the form of heat, should be continuously removed, to protect the core from damage. The most significant use of nuclear reactors is as an energy source for the generation of electrical power and for power in some military ships. This is usually accomplished by methods that involve using heat from the nuclear reaction to power steam turbines. Research reactors are used for radioisotope production and for beam experiments with free neutrons. Historically, the first use of nuclear reactors was the production of weapons grade plutonium for nuclear weapons. Currently all commercial nuclear reactors are based on nuclear fission. Fusion power is an experimental technology based on nuclear fusion instead of fission.

  15. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  16. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  17. Horizontal beam tubes in FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new research reactor in Garching FRM-II is equipped with 10 leak tight horizontal beam tubes (BT1 - BT10), each of them consisting of a beam tube structure taking an insert with neutron channels. The design of all beam tube structures is similar whereas the inserts are adapted to the special requirements of the using of each beam tube. Inside the reflector tank the beam tube structures are shaped by the inner cones which are made of Al-alloy with circular and rectangular cross sections. They are located in the region of maximum neutron flux (exception BT10), they are directly connected to the flanges of the reflector tank, their lengths are about 1.5 m (exception BT10) and their axes are directed tagentially to the core centre thus contributing to a low γ-noise at the experiments. (orig.)

  18. Alternate fusion concepts as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent successes of the tokamak concept of controlled fusion have not quenched interest in possible alternatives. This report summarizes a recent study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, which tried to quantify which hoped-for advantages persist when a serious attempt is made to design reactor plants around eight specific alternative concepts (Electron Beam-Heated Solenoid, Elmo Bumpy Torus, Fast Liner, Laser-Heated Solenoid, Linear Theta-Pinch, LINUS, Reversed-Field-Pinch, and Shock-Heated Annulus) addressing key technological issues and economic issues for each concept. The study aimed to isolate the cost drivers for the reactor plant and to compare their capital cost per kilowatt of electricity as well as address the impact of technological difficulty. Results of the study indicated that reactor block costs for the eight plants studied represent a substantially larger fraction of total plant costs than the corresponding fraction for light water reactors; bottom line costs of $ /kWe range over a factor of about two with cost drivers being the physical size of the power producing plasma and the relative magnitudes of the circulating power fraction and the nature of the power circulation. Other cost considerations are also enumerated and the author concludes by noting that one value of the engineering study and cost estimate has been to quantify the relation between physics uncertainty and cost uncertainty

  19. ITER Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Japanese design proposal of the ITER Neutral Beam Injection System (NBS) which is consistent with the ITER common design requirements is described. The injection system is required to deliver a neutral deuterium beam of 75MW at 1.3MeV to the reactor plasma and utilized not only for plasma heating but also for current drive and current profile control. The injection system is composed of 9 modules, each of which is designed so as to inject a 1.3MeV, 10MW neutral beam. The most important point in the design is that the injection system is based on the utilization of a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source which can produce an intense negative ion beam with high current density at a low source operating pressure. The design value of the source is based on the experimental values achieved at JAERI. The utilization of the cesium-seeded volume source is essential to the design of an efficient and compact neutral beam injection system which satisfies the ITER common design requirements. The critical components to realize this design are the 1.3MeV, 17A electrostatic accelerator and the high voltage DC acceleration power supply, whose performances must be demonstrated prior to the construction of ITER NBI system. (author)

  20. Plasma diagnostics of discharge channels for neutralized ion beam transport

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Most of the future accelerators will be high intensity machines delivering mega-watt beams for applications such as spallation neutron production, muon colliders, neutrino factories, nuclear-waste transmutation or inertial confinement fusion energy (IFE). Especially in the field of heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion, where space charge dominated multi kilo-ampere beams have to be transported over several meters through a reactor chamber to a mm-size target, some kind of beam neutral...

  1. Anomalous x-ray radiation of beam plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of non-equilibrium stationary plasma under the conditions of the planned plasma-chemical reactors based on beam-plasma discharge were investigated. The x-ray spectrum of the beam-plasma was measured and anomalous spectral properties were analyzed. Starting with some critical pressure the anomalous radiation was added to the classical bremsstrahlung spectrum. The occurrence of anomalous radiation can be used to diagnose the condition of beam transportation in such systems. (D.Gy.)

  2. A Mathematical Developed Model for Light Ion Beam Interactions with Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Mirfayzi, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Light Ion Beams are providing an efficient system for high energy applications using confinement reaction (ICF). This paper will demonstrate the mathematical properties of ion beams leaving ICF reactors and hitting a solid target. A single Hydrogen heavy nucleus current has been demonstrated using Child-Langmuir in an infinite radius as it leaves the reactor chamber. The maximum energy emission has been recorded by examining the total energy loss of the beam pulse using Bethe-Bloch (dE/dx) wh...

  3. Using Reactors to Measure $theta_{13}$

    CERN Document Server

    Shaevitz, M H

    2003-01-01

    A next-generation neutrino oscillation experiment using reactor neutrinos could give important information on the size of mixing angle $theta_{13}$. The motivation and goals for a new reactor measurement are discussed in the context of other measurements using off-axis accelerator neutrino beams. The reactor measurements give a clean measure of the mixing angle without ambiguities associated with the size of the other mixing angles, matter effects, and effects due to CP violation. The key question is whether a next-generation experiment can reach the needed sensitivity goals to make a measurement for $sin^{2}2theta_{13}$ at the 0.01 level. The limiting factors associated with a reactor disappearance measurement are described with some ideas of how sensitivities can be improved. Examples of possible experimental setups are presented and compared with respect to cost and sensitivity.

  4. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent shocks exerted on a vent head due to pool-swell caused within a pressure suppression chamber (disposed in a torus configuration around the dry well) upon loss of coolant accident in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The following relationship is established between the volume V (m3) of a dry well and the ruptured opening area A (m2) at the boundary expected upon loss of coolant accident: V >= 30340 (m) x A Then, the volume of the dry well is made larger than the ruptured open area, that is, the steam flow rate of leaking coolants upon loss of coolant accident to decrease the pressure rise in the dry well at the initial state where loss of coolant accident is resulted. Accordingly, the pressure of non-compressive gases jetted out from the lower end of the downcomer to the pool water is decreased to suppress the pool-swell. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Method of surface treatment for structure and facility in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfaces of weld zones, in contact with liquid, of structures and equipments in a reactor made of austenite stainless steels disposed in the reactor water of a reactor pressure vessel are melted by laser. Then, heat affected zones and grain boundary segregation portions, etc. with low corrosion resistance formed under irradiation are melted by laser beams and the molten surfaces are quenched by the surrounding reactor water. In this case, ferrites are formed to provide a two-phase structure. This can improve the corrosion resistance. Further, plasma technology can be used instead of the laser method. (I.S.)

  6. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: (1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, (2) operating experiences, (3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, (4) irradiation studies, (5) irradiation facilities, (6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and (7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  7. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: 1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, 2) operating experiences, 3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, 4) irradiation studies, 5) irradiation facilities, 6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and 7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  9. Shielding analyses for design of the upgraded JRR-3 research reactor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding analyses of neutron beam holes have been presented for the shield design of the upgraded JRR-3 research reactor. Description is given about the calculational procedures and results for the standard beam hole, the beam hole for neutron radiography and the guide tunnels. The streaming analyses are made by using the MORSE-CG and DOT 3.5 codes. (author)

  10. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  11. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively. PMID:26595774

  12. Comparison of activation in fission and fusion spectrum neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The materials used in the construction of fusion reactors have to satisfy a number of criterions, one of the important being low activation due to neutron irradiation. Experimental analysis of the activation of candidate materials for the first wall is performed with the irradiation of samples in various neutron fields, frequently in the field of a fission reactor. In the present work a calculation is performed to compare the expected activation of candidate materials intended to be used for the first wall in fusion reactors with the activation of a sample of the same material in a fission reactor beam. The FISPACT code is used for activation calculations. An investigation, to what extent the results of activation in a fission spectrum neutron beam, where most neutrons have energies of less than 2 MeV, mimic the real situation in a fusion reactor with the peak neutron energy around 14 MeV, is performed. (author)

  13. Status report of Indonesian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of three Indonesian research reactor, its irradiation facilities and its future prospect are described. Since 1965 Triga Mark II 250 KW Bandung, has been in operation and in 1972 the design powers were increased to 1000 KW. Using core grid form Triga 250 KW BATAN has designed and constructed Kartini Reactor in Yogyakarta which started its operation in 1979. Both of this Triga type reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as training manpower in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production and beam research in solid state physics. Each of this reactor have strong cooperation with Bandung Institute of Technology at Bandung and Gajah Mada University at Yogyakarta which has a faculty of Nuclear Engineering. Since 1976 the idea to have high flux reactor has been foreseen appropriate to Indonesian intention to prepare infrastructure for nuclear industry for both energy and non-energy related activities. The idea come to realization with the first criticality of RSG-GAS (Multipurpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy) in July 1987 at PUSPIPTEK Serpong area. It is expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reached its full power of 30 MW and by end 1992 its expected that irradiation facilities will be utilized in the future for nuclear scientific and engineering work. (author)

  14. A novel reactor concept for boron neutron capture therapy: annular low-low power reactor (ALLPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, B.; Levine, S.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNC), originally proposed in 50's, has been getting renewed attention over the last {approx}10 years. This is in particular due to its potential for treating deep-seated brain tumors by employing epithermal neutron beams. Large (several MW) research reactors are currently used to obtain epithermal beams for BNCT, but because of cost and licensing issues it is not likely that such high-power reactors can be placed in regular medical centers. This paper describes a novel reactor concept for BNCT devised to overcome this obstacle. The design objective was to produce a beam of epithermal neutrons of sufficient intensity for BNCT at <50 kW using low enriched uranium. It is achieved by the annular reactor design, which is called Annular Low-Low Power Reactor (ALLPR). Preliminary studies using Monte Carlo simulations are summarized in this paper. The ALLPR should be relatively economical to build, and safe and easy to operate. This novel concept may increase the viability of using BNCT in medical centers worldwide. (author)

  15. Preliminary design of a tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the TARA mirror experiment as a possible tandem mirror reactor configuration. This is a preliminary study to size the coil structure based on using the smallest end cell axial length that physics and engineering allow, zeroing the central cell parallel currents and having interchange stability. The input powers are estimated for the final reactor design so a Q value may be estimated. The Q value is defined as the fusion power divided by the total injected power absorbed by the plasma. A computer study was performed on the effect of the transition size, the transition vertical spacing and transition current. These parameters affect the central cell parallel currents, the recircularization of the flux tube and the ratio of central cell beta to anchor beta needed for marginal stability. Two designs were identified. The first uses 100 keV and 13 keV neutral beams to pump the ions that trap in the thermal barrier. The Q value of this reactor is 11.3. The second reactor uses a pump beam at 40 keV. This energy is chosen because there is a resonance for the charge exchange cross section between D0 and He2+ at this energy, thus the alpha ash will be pumped along with the deuterium and tritium. The Q value of this reactor is 11.6

  16. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  17. RB reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical fluctuations of reactivity represent reactor noise. Analysis of reactor noise enables determining a series of reactor kinetic parameters. Fluctuations of power was measured by ionization chamber placed next to the tank of the RB reactor. The signal was digitized by an analog-digital converter. After calculation of the mean power, 3000 data obtained by sampling were analysed

  18. Beam quality measure for vector beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndagano, Bienvenu; Sroor, Hend; McLaren, Melanie; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Vector beams have found a myriad of applications, from laser materials processing to microscopy, and are now easily produced in the laboratory. They are usually differentiated from scalar beams by qualitative measures, for example, visual inspection of beam profiles after a rotating polarizer. Here we introduce a quantitative beam quality measure for vector beams and demonstrate it on cylindrical vector vortex beams. We show how a single measure can be defined for the vector quality, from 0 (purely scalar) to 1 (purely vector). Our measure is derived from a quantum toolkit, which we show applies to classical vector beams. PMID:27472580

  19. Decommissioning of TRIGA Mark II type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first research reactor in Korea, KRR 1, is a TRIGA Mark II type with open pool and fixed core. Its power was 100 kWth at its construction and it was upgraded to 250 kWth. Its construction was started in 1957. The first criticality was reached in 1962 and it had been operated for 36,000 hours. The second reactor, KRR 2, is a TRIGA Mark III type with open pool and movable core. These reactors were shut down in 1995, and the decision was made to decommission both reactors. The aim of the decommissioning activities is to decommission the KRR 2 reactor and decontaminate the residual building structures and site, and to release them as unrestricted areas. The KRR 1 reactor was decided to be preserve as a historical monument. A project was launched for the decommissioning of these reactors in 1997, and approved by the regulatory body in 2000. A total budget for the project was 20.0 million US dollars. It was anticipated that this project would be completed and the site turned over to KEPCO by 2010. However, it was discovered that the pool water of the KRR 1 reactor was leaked into the environment in 2009. As a result, preservation of the KRR 1 reactor as a monument had to be reviewed, and it was decided to fully decommission the KRR 1 reactor. Dismantling of the KRR 1 reactor takes place from 2011 to 2014 with a budget of 3.25 million US dollars. The scope of the work includes licensing of the decommissioning plan change, removal of pool internals including the reactor core, removal of the thermal and thermalizing columns, removal of beam port tubes and the aluminum liner in the reactor tank, removal of the radioactive concrete (the entire concrete structure will not be demolished), sorting the radioactive waste (concrete and soil) and conditioning the radioactive waste for final disposal, and final statuses of the survey and free release of the site and building, and turning over the site to KEPCO. In this paper, the current status of the TRIGA Mark-II type reactor

  20. Decommissioning of TRIGA Mark II type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Jeong, Gyeonghwan; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The first research reactor in Korea, KRR 1, is a TRIGA Mark II type with open pool and fixed core. Its power was 100 kWth at its construction and it was upgraded to 250 kWth. Its construction was started in 1957. The first criticality was reached in 1962 and it had been operated for 36,000 hours. The second reactor, KRR 2, is a TRIGA Mark III type with open pool and movable core. These reactors were shut down in 1995, and the decision was made to decommission both reactors. The aim of the decommissioning activities is to decommission the KRR 2 reactor and decontaminate the residual building structures and site, and to release them as unrestricted areas. The KRR 1 reactor was decided to be preserve as a historical monument. A project was launched for the decommissioning of these reactors in 1997, and approved by the regulatory body in 2000. A total budget for the project was 20.0 million US dollars. It was anticipated that this project would be completed and the site turned over to KEPCO by 2010. However, it was discovered that the pool water of the KRR 1 reactor was leaked into the environment in 2009. As a result, preservation of the KRR 1 reactor as a monument had to be reviewed, and it was decided to fully decommission the KRR 1 reactor. Dismantling of the KRR 1 reactor takes place from 2011 to 2014 with a budget of 3.25 million US dollars. The scope of the work includes licensing of the decommissioning plan change, removal of pool internals including the reactor core, removal of the thermal and thermalizing columns, removal of beam port tubes and the aluminum liner in the reactor tank, removal of the radioactive concrete (the entire concrete structure will not be demolished), sorting the radioactive waste (concrete and soil) and conditioning the radioactive waste for final disposal, and final statuses of the survey and free release of the site and building, and turning over the site to KEPCO. In this paper, the current status of the TRIGA Mark-II type reactor

  1. Beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main part of this thesis consists of 15 published papers, in which the numerical Beam Propagating Method (BPM) is investigated, verified and used in a number of applications. In the introduction a derivation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is presented to connect the beginning of the soliton papers with Maxwell's equations including a nonlinear polarization. This thesis focuses on the wide use of the BPM for numerical simulations of propagating light and particle beams through different types of structures such as waveguides, fibers, tapers, Y-junctions, laser arrays and crystalline solids. We verify the BPM in the above listed problems against other numerical methods for example the Finite-element Method, perturbation methods and Runge-Kutta integration. Further, the BPM is shown to be a simple and effective way to numerically set up the Green's function in matrix form for periodic structures. The Green's function matrix can then be diagonalized with matrix methods yielding the eigensolutions of the structure. The BPM inherent transverse periodicity can be untied, if desired, by for example including an absorptive refractive index at the computational window edges. The interaction of two first-order soliton pulses is strongly dependent on the phase relationship between the individual solitons. When optical phase shift keying is used in coherent one-carrier wavelength communication, the fiber attenuation will suppress or delay the nonlinear instability. (orig.)

  2. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  3. Experimental investigations of plasma lens focusing and plasma channel transport of heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Final focusing of ion beams and propagation in a reactor chamber are crucial questions for heavy ion beam driven Fusion. An alternative solution to ballistic quadrupole focusing, as it is proposed in most reactor studies today, is the utilization of the magnetic field produced by a high current plasma discharge. This plasma lens focusing concept relaxes the requirements for low emittance and energy spread of the driver beam significantly and allows to separate the issues of focusing, which can be accomplished outside the reactor chamber, and of beam transport inside the reactor. For focusing a tapered wall-stabilized discharge is proposed, a concept successfully demonstrated at GSI, Germany. For beam transport a laser pre-ionized channel can be used

  4. Status of Research Reactor Utilization in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil has four research reactors in operation: the IEA-R1, a pool type research reactor of 5 MW; the IPR-R1, a TRIGA Mark I type research reactor of 100 kW; the ARGONAUTA, an Argonaut type research reactor of 500 W; and the IPEN/MB-01 a critical facility of 100 W. Research reactor utilization has more than fifty years in Brazil. The first three reactors, constructed in the late 50's and early 60's at university campus in Sao Paulo, Belo Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro, had their utilization for training, teaching and nuclear research. The IPEN/MB-01, designed and constructed in IPEN in the late 80's, is utilized for the development and qualification of reactor physics calculation for PWR core application. The IEA-R1 has had its application and utilization increased through the years and it is presently used for radioisotope production, neutron beam application, neutrongraphy, neutron activation analysis, and limited fuel and material irradiation tests, besides the regular use for training and teaching. The low power of the reactor and the lack of hot cells for post irradiation analysis limits its technical application for the nuclear fuel industry. Brazil has two nuclear power plants in operation, one unit starting construction and four more units planned for the next two decades. Brazil has significant quantities of uranium ore and has expertise in all the fuel cycle steps, including uranium enrichment, and produces the fuel assemblies for the nuclear power plants. These industrial activities demand the need of material and fuel irradiation tests. IPEN produces radiopharmaceutical kits for the treatment of more than three million patients each year. The majority of the radiopharmaceutical kits is produced from imported radioisotopes. The increasing price and shortage of world supply of 99mTc leads also to the need of increasing the radioisotope production in Brazil. Due to these new demands, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission is analyzing the costs and benefits

  5. Microdosimetry of high LET therapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental microdosimetry of high LET therapeutic beams were presented. The cyclotron produced fast neutron beams at IMS, TAMVEC and NRL, a reactor fast neutron at YAYOI, a proctor beam at Harvard and a pion beam at TRIUMF are included. Measurements were performed with a conventional tissue equivalent spherical proportional counter with a logarithmic amplifier which made the recording and analysis quite simple. All the energy deposition spectra were analysed in the conventional manner and anti y F, anti y D as well as anti y D* were calculated. The spectra and their mean lineal energies showed wide variations, depending on the particle type, energy, position in phantom. Fractional contribution of elemental particles ( electron, muon, pion, proton, alpha and so on) to the total dose were analysed. For fast neutron beams, the y spectra stayed almost constant at any depth along the central axis in the phantom. The y spectra of proton beam changed slightly along the depth. On the other side, the y spectra of pion beam change drastically in the phantom between plateau and dose peak region. A novel technique of time-of-flight microdosimetry was employed, which made it possible to separate the fractional contribution of contaminant electrons and muons out of pions. Finally, a map of the radiation quality for all the beams is presented and its significances are discussed. (author)

  6. Status report of Indonesian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of the three Indonesia research reactors, their irradiation facilities and future prospect are given. The 250 kW Triga Mark II in Bandung has been in operation since 1965 and in 1972 its designed power was increased to 1000 kW. The core grid from the previous 250 kW Triga Mark II was then used by Batan for designing and constructing the Kartini reactor in Yogyakarta. This reactor commenced its operation in 1979. Both Triga reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as for manpower training in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production, and beam research in solid state physics. The Triga reactor management in Bandung has a strong cooperation with the Bandung Institute of Technology and the one in Yogyakarta with the Gadjah Mada University which has a Nuclear Engineering Department at its Faculty of Engineering. In 1976 there emerged an idea to have a high flux reactor appropriate for Indonesia's intention to prepare an infrastructure for both nuclear energy and non-energy industry era. Such an idea was then realized with the achievement of the first criticality of the RSG-GAS reactor at the Serpong area. It is now expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reach its full 30 MW power level and by the end of 1992 the irradiation facilities be utilizable fully for future scientific and engineering work. As a part of the national LEU fuel development program a study has been underway since early 1989 to convert the RSG-GAS reactor core from using oxide fuel to using higher loading silicide fuel. (author)

  7. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  8. Introduction of Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces development, status, supply and demand and resource of nuclear reactor. It deals with basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, which are reactor system, heat recovery in reactor core, structural feature in reactor, materials of structure in reactor, shielding of gamma ray, shielding of reactor, safety and environmental problem of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel and economical efficiency of nuclear energy.

  9. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  10. Research reactor's role in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a TRIGA MARK-II was constructed in 1962, new research activity of a general nature, utilizing neutrons, prevailed in Korea. Radioisotopes produced from the MARK-II played a good role in the 1960's in educating people as to what could be achieved by a neutron source. Because the research reactor had implanted neutron science in the country, another TRIGA MARK-III had to be constructed within 10 years after importing the first reactor, due to increased neutron demand from the nuclear community. With the sudden growth of nuclear power, however, the emphasis of research changed. For a while research activities were almost all oriented to nuclear power plant technology. However, the specifics of nuclear power plant technology created a need for a more highly capable research reactor like HANARO 30MWt. HANARO will perform well with irradiation testing and other nuclear programs in the future, including: production of key radioisotopes, doping of silicon by transmutation, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiments, cold neutron source. 3 tabs., 2 figs

  11. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  12. Research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  13. Research projects at the TRIGA-reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985 the thermalizing column was modified to a beam tube with a conical collimator for neutron radiography. A highly sophisticated sample and cassette changer will be constructed in the next months. The central channel of the thermal column is also used for neutron radiography especially for small objects. The four beam tubes of the TRIGA-reactor are intensively used for neutron spectroscopy, small angle scattering, neutron interferometry and investigations of magnetic structures with polarized neutrons. The neutron activation installation in the piecing beam tube is permanently used for various sample analysis using a ultrafast pneumatic transfer system. In addition to these experiments directly related to the TRIGA-reactor other research projects are carried out, some of them under an IAEA research contract which are mostly focused towards nuclear safeguards such as the magnetic scanning of power reactor fuel assemblies or the laser surveillance system of spent fuel pools. (author)

  14. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  15. Reference design for the standard mirror hybrid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, D.J.; Fink, J.H.; Galloway, T.R.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, J.D.; Devoto, R.S.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-05-22

    This report describes the results of a two-year study by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Co. to develop a conceptual design for the standard (minimum-B) mirror hybrid reactor. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing nuclear fuel (/sup 239/Pu) for consumption in fission power reactors (light water reactors). The deuterium-tritium plasma produces approximately 400 MW of fusion power with a plasma Q of 0.64. The fast-fission blanket, which is fueled with depleted uranium and lithium, generates sufficient tritium to run the reactor, has a blanket energy multiplication of M = 10.4, and has a net fissile breeding ratio of Pu/n = 1.51. The reactor has a net electrical output of 600 MWe, a fissile production of 2000 kg of plutonium per year (at a capacity factor of 0.74), and a net plant efficiency of 0.18. The plasma-containment field is generated by a Yin-Yang magnet using NbTi superconductor, and the neutral beam system uses positive-ion acceleration with beam direct conversion. The spherical blanket is based on gas-cooled fast reactor technology. The fusion components, blanket, and primary heat-transfer loop components are all contained within a prestressed-concrete reactor vessel, which provides magnet restraint and supports the primary heat-transfer loop and the blanket.

  16. Reference design for the standard mirror hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of a two-year study by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Co. to develop a conceptual design for the standard (minimum-B) mirror hybrid reactor. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing nuclear fuel (239Pu) for consumption in fission power reactors (light water reactors). The deuterium-tritium plasma produces approximately 400 MW of fusion power with a plasma Q of 0.64. The fast-fission blanket, which is fueled with depleted uranium and lithium, generates sufficient tritium to run the reactor, has a blanket energy multiplication of M = 10.4, and has a net fissile breeding ratio of Pu/n = 1.51. The reactor has a net electrical output of 600 MWe, a fissile production of 2000 kg of plutonium per year (at a capacity factor of 0.74), and a net plant efficiency of 0.18. The plasma-containment field is generated by a Yin-Yang magnet using NbTi superconductor, and the neutral beam system uses positive-ion acceleration with beam direct conversion. The spherical blanket is based on gas-cooled fast reactor technology. The fusion components, blanket, and primary heat-transfer loop components are all contained within a prestressed-concrete reactor vessel, which provides magnet restraint and supports the primary heat-transfer loop and the blanket

  17. Description of the Korean multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) was still under construction at the time of the conference, and was scheduled for completion in 1994. It has since been completed. Owned by Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), KMRR is designed for fuel and materials testing, production of key nuclides (including 99Mo, 131I, 192Ir, 60Co, and transmutation doped Si), neutron activation analysis, and neutron radiography. KMRR is a 30 MWth open pool type research reactor, with a forced upward light water moderator and coolant flow, and a heavy water annular reflector. The fuel is made from low-enriched U-Si-Al alloy, with finned aluminum cladding. Two configurations of fuel bundle have been designed, namely, hexagonal 36 element and circular 18 element. The reactor has seven tangential beam tubes, the position of which has been carefully selected to maximize thermal neutron flux while minimizing fast neutrons and gamma. Heat is transported to two heat exchangers by the primary coolant circuit, and thence by the secondary coolant circuit to a set of cooling towers. The reactor regulating system has two stepping motors that drive four hafnium control rods. The control functions are performed by two redundant programmable controllers. The reactor protection system is equipped with four hafnium shutoff rods driven by a fail-safe hydraulic circuit. The design of KMRR uses leading edge technology, and it might well figure among the best multipurpose research reactors in the world. 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. ORPHEE reactor. Upgrade of the installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed by the end of the seventies, the ORPHEE Reactor is equipped with two hydrogen cold sources, one hot source and six cold neutron guides. The neutron beams are extracted by nine beam ports and used in two experimental halls, the reactor hall and the neutron guide hall. After fourteen years of use, a modernisation programme is in progress. One step concerns the neutron guides, another one the cold sources with the modification of the cell geometry in order to increase the cold neutron flux. This operation requires the use a new cryogenerator to ensure liquefaction capabilities for the new cells. It is also scheduled to replace the Zircaloy core housing in order to avoid difficulties linked to the expansion under irradiation. (author)

  19. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of applicability studies for the negative ion-based neutral beam injector to the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER). The operation scenario of FER has been proposed to adopt the neutral injection method as one of candidates, which has three functions of heating, current drive and profile control. One of the fundamental requirements is the tangential injection of the neutral beam. For neutral beam injectors, three port sections are available. Supposing to adopt the beam line with the straight long neutralizer which has been designed in JAERI, the geometrical arrangement was determined so as to avoid any trouble to the reactor structure. The conceptual study for major components which compose the beam line system was carried out including the estimation of the neutron streaming. The power supply system was studied also and the work was concentrated on the acceleration power supply which requires the output voltage of 500 kV and fast cut-off time. A basic concept, in which a inverter with a AC switch is used and the frequency of the supplied AC line is increased was proposed. In these works, the configuration of the neutral beam injection system was detailed and it was shown that the beam line seems to be well implemented with the geometrical constraints related to the reactor configuration. (author)

  20. Accelerator-induced transients in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achieving higher particles energies and beam powers have long been the main focus of research in accelerator technology. Since Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADSRs) have become the subject of increasing interest, accelerator reliability and modes of operation have become important matters that require further research and development in order to accommodate the engineering and economic needs of ADSRs. This paper focuses on neutronic and thermo-mechanical analyses of accelerator-induced transients in an ADSR. Such transients fall into three main categories: beam interruptions (trips), pulsed-beam operation, and beam overpower. The concept of a multiple-target ADSR is shown to increase system reliability and to mitigate the negative effects of beam interruptions, such as thermal cyclic fatigue in the fuel cladding and the huge financial cost of total power loss. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of the temperature-to-reactivity feedback mechanisms in ADSRs. A comparison of shutdown mechanisms using control rods and beam cut-off highlights the intrinsic safety features of ADSRs. It is evident that the presence of control rods is crucial in an industrial-scale ADSR. This paper also proposes a method to monitor core reactivity online using the repetitive pattern of beam current fluctuations in a pulsed-beam operation mode. Results were produced using PTS-ADS, a computer code developed specifically to study the dynamic neutronic and thermal responses to beam transients in subcritical reactor systems.

  1. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent seismic vibrations of external buildings from transmitting to the side walls of a reactor container in a tank type FBR reactor building. Constitution: The reactor building is structured such that the base mat for a reactor container chamber and a reactor container is separated from the base mat for the walls of building, and gas-tight material such as silicon rubber is filled in the gap therebetween. With such a constitution, even if the crane-supporting wall vibrates violently upon occurrence of earthqualkes, the seismic vibrations do not transmit toward the reactor container chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis for Israel Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main objectives of reactor safety systems is to keep the reactor core in condition that does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational and accident conditions. This paper focuses on the analysis of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), which is one of the most severe scenarios among other hypothetical events such as reactivity induced accidents, loss of flow accident, etc. The analysis was carried out for the Israel Research Reactor 1 (IRR-1), which is a 5MW swimming pool type research reactor. The IRR-1 core consists of MTR highlyenriched uranium (HEU) fuel type, and is reflected by Graphite elements. During normal operation, the reactor core is cooled by downward forced flow of light water circulated by a primary cooling circuit pump. But during shutdown stage, the reactor core is cooled by upward natural convection flow through a safety flapper valve. There could be several primary causes to initiate a LOCA in research reactors, such as breaks in the piping system, ruptures of the beam tubes, and concrete wall failures of the reactor pool. Although probability of large break accident in research reactors is very low, once the accident occurs, it may cause major core damages, so it must be considered

  3. Related activities on management of ageing of Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Van Lam [Reactor Dept., Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    1998-10-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed in 1982 from the previous 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed. The renovated reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. Since then DNRR has been operated safely. Retained structures of the former reactor such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, the horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding are 35 years old. During the recent years, in-service inspection has been carried out, the reactor control and instrumentation system were renovated due to ageing and obsolescence of its components, reactor general inspection and refurbishment were performed. Efforts are being made to cope with ageing of old reactor components to maintain safe operation of the DNRR. (author)

  4. Shakedown analysis of fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakedown analyses of a typical fusion reactor first wall including coolant channels subjected to cyclic thermal/steady primary and cyclic primary/steady thermal stresses are carried out. The stresses are assumed to be predominantly of the bending type. The first cycle of loading/unloading is analyzed using elastic-plastic beam bending theory. The general problem of shakedown is solved using the shakedown theorem of perfect plasticity

  5. Present and possible utilization of PUSPATI reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of PUSPATI TRIGA Mark II Reactor (PTR) has increased reasonably well since its commissioning last year. PTR was used mainly for training of operators, neutron flux measurements and neutron activation analysis. However, the present utilization data indicates that further increase in PTR utilization to include teaching and the usage of the beam ports is desirable. Some possible areas of PTR applications in the future in relevance to our needs are also described in this paper. (author)

  6. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  7. Neutronics design of upgraded JRR-3 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research reactor JRR-3 is currently planned to be upgraded by replacing the core and related cooling system. The proposed reactor is a water-moderated and -cooled pool type of 20 MW thermal output. The neutronics calculation was carried out on the core using 20% enriched U.Alsub(x) fuel. The results show that the core performances, such as reactivity, neutron flux, and burnup, are sufficient for beam experiments, material testing, and isotope production. (author)

  8. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  9. Operation experience of the research reactor HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation experiences and the status of utilization facilities are presented in this paper. Problems in the reactor regulating system, diesel generator, cooling fan, and fuel handling are described, along with their causes and the actions taken. Most of the problems were caused by instrument error but the problem in the cooling fan could be classified as a human error. Such problems are minor but give a lesson in reactor operation and maintenance. More kinds of radioisotopes are being produced every year in parallel with improvements in production technology. The number of neutron activation analyses and neutron radiography tasks done for customers is increasing. In the Hanaro reactor five beam tubes are reserved for neutron beam research and in three of them the beam facilities are already installed or are in installation. Non-fissile material testing using a capsule was performed and fissile material tests are planned for the beginning of 1999. The fuel test loop is expected to hold its first fuel test in the year 2000. Fission molybdenum, cold neutron source, and neutron capture therapy are in the stage of conceptual or basic design. The use of HANARO will be more and more in demand as installation of utilization facilities increases year by year. (author)

  10. Beam imaging sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  11. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  12. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  13. Process heat reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consumption of heat, for industrial and domestic needs, takes up half of the national energy supply; direct utilization of the heat produced by nuclear reactors could therefore contribute to reduce the deficit in the energetic results. The restraints proper to heat consumption (dispersal and variety of consumers, irregular demand) involve the development of the heat transport system structures and adequate nuclear reactors. With this in view, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and Technicatome are developing the CAS reactor series, pressurized water reactors (PWR), (CAS 3G reactor with a power of 420 MW.th.), and the Thermos reactor (100 MW.th.), directly conceived to produce heat at 1200C and whose technology derives from the experimental pool reactors type. In order to prove the value of the Thermos design, an experimental reactor should soon be constructed in the Saclay nuclear research centre

  14. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  15. Standard mirror fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the work of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Division's reactor study group during FY 1976 on the standard mirror reactor. The ''standard'' mirror reactor is characterized as a steady state, neutral beam sustained, D-T fusioning plasma confined by a Yin-Yang magnetic mirror field. The physics parameters are obtained from the same physics model that explains the 2XIIB experiment. The model assumes that the drift cyclotron loss cone mode occurs on the boundary of the plasma, and that it is stabilized by warm plasma with negligible energy investment. The result of the study was a workable mirror fusion power plant, steady-state blanket removal made relatively simple by open-ended geometry, and no impurity problem due to the positive plasma potential. The Q (fusion power/injected beam power) turns out to be only 1.1 because of loss out the ends from Coulomb collisions, i.e., classical losses. This low Q resulted in 77% of the gross electrical power being used to power the injectors, thereby causing the net power cost to be high. The low Q stimulated an intensive search for Q-enhancement concepts, resulting in the LLL reactor design effort turning to the field reversal mirror and the tandem mirror, each having Q of order 5

  16. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source

  17. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    2000-07-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

  18. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 11, Reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the following chapters describing: Organisation of reactor operation (including operational safety, fuel management, and regulatory rules for RA reactor operation); Control and maintenance of reactor components (reactor core, nuclear fuel, heavy water and cover gas systems, mechanical structures, electric power supply system, reactor instrumentation); Quality assurance and Training of the reactor personnel

  19. Current Status and prospect of Research Reactor Utilization in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, I. C.; Jung, H. S.; Lee, K. H.; Park, S. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. H. [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    In Korea, two research reactors are in operation. HANARO, which is a 30 MW research reactor operated by KAERI is being used for neutron beam research, nuclear material research, RI production, NAA and NTD. Since the installation of a cold source in 2009, its role as a tool for basic science is increasing and it becomes a regional neutron source. AGN-201K, which is a 10 W educational reactor, is being operated by Kyung Hee University. With the benefits of zero power, it plays unique roles in training and education after refurbishment in 2007. In April 2012, the project to build a new research reactor, which is called KJRR, started and its design is being conducted. The major utilization of this reactor will be RI production and NTD. HANARO has a plan to expand its beam research capability by installing thermal beam guides, which is expected to be funded in 5 years. When these projects are completed, the role of three research reactors in Korea will expand for research, irradiation service, RI production and training and education.

  20. Prompt γ-ray analysis with reactor neutrons (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron-induced prompt γ-ray analysis (PGA) has recently evolved as a non-destructive analytical method which can determine light elements, such as H and B, and multi-elements as a result of increased analytical sensitivities by using low-energy guided neutron beams of nuclear reactors. Firstly, the principle, characteristics and history of reactor neutron-based PGA is described; then, the characteristics of PGA systems which are classified into internal, beam and guided beam types are described. Moreover, the basics and standardization for the elemental determination in PGA are described and various applications of PGA are reviewed. Finally, micro-sample, spot spatial-distribution analyses of elements using a cold-neutron micro beam produced by a neutron lens are described and the future development of the method is predicted. (author)

  1. Kartini Research Reactor prospective studies for neutron scattering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widarto [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, BATAN (Indonesia)

    1999-10-01

    The Kartini Research Reactor (KRR) is located in Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, Yogyakarta - Indonesia. The reactor is operated for 100 kW thermal power used for research, experiments and training of nuclear technology. There are 4 beam ports and 1 column thermal are available at the reactor. Those beam ports have thermal neutron flux around 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}s each other and used for sub critical assembly, neutron radiography studies and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Design of neutron collimator has been done for piercing radial beam port and the calculation result of collimated neutron flux is around 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s. This paper describes experiment facilities and parameters of the Kartini research reactor, and further more the prospective studies for neutron scattering application. The purpose of this paper is to optimize in utilization of the beam ports facilities and enhance the manpower specialty. The special characteristic of the beam ports and preliminary studies, pre activities regarding with neutron scattering studies for KKR is presented. (author)

  2. The Chernobylsk reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction, the safety philosophy, the major reactor physical parameters of RBMK-1000 type reactor units and the detailed description of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident, its causes and conclusions, the efforts to reduce the consequences on the reactor site and in the surroundings are discussed based on different types of Soviet documents including the report presented to the IAEA by the Soviet Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. (V.N.)

  3. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  4. Verification of the MCNP model for the University of Texas TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MCNP model of The University of Texas TRIGA reactor has been used for design calculations for the neutron collimator system in the through beam port. The TRIGA MCNP model was verified by comparing its results with experimentally determined values

  5. High solids fermentation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  6. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  7. Fusion reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of fusion reactor systems studies, the objectives of these studies are outlined and some recent conceptual reactor designs are described. The need for further studies in greater depth is indicated so that progress towards a commercial fusion reactor may be consolidated. (U.K.)

  8. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  9. National facility for neutron beam research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A national facility for neutron beam research is operated at the research reactor Dhruva in BARC. It includes single-crystal and powder diffractometers, a polarization analysis spectrometer, inelastic and quasi-elastic scattering spectrometers in the reactor hall, and smallangle scattering instruments and a polarized neutron reflectometer in the neutron-guide laboratory. The National facility is utilized in collaboration with various universities and other institutions. The talk will present our facilities and discuss examples of recent work.

  10. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs

  11. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  12. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  13. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  16. Preliminary modeling of BNCT beam tube on IRT in Sofia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko 72, Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: belousov@inrne.bas.bg; Ilieva, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko 72, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2009-07-15

    The technical design of the research reactor IRT in Sofia is in progress. It includes an arrangement for a BNCT facility for tumor treatment. Modeling of geometry and material composition of filter/collimator for the BNCT beam tube on IRT has been carried out following the beam tube configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor [Harling et al., 2002. The fission converter-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor. Nucl. Sci. Eng. 140, 223-240.] and taking into account an ability to include the tube into the IRT reactor geometry. The results of neutron and gamma transport calculations performed for the model have shown that the facility will be able to supply an epithermal neutron flux of about 5x10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with low contamination from fast neutrons and gamma rays that would be among the best facilities currently available. An optimiziation study has been performed for the beam collimator, following similar studies for the TAPIRO research reactor in Italy. [Nava et al., 2005. Monte Carlo optimization of a BNCT facility for treating brain gliomas at the TAPIRO reactor. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 116 (1-4), 475-481.].

  17. Preliminary modeling of BNCT beam tube on IRT in Sofia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical design of the research reactor IRT in Sofia is in progress. It includes an arrangement for a BNCT facility for tumor treatment. Modeling of geometry and material composition of filter/collimator for the BNCT beam tube on IRT has been carried out following the beam tube configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor [Harling et al., 2002. The fission converter-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor. Nucl. Sci. Eng. 140, 223-240.] and taking into account an ability to include the tube into the IRT reactor geometry. The results of neutron and gamma transport calculations performed for the model have shown that the facility will be able to supply an epithermal neutron flux of about 5x109 n cm-2 s-1, with low contamination from fast neutrons and gamma rays that would be among the best facilities currently available. An optimiziation study has been performed for the beam collimator, following similar studies for the TAPIRO research reactor in Italy. [Nava et al., 2005. Monte Carlo optimization of a BNCT facility for treating brain gliomas at the TAPIRO reactor. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 116 (1-4), 475-481.

  18. Upgrading I and C for the Es Salam research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Es Salam is a multi-purpose research reactor intended for the production of the radio elements, material tests, education and training. It serves also as a source for neutron beams used by chemists, biologists, metallurgists and physicists for fundamental research and applications. The main task of the Es Salam Reactor Operation Division is to ensure a safe and reliable operation of the reactor. With this objective in hand, the Operation Division is responsible for updating the safety measures and conditions in the installation for the reactor equipments and systems. Due to the increased demand for experiences and to the ageing effects, modification and modernization of some safety items become necessary in comparison with state of the art installations. Furthermore, the technological advances and the development and introduction of new instruments, components and systems increased the need for modification. In this paper, we present the new I and C system which will be used for the Es Salam research reactor

  19. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPRTM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENATM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENATM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  20. Research Reactor: A Powerhouse of Nuclear Technology in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear era in Korea was opened with the 100 kW KRR-1 of which construction started in 1959. The second research reactor, 2 MW KRR-2, was finished in 1972, around when the first nuclear power plant project was launched. Then the next research reactor HANARO, a 30 MW multi-purpose reactor, started the operation in 1995 and has made the technologies for the research reactor development and utilization matured. The competitiveness of Korean research reactor technology was acknowledged by being selected as the supplier of 5 MW JRTR for Jordan. In addition, Korea is sharing its research reactor technologies with many other countries in the areas of training, engineering service, neutron beam instrument manufacturing, and supply of RI goods production equipment and of the advanced research reactor fuel material. KAERI, as a nuclear research institute, has a well-established R and D infrastructure together with the research reactor operation and utilization technology. It can contribute for the new comers to establish a research reactor facility as well as a research environment using the facility as a tool to build-up their nuclear technology and service capability for their public. (author)

  1. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  2. Filtered neutron beams at the FMRB - review and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of our experience with filtered neutron beams installed in beam tubes of the Research and Measurement Reactor Braunschweig since 1976: Desing of the filters and measurement of the beam parameters are reported and an outline of the research work done with the beams is given. The present status of the irradiation facility, which consists of 5 beams (144 keV, 24.5 keV, 2 keV, 0.2 keV and thermal neutrons), is described in some detail to allow understanding of the physical as well as the technical prerequisites for performing calibrations of neutron measuring instruments. An appendix contains the actual beam parameters. (orig.)

  3. The Maple reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  4. High temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements

  5. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  6. Reactor Safety: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Reactor Safety Division focuses on the development of expertise on materials behaviour under irradiation for fission and fusion oriented applications. Furthermore, as nuclear energy needs international public acceptance with respect to safety and efficient management of natural resources and wants to reduce the burden of nuclear waste, the Reactor Safety Division enhanced its efforts to develop the MYRRHA project. MYRRHA, an accelerator driven sub-critical system, might have the potential to cope in Europe with the above mentioned constraints on acceptability and might serve as a technological platform for GEN IV reactor development, in particular the Liquid Metal Fast Reactor.The Reactor Safety Division gathers three research entities that are internationally recognised: the Reactor Materials Research department, the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA department and the Instrumentation department.The objectives of Reactor Materials Research are: to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials and nuclear fuels used in present and future nuclear power industry; to perform research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material and fuel behaviour under or after irradiation; to contribute to the interpretation and modelling of the materials and fuels behaviour in order to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the Reactor Materials Research department concentrate on four distinct disciplines: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel embrittlement Stress corrosion cracking in reactor coolant environment, including Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; Nuclear Fuel characterisation and development of new fuel types for commercial and test reactors. Development of materials for Fusion and advanced nuclear fission reactors. The safe operation of present nuclear power plants relies primarily on the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel

  7. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  8. An optimized design of rectangle pumping cell for nuclear reactor pumped laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, J.-S.; Chen, L.-X.; Zhao, Z.-M.; Pan, X.-B.; Jing, C.-Y.; Zhao, X.-Q.; Liu, F.-H. [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2003-03-01

    Basing on our research of energy deposition in RPL (Reactor Pumped Laser) pumping cell and the laser power efficiency, a RPL test device on Pulsed Reactor has been designed. In addition, the laser beam power of the RPL test device is estimated in the paper. (author)

  9. Reactor operations informal montly report, May 1, 1995--May 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is an informal progress report for the operational performance of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor, for the month of May, 1995. Both machines ran well during this period, with no reportable instrumentation problems, all scheduled maintenance performed, and only one reportable occurance, involving a particle on Vest Button, Personnel Radioactive Contamination

  10. Examples of the work of the Health Physics Division of the Austrian TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It will be reported about some problems of radiation protection which arise during the operation of the Austrian TRIGA reactor. Determination of noble gas concentration in the gaseous effluent. Determination of aerosol activity in the gaseous effluent. Levels of dose- equivalent rate on the shieldings of the beam holes. Cases of contamination during the reactor operation. (author)

  11. The applications of research reactors. Report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owners and operators of many research reactors are finding that their facilities are not being utilized as fully as they might wish. Perhaps the original mission of the reactor has been accomplished or a particular analysis is now performed better in other ways. In addition, the fact that a research reactor exists and is available does not guarantee that users will come seeking to take advantage of the facility. Therefore, many research reactor owners and operators recognize that there is a need to develop a strategic plan for long term sustainability, including the 'marketing' of their facilities. An important first element in writing a strategic plan is to evaluate the current and potential capabilities of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to assist in such an evaluation by providing some factual and advisory information with respect to all of the current applications of research reactors. By reference to this text, each facility owner and operator will be able to assess whether or not a new application is feasible with the reactor, and what will be required to develop capability in that application. Applications fall into four broad categories: human resource development, irradiations, extracted beam work and testing. The human resource category includes public information, training and education and can be accomplished by any reactor. Irradiation applications involves inserting material into the reactor to induce radioactivity for analytical purposes, to produce radioisotopes or to induce radiation damage effects. Almost all reactors can be utilized for some irradiation applications, but as the reactor flux gets higher the range of potential uses gets larger. Beam work usually includes using neutron beams outside of the reactor for a variety of analytical purposes. Because of the magnitude of the fluxes needed at some distance from the core, most beam work can only be performed by the intermediate and higher powered research reactors. Testing nuclear

  12. Ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  13. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  14. Two-beam type IH-RFQ linear accelerator for low-energy and high intensity heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a two-beam type IH-RFQ (Interdigital H type Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac system to proof the principle of a multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac in Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology. The multi-beam type RFQ linac has several beam channels in a cavity for accelerating high intensity and low energy heavy ion beams. The developed system consists of a two-beam type IH-RFQ cavity as a prototype of the multi-beam type cavity, a two-beam type laser ion source with DPIS (Direct Plasma Injection Scheme) and beam analyzers mainly. A a result of the beam acceleration test, the linac system accelerates carbon ions from 5 keV/u to 60 keV/u and generates about 108 mA (2x54 mA/channel) in the total output current. In this paper, we describe the development of the linac system and some results of the beam acceleration test. (author)

  15. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  16. Development of underwater laser beam welding equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshiba has developed various laser-based maintenance and repair technologies and already applied to nuclear power plants. Laser beam welding technology has been developed as an SCC countermeasure for aged components in PWRs and BWRs. This technology can also be used underwater by blowing shielding gas for creating a local dry area. This welding equipment has damage detecting function of optical elements such as windows and optical fiber cables, and the laser beam spot position and diameter can be adjusted. These designs have improved safety and welding quality. In this report, the outline of the underwater laser beam welding for Reactor Coolant System nozzles of PWRs are presented, especially focused on the device configurations. (author)

  17. Feasibility of Colliding-beam fast-fission reactor via 238U80++238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV beam with suppressed plutonium and direct conversion of fission fragment (FF) energy into electricity and/or Rocket propellant with high specific impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Tim; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-uranium colliding beam experiment1, used fully ionized 238U92+ at energy 100GeV --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV. Using a simple model1 fission σf ~ 100 b. Suppression of Pu by a factor of 106 will be achieved because NO thermal neutron fission can take place; only fast, 1-3 MeV, where σabs is negligible. Direct conversion of 95% of 430 MeV produced is carried by electrically charged FFs which are magnetically funneled for direct conversion of energy of FFs via electrostatic decelerators4,11. 90% of 930 MeV is electrically recoverable. Depending on the assumptions, we project electric _ power density production of 20 to 200 MWe m-3, equivalent to Thermal 1.3 - 13 GWthm-3. If one-half of unburned U is used for propulsion while rest powers system, heavy FF ion mass provides specific impulse Isp = 106 sec., 103 times higher than current rocket engines.

  18. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  19. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  20. The current status of Bandung Triga Mark II reactor, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Bandung TRIGA Mark II Reactor - Indonesia was started-up on October 10, 1964 and it has been operated at power level of 250 kw. The facility has been, operated for research, production of radioisotopes and training. In 1971, the reactor has been upgraded from 250 kw to 1000 kw. Since that time the facility has been safely operating at various power levels of a maximum 1000 kw until February 1996, even though the reactor tank is kept unchanged. For a highly reliable reactor that can back-up the Ga Siwabessy Multipurpose Reactor - Jakarta, Indonesia, in producing sufficient radioisotopes, a higher power reactor is needed. This can be accomplished by increasing the thermal power of current TRIGA Mark II Bandung Reactor to 2000 kw as well as by enhancing the inherent and engineered safety features of the current reactor. The upgrading of reactor power shall ensure the increasing of neutron flux in the beam ports; hence the experiments such as neutron radiography, time of flight spectrometry and other nuclear physic experiments can be conducted better. For that the reactor tank, the number and configuration of fuel element, instrumentation and control rod, primary cooling system, secondary cooling system, water treatment system, shielding, etc. have been changed, and an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was added. One additional control rod, core configuration modification and enhancement of reactor shielding, shall increase the safety margin so that the reactor could be operated at a maximum power of 2000 kw. At the middle of May 2000 cold test (non-nuclear commissioning) was done, and continued to hot test (nuclear commissioning). Since June 24, 2000 the TRIGA Mark II Bandung has been operated at 2000 kw

  1. RMB. The new Brazilian multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil has four research reactors (RR) in operation: IEA-R1, a 5 MW pool type RR; IPR-R1, a 100 kW TRIGA type RR; ARGONAUTA, a 500 W Argonaut type RR, and IPEN/MB-01, a 100 W critical facility. The first three were constructed in the 50's and 60's, for teaching, training, and nuclear research, and for many years they were the basic infrastructure for the Brazilian nuclear developing program. The last, IPEN/MB-01, is the result of a national project developed specifically for qualification of reactor physics codes. Considering the relative low power of Brazilian research reactors, with exception of IEAR1, none of the other reactors are feasible for radioisotope production, and even IEA-R1 has a limited capacity. As a consequence, since long ago, 100% of the Mo-99 needed to attend Brazilian nuclear medicine services has been imported. Because of the high dependence on external supply, the international Moly-99 supply crisis that occurred in 2008/2009 affected significantly Brazilian nuclear medicine services, and as presented in previous IAEA events, in 2010 Brazilian government formalized the decision to build a new research reactor. The new reactor named RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) will be a 30 MW open pool type reactor, using low enriched uranium fuel. The facility will be part of a new nuclear research centre, to be built about 100 kilometres from Sao Paulo city, in the southern part of Brazil. The new nuclear research centre will have several facilities, to use thermal and cold neutron beams; to produce radioisotopes; to perform neutron activation analysis; and to perform irradiations tests of materials and fuels of interest for the Brazilian nuclear program. An additional facility will be used to store, for at least 100 years, all the fuel used in the reactor. The paper describes the main characteristics of the new centre, emphasising the research reactor and giving a brief description of the laboratories that will be constructed, It also presents the

  2. RMB. The new Brazilian multipurpose research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrotta, Jose Augusto; Soares, Adalberto Jose [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Brazil has four research reactors (RR) in operation: IEA-R1, a 5 MW pool type RR; IPR-R1, a 100 kW TRIGA type RR; ARGONAUTA, a 500 W Argonaut type RR, and IPEN/MB-01, a 100 W critical facility. The first three were constructed in the 50's and 60's, for teaching, training, and nuclear research, and for many years they were the basic infrastructure for the Brazilian nuclear developing program. The last, IPEN/MB-01, is the result of a national project developed specifically for qualification of reactor physics codes. Considering the relative low power of Brazilian research reactors, with exception of IEAR1, none of the other reactors are feasible for radioisotope production, and even IEA-R1 has a limited capacity. As a consequence, since long ago, 100% of the Mo-99 needed to attend Brazilian nuclear medicine services has been imported. Because of the high dependence on external supply, the international Moly-99 supply crisis that occurred in 2008/2009 affected significantly Brazilian nuclear medicine services, and as presented in previous IAEA events, in 2010 Brazilian government formalized the decision to build a new research reactor. The new reactor named RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) will be a 30 MW open pool type reactor, using low enriched uranium fuel. The facility will be part of a new nuclear research centre, to be built about 100 kilometres from Sao Paulo city, in the southern part of Brazil. The new nuclear research centre will have several facilities, to use thermal and cold neutron beams; to produce radioisotopes; to perform neutron activation analysis; and to perform irradiations tests of materials and fuels of interest for the Brazilian nuclear program. An additional facility will be used to store, for at least 100 years, all the fuel used in the reactor. The paper describes the main characteristics of the new centre, emphasising the research reactor and giving a brief description of the laboratories that will be constructed, It also

  3. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.)

  4. Intense positron beams: linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid-state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons were produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters were determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible. 10 references, 1 figure

  5. Measurement and simulation of the TRR BNCT beam parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza; Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser; Golshanian, Mohadeseh; Ghods, Hossein; Ezzati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Haddadi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the configuration of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) thermal column has been modified and a proper thermal neutron beam for preclinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been obtained. In this study, simulations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the BNCT beam parameters including the beam uniformity, the distribution of the thermal neutron dose, boron dose, gamma dose in a phantom and also the Therapeutic Gain (TG). To do this, the entire TRR structure including the reactor core, pool, the thermal column and beam tubes have been modeled using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. To measure in-phantom dose distribution a special head phantom has been constructed and foil activation techniques and TLD700 dosimeter have been used. The results show that there is enough uniformity in TRR thermal BNCT beam. TG parameter has the maximum value of 5.7 at the depth of 1 cm from the surface of the phantom, confirming that TRR thermal neutron beam has potential for being used in treatment of superficial brain tumors. For the purpose of a clinical trial, more modifications need to be done at the reactor, as, for example design, and construction of a treatment room at the beam exit which is our plan for future. To date, this beam is usable for biological studies and animal trials. There is a relatively good agreement between simulation and measurement especially within a diameter of 10 cm which is the dimension of usual BNCT beam ports. This relatively good agreement enables a more precise prediction of the irradiation conditions needed for future experiments.

  6. Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internals of Liquid Metal Reactor by using Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Jae Han

    2006-02-15

    The primary components such as a reactor core, heat exchangers, pumps and internal structures of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection and continuous monitoring as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures. Reactor core and internal structures of LMR can not be visually examined due to an opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing and remote inspection techniques by using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the in-service inspection of reactor internals. The remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic wave have been developed and applied for the visualization and ISI of reactor internals. The under sodium viewing technique has a limitation for the application of LMR due to the high temperature and irradiation environment. In this study, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium viewing and remote inspection. The Lamb wave propagation of a waveguide sensor has been analyzed and the zero-order antisymmetric A{sub 0} plate wave was selected as the application mode of the sensor. The A{sub 0} plate wave can be propagated in the dispersive low frequency range by using a liquid wedge clamped to the waveguide. A new technique is presented which is capable of steering the radiation beam angle of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the sensor assembly. The steering function of the ultrasonic radiation beam can be achieved by a frequency tuning method of the excitation pulse in the dispersive range of the A{sub 0} mode. The technique provides an opportunity to overcome the scanning limitation of a waveguide sensor. The beam steering function has been evaluated by an experimental verification. The ultrasonic C-scanning experiments are performed in water and the feasibility of the ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been verified. The various remote

  7. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  8. Evaluation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel elements. The maximum thermal power and the thermal neutron flux are 10 MW and 2x1014 n/cm2 see respectively. The reactor has been used for various experiments such as solid state physics, material irradiation, reactor fuel irradiation and radioisotope production. The JMTR is a multi-purpose tank type material testing reactor, and light water moderator and coolant, operated at 50 MW. The evaluation of lower enriched fuel and its consequences for both reactors is considered more especially

  9. The nuclear soliton reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic reactor physics of a completely novel nuclear fission reactor design - the soliton-reactor - is presented on the basis of a simple model. In such a reactor, the neutrons in the critical region convert either fertile material in the adjacent layers into fissile material or reduce the poisoning of fissile material in such a manner that successively new critical regions emerge. The result is an autocatalytically driven burn-up wave which propagates throughout the reactor. Thereby, the relevant characteristic spatial distributions (neutron flux, specific power density and the associated particle densities) are solitons - wave phenomena resulting from non-linear partial differential equations which do not change their shape during propagation. A qualitativley new kind of harnessing nuclear fission energy may become possible with fuel residence times comparable with the useful lifetime of the reactor system. In the long run, fast breeder systems which exploit the natural uranium and thorium resources, without any reprocessing capacity are imaginable. (orig.)

  10. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  11. Fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  12. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  14. PFBR reactor protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design philosophy adopted for Prototype Fast breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a classical one and has the following features: triplicated sensors for measuring important safety parameters; two independent reactor protection Logic Systems based on solid state devices; reactivity control achieved by control rods; gas equipped modules at the core blanket interface providing negative reactivity. Design verification of these features showed that safety of the reactor can be achieved by a traditional approach since the inherent features of LMFBR make this easy

  15. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  16. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  17. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  18. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  19. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  20. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)