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Sample records for beam radiation therapy

  1. Partial breast radiation therapy - external beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinoma of the breast - partial radiation therapy; Partial external beam radiation - breast; Intensity-modulated radiation therapy - breast cancer; IMRT - breast cancer WBRT; Adjuvant partial breast - IMRT; APBI - IMRT; ...

  2. Radiation therapy apparatus having retractable beam stopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coad, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a radiation therapy apparatus which utilized a linear translation mechanism for positioning a beam stopper. An apparatus is described wherein the beam stopper is pivotally attached to the therapy machine with an associated drive motor in such a way that the beam stopper retracts linearly

  3. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  4. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  5. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  6. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  7. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  8. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a highly...

  9. External beam radiation therapy for recurrent sigmoid colorectal cancer. Retrospective analysis by group comparison between the radiation therapy alone and the radiation therapy combined with other therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churei, Hisahiko; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hiraki, Yoshiyuki; Baba, Yasutaka; Hokotate, Hirohumi; Nakajo, Masayuki; Ohkubo, Kouichi; Miyaji, Noriaki

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate retrospectively clinical efficacy of curativeintent external beam radiation therapy for recurrent sigmoid colorectal cancer. As the radiation therapy of higher dose level combined with other therapies might improve pain control, tumor response, and prognosis, the total dose over 60 Gy was delivered except cases that were received surgery for the recurrent tumor. The study population consisted of 25 patients received the radiation therapy alone (RTA) and 24 patients received the radiation therapy combined with other one or two treatment modalities (RTC), which included surgery (tumor resection) in 15 cases, chemotherapy (low dose daily CDDP) in 13 cases, and hyperthermia in 6 cases. They received the radiation therapy from January, 1989 to June, 1996. Data on pain relief and tumor response were compared between the groups of RTA and RTC. The effect on pain relief was not different between the two groups. Tumor response appeared to be high in the patients combined with chemotherapy, but the difference was not statistically significant between the groups. There were no differences in the prognosis by the recurrent tumor size, the pain relief, and the tumor response. There was a statistically significant difference in the prognosis between the groups with and without extrapelvic distant metastases. A more effective treatment modality combined with the external radiation therapy is necessary to improve the clinical efficacy for the recurrent sigmoid colorectal cancer. (author)

  10. Dosimetry of beams for negative pi-meson radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Several new facilities have been built in the last few years which can produce high intensity beams of pions. As a result, a significant amount of new data related to pion dosimetry is available. Results of beam composition, beam shaping, and collimation are given along with depth dose curves and isodose contours. Experimental data which describe the radiation quality of pion beams and the change in radiation quality with position are presented. Experimental data determining the fraction of the dose resulting from neutrons are discussed. The present techniques used in pion dosimetry are summarized, and those areas of pion dosimetry which require additional effort in order to achieve routine treatment planning for patients are reviewed

  11. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOEBRT) for carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Konski, A.A.; Merrick, H.W. III; Bronn, D.G.; Schifeling, D.; Kamen, C.

    1991-01-01

    The abdominal cavities of 50 patients were explored in a specially constructed intraoperative radiotherapy operating amphitheater at the Medical College of Ohio. Twenty-six patients were treated with intraoperative and postoperative precision high dose external beam therapy, 12 with intraoperative irradiation but no external beam therapy, and 12 with palliative surgery alone. All but two patients completed the postoperative external beam radiation therapy as initially prescribed. The median survival time for patients treated with palliative surgery alone was 4 months, and that for patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy without external beam therapy was 3.5 months. Patients undergoing intraoperative irradiation and external beam radiation therapy had a median survival time of 10.5 months. Four patients died within 30 days of surgery and two patients died of gastrointestinal hemorrhage 5 months posttreatment

  12. Expanding options in radiation oncology: neutron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Twelve years experience with neutron beam therapy in Britain, the USA, Europe and Japan shows that local control is achievable in late-stage epidermoid cancer somewhat more frequently than with conventional radiotherapy. Tumours reputed to be radioresistant (salivary gland, bladder, rectosigmoid, melanoma, bone and soft-tissue sarcomas) have proved to be particularly responsive to neutrons. Pilot studies in brain and pancreatic tumours suggest promising new approaches to management of cancer in these sites. The availability of neutron therapy in the clinical environment opens new prospects for irradiation of 'radioresistant' tumours, permits more conservative cancer surgery, expands the use of elective chemotherapy and provides a wider range of options for cancer patients. (author)

  13. An implantable radiation dosimeter for use in external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, Charles W.; Ruslander, David M.; Rini, Christopher J.; Mann, Gregory G.; Nagle, H. Troy; Black, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    An implantable radiation dosimeter for use with external beam therapy has been developed and tested both in vitro and in canines. The device uses a MOSFET dosimeter and is polled telemetrically every day during the course of therapy. The device is designed for permanent implantation and also acts as a radiographic fiducial marker. Ten dogs (companion animals) that presented with spontaneous, malignant tumors were enrolled in the study and received an implant in the tumor CTV. Three dogs received an additional implant in collateral normal tissue. Radiation therapy plans were created for the animals and they were treated with roughly 300 cGy daily fractions until completion of the prescribed cumulative dose. The primary endpoints of the study were to record any adverse events due to sensor placement and to monitor any movement away from the point of placement. No adverse events were recorded. Unacceptable device migration was experienced in two subjects and a retention mechanism was developed to prevent movement in the future. Daily dose readings were successfully acquired in all subjects. A rigorous in vitro calibration methodology has been developed to ensure that the implanted devices maintain an accuracy of ±3.5% relative to an ionization chamber standard. The authors believe that an implantable radiation dosimeter is a practical and powerful tool that fosters individualized patient QA on a daily basis

  14. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginot, A.; Doyen, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Courdi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute skin toxicity is frequent during radiation therapy and can lead to temporary arrest of the treatment. Chronic toxicity can occur and conduct to cosmetic problems. Alopecia is the most frequent toxicity concerning hair and is most of the time reversible. Several factors linked to patients influence skin toxicity, such as under-nutrition, old age, obesity, smoking, skin diseases, autoimmune diseases, failure of DNA reparation. Skin, hair and nail toxicities depend also on radiation schedule. Acute toxicity is greater when dose per fraction increases. Chronic and acute toxicities are more often when total dose increases. Under 45 Gy, the risk of severe skin toxicity is low, and begins above 50 Gy. Skin toxicity depends also on the duration of radiotherapy and split course schedules are associated with less toxicities. Irradiation surface seems to influence skin toxicity but interaction is more complex. Reirradiation is often feasible in case of cancer recurrence but with a risk of grade 3-4 toxicity above all in head and neck cancer. The benefit/risk ratio has to be always precisely evaluated. Permanent alopecia is correlated with the follicle dose. Modern techniques of radiation therapy allow to spare skin. (authors)

  15. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberdiac, P.; Mineur, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the following article, we will discuss general issues relating to acute and late gastric's radiation toxicities. The tolerance of the stomach to complete or partial organ irradiation is more un-appreciated than for most other organs. We consulted the Medline database via PubMed and used the key words gastric - radiotherapy - toxicity. Currently, 60 Gy or less is prescribed in gastric radiation therapy. Acute clinical toxicity symptoms are predominantly nausea and vomiting. Although there is a general agreement that the whole stomach tolerance is for doses of 40 to 45 Gy without unacceptable complication, it is well established that a stomach dose of 35 Gy increases the risk of ulcer complications. (authors)

  16. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Describing dose constraints for organs at risk in external beam radiotherapy is a key-point in order to maximize the therapeutic ratio. In head and neck irradiation, mandible is frequently exposed to ionising radiation-related complications. Those complications will be exposed after a short description of anatomical and physiopathological aspects. A literature search was performed using the Pubmed-Medline database, with following keywords (Osteoradionecrosis, Radiotherapy, Mandible, Toxicity, Organ at risk, Trismus). Incidence and dose constraints will be reported. The incidence of osteoradionecrosis decreased since the 1990, but it remains a dreaded late complication of head and neck cancer radiotherapy. It essentially occurs with cumulative doses of 66 Gy on the mandible (standard fractionation) applied to a significant volume. Respecting oral care is crucial to avoid this kind of complication. The respect of the dose-constraint described should not lead to under treat tumor bed in a curative intent. Trismus related to ionising radiation is poorly described. Literature data cannot lead to describe precise dose constraints. (authors)

  17. What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment that uses high doses of radiation to destroy cancer cells and shrink tumors. ■ A large machine aims radiation ... treatment, higher doses of radiation are used to destroy cancer cells. ■ The radiation that destroys cancer cells also injures ...

  18. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul national university Bundang hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam{sup TM} STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy.

  19. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  20. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

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    Antonio C. Westphalen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher’s exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25 and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34. Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. RESULTS: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58% had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59 for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59. For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2. CONCLUSION: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy.

  1. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology. Abdominal Imaging Section], e-mail: antonio.westphalen@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  2. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem

  3. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

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    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ketonen, Leena [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Jeremy Y. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weinberg, Jeffrey [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Adesina, Adekunle [Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  4. Role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugachev, Andrei; Li, Jonathan G.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Hancock, Steven L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Lei Xing

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to examine the potential benefits of noncoplanar intensity-modulated beams. Methods and Materials: A beam orientation optimization algorithm was implemented. For this purpose, system variables were divided into two groups: beam position (gantry and table angles) and beam profile (beamlet weights). Simulated annealing was used for beam orientation optimization and the simultaneous iterative inverse treatment planning algorithm (SIITP) for beam intensity profile optimization. Three clinical cases were studied: a localized prostate cancer, a nasopharyngeal cancer, and a paraspinal tumor. Nine fields were used for all treatments. For each case, 3 types of treatment plan optimization were performed: (1) beam intensity profiles were optimized for 9 equiangular spaced coplanar beams; (2) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 coplanar beams; (3) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 noncoplanar beams. Results: For the localized prostate case, all 3 types of optimization described above resulted in dose distributions of a similar quality. For the nasopharynx case, optimized noncoplanar beams provided a significant gain in the gross tumor volume coverage. For the paraspinal case, orientation optimization using noncoplanar beams resulted in better kidney sparing and improved gross tumor volume coverage. Conclusion: The sensitivity of an IMRT treatment plan with respect to the selection of beam orientations varies from site to site. For some cases, the choice of beam orientations is important even when the number of beams is as large as 9. Noncoplanar beams provide an additional degree of freedom for IMRT treatment optimization and may allow for notable improvement in the quality of some complicated plans

  5. Beam orientation optimization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using mixed integer programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Ruijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital (Institute), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China); Dai Jianrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital (Institute), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China); Yang Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States); Hu Yimin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital (Institute), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2006-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to extend an algorithm proposed for beam orientation optimization in classical conformal radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to evaluate the algorithm's performance in IMRT scenarios. In addition, the effect of the candidate pool of beam orientations, in terms of beam orientation resolution and starting orientation, on the optimized beam configuration, plan quality and optimization time is also explored. The algorithm is based on the technique of mixed integer linear programming in which binary and positive float variables are employed to represent candidates for beam orientation and beamlet weights in beam intensity maps. Both beam orientations and beam intensity maps are simultaneously optimized in the algorithm with a deterministic method. Several different clinical cases were used to test the algorithm and the results show that both target coverage and critical structures sparing were significantly improved for the plans with optimized beam orientations compared to those with equi-spaced beam orientations. The calculation time was less than an hour for the cases with 36 binary variables on a PC with a Pentium IV 2.66 GHz processor. It is also found that decreasing beam orientation resolution to 10{sup 0} greatly reduced the size of the candidate pool of beam orientations without significant influence on the optimized beam configuration and plan quality, while selecting different starting orientations had large influence. Our study demonstrates that the algorithm can be applied to IMRT scenarios, and better beam orientation configurations can be obtained using this algorithm. Furthermore, the optimization efficiency can be greatly increased through proper selection of beam orientation resolution and starting beam orientation while guaranteeing the optimized beam configurations and plan quality.

  6. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in lung cancer (including mesothelioma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A Swedish group of oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. It is estimated that about 350 patients with lung cancer and about 20 patients with mesothelioma annually may benefit from proton beam therapy.

  7. On-line image guided radiation therapy using cone-beam CT (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Jin O; Park, Suk Won; Jeong, Kyung Keun; Keum, Ki Chang

    2006-01-01

    Using cone beam CT, we can compare the position of the patients at the simulation and the treatment. In on-line image guided radiation therapy, one can utilize this compared data and correct the patient position before treatments. Using cone beam CT, we investigated the errors induced by setting up the patients when use only the markings on the patients' skin. We obtained the data of three patients that received radiation therapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology in Chung-Ang University during August 2006 and October 2006. Just as normal radiation therapy, patients were aligned on the treatment couch after the simulation and treatment planning. Patients were aligned with lasers according to the marking on the skin that were marked at the simulation time and then cone beam CTs were obtained. Cone beam CTs were fused and compared with simulation CTs and the displacement vectors were calculated. Treatment couches were adjusted according to the displacement vector before treatments. After the treatment, positions were verified with kV X-ray (OBI system). In the case of head and neck patients, the average sizes of the setup error vectors, given by the cone beam CT, were 0.19 cm for the patient A and 0.18 cm for the patient B. The standard deviations were 0.15 cm and 0.21 cm, each. On the other hand, in the case of the pelvis patient, the average and the standard deviation were 0.37 cm and 01 cm. Through the on-line IGRT using cone beam CT, were could correct the setup errors that could occur in the conventional radiotherapy. The importance of the on-line IGRT should be emphasized in the case of 3D conformal therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy, which have complex target shapes and steep dose gradients

  8. The potentials of proton beam radiation therapy in malignant lymphoma, thymoma and sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A group of Swedish oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. Besides sarcomas of the base of skull, which are classical sites for proton beam therapy, it is estimated that about 40 patients yearly in Sweden with sarcomas at other sites are candidates for proton beam therapy. About 20 patients each with malignant lymphomas, chiefly in the mediastinum, and thymomas are also candidates to decrease doses to surrounding heart and lungs.

  9. Shaping and monitoring of the mini-beam structures for the spatially fractionated hadron radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Momot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Design of collimators and their effectiveness for the purposes of the fractionated mini-beam hadron radiation therapy were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations. The calculations have been performed for proton, carbon and oxygen ion beams at the energies relevant for medical applications. Micropixel metal and hybrid detectors were tested for measuring charged particles intensity distribution in multi-beam structures shaped by slit or matrix collimators exploring low energy proton beam at the Tandem generator (INR NASU, Kyiv. The results obtained illustrate reliable performance of the designed collimators as well as hybrid and metal microdetectors for measuring and imaging in real time the proton intensity distribution over mini-beam structures.

  10. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.; Dupuis, O.; Orain, I.; Crehange, G.

    2010-01-01

    The esophagus is a musculo-membranous tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. Due to its anatomical location, it can be exposed to ionizing radiation in many external radiotherapy indications. Radiation-induced esophageal mucositis is clinically revealed by dysphagia and odynophagia, and usually begins 3 to 4 weeks after the start of radiation treatment. With the rise of multimodality treatments (e.g., concurrent chemoradiotherapy, dose escalation and accelerated fractionation schemes), esophageal toxicity has become a significant dose-limiting issue. Understanding the predictive factors of esophageal injury may improve the optimal delivery of treatment plans. It may help to minimize the risks, hence increasing the therapeutic ratio. Based on a large literature review, our study describes both early and late radiation-induced esophageal injuries and highlights some of the predictive factors for cervical and thoracic esophagus toxicity. These clinical and dosimetric parameters are numerous but none is consensual. The large number of dosimetric parameters strengthens the need of an overall analysis of the dose/volume histograms. The data provided is insufficient to recommend their routine use to prevent radiation-induced esophagitis. Defining guidelines for the tolerance of the esophagus to ionizing radiation remains essential for a safe and efficient treatment. (authors)

  11. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, Charles, E-mail: c.dupin@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux (France); Lang, Philippe [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France); Dessard-Diana, Bernadette [Department of Radiotherapy, Hopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.9-243 cm{sup 3}) and 116 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-731 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas.

  12. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Hartmann, Bernadette; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Jäkel, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient`s condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2-30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such

  13. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martišíková, Mária; Hartmann, Bernadette; Jäkel, Oliver; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient's condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2–30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such

  14. External-beam radiation therapy after surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer. Long-term outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, C.V. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Radiomedicina, Service of Radiation Oncology, Santiago (Chile); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, F.A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Lozano, M.A.; Gonzalez-Sansegundo, C. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Bayon, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of General Surgery, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Lizarraga, S. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Gynecology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sabrido, J.L. [Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of General Surgery, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Gynecology, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    The goal of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors in patients treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT), surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiotherapy (IOERT) for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer (ORGC). From January 1995 to December 2012, 61 patients with ORGC [uterine cervix (52 %), endometrial (30 %), ovarian (15 %), vagina (3 %)] underwent IOERT (12.5 Gy, range 10-15 Gy), and surgical resection to the pelvic (57 %) and paraaortic (43 %) recurrence tumor bed. In addition, 29 patients (48 %) also received EBRT (range 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Median follow-up time for the entire cohort of patients was 42 months (range 2-169 months). The 10-year rates for overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 17 and 65 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, no tumor fragmentation (HR 0.22; p = 0.03), time interval from primary tumor diagnosis to locoregional recurrence (LRR) < 24 months (HR 4.02; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.95; p = 0.02) retained significance with regard to LRR. Time interval from primary tumor to LRR < 24 months (HR 2.32; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.77; p = 0.04) showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. External-beam radiation therapy at the time of pelvic recurrence, time interval for relapse ≥24 months and not multi-involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with ORGC. As suggested from the present analysis a significant group of ORGC patients could potentially benefit from multimodality rescue treatment. (orig.)

  15. External-beam radiation therapy after surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer. Long-term outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, C.V.; Calvo, F.A.; Lozano, M.A.; Gonzalez-Sansegundo, C.; Gonzalez-Bayon, L.; Alvarez, A.; Lizarraga, S.; Garcia-Sabrido, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors in patients treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT), surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiotherapy (IOERT) for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer (ORGC). From January 1995 to December 2012, 61 patients with ORGC [uterine cervix (52 %), endometrial (30 %), ovarian (15 %), vagina (3 %)] underwent IOERT (12.5 Gy, range 10-15 Gy), and surgical resection to the pelvic (57 %) and paraaortic (43 %) recurrence tumor bed. In addition, 29 patients (48 %) also received EBRT (range 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Median follow-up time for the entire cohort of patients was 42 months (range 2-169 months). The 10-year rates for overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 17 and 65 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, no tumor fragmentation (HR 0.22; p = 0.03), time interval from primary tumor diagnosis to locoregional recurrence (LRR) < 24 months (HR 4.02; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.95; p = 0.02) retained significance with regard to LRR. Time interval from primary tumor to LRR < 24 months (HR 2.32; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.77; p = 0.04) showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. External-beam radiation therapy at the time of pelvic recurrence, time interval for relapse ≥24 months and not multi-involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with ORGC. As suggested from the present analysis a significant group of ORGC patients could potentially benefit from multimodality rescue treatment. (orig.)

  16. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosunen, A

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?){sup water} {sub air}, in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in {sup 60}Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?){sup water} {sub air} can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation

  17. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?) water air , in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in 60 Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?) water air can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation). To improve the accuracy

  18. Adaptive radiation therapy for postprostatectomy patients using real-time electromagnetic target motion tracking during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M; Gay, Hiram A; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J

    2013-03-15

    Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: -0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  20. Evaluation of a GEM and CAT-based detector for radiation therapy beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.; Danielsson, M.; Iacobaeus, C.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.; Wallmark, M.

    2000-01-01

    We are developing a radiation therapy beam monitor for the Karolinska Institute. This monitor will consist of two consecutive detectors confined in one gas chamber: a 'keV-photon detector', which will allow diagnostic quality visualization of the patient, and a 'MeV-photon detector', that will measure the absolute intensity of the therapy beam and its position with respect to the patient. Both detectors are based on highly radiation resistant gas and solid photon to electron converters, combined with GEMs and a CAT as amplification structures. We have performed systematic studies of the high-rate characteristics of the GEM and the CAT, as well as tested the electron transfer through these electron multipliers and various types of converters. The tests show that the GEM and the CAT satisfy all requirements for the beam monitoring system. As a result of these studies we successfully developed and tested a full section of the beam monitor equipped with a MeV-photon converter placed between the GEM and the CAT

  1. Individualized Selection of Beam Angles and Treatment Isocenter in Tangential Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninkhof, Joan, E-mail: j.penninkhof@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Spadola, Sara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Baaijens, Margreet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose and Objective: Propose a novel method for individualized selection of beam angles and treatment isocenter in tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: For each patient, beam and isocenter selection starts with the fully automatic generation of a large database of IMRT plans (up to 847 in this study); each of these plans belongs to a unique combination of isocenter position, lateral beam angle, and medial beam angle. The imposed hard planning constraint on patient maximum dose may result in plans with unacceptable target dose delivery. Such plans are excluded from further analyses. Owing to differences in beam setup, database plans differ in mean doses to organs at risk (OARs). These mean doses are used to construct 2-dimensional graphs, showing relationships between: (1) contralateral breast dose and ipsilateral lung dose; and (2) contralateral breast dose and heart dose (analyzed only for left-sided). The graphs can be used for selection of the isocenter and beam angles with the optimal, patient-specific tradeoffs between the mean OAR doses. For 30 previously treated patients (15 left-sided and 15 right-sided tumors), graphs were generated considering only the clinically applied isocenter with 121 tangential beam angle pairs. For 20 of the 30 patients, 6 alternative isocenters were also investigated. Results: Computation time for automatic generation of 121 IMRT plans took on average 30 minutes. The generated graphs demonstrated large variations in tradeoffs between conflicting OAR objectives, depending on beam angles and patient anatomy. For patients with isocenter optimization, 847 IMRT plans were considered. Adding isocenter position optimization next to beam angle optimization had a small impact on the final plan quality. Conclusion: A method is proposed for individualized selection of beam angles in tangential breast IMRT. This may be especially important for patients with cardiac risk factors or an

  2. An examination of human factors in external beam radiation therapy: Findings and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R.E. Jr.; Morisseau, D.S.; Persensky, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    To better understand the contributing factors to human error in external beam radiation therapy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a series of human factors evaluations. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists, conducted visits to 24 radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of human-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. Representative findings and implications for improvement are discussed within the context of a dynamic model which holds that misadministration likely results from the unanticipated interaction of several necessary but singly insufficient conditions

  3. Predictive risk factors for radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy after proton beam therapy for uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Ira; Cordini, Dino; Hager, Annette; Tillner, Johanna; Riechardt, Aline I; Heufelder, Jens; Davids, Anja M; Rehak, Matus; Joussen, Antonia M

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed in order to evaluate the incidence of radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy occurring after proton beam therapy for uveal melanoma. Included in this study were all patients who had been treated with primary proton beam therapy for uveal melanoma at the oncology service between May 1998 and June 2014 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Excluded were all patients who underwent re-irradiation, or vitrectomy due to exudative retinal detachment or for tumor-resection. During this period, 1127 patients matched the inclusion criteria, of whom 768 (68.1 %) and 463 (41.0 %) developed radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy after a median time of 18.9 months (2.0-99.84 months) and 19.8 months (0.2-170.4 months), respectively. Mean follow-up was 53.4 months (12-170.4 months). Included were 558 men (49.5 %) and 569 women (50.5 %). Mean age was 61 years (16-89 years). Visual acuity slightly decreased from initial levels of 0.3 logMAR-0.4 logMAR in patients without developing any radiation-induced complication but severely decreased to 1.0 logMAR or 1.5 logMAR in the case of developing radiation retinopathy only or optic neuropathy, respectively. Independent risk factors for radiation retinopathy were a centrally (<2.5 mm from sensitive structures) located tumor or a thick tumor located more than 2.5 mm from sensitive structures, while those for radiation optic neuropathy comprised a short distance and applied dose to the optic disk. The risk for radiation retinopathy is higher in central uveal melanoma. Mid-/peripheral tumors are at high risk for radiation retinopathy and maculopathy if presenting with increased thickness.

  4. In vivo pink-beam imaging and fast alignment procedure for rat brain tumor radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoz, Christian; Kibleur, Astrid; Hyacinthe, Jean Noël; Berruyer, Gilles; Brochard, Thierry; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Le Duc, Géraldine; Brun, Emmanuel; Elleaume, Hélène; Serduc, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    A fast positioning method for brain tumor microbeam irradiations for preclinical studies at third-generation X-ray sources is described. The three-dimensional alignment of the animals relative to the X-ray beam was based on the X-ray tomography multi-slices after iodine infusion. This method used pink-beam imaging produced by the ID17 wiggler. A graphical user interface has been developed in order to define the irradiation parameters: field width, height, number of angles and X-ray dose. This study is the first reporting an image guided method for soft tissue synchrotron radiotherapy. It allowed microbeam radiation therapy irradiation fields to be reduced by a factor of ∼20 compared with previous studies. It permitted more targeted, more efficient brain tumor microbeam treatments and reduces normal brain toxicity of the radiation treatment.

  5. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  6. The dosimetric Properties of Electron Beam Using Lyon Intraoperative Device for Intraoperative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kye Jun; Park, Kyung Ran; Lee, Jong Young; Kim, Hie Yeon; Sung, Ki Joon; Chu, Sung Sil

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the dosimetric properties of electron beam using Lyon intraoperative device for intraoperative radiation therapy. The dosimetry data had compiled in such a way that a quick and correct decision regarding the cone shape, energy, and accurate calculations could be made. Using 3 dimensional water phantom, we have got the following data: cone output ratios, surface dose, dmax, dgo, flatness, symmetry, beam profiles, isodose curve, and SSD correction factors. The cone output ratios were measured with straight and bevelled cone, respectively. As the cone size and the energy were reduced, the cone output ratios decreased rapidly. With the flattening filter, the surface dose increased by electron beam to 85.3%, 89.2%, and 93.4%, for 6MeV, 9MeV, and 12MeV, respectively. It is important to increase the surface dose to 90% or more. Inspite of diminishing dose rate and beam penetration, this flattening filter increases the treatment volume significantly. With the combination of the three levels collimation and the flattening filter, we achieved good homogeneity of the beam and better flatness and the diameter of the 90% isodose curve was increased. It is important to increase the area that is included in the 90% isodose level. The value of measured and calculated SSD correction factors did not agree over the clinically important range from 100 cm to 110 cm

  7. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  8. Computer-aided beam arrangement based on similar cases in radiation treatment-planning databases for stereotactic lung radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magome, Taiki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided method for determination of beam arrangements based on similar cases in a radiotherapy treatment-planning database for stereotactic lung radiation therapy. Similar-case-based beam arrangements were automatically determined based on the following two steps. First, the five most similar cases were searched, based on geometrical features related to the location, size and shape of the planning target volume, lung and spinal cord. Second, five beam arrangements of an objective case were automatically determined by registering five similar cases with the objective case, with respect to lung regions, by means of a linear registration technique. For evaluation of the beam arrangements five treatment plans were manually created by applying the beam arrangements determined in the second step to the objective case. The most usable beam arrangement was selected by sorting the five treatment plans based on eight plan evaluation indices, including the D95, mean lung dose and spinal cord maximum dose. We applied the proposed method to 10 test cases, by using an RTP database of 81 cases with lung cancer, and compared the eight plan evaluation indices between the original treatment plan and the corresponding most usable similar-case-based treatment plan. As a result, the proposed method may provide usable beam arrangements, which have no statistically significant differences from the original beam arrangements (P>0.05) in terms of the eight plan evaluation indices. Therefore, the proposed method could be employed as an educational tool for less experienced treatment planners. (author)

  9. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J L; Webb, S

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans

  10. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D; Nazareth, Daryl P; Zhang, Hao H; Shi Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods

  11. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Warren D; Nazareth, Daryl P [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Hao H; Shi Leyuan [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Meyer, Robert R [Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: dsouzaw@ohsu.edu

    2008-06-21

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  12. External beam radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medini, Eitan; Medini, Allen; Gapany, Markus; Levitt, Seymour H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy for carcinoma of the soft palate aims to achieve loco-regional control with normal speech, nasal function, swallowing mechanism, and minimal side effects such as nasal speech and regurgitation of food into the nasopharynx. In this report we present our results of radiotherapy in the treatment of 24 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate were treated at the Veterans Administration Medical Center Minneapolis, MN, between February 1977 and May 1992. Of the 24 patients 2 had T1, 19 T2, 1 T3, and 2 had T4 lesions. Nineteen patients did not have clinical nodal disease, stage (N0), 1 had N1, 2 N2, and 2 N3 disease (Table 1). All the patients were treated by 4 MeV linear accelerator. A 1.75 Gy median dose was administered per fraction to a total of 70 Gy median dose. Bilateral opposed compensated shrinking fields technique was used. Results: The 3-year disease free survival rate after external beam radiation therapy was 100% (1 out of 1), 64.7% (11 out of 17), 100% (1 out of 1), and 0%, for patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease, respectively. Salvage surgery for recurrent disease was successful in 57.1% (4 out of 7 patients). The ultimate 3-year disease free survival rate for the entire group, including surgical salvage, was 81% (17 out of 21). Conclusion: Radiation therapy alone in our institution resulted in tumor control and survival rates compare favorably to previously published reports in the literature. Surgery can be reserved as salvage procedure

  13. Partial Breast Radiation Therapy With Proton Beam: 5-Year Results With Cosmetic Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Do, Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Lum, Sharon; Garberoglio, Carlos [Department of Surgical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Patyal, Baldev; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: We updated our previous report of a phase 2 trial using proton beam radiation therapy to deliver partial breast irradiation (PBI) in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had invasive nonlobular carcinoma with a maximal dimension of 3 cm. Patients underwent partial mastectomy with negative margins; axillary lymph nodes were negative on sampling. Subjects received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy to the surgical bed. The dose delivered was 40 Gy in 10 fractions, once daily over 2 weeks. Multiple fields were treated daily, and skin-sparing techniques were used. Following treatment, patients were evaluated with clinical assessments and annual mammograms to monitor toxicity, tumor recurrence, and cosmesis. Results: One hundred subjects were enrolled and treated. All patients completed the assigned treatment and were available for post-treatment analysis. The median follow-up was 60 months. Patients had a mean age of 63 years; 90% had ductal histology; the average tumor size was 1.3 cm. Actuarial data at 5 years included ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence-free survival of 97% (95% confidence interval: 100%-93%); disease-free survival of 94%; and overall survival of 95%. There were no cases of grade 3 or higher acute skin reactions, and late skin reactions included 7 cases of grade 1 telangiectasia. Patient- and physician-reported cosmesis was good to excellent in 90% of responses, was not changed from baseline measurements, and was well maintained throughout the entire 5-year follow-up period. Conclusions: Proton beam radiation therapy for PBI produced excellent ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival with minimal toxicity. The treatment proved to be adaptable to all breast sizes and lumpectomy cavity configurations. Cosmetic results appear to be excellent and unchanged from baseline out to 5 years following treatment. Cosmetic results may be improved over those reported with photon

  14. Improving efficiency and safety in external beam radiation therapy treatment delivery using a Kaizen approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ajay; Adair, Nilda; O'Brien, Mildred; Naparstek, Nikoleta; Cangelosi, Thomas; Zuvic, Petrina; Joseph, Sherin; Meier, Jason; Bloom, Beatrice; Potters, Louis

    Modern external beam radiation therapy treatment delivery processes potentially increase the number of tasks to be performed by therapists and thus opportunities for errors, yet the need to treat a large number of patients daily requires a balanced allocation of time per treatment slot. The goal of this work was to streamline the underlying workflow in such time-interval constrained processes to enhance both execution efficiency and active safety surveillance using a Kaizen approach. A Kaizen project was initiated by mapping the workflow within each treatment slot for 3 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators. More than 90 steps were identified, and average execution times for each were measured. The time-consuming steps were stratified into a 2 × 2 matrix arranged by potential workflow improvement versus the level of corrective effort required. A work plan was created to launch initiatives with high potential for workflow improvement but modest effort to implement. Time spent on safety surveillance and average durations of treatment slots were used to assess corresponding workflow improvements. Three initiatives were implemented to mitigate unnecessary therapist motion, overprocessing of data, and wait time for data transfer defects, respectively. A fourth initiative was implemented to make the division of labor by treating therapists as well as peer review more explicit. The average duration of treatment slots reduced by 6.7% in the 9 months following implementation of the initiatives (P = .001). A reduction of 21% in duration of treatment slots was observed on 1 of the machines (P Kaizen approach has the potential to improve operational efficiency and safety with quick turnaround in radiation therapy practice by addressing non-value-adding steps characteristic of individual department workflows. Higher effort opportunities are identified to guide continual downstream quality improvements. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by

  15. The Evolution of External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) from a Technological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detorie, Nicholas

    2008-03-01

    Since the discovery of x-rays by Roentgen in 1895 ionizing radiations have been used as a treatment for cancer. Such treatments have been based on either implantation of radioactive materials at the site of disease or by aiming external radiation beams at the diseased site. This later method is referred to as teletherapy because the beams originate from a location outside of the body distant from the disease site itself. A brief review of the basic radiation biology will be given to illustrate the rationale for therapeutic use of ionizing radiations and the effects of beam energy and beam type- particulate or photon. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the technological teletherapy developments supported by the required physical properties of the beams and their associated characteristics that make them suitable for patient treatments. Chronological highlights will include the following sources or devices: superficial x-rays, orthovaltage x-rays, megavoltage x-rays and Cobalt 60 photons, electron beams, neutron beams, negative pi mesons, protons, and heavy ions. The presentation will illustrate how the physical beam properties have been incorporated into modern radiation treatment devices, many of which are equipped with radiation imaging capability. Such devices include: linacs equipped with multileaf collimators for beam shaping and intensity modulation, the Gamma Knife for precise and accurate irradiation of brain tumors or arterial-venous malformations (AVM), the robotic arm based Cyber Knife, and the Helical Tomotherapy unit.

  16. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  17. Impact of cradle immobilization on setup reproducibility during external beam radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentel, Gunilla C.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Krishnamurthy, Rupa

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the setup accuracy during fractionated radiation therapy for two patient groups with lung cancer treated with and without an immobilization cradle. Methods: Three hundred ninety-seven port films from 30 patients immobilized in the Alpha Cradle TM1 were compared with 329 port films from 30 patients who were not immobilized with the cradle. All patients were treated with curative intent for nonmetastatic lung cancer. The frequency of physician-requested isocenter shifts were compared in the two groups using a two-tailed chi-square test. Initial port films taken on the first day of treatment, routine films taken usually weekly during radiation therapy, and requested films taken after a requested shift were considered separately. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made foam cradle that extended from above the head to the knees. Patients were generally treated with their arms above their heads, and treatment setup marks in the immobilized patients were placed on both the patients' skin and the immobilization cradle. For the noncradle patients, setup marks were placed only on the patients' skin. Results: For the routine films, the frequency of physician-requested isocenter shifts was lower in immobilized patients than in the nonimmobilized group (p = 0.139). Most of this reduction was seen on oblique fields (p = 0.038). No benefits were seen among initial or requested films. The two groups were well balanced with regard to stage, age, field size, and total dose. Conclusions: The use of aggressive immobilization improves the setup reproducibility in patients receiving external beam radiation therapy for lung cancer, especially during treatment with oblique fields. This improvement in treatment accuracy might improve the therapeutic ratio

  18. Imaging doses in radiation therapy from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Daniel Ellis

    Advances in radiation treatment delivery, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), have made it possible to deliver large doses of radiation with a high degree of conformity. While highly conformal treatments offers the advantage of sparing surrounding normal tissue, this benefit can only be realized if the patient is accurately positioned during each treatment fraction. The need to accurately position the patient has led to the development and use of gantry mounted kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) systems. These systems are used to acquire high resolution volumetric images of the patient which are then digitally registered with the planning CT dataset to confirm alignment of the patient on the treatment table. While kV-CBCT is a very useful tool for aligning the patient prior to treatment, daily use in a high fraction therapy regimen results in a substantial radiation dose. In order to quantify the radiation dose associated with CBCT imaging, an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 50th percentile adult male and a fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimetry system were both constructed as part of this dissertation. These tools were then used to directly measure organ doses incurred during clinical protocols for the head, chest, and pelvis. For completeness, the dose delivered from both the X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) and the On-Board Imager (OBI, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were investigated. While this study provided a direct measure of organ doses for estimating risk to the patient, a practical method for estimating organ doses that could be performed with phantoms and dosimeters currently available at most clinics was also desired. To accomplish this goal, a 100 mm pencil ion chamber was used to measure the "cone beam dose index" (CBDI) inside standard CT dose index (CTDI) acrylic phantoms. A weighted CBDI (CBDIw), similar to the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), was then calculated to

  19. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumours using flattening filter free beam: dosimetric and technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancosu Pietro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To report the initial institute experience in terms of dosimetric and technical aspects in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT delivered using flattening filter free (FFF beam in patients with liver lesions. Methods and Materials From October 2010 to September 2011, 55 consecutive patients with 73 primary or metastatic hepatic lesions were treated with SBRT on TrueBeam using FFF beam and RapidArc technique. Clinical target volume (CTV was defined on multi-phase CT scans, PET/CT, MRI, and 4D-CT. Dose prescription was 75 Gy in 3 fractions to planning target volume (PTV. Constraints for organs at risk were: 700 cc of liver free from the 15 Gy isodose, Dmax max 0.1 cc 15 Gy Results Forty-three patients with a single lesion, nine with two lesions and three with three lesions were treated with this protocol. Target and organs at risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean delivery time was 2.8 ± 1.0 min. Pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index of 98.6 ± 0.8%. Mean on-line co-registration shift of the daily CBCT to the simulation CT were: -0.08, 0.05 and -0.02 cm with standard deviations of 0.33, 0.39 and 0.55 cm in, vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions respectively. Conclusions SBRT for liver targets delivered by means of FFF resulted to be feasible with short beam on time.

  1. Robust Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment Planning for Rectal Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Kiely, Janid Patricia, E-mail: jkiely@sas.upenn.edu; White, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a treatment plan design and robustness study, whether proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) has the potential to offer advantages, relative to interfraction uncertainties, over photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a locally advanced rectal cancer patient population. Methods and Materials: Ten patients received a planning CT scan, followed by an average of 4 weekly offline CT verification CT scans, which were rigidly co-registered to the planning CT. Clinical PBS plans were generated on the planning CT, using a single-field uniform-dose technique with single-posterior and parallel-opposed (LAT) fields geometries. The VMAT plans were generated on the planning CT using 2 6-MV, 220° coplanar arcs. Clinical plans were forward-calculated on verification CTs to assess robustness relative to anatomic changes. Setup errors were assessed by forward-calculating clinical plans with a ±5-mm (left–right, anterior–posterior, superior–inferior) isocenter shift on the planning CT. Differences in clinical target volume and organ at risk dose–volume histogram (DHV) indicators between plans were tested for significance using an appropriate Wilcoxon test (P<.05). Results: Dosimetrically, PBS plans were statistically different from VMAT plans, showing greater organ at risk sparing. However, the bladder was statistically identical among LAT and VMAT plans. The clinical target volume coverage was statistically identical among all plans. The robustness test found that all DVH indicators for PBS and VMAT plans were robust, except the LAT's genitalia (V5, V35). The verification CT plans showed that all DVH indicators were robust. Conclusions: Pencil beam scanning plans were found to be as robust as VMAT plans relative to interfractional changes during treatment when posterior beam angles and appropriate range margins are used. Pencil beam scanning dosimetric gains in the bowel (V15, V20) over VMAT suggest that using PBS to treat rectal

  2. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depauw, Nicolas; Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  3. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depauw, Nicolas, E-mail: ndepauw@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  4. Primary carcinoma of the gallbladder: role of external beam radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, T.; Itami, J.; Aruga, M.; Araki, H.; Tani, M.; Kobori, O.

    1996-01-01

    Several reports have demonstrated that occasional long-term survival might be obtained with external beam radiation therapy in patients with gallbladder cancer. However, there are few reports which evaluate the local effect of irradiation. The aim of our study was to investigate the local effect of radiation therapy and to evaluate its role for locally advanced gallbladder cancer. Twenty-two patients with locally advanced gallbladder cancer were treated with high-dose external beam radiation therapy. Tumor resection was performed in 5 patients, palliative surgery in 5, and the remaining 12 patients were treated by radiation therapy alone. Overall survival was 36% at 1 year, 18% at 3 years and 14% at 5 years. All but 2 patients developed undergone tumor resection, partial response was obtained in 4 patients and no response in 13. Survival times in patients who achieved partial response were 14, 26, 47 and 99 months, whereas those of no response were 1 to 12 months with a mean of 4.8 months. Survival between these 2 groups (partial vs. no response) showed significant difference (p=0.0008, logrank test). It is concluded that high-dose external beam radiation therapy could improve survival in some patients with unresectable gallbladder cancer. (orig.) [de

  5. The role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma invading the trachea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Choi, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Kwang Sik [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the effect of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on local failure-free survival rate (LFFS) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) invading the trachea. Fifty-six patients with locally advanced PTC invading the trachea were treated with surgical resection. After surgery, 21 patients received adjuvant EBRT and radioactive iodine therapy (EBRT group) and 35 patients were treated with radioactive iodine therapy (control group). The age range was 26–87 years (median, 56 years). The median follow-up period was 43 months (range, 4 to 145 months). EBRT doses ranged from 50.4 to 66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Esophagus invasion and gross residual disease was more frequent in the EBRT group. In the control group, local recurrence developed in 9 (9/35, 26%) and new distant metastasis in 2 (2/35, 6%) patients, occurring 4 to 68 months (median, 37 months) and 53 to 68 months (median, 60 months) after surgery, respectively. Two patients had simultaneous local recurrence and new distant metastasis. There was one local failure in the EBRT group at 18 months after surgery (1/21, 5%). The 5-year LFFS was 95% in the EBRT group and 63% in the control group (p = 0.103). In the EBRT group, one late grade 2 xerostomia was developed. Although, EBRT group had a higher incidence of esophagus invasion and gross residual disease, EBRT group showed a better 5-year LFFS. Adjuvant EBRT may have contributed to the better LFFS in these patients.

  6. A comparison of two methods for estimating the technical costs of external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayman, James A.; Lash, Kathy A.; Tao, May L.; Halman, Marc A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with external beam radiation, it is necessary to have accurate estimates of its cost. One of the most common methods for estimating technical costs has been to convert Medicare charges into costs using Medicare Cost-to-Charge Ratios (CCR). More recently, health care organizations have begun to invest in sophisticated cost-accounting systems (CAS) that are capable of providing procedure-specific cost estimates. The purpose of this study was to examine whether these competing approaches result in similar cost estimates for four typical courses of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Technical costs were estimated for the following treatment courses: 1) a palliative 'simple' course of 10 fractions using a single field without blocks; 2) a palliative 'complex' course of 10 fractions using two opposed fields with custom blocks; 3) a curative course of 30 fractions for breast cancer using tangent fields followed by an electron beam boost; and 4) a curative course of 35 fractions for prostate cancer using CT-planning and a 4-field technique. Costs were estimated using the CCR approach by multiplying the number of units of each procedure billed by its Medicare charge and CCR and then summing these costs. Procedure-specific cost estimates were obtained from a cost-accounting system, and overall costs were then estimated for the CAS approach by multiplying the number of units billed by the appropriate unit cost estimate and then summing these costs. All costs were estimated using data from 1997. The analysis was also repeated using data from another academic institution to estimate their costs using the CCR and CAS methods, as well as the appropriate relative value units (RVUs) and conversion factor from the 1997 Medicare Fee Schedule to estimate Medicare reimbursement for the four treatment courses. Results: The estimated technical costs for the CCR vs. CAS approaches for the four

  7. A comparison of two methods for estimating the technical costs of external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, J A; Lash, K A; Tao, M L; Halman, M A

    2000-05-01

    To accurately assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with external beam radiation, it is necessary to have accurate estimates of its cost. One of the most common methods for estimating technical costs has been to convert Medicare charges into costs using Medicare Cost-to-Charge Ratios (CCR). More recently, health care organizations have begun to invest in sophisticated cost-accounting systems (CAS) that are capable of providing procedure-specific cost estimates. The purpose of this study was to examine whether these competing approaches result in similar cost estimates for four typical courses of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Technical costs were estimated for the following treatment courses: 1) a palliative "simple" course of 10 fractions using a single field without blocks; 2) a palliative "complex" course of 10 fractions using two opposed fields with custom blocks; 3) a curative course of 30 fractions for breast cancer using tangent fields followed by an electron beam boost; and 4) a curative course of 35 fractions for prostate cancer using CT-planning and a 4-field technique. Costs were estimated using the CCR approach by multiplying the number of units of each procedure billed by its Medicare charge and CCR and then summing these costs. Procedure-specific cost estimates were obtained from a cost-accounting system, and overall costs were then estimated for the CAS approach by multiplying the number of units billed by the appropriate unit cost estimate and then summing these costs. All costs were estimated using data from 1997. The analysis was also repeated using data from another academic institution to estimate their costs using the CCR and CAS methods, as well as the appropriate relative value units (RVUs) and conversion factor from the 1997 Medicare Fee Schedule to estimate Medicare reimbursement for the four treatment courses. The estimated technical costs for the CCR vs. CAS approaches for the four treatment courses were as follows

  8. Validated image fusion of dedicated PET and CT for external beam radiation and therapy in the head and neck area.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, W.V.; Schinagl, D.A.X.; Dalen, J.A. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information into computer tomography (CT)- based intensity modulated external beam radiation therapy (IMRT) allows adaptation of the target volume to functional parameters, but only when the image registration procedure is reliable. The aim of

  9. Beyond the conventional role of external-beam radiation therapy for skeletal metastases: new technologies and stereotactic directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H-H M; Hoffe, S E

    2012-04-01

    Radiation therapy is a common and effective treatment modality in the management of skeletal metastases. Recent advances in technology permitting delivery of an ablative radiation dose with an image-guided stereotactic approach improve the therapeutic threshold. The authors reviewed the literature on conventional external-beam radiation therapy and summarized the emerging data about image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for vertebral oligometastasis. Pain control can be achieved effectively with conventional external-beam radiation therapy and may be further improved with image-guided spinal SBRT. Image-guided SBRT allows delivery of an ablative radiation dose with minimal toxicity, may potentially improve local tumor control, and may enhance clinical outcomes for histologies that are considered radioresistant. However, further understanding of long-term normal tissue toxicity is lacking. Radiotherapy options are expanding for patients with skeletal metastases. Image-guided spinal SBRT can deliver a safe ablative radiation dose to improve pain control and potentially local tumor control. Randomized clinical trials are ongoing to assess clinical benefits and outcome with spinal SBRT.

  10. Application of the Medipix2 technology to space radiation dosimetry and hadron therapy beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, Lawrence; Stoffle, Nicholas; Empl, Anton; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Leroy, Claude; Kitamura, Hisashi; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Uchihori, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The Medipix2 Collaboration, based at CERN, has developed the TimePix version of the Medipix pixel readout chip, which has the ability to provide either an ADC or TDC capability separately in each of its 256 × 256 pixels. When coupled to a Si detector layer, the device is an excellent candidate for application as an active dosimeter for use in Space Radiation Environments. In order to facilitate such a development, data have been taken with Heavy Ions at the HIMAC facility in Chiba, Japan. In particular, the problem of determining the resolution of such a detector system with respect to heavy ions of differing charges and energies, but with similar dE/dx values has been explored for several ions. The ultimate problem is to parse the information in the pixel “footprint” images from the drift of the charge-cloud produced in the detector layer. In addition, with the use of convertor materials, the detector can be used as a neutron detector, and it has been used both as a charged particle and neutron detector to evaluate the detailed properties of the radiation fields produced by hadron therapy beams. The first space flight of a Medipix-based detector is currently planned for the first quarter of 2012 onboard the UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite as part of the LUCID project. The instrument to be flown is currently planned to have 5 TimePix versions of the Medipix2 detector deployed on 5 of the 6 faces of a cube with ∼3 cm on each side and enclosed by a 0.7 mm thick Al cylindrical cover. The planned orbit will have an altitude of 660 km and will be sun-synchronous with an inclination of 98°Current plans are for the instrument to be located on a vertical side of the satellite with one face upward, one downward, two opposed laterally and one facing in the forward direction with respect to the satellite’s velocity vector. As such, the instrument should be exposed to the outer belt electrons during polar passes as well as the South Atlantic Anomaly and ambient Galactic

  11. Application of the Medipix2 technology to space radiation dosimetry and hadron therapy beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, Lawrence; Stoffle, Nicholas; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Leroy, Claude; Gutierrez, Andrea; Kitamura, Hisashi; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Uchihori, Yulio

    2011-01-01

    The Medipix2 Collaboration, based at CERN, has developed the TimePix version of the Medipix pixel readout chip, which has the ability to provide either an ADC or TDC capability separately in each of its 256x256 pixels. When coupled to a Si detector layer, the device is an excellent candidate for application as an active dosimeter for use in space radiation environments. In order to facilitate such a development, data have been taken with heavy ions at the HIMAC facility in Chiba, Japan. In particular, the problem of determining the resolution of such a detector system with respect to heavy ions of differing charges and energies, but with similar dE/dx values has been explored for several ions. The ultimate problem is to parse the information in the pixel 'footprint' images from the drift of the charge cloud produced in the detector layer. In addition, with the use of convertor materials, the detector can be used as a neutron detector, and it has been used both as a charged particle and neutron detector to evaluate the detailed properties of the radiation fields produced by hadron therapy beams. New versions of the basic chip design are ongoing.

  12. Radiation optic neuropathy after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly : report of two cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, ACM; Hoving, MA; Links, TP; Dullaart, RPF; Ranchor, AV; ter Weeme, CA; Canrinus, AA; Szabo, BG; Pott, JWR

    For diagnosing radiation optic neuropathy (RON) ophthalmological and imaging data were evaluated from 63 acromegalic patients, irradiated between 1967 and 1998. Two patients developed RON: one patient in one optic nerve 10 years and another patient in both optic nerves 5 months after radiation

  13. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  14. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  15. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

  16. A Long Term Results of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Hemophilic Arthropathy of the Ankle in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Kang, Jin Oh; Choi, Jinhyun; Park, Seo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Bleeding into joint space is critical to develop hemophilic arthropathy. To reduce the frequency of bleeding in the ankle joint of children with hemophilic arthropathy, low dose external beam irradiation was performed for 37 patients. Among them, 35 patients followed-up for longer than 1 yr (median 87 months) were enrolled for analysis. The average number of bleedings per month was 3.6 during one year prior to radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, it was decreased to 2.1 during the firs...

  17. Fast shading correction for cone beam CT in radiation therapy via sparse sampling on planning CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linxi; Tsui, Tiffany; Wei, Jikun; Zhu, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The image quality of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is limited by severe shading artifacts, hindering its quantitative applications in radiation therapy. In this work, we propose an image-domain shading correction method using planning CT (pCT) as prior information which is highly adaptive to clinical environment. We propose to perform shading correction via sparse sampling on pCT. The method starts with a coarse mapping between the first-pass CBCT images obtained from the Varian TrueBeam system and the pCT. The scatter correction method embedded in the Varian commercial software removes some image errors but the CBCT images still contain severe shading artifacts. The difference images between the mapped pCT and the CBCT are considered as shading errors, but only sparse shading samples are selected for correction using empirical constraints to avoid carrying over false information from pCT. A Fourier-Transform-based technique, referred to as local filtration, is proposed to efficiently process the sparse data for effective shading correction. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on one anthropomorphic pelvis phantom and 17 patients, who were scheduled for radiation therapy. (The codes of the proposed method and sample data can be downloaded from https://sites.google.com/view/linxicbct) RESULTS: The proposed shading correction substantially improves the CBCT image quality on both the phantom and the patients to a level close to that of the pCT images. On the phantom, the spatial nonuniformity (SNU) difference between CBCT and pCT is reduced from 74 to 1 HU. The root of mean square difference of SNU between CBCT and pCT is reduced from 83 to 10 HU on the pelvis patients, and from 101 to 12 HU on the thorax patients. The robustness of the proposed shading correction is fully investigated with simulated registration errors between CBCT and pCT on the phantom and mis-registration on patients. The sparse sampling scheme of our method successfully

  18. SU-F-T-242: A Method for Collision Avoidance in External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We proposed a method for collision avoidance (CA) in external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The method encompasses the analysis of all positions of the moving components of the beam delivery system such as the treatment table and gantry, including patient specific information obtained from the CT images. This method eliminates the need for time-consuming dry-runs prior to the actual treatments. Methods: The QA procedure for EBRT requires that the collision should be checked prior to treatment. We developed a system capable of a rigorous computer simulation of all moving components including positions of the couch and gantry during the delivery, position of the patients, and imaging equipment. By running this treatment simulation it is possible to quantify and graphically represent all positions and corresponding trajectories of all points of the moving parts during the treatment delivery. The development of the workflow for implementation of the CA includes several steps: a) derivation of combined dynamic equation of motion of the EBRT delivery systems, b) developing the simulation model capable of drawing the motion trajectories of the specific points, c) developing the interface between the model and the treatment plan parameters such as couch and gantry parameters for each field. Results: The patient CT images were registered to the treatment couch so the patient dimensions were included into the simulation. The treatment field parameters were structured in the xml-file which was used as the input into the dynamic equations. The trajectories of the moving components were plotted on the same graph using the dynamic equations. If the trajectories intersect that was the signal that collision exists. Conclusion: This CA method was proved to be effective in the simulation of treatment delivery. The proper implementation of this system can potentially improve the QA program and increase the efficacy in the clinical setup.

  19. Audit of high energy therapy beams in hospital oncology departments by the National Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, V.G.

    1994-02-01

    In 1993 the output of every high energy radiotherapy beam used clinically in New Zealand was measured by National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) staff using independent dosimetry equipment. The purpose of this was to audit the dosimetry that is used by hospital physicists for the basis of patient treatments, and to uncover any errors that may be clinically significant. This report analyses the uncertainties involved in comparing the NRL and hospital measurements, and presents the results of the 1993 audit. The overall uncertainty turns out to be about 1.5%. The results for linear accelerator photon beams are consistent with a purely random variation within this uncertainty. Electron beams show some small errors beyond the expected uncertainty. Gamma beams have the potential to be the most accurately measured, but in practice are less accurately measured than linear accelerator beams. None of the disagreements indicated an error of clinical significance. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Noncoplanar Beam Angle Class Solutions to Replace Time-Consuming Patient-Specific Beam Angle Optimization in Robotic Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Linda; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Aluwini, Shafak; Heijmen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate development of a recipe for the creation of a beam angle class solution (CS) for noncoplanar prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy to replace time-consuming individualized beam angle selection (iBAS) without significant loss in plan quality, using the in-house “Erasmus-iCycle” optimizer for fully automated beam profile optimization and iBAS. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, Erasmus-iCycle was first used to generate 15-, 20-, and 25-beam iBAS plans for a CyberKnife equipped with a multileaf collimator. With these plans, 6 recipes for creation of beam angle CSs were investigated. Plans of 10 patients were used to create CSs based on the recipes, and the other 20 to independently test them. For these tests, Erasmus-iCycle was also used to generate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for the fixed CS beam setups. Results: Of the tested recipes for CS creation, only 1 resulted in 15-, 20-, and 25-beam noncoplanar CSs without plan deterioration compared with iBAS. For the patient group, mean differences in rectum D 1cc , V 60GyEq , V 40GyEq , and D mean between 25-beam CS plans and 25-beam plans generated with iBAS were 0.2 ± 0.4 Gy, 0.1% ± 0.2%, 0.2% ± 0.3%, and 0.1 ± 0.2 Gy, respectively. Differences between 15- and 20-beam CS and iBAS plans were also negligible. Plan quality for CS plans relative to iBAS plans was also preserved when narrower planning target volume margins were arranged and when planning target volume dose inhomogeneity was decreased. Using a CS instead of iBAS reduced the computation time by a factor of 14 to 25, mainly depending on beam number, without loss in plan quality. Conclusions: A recipe for creation of robust beam angle CSs for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy has been developed. Compared with iBAS, computation times decreased by a factor 14 to 25. The use of a CS may avoid long planning times without losses in plan quality

  1. Noncoplanar Beam Angle Class Solutions to Replace Time-Consuming Patient-Specific Beam Angle Optimization in Robotic Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Linda, E-mail: l.rossi@erasmusmc.nl; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Aluwini, Shafak; Heijmen, Ben

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate development of a recipe for the creation of a beam angle class solution (CS) for noncoplanar prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy to replace time-consuming individualized beam angle selection (iBAS) without significant loss in plan quality, using the in-house “Erasmus-iCycle” optimizer for fully automated beam profile optimization and iBAS. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, Erasmus-iCycle was first used to generate 15-, 20-, and 25-beam iBAS plans for a CyberKnife equipped with a multileaf collimator. With these plans, 6 recipes for creation of beam angle CSs were investigated. Plans of 10 patients were used to create CSs based on the recipes, and the other 20 to independently test them. For these tests, Erasmus-iCycle was also used to generate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for the fixed CS beam setups. Results: Of the tested recipes for CS creation, only 1 resulted in 15-, 20-, and 25-beam noncoplanar CSs without plan deterioration compared with iBAS. For the patient group, mean differences in rectum D{sub 1cc}, V{sub 60GyEq}, V{sub 40GyEq}, and D{sub mean} between 25-beam CS plans and 25-beam plans generated with iBAS were 0.2 ± 0.4 Gy, 0.1% ± 0.2%, 0.2% ± 0.3%, and 0.1 ± 0.2 Gy, respectively. Differences between 15- and 20-beam CS and iBAS plans were also negligible. Plan quality for CS plans relative to iBAS plans was also preserved when narrower planning target volume margins were arranged and when planning target volume dose inhomogeneity was decreased. Using a CS instead of iBAS reduced the computation time by a factor of 14 to 25, mainly depending on beam number, without loss in plan quality. Conclusions: A recipe for creation of robust beam angle CSs for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy has been developed. Compared with iBAS, computation times decreased by a factor 14 to 25. The use of a CS may avoid long planning times without losses in plan quality.

  2. Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovdenak, Nils; Wang Junru; Sung, C.-C.; Kelly, Thomas; Fajardo, Luis F.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Rectal toxicity (proctitis) is a dose-limiting factor in pelvic radiation therapy. Mucosal atrophy, i.e., net extracellular matrix degradation, is a prominent feature of radiation proctitis, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We prospectively examined changes in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 (gelatinase A and B) in the rectal mucosa during radiation therapy of prostate cancer, as well as the relationships of these changes with symptomatic, structural, and cellular evidence of radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled. Symptoms of gastrointestinal toxicity were recorded, and endoscopy with biopsy of the rectal mucosa was performed before radiation therapy, as well as 2 and 6 weeks into the treatment course. Radiation proctitis was assessed by endoscopic scoring, quantitative histology, and quantitative immunohistochemistry. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were localized immunohistochemically, and activities were determined by gelatin zymography. Results: Symptoms, endoscopic scores, histologic injury, and mucosal macrophages and neutrophils increased from baseline to 2 weeks. Symptoms increased further from 2 weeks to 6 weeks, whereas endoscopic and cellular evidence of proctitis did not. Compared to pretreatment values, there was increased total gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 at 2 weeks (p=0.02 and p=0.004, respectively) and 6 weeks (p=0.006 and p=0.001, respectively). Active MMP-2 was increased at both time points (p=0.0001 and p=0.002). Increased MMP-9 and MMP-2 at 6 weeks was associated with radiation-induced diarrhea (p=0.007 and p=0.02, respectively) and with mucosal neutrophil infiltration (rho=0.62). Conclusions: Pelvic radiation therapy causes increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the rectal mucosa. These changes correlate with radiation-induced diarrhea and granulocyte infiltration and may contribute to abnormal

  3. PSA bounce phenomenon after External Beam Radiation Therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszkowski, K.; Makarewicz, R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction to clinical practice of PSA antigen altered the therapeutic approach to treatment of prostate cancer. The PSA antigen was defined as sensitive marker for monitoring of prostate cancer. At treated with radiotherapy patients (EBRT) value of PSA nadir after treatment is the significant determinant of results of treatment statistically. Three consecutive PSA rise above the post-treatment nadir have been defined as biochemical failure by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus panel. However a single rise in post-EBRT PSA level continues to be a source of considerable anxiety due to the intriguing uncertainty of relationship between PSA bouncing and disease relapse. The clinical practice show that growth of level PSA after radiotherapy was possible and does not it join with progression of disease. Phenomenon this was named as PSA-bounce. Various definitions of PSA bounce have been used in the literature. The authors in presented work represent the current state of knowledge on this phenomenon after use radical External Beam Radiation Therapy. (authors)

  4. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  5. Photon beam audits for radiation therapy clinics: A pilot mailed dosemeter study in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegingil, Z.; DeWerd, L. A.; Davis, S. D.; Hammer, C.; Kunugi, K.

    2012-01-01

    A thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) mailed dose audit programme was performed at five radiotherapy clinics in Turkey. The intercomparison was organised by the Univ. of Wisconsin Radiation Calibration Laboratory (UWRCL), which was responsible for the technical aspects of the study including reference irradiations, distribution, collection and evaluation. The purpose of these audits was to perform an independent dosimetry check of the radiation beams using TLDs sent by mail. Acrylic holders, each with five TLD chips inside and instructions for their irradiation to specified absorbed dose to water of 2 Gy, were mailed to all participating clinics. TLD irradiations were performed with a 6 MV linear accelerator and 60 Co photon beams. The deviations from the TL readings of UWRCL were calculated. Discrepancies inside the limits of ±5 % between the participant-stated dose, and the TLD-measured dose were considered acceptable. One out of 10 beams checked was outside this limit, with a difference of 5.8 %. (authors)

  6. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five...... lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU...

  7. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Brain and hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberer, S.; Assouline, A.; Mazeron, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Anticancer treatments-induced central nervous system neurotoxicity has become a major problem in recent years. Real advances in therapeutic results for cancer treatments have improved patients survival. Nowadays, central nervous system radiation therapy is widely prescribed, both for palliative and curative treatments in the management of malignant or benign tumors. Recent data on tolerance of normal central nervous system to radiation therapy are reviewed here, early and delayed radiation-induced effects are described and dose recommendations are suggested for clinical practice. (authors)

  8. Conformal external beam radiation or selective internal radiation therapy-a comparison of treatment outcomes for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeru, Oluwadamilola T; Miccio, Joseph A; Yang, Jie; Xue, Yaqi; Ryu, Samuel; Stessin, Alexander M

    2016-06-01

    Non-operative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has expanded significantly with the use of selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) mostly with yttrium 90 ((90)Y) tagged microspheres and highly conformal external beam radiation therapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to treat unresectable liver tumors for local tumor control. SBRT is a noninvasive procedure using external radiation source under image guidance, while SIRT delivers radioactive particles by transarterial radioembolization (TARE). However, the survival benefits of SBRT versus SIRT have never been compared. The aim of the present study is to compare the outcomes of overall and disease specific survival (DSS) using SIRT versus SBRT to treat HCC. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database [2004-2011] was queried for cases of unresectable HCC. Patients with missing data and those who received surgery were excluded from the study. A total of 189 patients with unresectable HCC were identified and used for statistical analysis, with 112 receiving SBRT and 77 receiving SIRT. Overall and disease-specific survival was compared using multivariable cox proportional hazard models. After adjusting for confounding factors (age at diagnosis, gender, race, grade, stage, AFP level and type of surgery), there were no significant difference in overall survival (OS) [hazard ratio (HR), 0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.49-1.07; P=0.1077] and DSS (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46-1.05; P=0.0880) for SIRT compared to SBRT. However, patients with elevated AFP level were associated with higher death risk (P=0.0459) and disease specific death risk (P=0.0233) than those with AFP within normal limits in both treatment groups. The retrospective analysis serves as the first comparison of SIRT to SBRT in treatment of unresectable HCC. Our findings suggest both treatment approaches result in similar outcomes in overall and disease-specific survival benefit. Future prospective randomized

  9. Current perspectives of radiation therapy. History of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the discovery of X-Strahlen by Roentgen. The history of radiation therapy has evolved under mutual stimulating relationships of the external beam radiation therapy by X-ray tubes and accelerators, and the internal radiation therapy employing radium and other radionuclides. The currently employed technologies in radiation therapy have its origin already till nineteen sixties and the development of physics and engineering have realized the original concept. (author)

  10. Can multiparametric MRI replace Roach equations in staging prostate cancer before external beam radiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girometti, Rossano, E-mail: rgirometti@sirm.org [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Signor, Marco Andrea, E-mail: marco.signor@asuiud.sanita.fvg.it [Department of Oncological Radiation Therapy, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Piazzale S. M. della Misericordia, 15–33100, Udine (Italy); Pancot, Martina, E-mail: martypancot@libero.it [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Cereser, Lorenzo, E-mail: lcereser@sirm.org [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Zuiani, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.zuiani@uniud.it [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the agreement between Roach equations (RE) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in assessing the T-stage of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods: Seventy-three patients with biopsy-proven PCa and previous RE assessment prospectively underwent mpMRI on a 3.0T magnet before external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Using Cohen’s kappa statistic, we assessed the agreement between RE and mpMRI in defining the T-stage (≥T3 vs.T ≤ 2) and risk category according to the National comprehensive cancer network criteria (≤intermediate vs. ≥high). We also calculated sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in an additional group of thirty-seven patients with post-prostatectomy histological examination (mpMRI validation group). Results: The agreement between RE and mpMRI in assessing the T stage and risk category was moderate (k = 0.53 and 0.56, respectively). mpMRI changed the T stage and risk category in 21.9% (95%C.I. 13.4–33-4) and 20.5% (95%C.I. 12.3–31.9), respectively, prevalently downstaging PCa compared to RE. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in the mpMRI validation group were 81.8% (95%C.I. 65.1–91.9) and 88.5% (72.8–96.1). Conclusion: RE and mpMRI show moderate agreement only in assessing the T-stage of PCa, translating into an mpMRI-induced change in risk assessment in about one fifth of patients. As supported by high sensitivity/specificity for ≥T3 stage in the validation group, the discrepancy we found is in favour of mpMRI as a tool to stage PCa before ERBT.

  11. The impact of androgen deprivation therapy on setup errors during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem; Dolek, Yemliha; Ozdemir, Yurday [Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Adana Dr. Turgut Noyan Research and Treatment Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey)

    2017-06-15

    To determine whether setup errors during external beam radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer are influenced by the combination of androgen deprivation treatment (ADT) and RT. Data from 175 patients treated for prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment was as follows: concurrent ADT plus RT, 33 patients (19%); neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT plus RT, 91 patients (52%); RT only, 51 patients (29%). Required couch shifts without rotations were recorded for each megavoltage (MV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan, and corresponding alignment shifts were recorded as left-right (x), superior-inferior (y), and anterior-posterior (z). The nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used to compare shifts by group. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to measure the correlation of couch shifts between groups. Mean prostate shifts and standard deviations (SD) were calculated and pooled to obtain mean or group systematic error (M), SD of systematic error (Σ), and SD of random error (σ). No significant differences were observed in prostate shifts in any direction between the groups. Shifts on CBCT were all less than setup margins. A significant positive correlation was observed between prostate volume and the z-direction prostate shift (r = 0.19, p = 0.04), regardless of ADT group, but not between volume and x- or y-direction shifts (r = 0.04, p = 0.7; r = 0.03, p = 0.7). Random and systematic errors for all patient cohorts and ADT groups were similar. Hormone therapy given concurrently with RT was not found to significantly impact setup errors. Prostate volume was significantly correlated with shifts in the anterior-posterior direction only. (orig.) [German] Ziel war zu untersuchen, ob Konfigurationsfehler bei der externen Radiotherapie (RT) des Prostatakarzinoms durch die Kombination aus Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) und RT beeinflusst werden. Retrospektiv wurden die Daten von 175 wegen eines Prostatakarzinoms behandelten Patienten

  12. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  13. Comparison of quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma receiving conventional external beam radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Lu; Yan Senxiang; Yan Danfang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the acute and late adverse events and quality of life (QOL) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas receiving conventional external beam radiation therapy (RT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Ninety-one patients with newly diagnosed nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated in our institution between August 2008 and September 2010 were systemically reviewed, including 35 cases administered with conventional RT (RT group) and 56 cases with IMRT (IMRT group). Conjoint faciocervical fields plus tangential lower neck-supraclavicular field initially, and then shrinking preauricular portals plus electron beams to the neck were adopted in RT groups, with a total dose of 70 Gy/35 fractions.Nine coplanar fields were conducted in IMRT group with a total dose of 69.96 Gy/33 fractions. Acute and late adverse reactions were observed and compared between RT and IMRT groups, including acute reactions as xerostomia, odynophagia, dermatitis/mucositis and late events as dysphagia, trismus, hypothyroidism, optic/acoustic impairments, skin injury, hypodermal fibrosis, spinal myelitis and brain injury. Results: Compared with RT group, IMRT group showed less acute reactions in xerostomia, odynophagia, dysphagia and dermatitis and mucositis (χ 2 =85.73, 56.03, 26.58, 69.28, 55.99, P<0.05), and less late reactions in xerostomia, dysphagia, trismus, taste loss and skin injury (χ 2 =37.95, 7.48, 9.49, 9.49, 11.87, P<0.05), whereas the degree of acoustic/optic impairments and brain injury showed no difference in both groups. Conclusions: As compared to conventional RT, IMRT could decrease acute and some late side events, and improve the quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. (authors)

  14. Cyclotron radiation beam control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominke, P.

    1983-01-01

    This patent application describes an apparatus for attenuating a beam of particulate radiation comprising a series of modules, each module being constituted by a sphere having a passage, a cupola covering said sphere and a base supporting said sphere, and means for causing movement of the spheres for aligning said passages with an axis of a beam line and arranging said passages out of alignment so as to attenuate the beam. (author)

  15. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Proton Beam Radiation Therapy with Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Results of an Interim Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Smith, Jason C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Volk, Michael L. [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Reeves, Mark E. [VA Loma Linda Health Care System, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheng, Jason [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Grove, Roger [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Vera, Michael E. de [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To describe results of a planned interim analysis of a prospective, randomized clinical trial developed to compare treatment outcomes among patients with newly diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had either clinical or pathologic diagnosis of HCC and met either Milan or San Francisco transplant criteria. Patients were randomly assigned to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or to proton beam radiation therapy. Patients randomized to TACE received at least 1 TACE with additional TACE for persistent disease. Proton beam radiation therapy was delivered to all areas of gross disease to a total dose of 70.2 Gy in 15 daily fractions over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, with secondary endpoints of overall survival, local tumor control, and treatment-related toxicities as represented by posttreatment days of hospitalization. Results: At the time of this analysis 69 subjects were available for analysis. Of these, 36 were randomized to TACE and 33 to proton. Total days of hospitalization within 30 days of TACE/proton was 166 and 24 days, respectively (P<.001). Ten TACE and 12 proton patients underwent liver transplantation after treatment. Viable tumor identified in the explanted livers after TACE/proton averaged 2.4 and 0.9 cm, respectively. Pathologic complete response after TACE/proton was 10%/25% (P=.38). The 2-year overall survival for all patients was 59%, with no difference between treatment groups. Median survival time was 30 months (95% confidence interval 20.7-39.3 months). There was a trend toward improved 2-year local tumor control (88% vs 45%, P=.06) and progression-free survival (48% vs 31%, P=.06) favoring the proton beam treatment group. Conclusions: This interim analysis indicates similar overall survival rates for proton beam radiation therapy and TACE. There is a trend toward improved local tumor control and progression-free survival with proton beam. There are

  16. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A NOVEL, REMOVABLE, CERROBEND, BEAM-BLOCKING DEVICE FOR RADIATION THERAPY OF THE CANINE HEAD AND NECK: PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael S; Berlato, Davide; Vanhaezebrouck, Isabelle; Gordon, Ira K; Hansen, Katherine S; Theon, Alain P; Holt, Randall W; Trestrail, Earl A

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the head and neck can result in mucositis and other acute affects in the oral cavity. This prospective pilot study evaluated a novel, intraoral, beam-blocking device for use during imaging and therapeutic procedures. The beam-blocking device was made from a metal alloy inserted into a coated frozen dessert mold (Popsicle® Mold, Cost Plus World Market, Oakland, CA). The device was designed so that it could be inserted into an outer shell, which in turn allowed it to be placed or removed depending on the need due to beam configuration. A Farmer type ionization chamber and virtual water phantom were used to assess effects of field size on transmission. Six large breed cadaver dogs, donated by the owner after death, were recruited for the study. Delivered dose at the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the device, with and without the alloy block in place, were measured using radiochromic film. It was determined that transmission was field size dependent with larger field sizes leading to decreased attenuation of the beam, likely secondary to scatter. The mean and median transmission on the ventral surface without the beam-blocking device was 0.94 [range 0.94-0.96]. The mean and median transmission with the beam-blocking device was 0.52 [range 0.50-0.57]. The mean and median increase in dose due to backscatter on the dorsal surface of the beam-blocking device was 0.04 [range 0.02-0.04]. Findings indicated that this novel device can help attenuate radiation dose ventral to the block in dogs, with minimal backscatter. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Early effect of external beam radiation therapy on the anal sphincter: A study using anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, E.H.; Dreznik, Z.; Myerson, R.J.; Lacey, D.L.; Fry, R.D.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The early of pelvic irradiation on the anal sphincter has not been previously investigated. This study prospectively evaluated the acute effect of preoperative radiation on anal function. Twenty patients with rectal carcinoma received 4,500 cGy of preoperative external beam radiation. The field of radiation included the sphincter in 10 patients and was delivered above the anorectal ring in 10 patients. Anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound were performed before and four weeks after radiotherapy. No significant difference in mean maximal squeeze or resting pressure was found after radiation therapy. An increase in mean minimal sensory threshold was significant. Histologic examination revealed minimal radiation changes at the distal margin in 8 of 10 patients who underwent low anterior resection and in 1 of 3 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection. The authors conclude that preoperative radiation therapy has minimal immediate effect on the anal sphincter and is not a major contributing factor to postoperative incontinence in patients after sphincter-saving operations for rectal cancer

  19. Implementation of a system for external audits beam radiation therapy in terms of reference no

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Dominguez, Lourdes; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo; Garcia Yip, Fernando; Rodriguez Machado, Jorge; Morales Lopez, Jorge Luis; Silvestre Patallo, Ileana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents our experience in implementing a external audit system for radiotherapy beam in no reference conditions with the use of CIRS and a summary of the measurements with him made.This paper presents our experience in implementing a external audit system for radiotherapy beam in no reference conditions with the use of CIRS and a summary of the measurements with him made. Centers were audited with external beam high-energy Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV and were considered 4 treatment planning systems (TPS): AMEPLAN, Theraplan Plus, Precise Plan and MIRS to calculate doses prescribed in each test case. All measurements were acquired by the audit team using the anthropomorphic phantom CIRS, Semiflex chamber PTW 31010 and PTW electrometer STATES. The implementation and development of the external audits of beams radiotherapy in terms of 'no reference' has brought an improvement in both clinical aspects of treatment and the radiation safety and the quality control, has given us greater confidence and for this reason we believe has become essential. (Author)

  20. In vivo pink-beam imaging and fast alignment procedure for rat brain lesion microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphaël, E-mail: raph.serduc@gmail.com; Berruyer, Gilles; Brochard, Thierry; Renier, Michel; Nemoz, Christian [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-05-01

    A fast 50 µm-accuracy alignment procedure has been developed for the radiosurgery of brain lesions in rats, using microbeam radiation therapy. A fast 50 µm-accuracy alignment procedure has been developed for the radiosurgery of brain lesions in rats, using microbeam radiation therapy. In vivo imaging was performed using the pink beam (35–60 keV) produced by the ID17 wiggler at the ESRF opened at 120 mm and filtered. A graphical user interface has been developed in order to define the irradiation field size and to position the target with respect to the skull structures observed in X-ray images. The method proposed here allows tremendous time saving by skipping the swap from white beam to monochromatic beam and vice versa. To validate the concept, the somatosensory cortex or thalamus of GAERS rats were irradiated under several ports using this alignment procedure. The magnetic resonance images acquired after contrast agent injection showed that the irradiations were selectively performed in these two expected brain regions. Image-guided microbeam irradiations have therefore been realised for the first time ever, and, thanks to this new development, the ID17 biomedical beamline provides a major tool allowing brain radiosurgery trials on animal patients.

  1. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  2. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Calley, Cynthia S.J. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2015-02-01

    higher dose. The EC50 model provides suggested dose–volume temporal lobe constraints for conventionally fractionated high-dose skull base radiation therapy.

  3. Benefits, risks, and safety of external beam radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lindsay C; Mutter, Robert W; Halyard, Michele Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common and complex disease often necessitating multimodality care. Breast cancer may be treated with surgical resection, radiotherapy (RT), and systemic therapy, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapies, or a combination thereof. In the past 50 years, RT has played an increasingly significant role in the treatment of breast cancer, resulting in improvements in locoregional control and survival for women undergoing mastectomy who are at high risk of recurrence, and allowing for breast conservation in certain settings. Although radiation provides significant benefit to many women with breast cancer, it is also associated with risks of toxicity, including cardiac and pulmonary toxicity, lymphedema, and secondary malignancy. RT techniques have advanced and continue to evolve dramatically, offering increased precision and reproducibility of treatment delivery and flexibility of treatment schedule. This increased sophistication of RT offers promise of improved outcomes by maintaining or improving efficacy, reducing toxicity, and increasing patient access and convenience. A review of the role of radiation therapy in breast cancer, its associated toxicities and efforts in toxicity reduction is presented.

  4. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: new methods for mini-beams radiation therapy and treatment follow-up by functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, P.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative method of synchrotron radiation therapy, called mini-beams, was proposed by A. Dilmanian et al. in 2006. Mini-beams consists in tumor irradiation with monochromatic sub-millimetric x-ray beams spatially fractionated produced by a synchrotron source. To obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume, an interleaving is realized using two orthogonal incidences. Adjacent healthy tissue is only partially irradiated by mini-beams, the areas between the beams only receive scattered radiation and therefore the energy deposited is 10 to 15 times lower than on one mini-beam axis, leading to a sparing effect of healthy tissue even when a high dose is deposited in the target volume. The thesis project is the development of this experimental method of monochromatic mini-beams, which involves the control of the irradiation geometry, the control of dosimetry and its modeling by Monte Carlo simulations. To evaluate the method, preclinical experiments on models of brain tumors implanted in rats (F98) are performed. Follow-up by anatomical and functional imaging is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Functional imaging of cerebral perfusion (volume and cerebral blood flow, mean transit time of heavy elements) appears to be associated in the literature as a relevant method for monitoring prognostic. The key parameters of the cerebral vasculature are mainly studied in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because of the harmlessness of this imaging modality. The relation between MRI signal and contrast agent concentration is very complex and no quantitative relationship is well known. Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) is an imaging modality with performances to measure absolute contrast agent concentration very close to the theoretical limits and can be used as gold-standard. The used pharmacokinetic models need as input parameters a contrast agent concentration versus time. A comparison of perfusion measurements between MRI and SRCT

  5. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications.

  6. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L; Haddock, Michael G; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia N; Arndt, Carola A S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy

  7. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  8. Secondary radiation doses of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton beam therapy in patients with lung and liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonkyu; Min, Byung Jun; Yoon, Myonggeun; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Sungkoo; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2011-03-01

    To compare the secondary radiation doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) in patients with lung and liver cancer. IMRT and PBT were planned for three lung cancer and three liver cancer patients. The treatment beams were delivered to phantoms and the corresponding secondary doses during irradiation were measured at various points 20-50 cm from the beam isocenter using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and PBT, respectively. The secondary dose per Gy (i.e., a treatment dose of 1Gy) from PBT for lung and liver cancer, measured 20-50 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.17 to 0.086 mGy. The secondary dose per Gy from IMRT, however, ranged between 5.8 and 1.0 mGy, indicating that PBT is associated with a smaller dose of secondary radiation than IMRT. The internal neutron dose per Gy from PBT for lung and liver cancer, 20-50 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.03 to 0.008 mGy. The secondary dose from PBT is less than or compatible to the secondary dose from conventional IMRT. The internal neutron dose generated by the interaction between protons and body material is generally much less than the external neutron dose from the treatment head. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A set cover approach to fast beam orientation optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy for total marrow irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chieh-Hsiu Jason; Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B, E-mail: chjlee@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: michael.sharpe@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-09-07

    The beam orientation optimization (BOO) problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is a nonlinear problem, and existing methods to obtain solutions to the BOO problem are time consuming due to the complex nature of the objective function and size of the solution space. These issues become even more difficult in total marrow irradiation (TMI), where many more beams must be used to cover a vastly larger treatment area than typical site-specific treatments (e.g., head-and-neck, prostate, etc). These complications result in excessively long computation times to develop IMRT treatment plans for TMI, so we attempt to develop methods that drastically reduce treatment planning time. We transform the BOO problem into the classical set cover problem (SCP) and use existing methods to solve SCP to obtain beam solutions. Although SCP is NP-Hard, our methods obtain beam solutions that result in quality treatments in minutes. We compare our approach to an integer programming solver for the SCP to illustrate the speed advantage of our approach.

  10. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam

  11. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam.

  12. Optimal starting gantry angles using equiangular-spaced beams with intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 0126: A clinical study of 5 and 7 fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Butler, James B.; El-Gubtan, Adel S.; Nugent, Zoann

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the effects of starting gantry angle and number of equiangular-spaced beams for prostate cancer radiotherapy on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0126 protocol using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: Ten localized prostate cancer patients were prescribed to 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Static IMRT plans using five and seven equiangular-spaced beams were generated. The starting gantry angles were incremented by 5 o resulting in 15 (5 beams) and 11 (7 beams) plans per patient. Constant target coverage was ensured for all plans in order to isolate the variation in the rectal and bladder metrics as a function of starting gantry angle. Results: The variation with starting gantry angle in rectal metrics using 5 beams was statistically significant (p o and 50 o . Statistically insignificant differences were observed for the bladder metrics using 5 beams. There was little dosimetric variation in the rectal and bladder metrics with 7 beams. Nearly equivalent rectal V 75 Gy was achieved between 5 optimal equiangular-spaced beams starting at 20 o (class solution) and 7 equiangular-spaced beams starting at 0 o for most patients. Conclusions: The use of an optimal starting gantry angle for 5 equiangular-spaced beams, as indicated by a class solution in this study, will facilitate rectal sparing and can produce plans that are equivalent to those employing 7 equiangular-spaced beams

  13. Prevalence and Predicting Factors for Commonly Neglected Sexual Side Effects to External-Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Anders; Pedersen, Christian; Lindberg, Henriette; Bisbjerg, Rasmus; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2017-04-01

    Changes in sexual function other than erectile dysfunction are sparsely investigated after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. To investigate orgasmic dysfunction, urinary incontinence during sexual activity, changes in penile morphology, and sensory disturbances in the penis in patients with prostate cancer treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). In February 2015, men treated with EBRT at our center 3 months to 5 years previously (N = 519) received a study-specific questionnaire. This was developed from purpose-built questions and validated tools including the Erection Hardness Scale. All patients had received a radiation dose of 78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered according to disease characteristics. Outcome measurements were prevalence rates and predictors of these side effects as identified by multivariate logistic regression analyses. One hundred nine patients were eligible (sexually active and had completed androgen deprivation therapy) for inclusion. Twenty-four percent reported anorgasmia, 44% reported a decreased intensity of their orgasms, and 40% reported that the time it took to reach orgasm had increased. Eleven percent reported anejaculation. Fifteen percent reported orgasm-associated pain. Only 4% reported urinary incontinence during sexual activity. Subjective penile length loss in excess of 1 cm was reported by 42%. Twelve percent reported an altered curvature of their penis after EBRT. Six percent reported painful erections. Twenty-seven percent reported decreased sensitivity in the penis after EBRT, 2% reported a cold sensation, and 2% reported paresthesia. Increasing time since final treatment increased the risk of penile sensory disturbances (odds ratio = 1.05; P = .028). Orgasmic dysfunction, changes in penile morphology, and sensory disturbances in the penis are common side effects of ERBT. Patients should be properly informed of the occurrence of these side effects before deciding which treatment to

  14. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Oglio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.delloglio@gmail.com [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Boehm, Katharina [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Trudeau, Vincent [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Tian, Zhe [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Larcher, Alessandro [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh F. [Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  15. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Larcher, Alessandro; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  16. [Non-targeted effects (bystander, abscopal) of external beam radiation therapy: an overview for the clinician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, R; Sbai, A; Ganem, G; Boudabous, M; Collin, F; Marcy, P-Y; Doglio, A; Thariat, J

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy is advocated in the treatment of cancer of over 50 % of patients. It has long been considered as a focal treatment only. However, the observation of effects, such as fatigue and lymphopenia, suggests that systemic effects may also occur. The description of bystander and abscopal effects suggests that irradiated cells may exert an action on nearby or distant unirradiated cells, respectively. A third type of effect that involves feedback interactions between irradiated cells was more recently described (cohort effect). This new field of radiation therapy is yet poorly understood and the definitions suffer from a lack of reproducibility in part due to the variety of experimental models. The bystander effect might induce genomic instability in non-irradiated cells and is thus extensively studied for a potential risk of radiation-induced cancer. From a therapeutic perspective, reproducing an abscopal effect by using a synergy between ionizing radiation and immunomodulatory agents to elicit or boost anticancer immune responses is an interesting area of research. Many applications are being developed in particular in the field of hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation of metastatic disease. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  18. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  19. Statistical modeling of the eye for multimodal treatment planning for external beam radiation therapy of intraocular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüegsegger, Michael B; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Pica, Alessia; Amstutz, Christoph A; Rudolph, Tobias; Aebersold, Daniel; Kowal, Jens H

    2012-11-15

    Ocular anatomy and radiation-associated toxicities provide unique challenges for external beam radiation therapy. For treatment planning, precise modeling of organs at risk and tumor volume are crucial. Development of a precise eye model and automatic adaptation of this model to patients' anatomy remain problematic because of organ shape variability. This work introduces the application of a 3-dimensional (3D) statistical shape model as a novel method for precise eye modeling for external beam radiation therapy of intraocular tumors. Manual and automatic segmentations were compared for 17 patients, based on head computed tomography (CT) volume scans. A 3D statistical shape model of the cornea, lens, and sclera as well as of the optic disc position was developed. Furthermore, an active shape model was built to enable automatic fitting of the eye model to CT slice stacks. Cross-validation was performed based on leave-one-out tests for all training shapes by measuring dice coefficients and mean segmentation errors between automatic segmentation and manual segmentation by an expert. Cross-validation revealed a dice similarity of 95%±2% for the sclera and cornea and 91%±2% for the lens. Overall, mean segmentation error was found to be 0.3±0.1 mm. Average segmentation time was 14±2 s on a standard personal computer. Our results show that the solution presented outperforms state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy, reliability, and robustness. Moreover, the eye model shape as well as its variability is learned from a training set rather than by making shape assumptions (eg, as with the spherical or elliptical model). Therefore, the model appears to be capable of modeling nonspherically and nonelliptically shaped eyes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Statistical Modeling of the Eye for Multimodal Treatment Planning for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Intraocular Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueegsegger, Michael B. [ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern (Switzerland); Bach Cuadra, Meritxell [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Center (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Signal Processing Laboratory - LTS5, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Pica, Alessia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Amstutz, Christoph A. [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Rudolph, Tobias [ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern (Switzerland); Aebersold, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kowal, Jens H., E-mail: jens.kowal@artorg.unibe.ch [ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Ocular anatomy and radiation-associated toxicities provide unique challenges for external beam radiation therapy. For treatment planning, precise modeling of organs at risk and tumor volume are crucial. Development of a precise eye model and automatic adaptation of this model to patients' anatomy remain problematic because of organ shape variability. This work introduces the application of a 3-dimensional (3D) statistical shape model as a novel method for precise eye modeling for external beam radiation therapy of intraocular tumors. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic segmentations were compared for 17 patients, based on head computed tomography (CT) volume scans. A 3D statistical shape model of the cornea, lens, and sclera as well as of the optic disc position was developed. Furthermore, an active shape model was built to enable automatic fitting of the eye model to CT slice stacks. Cross-validation was performed based on leave-one-out tests for all training shapes by measuring dice coefficients and mean segmentation errors between automatic segmentation and manual segmentation by an expert. Results: Cross-validation revealed a dice similarity of 95% {+-} 2% for the sclera and cornea and 91% {+-} 2% for the lens. Overall, mean segmentation error was found to be 0.3 {+-} 0.1 mm. Average segmentation time was 14 {+-} 2 s on a standard personal computer. Conclusions: Our results show that the solution presented outperforms state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy, reliability, and robustness. Moreover, the eye model shape as well as its variability is learned from a training set rather than by making shape assumptions (eg, as with the spherical or elliptical model). Therefore, the model appears to be capable of modeling nonspherically and nonelliptically shaped eyes.

  1. Proton Beam Therapy Versus Conformal Photon Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma: Multi-institutional Analysis of Outcomes, Cyst Dynamics, and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Greenfield, Brad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih [Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Kahalley, Lisa S. [Section of Psychology, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; McGovern, Susan L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We compared proton beam therapy (PBT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for pediatric craniopharyngioma in terms of disease control, cyst dynamics, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records from 52 children treated with PBT (n=21) or IMRT (n=31) at 2 institutions from 1996-2012. Endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control, cyst dynamics, and toxicity. Results: At 59.6 months' median follow-up (PBT 33 mo vs IMRT 106 mo; P<.001), the 3-year outcomes were 96% for OS, 95% for nodular failure-free survival and 76% for cystic failure-free survival. Neither OS nor disease control differed between treatment groups (OS P=.742; nodular failure-free survival P=.546; cystic failure-free survival P=.994). During therapy, 40% of patients had cyst growth (20% requiring intervention); immediately after therapy, 17 patients (33%) had cyst growth (transient in 14), more commonly in the IMRT group (42% vs 19% PBT; P=.082); and 27% experienced late cyst growth (32% IMRT, 19% PBT; P=.353), with intervention required in 40%. Toxicity did not differ between groups. On multivariate analysis, cyst growth was related to visual and hypothalamic toxicity (P=.009 and .04, respectively). Patients given radiation as salvage therapy (for recurrence) rather than adjuvant therapy had higher rates of visual and endocrine (P=.017 and .024, respectively) dysfunction. Conclusions: Survival and disease-control outcomes were equivalent for PBT and IMRT. Cyst growth is common, unpredictable, and should be followed during and after therapy, because it contributes to late toxicity. Delaying radiation therapy until recurrence may result in worse visual and endocrine function.

  2. Determination of Endpoint Energy and Bremsstrahlung Spectra for High-Energy Radiation-Therapy Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Danny Joe

    Few attempts have been made to experimentally determine thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra of megavoltage therapy beams. For spectral studies using the Compton scattering technique, sodium iodine (NaI) detectors with relatively poor energy resolution have been used. Other experimental techniques for determining spectra are generally not suited for a clinical environment with the inherent time and space constraints. To gather more spectral information than previously obtained in the region near the endpoint energy, the use of a high-resolution intrinsic-germanium (Ge) detector was proposed. A response function matrix was determined from experimentally obtained pulse height distributions on the multichannel analyzer. The distributions were for nine various monoenergetic sources between 280 adn 1525 keV. The response function was used to convert the measured pulse height distributions to photon flux spectra using an iterative approximation technique with a computer. Photon flux spectra from the Sagittaire Linear Accelerator were obtained at average-electron endpoint energies of 15, 20, and 25 MeV. Two spectra were measured at the 25 MeV setting; one spectrum was measured along the central axis and one spectrum at 4(DEGREES) off axis. Photon spectra were also obtained for a Van de Graaff generator at the nominal endpoint energies of 2.2, 2.35, and 2.5 MeV. The results for both the linac and the Van de Graaff generator were compared with theoretical spectra and previously measured spectra where available. Also, photon spectra from a Theratron-80 (('60)Co) unit were determined for three field sizes and for a 10 x 10 cm. field with a lucite tray or a 45(DEGREES) wedge in the beam. The resulting spectra were compared to previously measured ('60)Co spectra.

  3. Computerized System for Safety Verification of External Beam Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clay; Kukluk, Jacek; Molodowitch, Christina; Czerminska, Maria; Hancox, Cindy; Cormack, Robert A; Beaudette, Kevin; Killoran, Joseph H

    2017-07-01

    To report an assessment of in-house software, Verifier, developed to improve efficacy and efficiency of the radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning process and quality control review (QCR). Radiation therapy plan parameters retrieved from our treatment planning database are used by automated tests to give 75 types of warnings, such as prescription and plan discrepancies. The software is continuously updated on the basis of new issues, ideas, and planning policies. Verifier was retrospectively assessed (2007-2015) by examining impact on treatment plan revisions, frequency of quality improvement incident reports of avoidable RT plan-related safety events, unaddressed issues, and staff efficiency. Plan revisions for specific issues declined dramatically in response to implementation of corresponding Verifier tests. Between 2012 and 2015 our institution's total rate of plan revisions dropped from 18.0% to 11.2%. Between 2008 and 2015 specific tests were added to Verifier while the rate of corresponding avoidable safety events was reduced from 0.34% to 0.00% over the same period. Simulations suggest Verifier saves approximately 2 to 5 minutes per QCR. The decrease in quantifiable metrics of plan revisions and incident reports suggests automatic RT plan-checking software enhances patient safety and clinical efficiency. Although only modest time savings may be gained using Verifier for the QCR itself, the greater impact on efficiency is through avoiding late-stage plan modifications and improving documentation via automation. We encourage other institutions to consider working toward adding similar technologies to enhance their RT quality assurance programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain ...

  5. SU-E-T-353: Decoding the Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, W; Cho, S; Zhang, X; Hoffman, K; Kudchadker, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Modern IMRT relies on computers to generate treatment plans of varied complexity. A highly complex treatment plan may use a large number of small and irregular beam apertures in order to achieve high dose conformity. However, excessive beam complexity can increase dosimetric uncertainty, prolong treatment time, and increase susceptibility to target or organ motion. In this study we sought to develop metrics to assess the complexity of IMRT beams and plans. Methods: Based the information of leaf positions and MU for each beam segment, we calculated the following beam complexity metrics: aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation. Then these beam complexity metrics were averaged to obtain the corresponding plan complexity metrics, using the beam MUs as weighting factors. We evaluated and compared the beam and plan complexity scores for 65 IMRT plans from 3 sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine). We also studied how the plan complexity scores were affected by adjusting inverse planning parameters. Results: For prostate IMRT, the lateral beams had large MUs and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior or posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest shape irregularity and beam modulation; the HN IMRT plans had the largest aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic IMRT plans often had small aperture area, which may be associated with relatively large discrepancies between calculated and measures doses. The plan complexity increased as the number of optimization iterations and the number of beam segments increased and as the minimum segment area decreased. Conclusion: Complexity of IMRT beams and plans were quantified in terms of aperture area, shape irregularity and beam modulation. The complexity metrics varied among IMRT plans for different disease sites and were affected when the planning parameters were adjusted

  6. Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, A.; Garcia, R.; Knöös, T.; Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Khamphan, C.; Cozzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy clinical practice. Such beams present fundamental differences with respect to the standard filter flattened (FF) beams, making the generally used dosimetric parameters and definitions not always viable. The present study will propose possible definitions and suggestions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of FFF beams generated by medical linacs in radiotherapy. Methods: The main characteristics of the photon beams have been analyzed using specific data generated by a Varian TrueBeam linac having both FFF and FF beams of 6 and 10 MV energy, respectively. Results: Definitions for dose profile parameters are suggested starting from the renormalization of the FFF with respect to the corresponding FF beam. From this point the flatness concept has been translated into one of “unflatness” and other definitions have been proposed, maintaining a strict parallelism between FFF and FF parameter concepts. Conclusions: Ideas for quality controls used in establishing a quality assurance program when introducing FFF beams into the clinical environment are given here, keeping them similar to those used for standard FF beams. By following the suggestions in this report, the authors foresee that the introduction of FFF beams into a clinical radiotherapy environment will be as safe and well controlled as standard beam modalities using the existing guidelines.

  7. Dose Recalculation and the Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (DGRT) Process Using Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Joey; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Yom, Sue S.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Celi, Juan Carlos; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: At University of California San Francisco, daily or weekly three-dimensional images of patients in treatment position are acquired for image-guided radiation therapy. These images can be used for calculating the actual dose delivered to the patient during treatment. In this article, we present the process of performing dose recalculation on megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography images and discuss possible strategies for dose-guided radiation therapy (DGRT). Materials and Methods: A dedicated workstation has been developed to incorporate the necessary elements of DGRT. Patient image correction (cupping, missing data artifacts), calibration, completion, recontouring, and dose recalculation are all implemented in the workstation. Tools for dose comparison are also included. Examples of image correction and dose analysis using 6 head-and-neck and 2 prostate patient datasets are presented to show possible tracking of interfraction dosimetric endpoint variation over the course of treatment. Results: Analysis of the head-and-neck datasets shows that interfraction treatment doses vary compared with the planning dose for the organs at risk, with the mean parotid dose and spinal cord D 1 increasing by as much as 52% and 10%, respectively. Variation of the coverage to the target volumes was small, with an average D 5 dose difference of 1%. The prostate patient datasets revealed accurate dose coverage to the targeted prostate and varying interfraction dose distributions to the organs at risk. Conclusions: An effective workflow for the clinical implementation of DGRT has been established. With these techniques in place, future clinical developments in adaptive radiation therapy through daily or weekly dosimetric measurements of treatment day images are possible.

  8. Conventional external beam radiation therapy and high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy as a boost for patients older than 70 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson

    2005-01-01

    The treatment options for patients with non metastatic prostate cancer range from observation, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy to various combination of some to all of them. Objective: we evaluated the impact on biochemical control of disease (bNED), acute and late intestinal (GI) and urological (GU) morbidity for a group of patients older than 70 years presenting initial or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost to conventional external beam radiation therapy (RT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology from Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: a total of 56 patients older than 70 were treated from March, 1997 to June, 2002. All patients had prior to HDRB a course of RT to a median dose of 45 Gy. HDRB doses ranged from 16 Gy to 20 Gy, given in 4 fractions. Results: the median age of the patients was 74.4 years (range 70-83) and the median follow-up 33 months (range 24 to 60). The 5-year actuarial bNED rate was 77%. Acute GU and GI morbidity G1-2 were seen in 17.8% and 7.1% of patients, respectively. Late G1 or G2 GU morbidity was seen in 10.7% of the patients, while late G3 morbidity was observed in 7.1% of the patients, represented by urethral strictures. Conclusion: this group of patients had similar bNED rates when compared to literature, with acceptable morbidity rates. (author)

  9. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  10. Noninvasive referencing of intraocular tumors for external beam radiation therapy using optical coherence tomography: A proof of concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Steiner, Patrick; Kowal, Jens H.; Geiser, Dominik; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy is currently considered the most common treatment modality for intraocular tumors. Localization of the tumor and efficient compensation of tumor misalignment with respect to the radiation beam are crucial. According to the state of the art procedure, localization of the target volume is indirectly performed by the invasive surgical implantation of radiopaque clips or is limited to positioning the head using stereoscopic radiographies. This work represents a proof-of-concept for direct and noninvasive tumor referencing based on anterior eye topography acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods: A prototype of a head-mounted device has been developed for automatic monitoring of tumor position and orientation in the isocentric reference frame for LINAC based treatment of intraocular tumors. Noninvasive tumor referencing is performed with six degrees of freedom based on anterior eye topography acquired using OCT and registration of a statistical eye model. The proposed prototype was tested based on enucleated pig eyes and registration accuracy was measured by comparison of the resulting transformation with tilt and torsion angles manually induced using a custom-made test bench. Results: Validation based on 12 enucleated pig eyes revealed an overall average registration error of 0.26 ± 0.08° in 87 ± 0.7 ms for tilting and 0.52 ± 0.03° in 94 ± 1.4 ms for torsion. Furthermore, dependency of sampling density on mean registration error was quantitatively assessed. Conclusions: The tumor referencing method presented in combination with the statistical eye model introduced in the past has the potential to enable noninvasive treatment and may improve quality, efficacy, and flexibility of external beam radiotherapy of intraocular tumors

  11. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondevila, Damian; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Monica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (α max ) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining α max , which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t E ) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL e ) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that α max increases for increasing TVL e (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t E , with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation

  12. Characterization of a microDiamond detector in high-dose-per-pulse electron beams for intra operative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, C; Marinelli, Marco; Tonnetti, A; Verona-Rinati, G; Falco, M D; Pimpinella, M; Ciccotelli, A; De Stefano, S; Felici, G; Marangoni, F

    2015-12-01

    To characterize a synthetic diamond dosimeter (PTW Freiburg microDiamond 60019) in high dose-per-pulse electron beams produced by an Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) dedicated accelerator. The dosimetric properties of the microDiamond were assessed under 6, 8 and 9 MeV electron beams by a NOVAC11 mobile accelerator (Sordina IORT Technologies S.p.A.). The characterization was carried out with dose-per-pulse ranging from 26 to 105 mGy per pulse. The microDiamond performance was compared with an Advanced Markus ionization chamber and a PTW silicon diode E in terms of dose linearity, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, beam profiles and output factors. A good linearity of the microDiamond response was verified in the dose range from 0.2 Gy to 28 Gy. A sensitivity of 1.29 nC/Gy was measured under IORT electron beams, resulting within 1% with respect to the one obtained in reference condition under (60)Co gamma irradiation. PDD measurements were found in agreement with the ones by the reference dosimeters, with differences in R50 values below 0.3 mm. Profile measurements evidenced a high spatial resolution of the microDiamond, slightly worse than the one of the silicon diode. The penumbra widths measured by the microDiamond resulted approximately 0.5 mm larger than the ones by the Silicon diode. Output factors measured by the microDiamond were found within 2% with those obtained by the Advanced Markus down to 3 cm diameter field sizes. The microDiamond dosimeter was demonstrated to be suitable for precise dosimetry in IORT applications under high dose-per-pulse conditions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam CT for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouliot, Jean; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Chen, Josephine; Svatos, Michelle; Ghelmansarai, Farhad; Mitschke, Matthias; Aubin, Michele; Xia Ping; Morin, Olivier; Bucci, Kara; Roach, Mack; Hernandez, Paco; Zheng Zirao; Hristov, Dimitre; Verhey, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring low-exposure megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) three-dimensional (3D) image data of sufficient quality to register the CBCT images to kilovoltage planning CT images for patient alignment and dose verification purposes. Methods and materials: A standard clinical 6-MV Primus linear accelerator, operating in arc therapy mode, and an amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat-panel electronic portal-imaging device (EPID) were employed. The dose-pulse rate of a 6-MV Primus accelerator beam was windowed to expose an a-Si flat panel by using only 0.02 to 0.08 monitor units (MUs) per image. A triggered image-acquisition mode was designed to produce a high signal-to-noise ratio without pulsing artifacts. Several data sets were acquired for an anthropomorphic head phantom and frozen sheep and pig cadaver heads, as well as for a head-and-neck cancer patient on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For each CBCT image, a set of 90 to 180 projection images incremented by 1 deg to 2 deg was acquired. The two-dimensional (2D) projection images were then synthesized into a 3D image by use of cone-beam CT reconstruction. The resulting MV CBCT image set was used to visualize the 3D bony anatomy and some soft-tissue details. The 3D image registration with the kV planning CT was performed either automatically by application of a maximization of mutual information (MMI) algorithm or manually by aligning multiple 2D slices. Results: Low-noise 3D MV CBCT images without pulsing artifacts were acquired with a total delivered dose that ranged from 5 to 15 cGy. Acquisition times, including image readout, were on the order of 90 seconds for 180 projection images taken through a continuous gantry rotation of 180 deg . The processing time of the data required an additional 90 seconds for the reconstruction of a 256 3 cube with 1.0-mm voxel size. Implanted gold markers (1 mm x 3 mm) were easily visible for all exposure

  14. Impact of Concurrent Androgen Deprivation on Fiducial Marker Migration in External-beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberi, David A.; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Nguyen, Thu Van; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the extent of gold fiducial marker (FM) migration in patients treated for prostate cancer with concurrent androgen deprivation and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Three or 4 gold FMs were implanted in 37 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in conjunction with 70-78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was started a median of 3.9 months before EBRT (range, 0.3-12.5 months). To establish the extent of FM migration, the distance between each FM was calculated for 5-8 treatments once per week throughout the EBRT course. For each treatment, the distance between FMs was compared with the distance from the digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the planning CT. A total of 281 treatments were analyzed. Results: The average daily migration was 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mm, with distances ranging from 0.2 mm-2.6 mm. Two of the 281 assessed treatments (0.7%) showed migrations >2 mm. No correlation between FM migration and patient weight or time delay between ADT and start of EBRT was found. There was no correlation between the extent of FM migration and prostate volume. Conclusion: This is the largest report of implanted FM migration in patients receiving concomitant ADT. Only 0.7% of the 281 treatments studied had significant marker migrations (>2 mm) throughout the course of EBRT. Consequently, the use of implanted FMs in these patients enables accurate monitoring of prostate gland position during treatment.

  15. SU-F-T-232: Monthly Quality Assurance in External Beam Radiation Therapy Using a Single System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ji, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Iordachita, I [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Velarde, E; Hyatt, J; Wong, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Monthly quality assurance (QA) is time consuming for external beam radiation therapy, taking as long as 6–8 hours for each machine. It is due to the use and setup of multiple devices for different QA procedures. We have developed a single system with rotational capability for the measurement of both optical light and radiation which significantly reduces the time spent on Monthly QA. Methods: A single system using mirrors, a phosphor screen and a CCD camera is housed on a cylindrical motor so that it can rotate 360 degrees. For monthly QA, the system is placed on the patient couch of the medical accelerator with the plane of the phosphor screen at isocenter for all measurements. For optical QA such as optical distance indicator, room laser and light field, the optical image is collected directly with the camera. For radiation QA such as beam profile, MLC speed, picket-fence test, collimator rotation, table rotation and gantry rotation, a brass build-up plate is attached to the top of the phosphor screen. Two brass plates with islands of different thickness were designed for photon energy and electron energy constancy checks. Flex map, distortion map and uniformity map were developed to calibrate the motor bearing, camera/lens distortion, and the phosphor screen’s measured response across the field. Results: Following the TG142 guidelines for monthly QA with our system, the overall run time is reduced from 6–8 hours to 1.5 hours. Our system’s rotating design allows for quick testing of the gantry radiation isocenter test that is also independent of the sag of the gantry and the EPID. Conclusion: Our system significantly shortens the time needed for monthly QA by unifying the tests with a single system. Future work will be focused on extending the technology to Brachytherapy, IMRT and proton therapy QAs. This work is funded in part by a sponsor research grant from JPLC who owns the Raven technology. John Wong is a co-founder of JPLC.

  16. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill any cancer cells that remain. Lifetime Dose Limits There is a limit to the amount of radiation an area of ... total dose of radiation more quickly or to limit damage to healthy cells. Different ways of delivering ...

  17. Prospective study of proton-beam radiation therapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Verma, Vivek; Lin, Liyong; Berman, Abigail T; Levin, William P; Evans, Tracey L; Aggarwal, Charu; Rengan, Ramesh; Langer, Corey; Cohen, Roger B; Simone, Charles B

    2017-11-01

    Existing data supporting the use of proton-beam therapy (PBT) for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) are limited to a single 6-patient case series. This is the first prospective study to evaluate clinical outcomes and toxicities of PBT for LS-SCLC. This study prospectively analyzed patients with primary, nonrecurrent LS-SCLC definitively treated with PBT and concurrent chemotherapy from 2011 to 2016. Clinical backup intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for each patient and were compared with PBT plans. Outcome measures included local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates and toxicities. Thirty consecutive patients were enrolled and evaluated. The median dose was 63.9 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45-66.6 cobalt gray equivalents) in 33 to 37 fractions delivered daily (n = 18 [60.0%]) or twice daily (n = 12 [40.0%]). The concurrent chemotherapy was cisplatin/etoposide (n = 21 [70.0%]) or carboplatin/etoposide (n = 9 [30.0%]). In comparison with the backup IMRT plans, PBT allowed statistically significant reductions in the cord, heart, and lung mean doses and the volume receiving at least 5 Gy but not in the esophagus mean dose or the lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy. At a median follow-up of 14 months, the 1-/2-year LC and RFS rates were 85%/69% and 63%/42%, respectively. The median OS was 28.2 months, and the 1-/2-year OS rates were 72%/58%. There was 1 case each (3.3%) of grade 3 or higher esophagitis, pneumonitis, anorexia, and pericardial effusion. Grade 2 pneumonitis and esophagitis were seen in 10.0% and 43.3% of patients, respectively. In the first prospective registry study and largest analysis to date of PBT for LS-SCLC, PBT was found to be safe with a limited incidence of high-grade toxicities. Cancer 2017;123:4244-4251. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Evaluation of Delivery Costs for External Beam Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Nilsen, Kristine; Hill, Colin; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Lash, Donna H; Lain, Melody; Christodoulou, Deborah; Hodge, Constance; Showalter, Timothy N

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the delivery costs, using time-driven activity-based costing, and reimbursement for definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Process maps were created to represent each step of the radiation treatment process and included personnel, equipment, and consumable supplies used to deliver care. Personnel were interviewed to estimate time involved to deliver care. Salary data, equipment purchasing information, and facilities costs were also obtained. We defined the capacity cost rate (CCR) for each resource and then calculated the total cost of patient care according to CCR and time for each resource. Costs were compared with 2016 Medicare reimbursement and relative value units (RVUs). The total cost of radiation therapy for cervical cancer was $12,861.68, with personnel costs constituting 49.8%. Brachytherapy cost $8610.68 (66.9% of total) and consumed 423 minutes of attending radiation oncologist time (80.0% of total). External beam radiation therapy cost $4055.01 (31.5% of total). Personnel costs were higher for brachytherapy than for the sum of simulation and external beam radiation therapy delivery ($4798.73 vs $1404.72). A full radiation therapy course provides radiation oncologists 149.77 RVUs with intensity modulated radiation therapy or 135.90 RVUs with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, with total reimbursement of $23,321.71 and $16,071.90, respectively. Attending time per RVU is approximately 4-fold higher for brachytherapy (5.68 minutes) than 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (1.63 minutes) or intensity modulated radiation therapy (1.32 minutes). Time-driven activity-based costing was used to calculate the total cost of definitive radiation therapy for cervical cancer, revealing that brachytherapy delivery and personnel resources constituted the majority of costs. However, current reimbursement policy does not reflect the increased attending physician effort and delivery costs of brachytherapy. We

  19. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignant tumor in the female genital tract. Radiation therapy continues to play a major role in the management of endometrial carcinoma, both as primary therapy and as adjuvant treatment. The utility of pelvic external beam therapy and intracavitary therapy is long established. However, the modern era of surgical staging has lead to an appreciation of the role of radiation therapy beyond the pelvis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be of particular benefit in peritoneal and nodal spread. The classic management of endometrial cancer is reviewed and relatively new and somewhat controversial topics, such as preoperative intracavitary therapy followed by external beam therapy are discussed

  20. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Schneider, Uwe; Ishida, Yuji; Konno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Haruo; Kase, Yuki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT

  1. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  2. SU-F-J-202: Secondary Radiation Measurements for Charged Particle Therapy Monitoring: Fragmentation of Therapeutic He, C and O Ion Beams Impinging On a PMMA Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucinski, A; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Paramatti, R; Pinci, D; Russomando, A; Voena, C [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Rome, Rome (Italy); Battistoni, G; Muraro, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Milano, Milano, Milano (Italy); Collamati, F; Faccini, R; Camillocci, E Solfaroli [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Italy, Dipartiment, Rome, Rome (Italy); Collini, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Pisa (Italy); De Lucia, E; Piersanti, L; Toppi, M [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (rome), Rome (Italy); Frallicciardi, P [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, Rome, Rome (Italy); Marafini, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Museo Storico dell, Rome, Rome (Italy); Patera, V; Sciubba, A; Traini, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Sc, Rome, Rome (Italy); and others

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In Charged Particle Therapy (CPT), besides protons, there has been recently a growing interest in 4He, 12C and 16O beams. The secondary radiation produced in the interaction of those beams with a patient could be potentially used for on-line monitoring of range uncertainties in order to fully exploit the advantages of those light ions resulting from increased Radio Biological Effectiveness, reduced multiple scattering and Oxygen Enhancement Ratio. The study and precise characterization of secondary radiation (beta+, prompt gamma, charged fragments) is the cornerstone of any R&D activity aiming for online monitoring development and purpose of the analysis presented here. Methods: We present the measurements of the secondary radiation generated by He, C and O beams impinging on a beam stopping PMMA target. The data has been collected at the Heidelberg Ionbeam Therapy center (HIT), where several millions of collisions were recorded at different energies, relevant for therapeutical applications. Results: The experimental setup, as well as the analysis strategies will be reviewed. The detected particle fluxes as a function of the primary beam energy and the emission angle with respect to the beam direction will be presented and compared to the results of other available measurements. In addition, the energy spectra and emission shapes of charged secondary particles will be shown and discussed in the context of the primary beam range monitoring technique that is being developed by the ARPG collaboration, within the INSIDE project funded by the Italian research ministry. The implications for dose monitoring applications will be discussed, in the context of the current (or planned) state-of- the-art detector solutions. Conclusion: The characterization of the radiation produced by 12C, 4He and 16O beams fully supports the feasibility of on-line range monitoring in the clinical practice of CPT by means of secondary particles detection.

  3. SU-F-P-28: A Method of Maximize the Noncoplanar Beam Orientations and Assure the Beam Delivery Clearance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J [Presence St. Joseph Medical Ctr., Joliet, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to maximize the noncoplanar beam orientations and assure the beam delivery clearance for SBRT, therefore, optimize the dose conformality to the target, increase the dose sparing to the critical normal organs and reduce the hot spots in the body. Methods: A SBRT body frame (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) was used for patient immobilization and target localization. The SBRT body frame has CT fiducials on its side frames. After patient’s CT scan, the radiation treatment isocenter was defined and its coordinators referring to the body frame was calculated in the radiation treatment planning process. Meanwhile, initial beam orientations were designed based on the patient target and critical organ anatomy. The body frame was put on the linear accelerator couch and positioned to the calculated isocenter. Initially designed beam orientations were manually measured by tuning the body frame position on the couch, the gantry and couch angles. The finalized beam orientations were put into the treatment planning for dosimetric calculations. Results: Without patient presence, an optimal set of beam orientations were designed and validated. The radiation treatment plan was optimized and guaranteed for delivery clearance. Conclusion: The developed method is beneficial and effective in SBRT treatment planning for individual patient. It first allows maximizing the achievable noncoplanar beam orientation space, therefore, optimize the treatment plan for specific patient. It eliminates the risk that a plan needs to be modified due to the gantry and couch collision during patient setup.

  4. Anticipated Intraoperative Electron Beam Boost, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limb-Sparing Surgical Resection for Patients with Pediatric Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity: A Multicentric Pooled Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Polo, Alfredo [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Alvarez, Ana; Gonzalez, Carmen [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Jose [Service of Pediatric Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a joint analysis of data from 3 contributing centers within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT)-Spanish program, to determine the potential of IOERT as an anticipated boost before external beam radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of pediatric extremity soft-tissue sarcomas. Methods and Materials: From June 1993 to May 2013, 62 patients (aged <21 years) with a histologic diagnosis of primary extremity soft-tissue sarcoma with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing grossly resected surgery, external beam radiation therapy (median dose 40 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 10 Gy) were considered eligible for this analysis. Results: After a median follow-up of 66 months (range, 4-235 months), 10-year local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival was 85%, 76%, and 81%, respectively. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for other covariates, tumor size >5 cm (P=.04) and R1 margin status (P=.04) remained significantly associated with local relapse. In regard to overall survival only margin status (P=.04) retained association on multivariate analysis. Ten patients (16%) reported severe chronic toxicity events (all grade 3). Conclusions: An anticipated IOERT boost allowed for external beam radiation therapy dose reduction, with high local control and acceptably low toxicity rates. The combined radiosurgical approach needs to be tested in a prospective trial to confirm these results.

  5. Cone beam CT imaging with limited angle of projections and prior knowledge for volumetric verification of non-coplanar beam radiation therapy: a proof of concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Bowen; Xing, Lei; Han, Bin; Koong, Albert; Chang, Daniel; Li, Ruijiang; Cheng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Non-coplanar beams are important for treatment of both cranial and noncranial tumors. Treatment verification of such beams with couch rotation/kicks, however, is challenging, particularly for the application of cone beam CT (CBCT). In this situation, only limited and unconventional imaging angles are feasible to avoid collision between the gantry, couch, patient, and on-board imaging system. The purpose of this work is to develop a CBCT verification strategy for patients undergoing non-coplanar radiation therapy. We propose an image reconstruction scheme that integrates a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) technique with image registration. Planning CT or CBCT acquired at the neutral position is rotated and translated according to the nominal couch rotation/translation to serve as the initial prior image. Here, the nominal couch movement is chosen to have a rotational error of 5° and translational error of 8 mm from the ground truth in one or more axes or directions. The proposed reconstruction scheme alternates between two major steps. First, an image is reconstructed using the PICCS technique implemented with total-variation minimization and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction. Second, the rotational/translational setup errors are corrected and the prior image is updated by applying rigid image registration between the reconstructed image and the previous prior image. The PICCS algorithm and rigid image registration are alternated iteratively until the registration results fall below a predetermined threshold. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is evaluated with an anthropomorphic digital phantom and physical head phantom. The proposed algorithm provides useful volumetric images for patient setup using projections with an angular range as small as 60°. It reduced the translational setup errors from 8 mm to generally <1 mm and the rotational setup errors from 5° to <1°. Compared with the PICCS algorithm alone, the integration of rigid

  6. GATE Monte Carlo simulation in radiation therapy for complex and dynamic beams in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhalouche, Saadia

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the three methods of cancer treatment along with surgery and chemotherapy. It has evolved with the development of treatment techniques such as IMRT and VMAT along with IGRT for patient positioning. The aim is to effectively treat tumors while limiting the dose to healthy organs. In our work, we use the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform to model a LINAC for a 6 MV photon beam. The resulting model is then validated with a dosimetric study by calculating relevant parameters for the beam quality. The LINAC model is then used for simulating clinical IMRT treatment plans in the ORL domain. Simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. We also explored the possibility of modeling the LINAC portal imaging system. This technique referred to as MV-CBCT combine the LINAC source with a flat panel detector to acquire 3D images of the patient. This part was validated first by acquiring 2D projections on patient and anthropomorphic phantom, and by reconstructing 3D volumes. Here again, validation was performed by comparing simulated and actual images. As a second step, a dosimetric validation was done by evaluating the dose deposited by IMRT beams, by means of portal signal only. We show in the present work the ability of GATE to perform complex IMRT treatments and portal images as they are performed routinely for dosimetric quality control. (author) [fr

  7. Determination of absorbed dose in a proton beam for purposes of charged-particle radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, L.J.; Koehler, A.M.; McDonald, J.C.; Goitein, M.; Ma, I.C.; Schneider, R.J.; Wagner, M.

    1979-01-01

    Four methods are described by which absorbed dose has been measured in a proton beam extracted from the 160-MeV Harvard cyclotron. The standard dosimetry, used to determine doses for patient treatments, is based upon an absolute measurement of particle flux using a Faraday cup. Measurements have also been made using a parallel-plate ionization chamber; a thimble ionization chamber carying a 60 Co calibration traceable to NBS; and a tissue-equivalent calorimeter. The calorimeter, which provides an independent check of the dosimetry, agreed with the standard dosimetry at five widely different depths within a range from 0.8 to 2.6%

  8. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Materials and methods Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Results Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Conclusions Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study.

  9. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, Olivier; Fontenot, Jonas D; Fields, Robert S; Gibbons, John P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R

    2011-01-01

    To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study

  10. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipritidis, John; Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r - Inter =0.52±0

  11. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  12. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  13. A comparative analysis of multichannel Data Acquisition Systems for quality assurance in external beam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Espinoza, A. A.; Aldosari, A. H.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents a comparative study performed by the Centre of Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) on three multichannel Data Acquisition Systems (DAQ) based on different analogue front-ends to suit a wide range of radiotherapy applications. The three front-ends are: a charge-to-frequency converter developed by INFN Torino, an electrometer and a charge-to-digital converter (both commercial devices from Texas Instruments). For the first two (named DAQ A and B), the CMRP has designed the read-out systems whilst the third one (DAQ C) comes with its own evaluation board. For the purpose of the characterization DAQ A and DAQ B have been equipped with 128 channels while DAQ C has 256 channels. In terms of performances, the DAQs show good linearity over all the dynamic range. Each one has a different range of sensitivity ranging from less than 1 pC up to 13 nC, which makes the three front-ends complementary and suitable for use with different radiation detectors for different radiotherapy applications, or in a mixed solution which can house different front-ends.

  14. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  15. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Larynx and pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debelleix, C.; Pointreau, Y.; Calais, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Lafond, C.; Denis, F.; Bourhis, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    For head and neck cancers, the radiation dose usually needed to sterilize a macroscopic tumour is at least 70 Gy in conventional fractionation. In the larynx, this dose level enables optimal tumour control while exposing the patient to a limited risk of severe complications. For oropharynx and nasopharynx tumors, it is sometimes possible to limit the dose received by the larynx according to the extent of the primary lesion. Thus, if the tumour constraints permit, the maximum dose to the larynx must be less than 63 to 66 Gy. To reduce the risk of laryngeal edema, it is recommended if possible to limit the mean non-involved larynx dose to 40 to 45 Gy. In the pharynx, literature's data suggested to minimize the volume of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles receiving a dose greater than or equal to 60 Gy. Limiting the volume receiving a dose greater than or equal to 50 Gy reduces the risk of dysphagia. These dose constraints should be tailored to each patient taking into account the extent of the initial primary lesion, the possible addition of chemotherapy or a modified fractionation radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. Donut-shaped high-dose configuration for proton beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutz, H.P.; Lomax, A.J. [Div. of Radiation Medicine, Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2005-01-01

    Background: the authors report on the conception and first clinical application of a donut-shaped high-dose configuration for proton therapy (PT). This approach allows one to intensify target volume dose coverage for targets encompassing a critical, dose-limiting structure - like here, the cauda equina -, whilst delivering minimal dose to other healthy structures surrounding the target, thereby reducing the integral dose. Methods and results: intensity-modulated PT methods (IMPT) for spot scanning were applied to create and deliver a donut-shaped high-dose configuration with protons, allowing treating > 75% of the target with at least 95% of the prescribed dose of 72.8 CGE, whilst restricting dose to the cauda equina to 60-65 CGE. Integral dose was lower by a factor of 3.3 as compared to intensity-modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMXT). Conclusion: IMPT and spot scanning technology allow a potentially clinically useful approach which is also applicable to spare other critical structures passing through a target volume, including spinal cord, optic nerves, chiasm, brain stem, or urethra. (orig.)

  17. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  18. Electromagnetic transponders indicate prostate size increase followed by decrease during the course of external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin L; Butler, Wayne M; Merrick, Gregory S; Kurko, Brian S; Reed, Joshua L; Murray, Brian C; Wallner, Kent E

    2011-04-01

    Real-time image guidance enables more accurate radiation therapy by tracking target movement. This study used transponder positions to monitor changes in prostate volume that may be a source of dosimetric and target inaccuracy. Twenty-four men with biopsy-proven T1c-T3a prostate cancer each had three electromagnetic transponders implanted transperineally. Their coordinates were recorded by the Calypso system, and the perimeter of the triangle formed by the transponders was used to calculate prostate volumes at sequential time points throughout the course of radiation therapy to a dose of 81 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. There was a significant decrease in mean prostate volume of 10.9% from the first to the final day of radiation therapy. The volume loss did not occur monotonically but increased in most patients (75%) during the first several weeks to a median maximum on Day 7. The volume increased by a mean of 6.1% before decreasing by a mean maximum difference of 18.4% to nadir (p radiation therapy and then significant and asymmetric shrinkage by the final day. Understanding and tracking volume fluctuations of the prostate during radiation therapy can help real-time imaging technology perform to its fullest potential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Clinical application of cone-beam CT online correcting technology in volume modulated radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chao; Liang, Guangli; Liu, Guizhi

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the clinical application value of cone-beam CT (CBCT) online correcting technology in volume modulated radiation therapy (VMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty NPC patients applying head neck and shoulder thermoplastic body membrane fixing device were eligible for treatment VMRT, these patients would accept a couple of CBCT scanning by on board imager (OBI) in a fixed time each week after initial setup and after online correcting during the first three week for radiotherapy, CBCT images and DRR images constructed by CT simulation were carried out registration,which could calculate the setup errors of initial setup and after online correcting. Fifty patients were accepted 150 scanning after initial setup and 150 scanning after online correcting respectively, the errors after initial setup were (-1.24 ± 1.25)mm in X direction, (1.19 ± 1.85)mm in Y direction, (1.49 ± 1.70) mm in Z direction. The setup errors after online correcting were (-0.13 ± 0.29)mm in X direction, (0.10 ± 0.47)mm in Y direction, (0.17 ± 0.36)mm in Z direction. The setup errors after online correcting were significantly lower than the errors after initial setup in X direction (P online correcting were 0.46 mm, 0.53 mm and 0.59 mm in X, Y and Z directions respectively. The use of CBCT online correcting technology can significantly reduce the setup errors of VMRT for NPC and improve the treatment effect.

  20. 4D cone-beam CT imaging for guidance in radiation therapy: setup verification by use of implanted fiducial markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; van Wieringen, Niek; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    The use of 4D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fiducial markers for guidance during radiation therapy of mobile tumors is challenging due to the trade-off between image quality, imaging dose, and scanning time. We aimed to investigate the visibility of markers and the feasibility of marker-based 4D registration and manual respiration-induced marker motion quantification for different CBCT acquisition settings. A dynamic thorax phantom and a patient with implanted gold markers were included. For both the phantom and patient, the peak-to-peak amplitude of marker motion in the cranial-caudal direction ranged from 5.3 to 14.0 mm, which did not affect the marker visibility and the associated marker-based registration feasibility. While using a medium field of view (FOV) and the same total imaging dose as is applied for 3D CBCT scanning in our clinic, it was feasible to attain an improved marker visibility by reducing the imaging dose per projection and increasing the number of projection images. For a small FOV with a shorter rotation arc but similar total imaging dose, streak artifacts were reduced due to using a smaller sampling angle. Additionally, the use of a small FOV allowed reducing total imaging dose and scanning time (~2.5 min) without losing the marker visibility. In conclusion, by using 4D CBCT with identical or lower imaging dose and a reduced gantry speed, it is feasible to attain sufficient marker visibility for marker-based 4D setup verification. Moreover, regardless of the settings, manual marker motion quantification can achieve a high accuracy with the error <1.2 mm.

  1. Migration of intraprostatic fiducial markers and its influence on the matching quality in external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delouya, Guila; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the influence of fiducial marker (FM) migration on the matching quality in external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The position of FMs were identified using on-board kV imaging (OBI) and their 3-D position established using an in-house reconstruction algorithm for 31 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma. To carry out the match, the positions were overlaid on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) generated from the planning CT. The distance between each FM was calculated for seven treatments throughout the EBRT course. Four radiotherapy technologists were asked to independently perform and rate the match from OBI to DRR which was then correlated to the extent of FM migration. Results: All the matches were rated by at least three radiotherapy technologists as 'very easy' ('easy' subgroup) for 24 patients (77%), while the other seven patients had their match rated less than 'very easy' and considered the 'not easy' subgroup. The average daily FM migration was 0.93 ± 0.34 mm for the 'easy' subgroup vs. 1.82 ± 0.75 mm for the latter. An average migration >2 mm was seen in five/seven patients in the 'not easy' subgroup as compared to none in the 'easy' subgroup. There was a trend towards less FM migration and better matching if the planning CT was done later than the day of the FM implant (p = 0.093). Conclusions: FM migration >2 mm predicts for a more difficult matching process; PTV margins might have to be adjusted or the planning CT repeated.

  2. Summary and recommendations of a National Cancer Institute workshop on issues limiting the clinical use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms for megavoltage external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; Smathers, James; Deye, James

    2003-01-01

    Due to the significant interest in Monte Carlo dose calculations for external beam megavoltage radiation therapy from both the research and commercial communities, a workshop was held in October 2001 to assess the status of this computational method with regard to use for clinical treatment planning. The Radiation Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, in conjunction with the Nuclear Data and Analysis Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, gathered a group of experts in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning and Monte Carlo dose calculations, and examined issues involved in clinical implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods in clinical radiotherapy. The workshop examined the current status of Monte Carlo algorithms, the rationale for using Monte Carlo, algorithmic concerns, clinical issues, and verification methodologies. Based on these discussions, the workshop developed recommendations for future NCI-funded research and development efforts. This paper briefly summarizes the issues presented at the workshop and the recommendations developed by the group

  3. Neoadjuvant hormone therapy and external-beam radiation for localized high-risk prostate cancer: The importance of PSA nadir before radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludgate, Charles M.; Bishop, Darcy C.; Pai, Howard; Eldridge, Brenna; Lim, Jan; Berthelet, Eric; Blood, Paul; Piercy, G. Bruce; Steinhoff, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of various patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on outcome in patients treated with neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NAHT) and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for clinically localized, high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma (initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level >20, Gleason score 8-10 or Stage ≥ T3). Methods and Materials A retrospective chart review was conducted on 407 patients treated between 1991 and 2001 with NAHT and EBRT for high-risk prostate cancer. The effect of tumor (PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage) and treatment (NAHT duration, total-hormone duration, preradiation PSA) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were examined. Results Median follow-up time was 78 months (range: 5-140 months). Actuarial bDFS at 5 years was 52% (95% confidence interval [CI], 46% to 57%) for the entire group. On multivariate analysis, initial PSA level (p = 0.004), Gleason score (p = 0.005), and preradiation PSA level (p < 0.001) were predictive of bDFS, whereas age, T stage, duration of NAHT, and duration of total hormone therapy were not predictive of outcomes. Gleason score and preradiation PSA level were also predictive of prostate cancer-specific survival rates. Conclusion Improved bDFS in patients with high-risk prostate cancer was associated with lower initial PSA level, lower Gleason score, and lower preradiation PSA level. The duration of NAHT did not have an impact on outcomes, but the preradiation PSA was an important predictor of bDFS in high-risk patients

  4. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - A potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Nielsen, Morten; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose. Methods: A total of 665 CBCTs in 65 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT/VMAT to 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. For each patient, CBCT lung density changes during the treatment course were related to the locally delivered dose. Results: A dose response is observed for the patient population at the end of the treatment course. However, the observed dose response is highly variable among patients. Density changes at 10th and 20th fraction are clearly correlated to those observed at the end of the treatment course. Conclusions: CBCT density changes in healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy correlate with the locally delivered dose and can be detected relatively early during the treatment. If these density changes are correlated to subsequent clinical toxicity this assay could form the basis for biological adaptive radiotherapy.

  5. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K. [Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India). Departments of Radiation Oncology, Radiodiagnosis and Haematology

    1998-11-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a `pseudotumour` or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 14 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K.

    1998-01-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a 'pseudotumour' or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomottogoo, G.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation therapy experienced at the hospital are classified into two sections:palliative and radically. A radically therapy can be done before or after surgery. Therapy after surgery is done when the results of the surgery have certain limits. The radiation therapy is accomplished within 2-3 weeks and 6 weeks at latest. A conclusion:1.To improving and increasing of radically radiation therapy method is necessary in the present time. 2.Monitoring, management and supervision capacity of the cancer radiation therapy for the nearest and future results should be strengthened

  8. Lack of Apparent Survival Benefit With Use of Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Patients With High-risk Prostate Cancer Receiving Combined External Beam Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, David D; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Mahal, Brandon A; Nguyen, Paul L; Devlin, Phillip M; King, Martin T; Orio, Peter F

    2018-01-01

    Although level 1 evidence has demonstrated a survival benefit from the addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the benefits of ADT with combined EBRT and brachytherapy for high-risk patients are unclear. We examined the association between ADT and overall survival in a national cohort of high-risk patients treated with EBRT with or without brachytherapy. We identified 46,325 men in the National Cancer Database with a diagnosis of high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score 8-10, clinical stage T3-T4, or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL) who were treated with EBRT with or without brachytherapy and ADT from 2004 through 2011. Multivariable Cox regression analysis adjusting for sociodemographic and clinicopathologic factors was used to identify the association between ADT and overall survival. The median follow-up period was 48.6 and 59.2 months for patients treated with EBRT only and combined modality RT, respectively. ADT was associated with an improvement in overall survival for the 85.0% (39,361) of the study cohort who underwent EBRT alone (adjusted hazard ratio 0.91, P=.001) but not for patients treated with combined modality RT (adjusted hazard ratio 1.05, P=.496), with a significant interaction (P interaction =.036). In contrast to the known survival benefit when ADT is given with EBRT, our results suggest that ADT might not improve survival for high-risk patients who undergo combined EBRT and brachytherapy. Given the significant adverse effects of ADT, in particular, with long-term therapy, a randomized controlled trial of combined EBRT and brachytherapy with or without ADT for select high-risk patients using a noninferiority design should be undertaken. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measurements of radiation beam characteristics and do other safety tests on a regular basis. Therapeutic medical physicists have doctorates or master's degrees and have completed four years of college, two to four years of graduate school and typically one to two years of clinical ...

  10. External Beam Radiation Therapy or Brachytherapy With or Without Short-course Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter, Prospective Study of Quality of Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Hiram A.; Sanda, Martin G.; Liu, Jingxia; Wu, Ningying; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Wei, John T.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Klein, Eric A.; Sandler, Howard M.; Saigal, Christopher S.; Litwin, Mark S.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Hembroff, Larry; Regan, Meredith M.; Chang, Peter; Michalski, Jeff M.; Regan, Meredith; Hembroff, Larry; Wei, John T.; Hamstra, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The long-term effects of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) with radiation therapy on participant-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been characterized in prospective multicenter studies. We evaluated HRQOL for 2 years among participants undergoing radiation therapy (RT) with or without NADT for newly diagnosed, early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed longitudinal cohort data from the Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium to ascertain the HRQOL trajectory of men receiving NADT with external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy. HRQOL was measured using the expanded prostate cancer index composite 26-item questionnaire at 2, 6, 12, and 24 months after the initiation of NADT. We used the χ 2 or Fisher exact test to compare the shift in percentages between groups that did or did not receive NADT. Analyses were conducted at the 2-sided 5% significance level. Results: For subjects receiving EBRT, questions regarding the ability to have an erection, ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, frequency of erections, ability to function sexually, and lack of energy were in a significantly worse dichotomized category for the patients receiving NADT. Comparing the baseline versus 24-month outcomes, 24%, 23%, and 30% of participants receiving EBRT plus NADT shifted to the worse dichotomized category for the ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually compared with 14%, 13%, and 16% in the EBRT group, respectively. Conclusions: Compared with baseline, at 2 years, participants receiving NADT plus EBRT compared with EBRT alone had worse HRQOL, as measured by the ability to reach orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually. However, no difference was found in the ability to have an erection, frequency of erections, overall sexual function, hot flashes, breast tenderness/enlargement, depression, lack of

  11. External Beam Radiation Therapy or Brachytherapy With or Without Short-course Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter, Prospective Study of Quality of Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hiramgay@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sanda, Martin G. [Department of Urology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Jingxia; Wu, Ningying [Division of Public Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Texas Center for Proton Therapy, Irving, Texas (United States); Wei, John T.; Dunn, Rodney L. [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Saigal, Christopher S. [Department of Urology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Litwin, Mark S. [Department of Urology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Health Policy and Management, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hembroff, Larry [Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Regan, Meredith M. [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chang, Peter [Department of Surgery, Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Regan, Meredith; Hembroff, Larry; Wei, John T.; Hamstra, Dan; and others

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: The long-term effects of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) with radiation therapy on participant-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been characterized in prospective multicenter studies. We evaluated HRQOL for 2 years among participants undergoing radiation therapy (RT) with or without NADT for newly diagnosed, early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed longitudinal cohort data from the Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium to ascertain the HRQOL trajectory of men receiving NADT with external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy. HRQOL was measured using the expanded prostate cancer index composite 26-item questionnaire at 2, 6, 12, and 24 months after the initiation of NADT. We used the χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact test to compare the shift in percentages between groups that did or did not receive NADT. Analyses were conducted at the 2-sided 5% significance level. Results: For subjects receiving EBRT, questions regarding the ability to have an erection, ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, frequency of erections, ability to function sexually, and lack of energy were in a significantly worse dichotomized category for the patients receiving NADT. Comparing the baseline versus 24-month outcomes, 24%, 23%, and 30% of participants receiving EBRT plus NADT shifted to the worse dichotomized category for the ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually compared with 14%, 13%, and 16% in the EBRT group, respectively. Conclusions: Compared with baseline, at 2 years, participants receiving NADT plus EBRT compared with EBRT alone had worse HRQOL, as measured by the ability to reach orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually. However, no difference was found in the ability to have an erection, frequency of erections, overall sexual function, hot flashes, breast tenderness/enlargement, depression

  12. Temporal Evolution and Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Visual Acuity After Proton Beam Radiation Therapy of Uveal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, Alexei L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: Kavita.Mishra@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian; Daftari, Inder K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Nguyen, Jacqueline M.; Cole, Tia B. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an in-depth temporal analysis of visual acuity (VA) outcomes after proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) in a large, uniformly treated cohort of uveal melanoma (UM) patients, to determine trends in VA evolution depending on pretreatment and temporally defined posttreatment VA measurements; and to investigate the relevance of specific patient, tumor and dose-volume parameters to posttreatment vision loss. Methods and Materials: Uveal melanoma patients receiving PBRT were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Included patients (n=645) received 56 GyE in 4 fractions, had pretreatment best corrected VA (BCVA) in the affected eye of count fingers (CF) or better, with posttreatment VA assessment at specified post-PBRT time point(s). Patients were grouped according to the pretreatment BCVA into favorable (≥20/40) or unfavorable (20/50-20/400) and poor (CF) strata. Temporal analysis of BCVA changes was described, and univariate and forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors for VA loss. Results: Median VA follow-up was 53 months (range, 3-213 months). At 60-month follow up, among evaluable treated eyes with favorable pretreatment BCVA, 45% retained BCVA ≥20/40, whereas among evaluable treated eyes with initially unfavorable/poor BCVA, 21% had vision ≥20/100. Among those with a favorable initial BCVA, attaining BCVA of ≥20/40 at any posttreatment time point was associated with subsequent maintenance of excellent BCVA. Multivariate analysis identified volume of the macula receiving 28GyE (P<.0001) and optic nerve (P=.0004) as independent dose-volume histogram predictors of 48-month post-PBRT vision loss among initially favorable treated eyes. Conclusions: Approximately half of PBRT-treated UM eyes with excellent pretreatment BCVA assessed at 5 years after treatment will retain excellent long-term vision. 28GyE macula and optic nerve dose-volume histogram parameters allow for

  13. Review of electron beam therapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed. (review)

  14. Review of electron beam therapy physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-07-07

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed.

  15. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  16. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eunpi [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mostaghel, Elahe A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Marck, Brett T. [Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Matsumoto, Alvin M. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dalkin, Bruce L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Montgomery, R. Bruce, E-mail: rbmontgo@uw.edu [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  17. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence-based pO2 estimation during multi-beam radiation therapy: phantom and simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Robert W; Zhang, Rongxiao; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Glaser, Adam K; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-09-21

    Megavoltage radiation beams used in External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) generate Cherenkov light emission in tissues and equivalent phantoms. This optical emission was utilized to excite an oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe, PtG4, which has been developed specifically for NIR lifetime-based sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Phosphorescence emission, at different time points with respect to the excitation pulse, was acquired by an intensifier-gated CCD camera synchronized with radiation pulses delivered by a medical linear accelerator. The pO2 distribution was tomographically recovered in a tissue-equivalent phantom during EBRT with multiple beams targeted from different angles at a tumor-like anomaly. The reconstructions were tested in two different phantoms that have fully oxygenated background, to compare a fully oxygenated and a fully deoxygenated inclusion. To simulate a realistic situation of EBRT, where the size and location of the tumor is well known, spatial information of a prescribed region was utilized in the recovery estimation. The phantom results show that region-averaged pO2 values were recovered successfully, differentiating aerated and deoxygenated inclusions. Finally, a simulation study was performed showing that pO2 in human brain tumors can be measured to within 15 mmHg for edge depths less than 10-20 mm using the Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen imaging (CEPhOx) method and PtG4 as a probe. This technique could allow non-invasive monitoring of pO2 in tumors during the normal process of EBRT, where beams are generally delivered from multiple angles or arcs during each treatment fraction.

  18. Assessment of residual error in liver position using kV cone-beam computed tomography for liver cancer high-precision radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Maria A.; Brock, Kristy K.; Eccles, Cynthia; Moseley, Douglas; Jaffray, David; Dawson, Laura A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual error in liver position using breath-hold kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CT) following on-line orthogonal megavoltage (MV) image-guided breath-hold liver cancer conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with liver cancer treated with 6-fraction breath-hold conformal radiotherapy were investigated. Before each fraction, orthogonal MV images were obtained during exhale breath-hold, with repositioning for offsets >3 mm, using the diaphragm for cranio-caudal (CC) alignment and vertebral bodies for medial-lateral (ML) and anterior posterior (AP) alignment. After repositioning, repeat orthogonal MV images, orthogonal kV fluoroscopic movies, and kV cone-beam CTs were obtained in exhale breath-hold. The cone-beam CT livers were registered to the planning CT liver to obtain the residual setup error in liver position. Results: After repositioning, 78 orthogonal MV image pairs, 61 orthogonal kV image pairs, and 72 kV cone-beam CT scans were obtained. Population random setup errors (σ) in liver position were 2.7 mm (CC), 2.3 mm (ML), and 3.0 mm (AP), and systematic errors (Σ) were 1.1 mm, 1.9 mm, and 1.3 mm in the superior, medial, and posterior directions. Liver offsets >5 mm were observed in 33% of cases; offsets >10 mm and liver deformation >5 mm were observed in a minority of patients. Conclusions: Liver position after radiation therapy guided with MV orthogonal imaging was within 5 mm of planned position in the majority of patients. kV cone-beam CT image guidance should improve accuracy with reduced dose compared with orthogonal MV image guidance for liver cancer radiation therapy

  19. Clinical features of refractory radiation esophageal ulcer after proton beam therapy and its management in a patient with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisakura, Katsuji; Terashima, Hideo; Nagai, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that proton beam therapy is an effective treatment method for patients with locally confined esophageal cancer. However, there seems to be serious problems related to post-radiotherapy (RT) esophageal ulcers. We treated 7 patients who developed post-RT esophageal ulcers with the earliest symptom of esophageal stenosis, which was observed 7-17 months (median, 10.0) after completion of RT. Five of the patients had unhealed ulcers leading to lethal events such as perforation or penetration. The mean time between the appearance of the earliest symptom and lethal episode was no more than 2 months (mean, 2.1). The first 3 patients who underwent conservative therapies died from severe complications caused by perforation or penetration of post-RT esophageal ulcers. In the case of 2 consecutive patients, we performed surgical treatment as soon as possible since there were indications of penetration in post-RT developed esophageal ulcers. Therefore, they could be cured by a salvage operation which was subtotal esophagectomy using the stomach for esophageal replacement. Through the above-mentioned experience, we discussed surgical management for esophageal ulcers after proton beam therapy. (author)

  20. Ion beam therapy fundamentals, technology, clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book provides a detailed, up-to-date account of the basics, the technology, and the clinical use of ion beams for radiation therapy. Theoretical background, technical components, and patient treatment schemes are delineated by the leading experts that helped to develop this field from a research niche to its current highly sophisticated and powerful clinical treatment level used to the benefit of cancer patients worldwide. Rather than being a side-by-side collection of articles, this book consists of related chapters. It is a common achievement by 76 experts from around the world. Their expertise reflects the diversity of the field with radiation therapy, medical and accelerator physics, radiobiology, computer science, engineering, and health economics. The book addresses a similarly broad audience ranging from professionals that need to know more about this novel treatment modality or consider to enter the field of ion beam therapy as a researcher. However, it is also written for the interested public an...

  1. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Thyroid; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la thyroide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berges, O.; Giraud, P. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, universite Paris Descartes, 75 - Paris (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Henri-Mondor, universite Paris 12, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-07-15

    The thyroid is the most developed endocrine gland of the body. Due to its anatomical location, it may be exposed to ionizing radiation in external radiotherapy involving head and neck. This review aims to describe the thyroid radiation disorders, probably under-reported in the literature, their risk factors and follow-up procedures. The functional changes after external beam radiation consists mainly of late effects occurring beyond 6 months, and are represented by the clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism. Its incidence is approximately 20 to 30% and it can occur after more than 25 years after radiation exposure. Hyperthyroidism and auto-immune manifestations have been described in a lesser proportion. The morphological changes consist of benign lesions, primarily adenomas, and malignant lesions, the most feared and which incidence is 0.35%. The onset of hypothyroidism depends of the total dose delivered to the gland, and the irradiated. Modern techniques of conformal radiotherapy with modulated intensity could improve the preservation of the thyroid, at the expense of the increase in low doses and the theoretical risk of secondary cancers. (authors)

  2. The prognostic significance of Gleason pattern 5 in prostate cancer patients treated with Pd 103 plus beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Cavanagh, William; Butler, Wayne; Reed, Daniel; True, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    There is little clinical information specifically regarding the clinical significance of Gleason pattern 5 in prostate biopsies. Accordingly, we have analyzed the effect of pattern 5 cancer on the prognosis of prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy. Intermediate-risk patients with a Gleason score of 7 or higher and/or a prostate-specific antigen level of 10-20 ng/mL and whose biopsy slides were available for review were treated on a randomized trial. The regimens consisted of implantation with Pd 103 (90 vs 115 Gy [National Institute of Standards and Technology; NIST-1999]), combined with 44 Gy versus 20 Gy of supplemental beam radiation, respectively. Beam radiation was delivered with a four-field arrangement, designed to cover the prostate and seminal vesicles with a 2-cm margin (reduced to 1.0 cm posteriorly). Isotope implantation was per formed by standard techniques, using a modified peripheral loading pattern. All prostate biopsy specimens were reviewed for Gleason score by one investigator (L. T.). Along with assignment of a Gleason score based on established criteria, the presence of any pattern 5 cancer was separately noted and photographed for future review. Freedom from biochemical failure was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen level systemic failure, we are encouraged that high-dose, brachytherapy-based treatment seems to provide a high likelihood of biochemical cancer control, even in patients with the highest-grade cancer.

  3. Optimization of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsubo, Masaaki

    1990-01-01

    In radiotherapy, dose optimization is to give adequate dose uniformly over target volume and minimize the dose to normal and adjacent critical organs. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze dose distribution in detail. This paper presents a method for quantitatively assessing treatment planning by analysis of dose distribution. For this purpose, several parameters were introduced, such as D T, min (minimum target absorbed dose), NUF (nonuniformity factor), volume rate of damaged lung and spinal cord, R T/T (ratio of target volume to treatment volume), LE (local efficiency), integral dose, etc. And some criteria were made using these parameters, and were applied to evaluate various plans in external beam radiation therapy for lung and esophagus cancer. In these parameters, NUF was especially useful to obtain three-dimensional dose information of target volume, and value of NUF was in agreement with the information provided by dose volume histogram. AP-PA parallel opposed fields technique was inferior in D T,min and NUF. In lung cancer, there was no spinal cord injury in oblique parallel opposed fields technique, and this technique is particularly useful when target volume is in posterior. In these two techniques, R T/T was small and hot spots were frequently observed. R T/T was largest in oblique wedged two-fields technique, but this technique was inferior in D T, min and NUF. About D T, min and NUF, four fields technique was the best, but in this technique spinal cord complication often occurred in case that target volume was in the middle. In moving beam technique (360deg rotation or arc), integral dose is large, and the more target volume is in posterior, the more often spinal cord complication occurs. In esophageal cancer, three fields technique was the best to avoid spinal cord injury. It seems that this method is very useful for optimization in radiation treatment planning. (author)

  4. Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ... Information Translations Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Expand Section Radiation Therapy - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  5. Development of a new prior knowledge based image reconstruction algorithm for the cone-beam-CT in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaegler, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer in radiation therapy is achievable today by techniques that enable highly conformal dose distributions and steep dose gradients. In order to avoid mistreatment, these irradiation techniques have necessitated enhanced patient localization techniques. With an integrated x-ray tube at modern linear accelerators kV-projections can be acquired over a sufficiently large angular space and can be reconstructed to a volumetric image data set from the current situation of the patient prior to irradiation. The so-called Cone-Beam-CT (CBCT) allows a precise verification of patient positioning as well as adaptive radiotherapy. The benefits of an improved patient positioning due to a daily performed CBCT's is contrary to an increased and not negligible radiation exposure of the patient. In order to decrease the radiation exposure, substantial research effort is focused on various dose reduction strategies. Prominent strategies are the decrease of the charge per projection, the reduction of the number of projections as well as the reduction of the acquisition space. Unfortunately, these acquisition schemes lead to images with degraded quality with the widely used Feldkamp-Davis-Kress image reconstruction algorithm. More sophisticated image reconstruction techniques can deal with these dose-reduction strategies without degrading the image quality. A frequently investigated method is the image reconstruction by minimizing the total variation (TV), which is also known as Compressed Sensing (CS). A Compressed Sensing-based reconstruction framework that includes prior images into the reconstruction algorithm is the Prior-Image-Constrained- Compressed-Sensing algorithm (PICCS). The images reconstructed by PICCS outperform the reconstruction results of the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm (FDK) based method if only a small number of projections are available. However, a drawback of PICCS is that major deviations between prior image data sets and

  6. Radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRue, S.M.; Gillette, S.M.; Poulson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, radiotherapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors in animals has been limited. However, the availability of computerized tomography and other imaging techniques to aid in determining the extent of tumor, an increase in knowledge of dose tolerance of regional organs, the availability of isocentrically mounted megavoltage machines, and the willingness of patients to pursue more aggressive treatment is making radiation therapy of tumors in these regions far more common. Tumor remission has been reported after radiation therapy of thymomas. Radiation therapy has been used to treat mediastinal lymphoma refractory to chemotherapy, and may be beneficial as part of the initial treatment regimen for this disease. Chemodectomas are responsive to radiation therapy in human patients, and favorable response has also been reported in dogs. Although primary lung tumors in dogs are rare, in some cases radiation therapy could be a useful primary or adjunctive therapy. Lung is the dose-limiting organ in the thorax. Bladder and urethral tumors in dogs have been treated using intraoperative and external-beam radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. These tumors are difficult to control locally with surgery alone, although the optimal method of combining treatment modalities has not been established. Local control of malignant perianal tumors is also difficult to achieve with surgery alone, and radiation therapy should be used. Intraoperative radiation therapy combined with external-beam radiation therapy has been used for the management of metastatic carcinoma to the sublumbar lymph nodes. Tolerance of retroperitoneal tissues may be decreased by disease or surgical manipulation

  7. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Cardiac structures; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: le coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyen, J. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Giraud, P. [Universite Rene-Descartes Paris 5, 75 - Paris (France); Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Faculte de medecine de Creteil, universite Paris 12, 94 - Creteil (France); Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation thoracic tumors may be associated with cardiac toxicity because of the central position of the heart in the thorax. The present review aims to describe the cardiotoxicity during radiotherapy of different tumor sites most associated with this complication and the risk factors of cardiotoxicity during radiation therapy. Medline literature searches were performed using the following cardiac - heart - radiotherapy - toxicity - cardiotoxicity - breast cancer - lymphoma. Cardiac toxicity after breast cancer and mediastinal lymphoma is the most reported radiation-induced complication. The most frequent clinical complications are pericarditis, congestive heart failure, and heart infarction. These events are mostly asymptomatic. Thus clinicians have to give particular attention to these complications. Anthracycline treatment is a major risk factor for additional cardiotoxicity during radiotherapy with a synergistic effect. Correction of cardiovascular risk is an important point of the prevention of heart complications. Total dose delivered to the planned target volume (PTV), the dose per fraction and the irradiated volume were correlated to the risk of cardiotoxicity. Volume of heart receiving 35 Gy must be inferior to 30% and dose per fraction should not exceed 2 Gy when dose of prescription exceeds 30 Gy. Maximum heart distance (maximal thickness of heart irradiated) must be less than 1 cm during irradiation of breast cancer. Modern irradiation techniques seem to be associated with a limited risk of heart complication. The use of anthracycline, other cardio-toxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies should incite for great caution by performing a careful treatment planning and optimisation. (authors)

  8. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Skin; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la peau et les phaneres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginot, A.; Doyen, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Courdi, A. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-07-15

    Acute skin toxicity is frequent during radiation therapy and can lead to temporary arrest of the treatment. Chronic toxicity can occur and conduct to cosmetic problems. Alopecia is the most frequent toxicity concerning hair and is most of the time reversible. Several factors linked to patients influence skin toxicity, such as under-nutrition, old age, obesity, smoking, skin diseases, autoimmune diseases, failure of DNA reparation. Skin, hair and nail toxicities depend also on radiation schedule. Acute toxicity is greater when dose per fraction increases. Chronic and acute toxicities are more often when total dose increases. Under 45 Gy, the risk of severe skin toxicity is low, and begins above 50 Gy. Skin toxicity depends also on the duration of radiotherapy and split course schedules are associated with less toxicities. Irradiation surface seems to influence skin toxicity but interaction is more complex. Reirradiation is often feasible in case of cancer recurrence but with a risk of grade 3-4 toxicity above all in head and neck cancer. The benefit/risk ratio has to be always precisely evaluated. Permanent alopecia is correlated with the follicle dose. Modern techniques of radiation therapy allow to spare skin. (authors)

  9. Prostate cancer volume adds significantly to prostate specific antigen in the prediction of early biochemical failure after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, A.V.; Propert, K.J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose A new clinical pre-treatment quantity that closely approximates the true prostate cancer volume is defined. Materials and Methods The cancer specific prostate specific antigen, PSA density, prostate cancer volume (V Ca ) and the volume fraction of the gland involved with carcinoma (V Ca fx) were calculated for 227 prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was employed to test if any of these clinical pre-treatment parameters added significantly to PSA in predicting early post-radiation PSA failure. Cancer specific PSA = PSA - [PSA from benign epithelial tissue] V Ca = Cancer specific/[PSA in serum per cm 3 of cancer] V Ca fx = V Ca /ultrasound prostate gland volume Results The prostate cancer volume (p = .039) and the volume fraction of the gland involved by carcinoma (p = .035) significantly added to the PSA in predicting post-radiation PSA failure on multivariate analysis. Conversely, the PSA density and the cancer specific PSA did not add significantly (p > .05) to PSA in predicting post-radiation PSA failure. Conclusion The volume of cancer (V Ca ) and the resulting volume fraction of cancer both added significantly to PSA in their ability to predict for early post-radiation PSA failure. These new parameters may be used to optimize the selection of patients in prospective randomized trials that examine the efficacy of combining radiation and androgen ablative therapy in patients with clinically localized disease but who are at high risk for early post-radiation PSA failure

  10. Radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Y. J.; Cho, J. G.; Ahn, S. D.; Choi, E. K.; Kim, J. H.; Kang, O. C.; Chang, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the results of radiation therapy and prognostic factors influencing the results in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. From October 1989 to May 1996, 56 patients were treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma at Department of Radiation Oncology. According to stage, patients were distributed as follows: stage I (2), II (13), III (11), IV (30). Twenty-eight patients were treated with radiation therapy and weekly CDDP. After external beam radiotherapy of 60Gy, 46 patients received boost dose with intracavitary radiation and 9 patients with 3D conformal therapy. One patient received boost dose with 2 dimensional photon beam therapy. The tumor dose ranged from 69.4Gy to 86.2Gy with median dose of 74.4Gy. The follow-up period ranged from 5 months to 92 months with a median of 34 months. Forty-seven patients achieved complete response and 8 patients showed partial response. One patient showed minimal response. Patterns of failure were as follows: locoregional recurrence (8) and distant metastasis (18). Among these patients, 2 patients failed locoregionally and distantly, The sites of distant metastasis were bone (8), lung (8) and liver (4). Five years survival rate was 67.2% and 5 years disease-free survival rate was 53.6%. KPS (P=0.005) and response of radiation therapy (P=0.0001) were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. KPS (P=0.02) and response of radiation therapy (P=0.005) were significant prognostic factors for disease-free survival. This retrospective study showed that distant metastasis was the predominant pattern of relapse in nasopharyngeal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy or weekly CDDP did not influence the distant metastasis-free survival. For advanced T stage, 3D conformal therapy provided an improved dose coverage compared to ICR. But further follow-up was needed in patients with 3D conformal therapy to assess the efficacy of this therapy. Development of techniques of radiation therapy to improve locoregional

  11. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  12. Determinants of Change in Prostate-Specific Antigen Over Time and Its Association With Recurrence After External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer in Five Large Cohorts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust-Lima, Cecile; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Williams, Scott G.; Ankerst, Donna P.; Liu Ning; Kestin, Larry L.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Sandler, Howard M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between prognostic factors, postradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dynamics, and clinical failure after prostate cancer radiation therapy using contemporary statistical models. Methods and Materials: Data from 4,247 patients with 40,324 PSA measurements treated with external beam radiation monotherapy in five cohorts were analyzed. Temporal change of PSA after treatment completion was described by a specially developed linear mixed model that included standard prognostic factors. These factors, along with predicted PSA evolution, were incorporated into a Cox model to establish their predictive value for the risk of clinical recurrence over time. Results: Consistent relationships were found across cohorts. The initial PSA decline after radiation therapy was associated with baseline PSA and T-stage (p < 0.001). The long-term PSA rise was associated with baseline PSA, T-stage, and Gleason score (p < 0.001). The risk of clinical recurrence increased with current level (p < 0.001) and current slope of PSA (p < 0.001). In a pooled analysis, higher doses of radiation were associated with a lower long-term PSA rise (p < 0.001) but not with the risk of recurrence after adjusting for PSA trajectory (p = 0.63). Conversely, after adjusting for other factors, increased age at diagnosis was not associated with long-term PSA rise (p = 0.85) but was directly associated with decreased risk of recurrence (p < 0.001). Conclusions: We conclude that a linear mixed model can be reliably used to construct typical patient PSA profiles after prostate cancer radiation therapy. Pretreatment factors along with PSA evolution and the associated risk of recurrence provide an efficient and quantitative way to assess the impact of risk factors on disease progression

  13. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  14. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The mandible; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la mandibule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, A.; Bensadoun, R.J. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, PRC, CHU de la Miletrie, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2010-07-15

    Describing dose constraints for organs at risk in external beam radiotherapy is a key-point in order to maximize the therapeutic ratio. In head and neck irradiation, mandible is frequently exposed to ionising radiation-related complications. Those complications will be exposed after a short description of anatomical and physiopathological aspects. A literature search was performed using the Pubmed-Medline database, with following keywords (Osteoradionecrosis, Radiotherapy, Mandible, Toxicity, Organ at risk, Trismus). Incidence and dose constraints will be reported. The incidence of osteoradionecrosis decreased since the 1990, but it remains a dreaded late complication of head and neck cancer radiotherapy. It essentially occurs with cumulative doses of 66 Gy on the mandible (standard fractionation) applied to a significant volume. Respecting oral care is crucial to avoid this kind of complication. The respect of the dose-constraint described should not lead to under treat tumor bed in a curative intent. Trismus related to ionising radiation is poorly described. Literature data cannot lead to describe precise dose constraints. (authors)

  15. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengbusch, E.; Perez-Andujar, A.; DeLuca, P. M. Jr.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    proton kinetic energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility.

  16. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-10-01

    With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  18. Spectroscopic properties and radiation damage investigation of a diamond based Schottky diode for ion-beam therapy microdosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma (Italy); Magrin, G.; Solevi, P.; Mayer, R. [EBG MedAustron Marie Curie-St. 5, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Grilj, V.; Jakšić, M. [Ruder Boškovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-11-14

    In this work, a detailed analysis of the properties of a novel microdosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond is reported. Focused ion microbeams were used to investigate the device spectropscopic properties as well as the induced radiation damage effects. A diamond based Schottky diode was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition with a very thin detecting region, about 400 nm thick (approximately 1.4 μm water equivalent thickness), corresponding to the typical size in microdosimetric measurements. A 200 × 200 μm{sup 2} square metallic contact was patterned on the diamond surface by standard photolithography to define the sensitive area. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Ruder Boškovic′ Institute microbeam facility using 4 MeV carbon and 5 MeV silicon ions. Ion beam induced charge maps were employed to characterize the microdosimeter response in terms of its charge collection properties. A stable response with no evidence of polarization or memory effects was observed up to the maximum investigated ion beam flux of about 1.7 × 10{sup 9} ions·cm{sup −2}·s{sup −1}. A homogeneity of the response about 6% was found over the sensitive region with a well-defined confinement of the response within the active area. Tests of the radiation damage effect were performed by selectively irradiating small areas of the device with different ion fluences, up to about 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. An exponential decrease of the charge collection efficiency was observed with a characteristic decay constant of about 4.8 MGy and 1 MGy for C and Si ions, respectively. The experimental data were analyzed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. A direct correlation between the diamond damaging effect and the Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) fraction was found. In particular, an exponential decay of the charge collection efficiency with an exponential decay as a function of NIEL is observed, with a characteristic constant of about

  19. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Mara W.; Kato, Catherine M.; Carson, Kelly M.P.; Matsunaga, Nathan M.; Arao, Robert F.; Doss, Emily J.; McCracken, Charles L.; Meng, Lu Z.; Chen, Yiyi; Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin; Tanyi, James A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R 50 (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D 2 cm (D max at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D max and D 5 /D 50 were computed. Chest wall (CW) D max and absolute V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V 10 /V 5 Gy , as well as contralateral CW D max and V 10 /V 5 Gy (all p max and D 5 /D 50 for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p 50 significantly improved with IMRT-s/VMAT-c (p 2 cm significantly improved with VMAT-c (p < 0.001). Plan delivery efficiency improved with sectored technique (p < 0.001); mean monitor unit (MU)/cGy of PD decreased from 5.8 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.7 (IMRT) and 2.7 ± 0.4 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 (VMAT). The sectored configuration achieves unambiguous dosimetric advantages over circumferential arrangement in terms

  20. Regression and statistical shape model based substitute CT generation for MRI alone external beam radiation therapy from standard clinical MRI sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Greer, Peter B.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Henault, David; Mitra, Jhimli; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Dowling, Jason A.

    2017-11-01

    In MR only radiation therapy planning, generation of the tissue specific HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the need of CT image acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. The aim of this work is to generate and validate substitute CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2 weighted MR pelvic scans in prostate radiation therapy dose planning. A Siemens Skyra 3T MRI scanner with laser bridge, flat couch and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole pelvis MRI (1.6 mm 3D isotropic T2w SPACE sequence) was acquired. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Co-registered whole pelvis CT and T2w MRI pairs were used as training images. Advanced tissue specific non-linear regression models to predict HU for the fat, muscle, bladder and air were created from co-registered CT-MRI image pairs. On a test case T2w MRI, the bones and bladder were automatically segmented using a novel statistical shape and appearance model, while other soft tissues were separated using an Expectation-Maximization based clustering model. The CT bone in the training database that was most ‘similar’ to the segmented bone was then transformed with deformable registration to create the sCT component of the test case T2w MRI bone tissue. Predictions for the bone, air and soft tissue from the separate regression models were successively combined to generate a whole pelvis sCT. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same IMRT dose plan was found to be 0.3%+/-0.9% (mean  ±  standard deviation) for 39 patients. The 3D Gamma pass rate was 99.8+/-0.00 (2 mm/2%). The novel hybrid model is computationally efficient, generating an sCT in 20 min from standard T2w images for prostate cancer radiation therapy dose planning and DRR generation.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Noncoplanar Beams for Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prosthesis-A Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Chris; Cheung, Rex Min; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2010-01-01

    Megavoltage photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is typically used in the treatment of prostate cancer at our institution. Approximately 1% to 2% of patients with prostate cancer have hip prostheses. The presence of the prosthesis usually complicates the planning process because of dose perturbation around the prosthesis, radiation attenuation through the prosthesis, and the introduction of computed tomography artifacts in the planning volume. In addition, hip prostheses are typically made of materials of high atomic number, which add uncertainty to the dosimetry of the prostate and critical organs in the planning volume. When the prosthesis is bilateral, treatment planning is further complicated because only a limited number of beam angles can be used to avoid the prostheses. In this case study, we will report the observed advantages of using noncoplanar beams in the delivery of IMRT to a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip prostheses. The treatment was planned for 75.6 Gy using a 7-field coplanar approach and a noncoplanar arrangement, with all fields avoiding entrance though the prostheses. Our results indicate that, compared with the coplanar plan, the noncoplanar plan delivers the prescribed dose to the target with a slightly better conformality and sparing of rectal tissue versus the coplanar plan.

  2. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  3. Neutron beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  4. Development of local radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed.

  5. Development of local radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed

  6. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ability ...

  7. Intensified external-beam radiation therapy improves the outcome of stage 4 neuroblastoma in children > 1 year with residual local disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, T.; Hero, B.; Berthold, F.; Bongartz, R.; Mueller, R.P.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: in neuroblastoma, the value of radiation therapy in high-intensive first-line treatment protocols is still not exactly known but radiation-associated long-term effects need to be considered. The impact of external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of stage 4 neuroblastoma patients of the NB97 trial was analyzed. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively analyzed data of 110 stage 4 neuroblastoma patients ≥ 1 year who underwent induction therapy and high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation without relapse. Intensified local EBRT (36 Gy) of the residual tumor volume was reserved for patients with residual viable tumor documented by MRI and corresponding metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake. Results: 13 patients who received EBRT for local residual disease had similar outcome (3-year EFS 85 ± 10%, 3-year OS 92 ± 7%) as 74 patients without any MIBG residual (3-year EFS 61 ± 6%, 3-year OS 75 ± 6%). Outcome was worse in 23 children without EBRT to residual primary (3-year EFS 25 ± 10%, 3-year OS 51 ± 11%). Separate analysis of 14 patients with isolated localized residual disease found far better outcome of eight patients with EBRT (3-year EFS 100%, 3-year OS 100%) compared to six patients without EBRT (3-year EFS 20 ± 18%, 3-year OS 20 ± 18%). Multivariate analysis identified EBRT as influential on EFS (hazard ratio 0.27) and OS (hazard ratio 0.17) in addition to MYCN amplification and presence of primary tumor site MIBG residual. Conclusion: EBRT appeared effective in high-intensive treatment of stage 4 neuroblastoma. It seems to compensate the disadvantage of incomplete response to induction chemotherapy. These retrospective results need confirmation by a prospective randomized trial. (orig.)

  8. Use of PSA nadir to predict subsequent biochemical outcome following external beam radiation therapy for T1-2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietman, A.L.; Tibbs, M.K.; Dallow, K.C.; Smith, C.T.; Althausen, A.F.; Zlotecki, R.A.; Shipley, W.U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose. This study assessed the ability of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to act as an early surrogate for subsequent freedom from biochemical failure following radiation therapy for T1-2 prostatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and materials. A retrospective analysis was performed on the biochemical outcome of 314 consecutive men with T1-2 disease treated by conventional external beam radiation at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Minimum follow up was 2 years, and failure was defined as three successive rises in serum PSA of greater than 10%. Kaplan-Meier actuarial analysis of outcome was employed. Results. The overall 5-year freedom from biochemical progression was 63%. For those who achieved a PSA nadir of ≤ 0.5 ng/ml (n = 123) it was 90%, for 0.6-1.0 ng/ml (n = 103) it was 55%, and for > 1.0 ng/ml (n = 88) it was 34%. Multivariate analysis showed an undetectable PSA nadir to be independent of Gleason grade and initial PSA in predicting subsequent outcome (P < 0.05). The likelihood of achieving an undetectable PSA nadir correlated strongly with the pretreatment value: 74% if this was below 4 ng/ml; 42% for those between 4.1 and 10 ng/ml; and 32% for those above 10 ng/ml. Conclusion. A PSA nadir of ≤ 0.5 ng/ml represents an early endpoint strongly predictive of a favorable outcome following radiation therapy which may be used for the rapid assessment of new radiation strategies

  9. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, M [Terapia Radiante S.A., La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salinas Aranda, F [Vidt Centro Medico, Ciudad Autonoma De Buenos Aires (Argentina); 21st Century Oncology, Ft. Myers, FL (United States); Sciutto, S [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dodat, D [Centro Medico Privado Dean Funes, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Larragueta, N [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Medico Privado Dean Funes, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO™ 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse™ Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use

  10. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchior, M; Salinas Aranda, F; Sciutto, S; Dodat, D; Larragueta, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO™ 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse™ Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, Teruyoshi; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively

  12. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... novel targeted therapies can act as radiosensitizers. Systemic Radiation Therapy Certain cancers may be treated with radioactive drugs ... intravenous). This type of treatment is called systemic radiation therapy because the medicine goes to the entire body. ...

  13. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Bounce After Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy Is an Independent Predictor of PSA Recurrence, Metastasis, and Survival in Prostate Adenocarcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romesser, Paul B; Pei, Xin; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Kollmeier, Marisa; McBride, Sean M; Zelefsky, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the difference in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence-free, distant metastasis-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival between PSA bounce (PSA-B) and non-bounce patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT). During 1990-2010, 1898 prostate adenocarcinoma patients were treated with DE-EBRT to ≥75 Gy with ≥5 years follow-up. Patients receiving neoadjuvant/concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (n=1035) or with fewer than 4 PSA values obtained 6 months or more after post-EBRT completion (n=87) were excluded. The evaluable 776 patients were treated (median, 81.0 Gy). Prostate-specific antigen bounce was defined as a ≥0.2-ng/mL increase above the interval PSA nadir, followed by a decrease to nadir or below. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as post-radiation therapy PSA nadir + 2 ng/mL. Median follow-up was 9.2 years (interquartile range, 6.9-11.3 years). One hundred twenty-three patients (15.9%) experienced PSA-B after DE-EBRT at a median of 24.6 months (interquartile range, 16.1-38.5 months). On multivariate analysis, younger age (P=.001), lower Gleason score (P=.0003), and higher radiation therapy dose (P=.0002) independently predicted PSA-B. Prostate-specific antigen bounce was independently associated with decreased risk for PSA relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.85; P=.008), distant metastatic disease (HR 0.34; 95% CI 0.12-0.94; P=.04), and all-cause mortality (HR 0.53; 95% CI 0.29-0.96; P=.04) on multivariate Cox analysis. Because all 50 prostate cancer-specific deaths in patients without PSA-B were in the non-bounce cohort, competing-risks analysis was not applicable. A nonparametric competing-risks test demonstrated that patients with PSA-B had superior cancer-specific survival compared with patients without PSA-B (P=.004). Patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy for prostate adenocarcinoma who experience posttreatment PSA-B have

  14. Nanoscale insights into ion-beam cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a unique and comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art understanding of the molecular and nano-scale processes that play significant roles in ion-beam cancer therapy. It covers experimental design and methodology, and reviews the theoretical understanding of the processes involved. It offers the reader an opportunity to learn from a coherent approach about the physics, chemistry and biology relevant to ion-beam cancer therapy, a growing field of important medical application worldwide. The book describes phenomena occurring on different time and energy scales relevant to the radiation damage of biological targets and ion-beam cancer therapy from the molecular (nano) scale up to the macroscopic level. It illustrates how ion-beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal tissue whilst maximizing cell-killing within the tumour, offering a significant development in cancer therapy. The full potential ...

  15. Five year biochemical recurrence free survival for intermediate risk prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy or permanent seed implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassil, Andrew D; Murphy, Erin S; Reddy, Chandana A; Angermeier, Kenneth W; Altman, Andrew; Chehade, Nabil; Ulchaker, James; Klein, Eric A; Ciezki, Jay P

    2010-11-01

    To compare biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated by retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), external beam radiation therapy (RT), or permanent seed implantation (PI). Patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines from 1996 to 2005 were studied. Variables potentially affecting bRFS were examined using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Five-year bRFS rates were calculated by actuarial methods; bRFS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Nadir +2 definition of biochemical failure was used for RT and PI patients; a PSA ≥ 0.4 ng/mL was used for radical prostatectomy (RP) patients. Time to initiation of salvage therapy was compared for each treatment group using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Nine-hundred seventy-nine patients were analyzed with a median follow-up of 65 months. Five years bRFS rate was 82.8% for all patients (89.5% PI, 85.7% RT, 79.9% RRP, and 60.2% LRP). Patients treated by LRP had significantly worse bRFS than RT (P PI (P PSA tests per year (P PI, 47.8 RT; P PI, RT, or RRP appear to have improved 5-year bRFS and delayed salvage therapy compared with LRP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  17. Prospective Phase II Study of Brachytherapy Boost as a Component of Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-SAYED, M.E.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to assess the response rate and toxicity profile in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer using brachytherapy (BT) boost following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), concomitant with chemotherapy as a component of the neoadjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective phase II study of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who presented to the department of radiation oncology, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Seventeen patients had been included in the study. Radiation therapy was given as: phase I,45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of EBRT, followed by brachytherapy boost (within one week after the end of EBRT) using high dose rate iridium 192 (Ir 192 ) aiming at 800 c Gy given in 2 fractions (each 400 c Gy) separated by 1 week. All patients received the same concomitant chemotherapy in the form of Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin. The clinical and pathological response rates, together with the toxicity profile were assessed. Results: Seventeen patients had been studied; the majority (14; 82%) were males, while 3 only (18%) were females, their mean age was 57.4 years. All patients had low anterior resection (LAR). The clinical response rate, assessed by digital rectal examination ± endoscopy examination 4 weeks after the end of EBRT and BT, revealed that complete clinical response (cCR) was noted in 3 patients (18%), clinical partial response (cPR) in 14 patients (82%); while the pathological response rate was: complete pathological response (pCR) in 8 patients (47%), pathological partial response (pPR) in 9 patients (53%). The toxicity profile showed that grade III radiation proctitis was seen in one patient (6%), grade III dermatitis in 2 (12%), while no patients developed grade III cystitis. For chemotherapy toxicities, three patients (18%) developed grade III nausea and/or vomiting, 2 (12%) developed grade III diarrhea. Conclusion

  18. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hardemark, B; Hynning, E [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  19. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M; Hardemark, B; Hynning, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  20. Impact of different beam set-up methods on quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhengfei; Xu Zhiyong; Chen Lanfei; Hu Weigang; Fan Min; Wu Kailiang; Xia Bing; Fu Xiaolong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the change of beam set-up methods will influence the dosimetric quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Twenty-one stage I-III NSCLC patients were selected for this study. The technique of step and shoot was used and three different beam set-up methods were chosen for IMRT planning including IMRT-7 with nine equal-spaced beams angled 0 degree, 51 degree, 102 degree, 153 degree, 204 degree, 255 degree and 306 degree; IMRT-5 with five equal-spaced beams angled 0 degree, 72 degree, 144 degree, 216 degree and 288 degree; and IMRT-5m which was created from IMRT-7 but excluded 2 fields (51 degree and 102 degree were omitted if there was lesion in the right lung, while 255 degree and 306 degree were excluded if there was lesion in the left lung). The dose constrains of normal lungs for IMRT were set according to V 5 -V 60 of normal lungs obtained from the same patient's actually treated 3D-CRT dose volume histogram. The prescription dose for IMRT started from 65 Gy, and then escalated or decreased step by step by 2 Gy once a time until best plan was obtained. Results: For normal lung dose, IMRT-5m had lower V 5 -V 25 than the other two groups; but there was no significant difference in V 30 -V 40 . IMRT-5 was the worst for V 45 -V 60 ; and mean lung dose was lowest in IMRT-5m. Dose parameters of esophagus and spinal cord, target conformity index, and total monitor units were all similar among difference plans. IMRT-5m had lowest heart V 40 compared to the other two groups. For target heterogeneity index, IMRT-5 was higher than IMRT-7, but there were no significant differences among IMRT-5m, IMRT-5 and IMRT-7. Compared to 3D-CRT, the prescription dose could be increased by (5.1±4.6) Gy for IMRT-7, (3.1±5.3) Gy for IMRT-5, and (5.5±4.8) Gy for IMRT-5m. Conclusions: Fewer beams and modified beam angles could result in similar, even better plan quality. (authors)

  1. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  2. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V 10 , V 30 , and V 50 values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life

  3. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandula, Shravan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, Xiaorong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  4. Assessing the radiation-induced second cancer risk in proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors: the impact of employing a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Moteabbed, Maryam; Xie, Yunhe; Schuemann, Jan; Yock, Torunn; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation-induced second cancer risks for in-field and out-of-field organs and tissues for pencil beam scanning (PBS) and passive scattering proton therapy (PPT) and assess the impact of adding patient-specific apertures to sharpen the penumbra in pencil beam scanning for pediatric brain tumor patients. Five proton therapy plans were created for each of three pediatric patients using PPT as well as PBS with two spot sizes (average sigma of ~17 mm and ~8 mm at isocenter) and choice of patient-specific apertures. The lifetime attributable second malignancy risks for both in-field and out-of-field tissues and organs were compared among five delivery techniques. The risk for in-field tissues was calculated using the organ equivalent dose, which is determined by the dose volume histogram. For out-of-field organs, the organ-specific dose equivalent from secondary neutrons was calculated using Monte Carlo and anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. We find that either for small spot size PBS or for large spot size PBS, a patient-specific aperture reduces the in-field cancer risk to values lower than that for PPT. The reduction for large spot sizes (on average 43%) is larger than for small spot sizes (on average 21%). For out-of-field organs, the risk varies only marginally by employing a patient-specific aperture (on average from  -2% to 16% with increasing distance from the tumor), but is still one to two orders of magnitude lower than that for PPT. In conclusion, when pencil beam spot sizes are large, the addition of apertures to sharpen the penumbra decreases the in-field radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. There is a slight increase in out-of-field cancer risk as a result of neutron scatter from the aperture, but this risk is by far outweighed by the in-field risk benefit from using an aperture with a large PBS spot size. In general, the risk for developing a second malignancy in out-of-field organs for PBS remains

  5. Development of beam monitoring system for proton pencil beam scanning using fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaeman; Koo, Jihye; Moon, Sunyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Sun-Young; Lim, Youngkyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Meyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to develop a beam monitoring system based on a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS), which can be used in real time in a beam control room, to monitor a beam in proton therapy, where patients are treated using a pencil beam scanning (PBS) mode, by measuring the beam spot width (BSW) and beam spot position (BSP) of the PBS. We developed two-dimensional detector arrays to monitor the PBS beam in the beam control room. We measured the BSW for five energies of the PBS beam and compared the measurements with those of Lynx and EBT3 film. In order to confirm the BSP, we compared the BSP values of the PBS calculated from radiation treatment planning (RTP), to five BSP values measured using FORS at 224.2 MeV. When comparing BSW values obtained using developed monitoring system to the measurements obtained using commercial EBT3 film, the average difference in BSW value of the PBS beam was 0.1 ± 0.1 mm. In the comparison of BSW values with the measurements obtained using Lynx, the average difference was 0.2 ± 0.1 mm. When comparing BSP measurements to the values calculated from RTP, the average difference was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. The study results confirmed that the developed FORS-based beam monitoring system can monitor a PBS beam in real time in a beam control room, where proton beam is controlled for the patient.

  6. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  7. Localization of a Portion of an Endorectal Balloon for Prostate Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Cone-Beam Tomosynthesis: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Lyatskaya, Yulia; D’Amico, Anthony V.; Cormack, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using cone-beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) to localize the air–tissue interface for the application of prostate image-guided radiation therapy using an endorectal balloon for immobilization and localization. Methods and Materials: A Feldkamp-David-Kress-based CBTS reconstruction was applied to selected sets of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection data to simulate volumetric imaging achievable from tomosynthesis for a limited range of scan angles. Projection data were calculated from planning CT images of 10 prostate cancer patients treated with an endorectal balloon, as were experimental CBCT projections for a pelvic phantom in two patients. More than 50 points at the air–tissue interface were objectively identified by an intensity-based interface-finding algorithm. Using three-dimensional point sets extracted from CBTS images compared with points extracted from corresponding CBCT images, the relative shift resulting from a reduced scan angle was determined. Because the CBCT and CBTS images were generated from the same projection data set, shift identified was presumed to be due to distortions introduced by the tomosynthesis technique. Results: Scans of ≥60° were shown to be able to localize an air–tissue interface near the isocenter with accuracy on the order of a millimeter. The accuracy was quantified in terms of the mean discrepancy as a function of reconstruction angle. Conclusion: This work provides an understanding of the effect of scan angle used in localization of a portion of an endorectal balloon by means of CBTS. CBTS with relatively small scan angles is capable of accurately localizing an extended interface near the isocenter and may provide clinically relevant measurements to guide IGRT treatments while reducing imaging radiation to the patient.

  8. A practical method of modeling a treatment couch using cone-beam computed tomography for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and RapidArc treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldosary, Ghada; Nobah, Ahmad; Al-Zorkani, Faisal; Devic, Slobodan; Moftah, Belal

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a treatment couch on dose perturbation is not always fully considered in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). In the course of inverse planning radiotherapy techniques, beam parameter optimization may change in the absence of the couch, causing errors in the calculated dose distributions. Although modern treatment planning systems (TPS) include data for the treatment couch components, they are not manufactured identically. Thus, variations in their Hounsfield unit (HU) values may exist. Moreover, a radiotherapy facility may wish to have a third-party custom tabletop installed that is not included by the TPS vendor. This study demonstrates a practical and simple method of acquiring reliable computed tomography (CT) data for the treatment couch and shows how the absorbed dose calculated with the modeled treatment couch can differ from that with the default treatment couch found in the TPS. We also experimentally verified that neglecting to incorporate the treatment couch completely in the treatment planning process might result in dose differences of up to 9.5% and 7.3% for 4-MV and 10-MV photon beams, respectively. Furthermore, 20 RapidArc and IMRT cases were used to quantify the change in calculated dose distributions caused by using either the default or modeled couch. From 2-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array measurements, we observed large dose distribution differences between the measurements and calculations when the couch was omitted that varied according to the planning technique and anatomic site. Thus, incorporating the treatment couch in the dose calculation phase of treatment planning significantly decreases dose calculation errors.

  9. Radiation therapy facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballas, Leslie K.; Elkin, Elena B.; Schrag, Deborah; Minsky, Bruce D.; Bach, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: About half of all cancer patients in the United States receive radiation therapy as a part of their cancer treatment. Little is known, however, about the facilities that currently deliver external beam radiation. Our goal was to construct a comprehensive database of all radiation therapy facilities in the United States that can be used for future health services research in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: From each state's health department we obtained a list of all facilities that have a linear accelerator or provide radiation therapy. We merged these state lists with information from the American Hospital Association (AHA), as well as 2 organizations that audit the accuracy of radiation machines: the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) and Radiation Dosimetry Services (RDS). The comprehensive database included all unique facilities listed in 1 or more of the 4 sources. Results: We identified 2,246 radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States as of 2004-2005. Of these, 448 (20%) facilities were identified through state health department records alone and were not listed in any other data source. Conclusions: Determining the location of the 2,246 radiation facilities in the United States is a first step in providing important information to radiation oncologists and policymakers concerned with access to radiation therapy services, the distribution of health care resources, and the quality of cancer care

  10. SU-E-T-571: Newly Emerging Integrated Transmission Detector Systems Provide Online Quality Assurance of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D; Chung, E; Hess, C; Stern, R; Benedict, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two newly emerging transmission detectors positioned upstream from the patient have been evaluated for online quality assurance of external beam radiotherapy. The prototype for the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), developed by iRT Systems GmbH (Koblenz, Germany) is a large-area ion chamber mounted on the linac accessory tray to monitor photon fluence, energy, beam shape, and gantry position during treatment. The ion chamber utilizes a thickness gradient which records variable response dependent on beam position. The prototype of Delta4 Discover™, developed by ScandiDos (Uppsala, Sweden) is a linac accessory tray mounted 4040 diode array that measures photon fluence during patient treatment. Both systems are employable for patient specific QA prior to treatment delivery. Methods: Our institution evaluated the reproducibility of measurements using various beam types, including VMAT treatment plans with both the IQM ion chamber and the Delta4 Discover diode array. Additionally, the IQM’s effect on photon fluence, dose response, simulated beam error detection, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer were characterized. The evaluated photon beam errors are based on the annual tolerances specified in AAPM TG-142. Results: Repeated VMAT treatments were measured with 0.16% reproducibility by the IQM and 0.55% reproducibility by the Delta4 Discover. The IQM attenuated 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43±0.02%, 4.60±0.02%, and 4.21±0.03% respectively. Photon beam profiles were affected <1.5% in the non-penumbra regions. The IQM’s ion chamber’s dose response was linear and the thermometer, barometer, and inclinometer agreed with other calibrated devices. The device detected variations in monitor units delivered (1%), field position (3mm), single MLC leaf positions (13mm), and photon energy. Conclusion: We have characterized two new transmissions detector systems designed to provide in-vivo like measurements upstream

  11. SU-E-T-571: Newly Emerging Integrated Transmission Detector Systems Provide Online Quality Assurance of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D; Chung, E; Hess, C; Stern, R; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Two newly emerging transmission detectors positioned upstream from the patient have been evaluated for online quality assurance of external beam radiotherapy. The prototype for the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), developed by iRT Systems GmbH (Koblenz, Germany) is a large-area ion chamber mounted on the linac accessory tray to monitor photon fluence, energy, beam shape, and gantry position during treatment. The ion chamber utilizes a thickness gradient which records variable response dependent on beam position. The prototype of Delta4 Discover™, developed by ScandiDos (Uppsala, Sweden) is a linac accessory tray mounted 4040 diode array that measures photon fluence during patient treatment. Both systems are employable for patient specific QA prior to treatment delivery. Methods: Our institution evaluated the reproducibility of measurements using various beam types, including VMAT treatment plans with both the IQM ion chamber and the Delta4 Discover diode array. Additionally, the IQM’s effect on photon fluence, dose response, simulated beam error detection, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer were characterized. The evaluated photon beam errors are based on the annual tolerances specified in AAPM TG-142. Results: Repeated VMAT treatments were measured with 0.16% reproducibility by the IQM and 0.55% reproducibility by the Delta4 Discover. The IQM attenuated 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43±0.02%, 4.60±0.02%, and 4.21±0.03% respectively. Photon beam profiles were affected <1.5% in the non-penumbra regions. The IQM’s ion chamber’s dose response was linear and the thermometer, barometer, and inclinometer agreed with other calibrated devices. The device detected variations in monitor units delivered (1%), field position (3mm), single MLC leaf positions (13mm), and photon energy. Conclusion: We have characterized two new transmissions detector systems designed to provide in-vivo like measurements upstream

  12. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes funny ... melanoma.org Skin Cancer Foundation www.skincancer.org Radiation Therapy Answers www.rtanswers.org LEARNING ABOUT CLINICAL TRIALS ...

  13. Prostate cancer volume adds significantly to prostate-specific antigen in the prediction of early biochemical failure after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Propert, Kathleen J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A new clinical pretreatment quantity that closely approximates the true prostate cancer volume is defined. Methods and Materials: The cancer-specific prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA density, prostate cancer volume (V Ca ), and the volume fraction of the gland involved with carcinoma (V Ca fx) were calculated for 227 prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy. 1. PSA density PSA/ultrasound prostate gland volume 2. Cancer-specific PSA = PSA - [PSA from benign epithelial tissue] 3. V Ca = Cancer-specific PSA/[PSA in serum per cm 3 of cancer] 4. V Ca fx = V Ca /ultrasound prostate gland volume A Cox multiple regression analysis was used to test whether any of these-clinical pretreatment parameters added significantly to PSA in predicting early postradiation PSA failure. Results: The prostate cancer volume (p = 0.039) and the volume fraction of the gland involved by carcinoma (p = 0.035) significantly added to the PSA in predicting postradiation PSA failure. Conversely, the PSA density and the cancer-specific PSA did not add significantly (p > 0.05) to PSA in predicting postradiation PSA failure. The 20-month actuarial PSA failure-free rates for patients with calculated tumor volumes of ≤0.5 cm 3 , 0.5-4.0 cm 3 , and >4.0 cm 3 were 92, 80, and 47%, respectively (p = 0.00004). Conclusion: The volume of prostate cancer (V Ca ) and the resulting volume fraction of cancer both added significantly to PSA in their ability to predict for early postradiation PSA failure. These new parameters may be used to select patients in prospective randomized trials that examine the efficacy of combining radiation and androgen ablative therapy in patients with clinically localized disease, who are at high risk for early postradiation PSA failure

  14. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  15. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Paliwal, Bhudatt; Tewatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are ma...

  16. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  17. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Elliott, Sean [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  18. Synchrotron accelerator technology for proton beam therapy with high accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Proton beam therapy was applied at the beginning to head and neck cancers, but it is now extended to prostate, lung and liver cancers. Thus the need for a pencil beam scanning method is increasing. With this method radiation dose concentration property of the proton beam will be further intensified. Hitachi group has supplied a pencil beam scanning therapy system as the first one for M. D. Anderson Hospital in United States, and it has been operational since May 2008. Hitachi group has been developing proton therapy system to correspond high-accuracy proton therapy to concentrate the dose in the diseased part which is located with various depths, and which sometimes has complicated shape. The author described here on the synchrotron accelerator technology that is an important element for constituting the proton therapy system. (K.Y.)

  19. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word ''abstract,'' but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your ''Enter'' key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  20. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  1. Different setup errors assessed by weekly cone-beam computed tomography on different registration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su JQ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jiqing Su,1,2,* Wen Chen,2,* Huiyun Yang,2 Jidong Hong,2 Zijian Zhang,2 Guangzheng Yang,2 Li Li,2 Rui Wei21Department of Oncology, Changsha Central Hospital, Changsha, 2Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The study aimed to investigate the difference of setup errors on different registration in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma based on weekly cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Thirty nasopharyngeal cancer patients scheduled to undergo intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT were prospectively enrolled in the study. Each patient had a weekly CBCT before radiation therapy. In the entire study, 201 CBCT scans were obtained. The scans were registered to the planning CT to determine the difference of setup errors on different registration sites. Different registration sites were represented by bony landmarks. Nasal septum and pterygoid process represent head, cervical vertebrae 1–3 represent upper neck, and cervical vertebrae 4–6 represent lower neck. Patient positioning errors were recorded in the right–left (RL, superior–inferior (SI, and anterior–posterior (AP directions over the course of radiotherapy. Planning target volume margins were calculated from the systematic and random errors. In this study, we can make a conclusion that there are setup errors in RL, SI, and AP directions of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients undergoing IMRT. In addition, the head and neck setup error has the difference, with statistical significance, while patient setup error of neck is greater than that of head during the course of radiotherapy. In our institution, we recommend a planning target volume margin of 3.0 mm in RL direction, 1.3 mm in SI direction, and 2.6 mm in AP direction for nasopharyngeal cancer patients undergoing IMRT with weekly CBCT scans.Keywords: cone-beam computed tomography, setup error, PTV

  2. Characterization and evaluation of an integrated quality monitoring system for online quality assurance of external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David; Chung, Eunah; Hess, Clayton; Stern, Robin; Benedict, Stanley

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to comprehensively evaluate a new large field ion chamber transmission detector, Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), for online external photon beam verification and quality assurance. The device is designed to be mounted on the linac accessory tray to measure and verify photon energy, field shape, gantry position, and fluence before and during patient treatment. Our institution evaluated the newly developed ion chamber's effect on photon beam fluence, response to dose, detection of photon fluence modification, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer. The detection of photon fluence modifications was performed by measuring 6 MV with fields of 10 cm × 10 cm and 1 cm × 1 cm "correct" beam, and then altering the beam modifiers to simulate minor and major delivery deviations. The type and magnitude of the deviations selected for evaluation were based on the specifications for photon output and MLC position reported in AAPM Task Group Report 142. Additionally, the change in ion chamber signal caused by a simulated IMRT delivery error is evaluated. The device attenuated 6 MV, 10 MV, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43 ± 0.02%, 4.60 ± 0.02%, and 4.21 ± 0.03%, respectively. Photon beam profiles were altered with the IQM by < 1.5% in the nonpenumbra regions of the beams. The photon beam profile for a 1 cm × 1 cm 2 fields were unchanged by the presence of the device. The large area ion chamber measurements were reproducible on the same day with a 0.14% standard deviation and stable over 4 weeks with a 0.47% SD. The ion chamber's dose-response was linear (R 2 = 0.99999). The integrated thermometer agreed to a calibrated thermometer to within 1.0 ± 0.7°C. The integrated barometer agreed to a mercury barometer to within 2.3 ± 0.4 mmHg. The integrated inclinometer gantry angle measurement agreed with the spirit level at 0 and 180 degrees within 0.03 ± 0.01 degrees and 0.27 ± 0.03 at 90 and 270 degrees. For the

  3. Proton beam therapy control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael A [Riverside, CA; Beloussov, Alexandre V [Bernardino, CA; Bakir, Julide [Alta Loma, CA; Armon, Deganit [Redlands, CA; Olsen, Howard B [Colton, CA; Salem, Dana [Riverside, CA

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  4. Dependence of Coronary 3-Dimensional Dose Maps on Coronary Topologies and Beam Set in Breast Radiation Therapy: A Study Based on CT Angiographies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.moignier@gmail.com [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, Laboratoire d' Evaluation de la Dose Interne, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Broggio, David [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, Laboratoire d' Evaluation de la Dose Interne, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Derreumaux, Sylvie [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PRP-HOM/SER/UEM, Unité d' Expertise en radioprotection Médicale, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Baf, Fida [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, Laboratoire d' Evaluation de la Dose Interne, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mandin, Anne-Marie [Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Service de Radiothérapie Oncologique, Paris (France); Girinsky, Théodore [Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Radiothérapie Oncologique, Villejuif (France); Paul, Jean-François [Centre Chirurgical Marie-Lannelongue, Service de Radiologie, Le Plessis-Robinson (France); and others

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: In left-side breast radiation therapy (RT), doses to the left main (LM) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arteries are usually assessed after delineation by prior anatomic knowledge on the treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scan. In this study, dose sensitivity due to interindividual coronary topology variation was assessed, and hot spots were located. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two detailed heart models, created from heart computed tomography angiographies, were fitted into a single representative female thorax. Two breast RT protocols were then simulated into a treatment planning system: the first protocol comprised tangential and tumoral bed beams (TGs{sub T}B) at 50 + 16 Gy, the second protocol added internal mammary chain beams at 50 Gy to TGs{sub T}B (TGs{sub T}B{sub I}MC). For the heart, the LAD, and the LM, several dose indicators were calculated: dose-volume histograms, mean dose (D{sub mean}), minimal dose received by the most irradiated 2% of the volume (D{sub 2%}), and 3-dimensional (3D) dose maps. Variations of these indicators with anatomies were studied. Results: For the LM, the intermodel dispersion of D{sub mean} and D{sub 2%} was 10% and 11%, respectively, with TGs{sub T}B and 40% and 80%, respectively, with TGs{sub T}B{sub I}MC. For the LAD, these dispersions were 19% (D{sub mean}) and 49% (D{sub 2%}) with TGs{sub T}B and 35% (D{sub mean}) and 76% (D{sub 2%}) with TGs{sub T}B{sub I}MC. The 3D dose maps revealed that the internal mammary chain beams induced hot spots between 20 and 30 Gy on the LM and the proximal LAD for some coronary topologies. Without IMC beams, hot spots between 5 and 26 Gy are located on the middle and distal LAD. Conclusions: Coronary dose distributions with hot spot location and dose level can change significantly depending on coronary topology, as highlighted by 3D coronary dose maps. In clinical practice, coronary imaging may be required for a relevant coronary dose assessment

  5. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J; Wang, An

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (−1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  6. The effect of customized beam shaping on normal tissue complications in radiation therapy of parotid gland tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keus, R.; Boer, R. de; Lebesque, J.; Noach, P.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of customized beam shaping was studied for 5 patients with parotid tumors treated with a paired wedged field technique. For each patient 2 plans were generated. The standard plan had unblocked portals with field sizes defined by the largest target contour found in any CT slice. In the 2nd plan customized beam's view (BEV) designed blocks were added to both beams. The differences in those distributions between the 2 types of plans were evaluated using dose-volume histograms (DVH). As expected, the dose distribution within the target volume showed no difference. However, a considerable sparing of normal tissue was observed for the plans with customized blocks. The volume of un-necessary exposed normal tissue that received more than 90 percent of the prescribed dose, was reduced by a factor of about 4: from 165 to 44 percent on an average, if the volume is expressed as a percentage of the target volume in each patient. In particular, the homolateral mandible showed a mean decrease of 21 percent of integral dose when blocks were used. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were calculated. For a tumor dose of 70 Gy, the average bone necrosis probability was reduced from 8.4 percent (no blocks) to 4.1. percent (blocks). For other normal tissues such as nervous tissue, other soft tissues and bones a substantial reduction of integral dose was found for al patients when individual blocks were used. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A.; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L. [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.

  8. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezki, Jay P; Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  10. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.P.; Share, F.S.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  11. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  12. Limb-sparing management with surgical resection, external-beam and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy boost for patients with primary soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity. A multicentric pooled analysis of long-term outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Polo, Alfredo; Montero, Angel; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Alvarez, Ana; Cuervo, Miguel; Julian, Mikel San

    2014-01-01

    A joint analysis of data from three contributing centres within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) Spanish program was performed to investigate the main contributions of IORT to the multidisciplinary treatment of high-risk extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients with an histologic diagnosis of primary extremity STS, with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing surgery with radical intent, external beam radiotherapy (median dose 45 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. From 1986-2012, a total of 159 patients were analysed in the study from three Spanish institutions. With a median follow-up time of 53 months (range 4-316 years), 5-year local control (LC) was 82 %. The 5-year IOERT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 86, 62 and 72 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only microscopically involved margin (R1) resection status retained significance in relation to LC (HR 5.20, p [de

  13. [Cardiac effects of radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohinen, Suvi; Turpeinen, Anu; Skyttä, Tanja; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Because of increased life-expentancy cancer patients having undergone radiation therapy nowadays live longer, and late-appearing adverse effects are therefore playing a more significant role. Radiation therapy given to the chest is known to approximately double the risk of heart disease, the cumulative total radiation dose being the most important risk-increasing factor. The most significant adverse effects appear only years after the treatment. The mortality from late manifestations reduces the total benefit of radiation therapy. Patients with radiation therapy due to a cancer of the left breast or Hodgkin's lymphoma are particularly susceptible to cardiac effects. A safe radiation dose is not known.

  14. Image Guidance During Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Alignment Trends With In-Room Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumsteg, Zachary; DeMarco, John; Lee, Steve P.; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lin, Chun Shu; McBride, William; Lin, Kevin; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Lee, Percy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is currently available for alignment of patients with head-and-neck cancer before radiotherapy. However, daily CBCT is time intensive and increases the overall radiation dose. We assessed the feasibility of using the average couch shifts from the first several CBCTs to estimate and correct for the presumed systematic setup error. Methods and Materials: 56 patients with head-and-neck cancer who received daily CBCT before intensity-modulated radiation therapy had recorded shift values in the medial–lateral, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior dimensions. The average displacements in each direction were calculated for each patient based on the first five or 10 CBCT shifts and were presumed to represent the systematic setup error. The residual error after this correction was determined by subtracting the calculated shifts from the shifts obtained using daily CBCT. Results: The magnitude of the average daily residual three-dimensional (3D) error was 4.8 ± 1.4 mm, 3.9 ± 1.3 mm, and 3.7 ± 1.1 mm for uncorrected, five CBCT corrected, and 10 CBCT corrected protocols, respectively. With no image guidance, 40.8% of fractions would have been >5 mm off target. Using the first five CBCT shifts to correct subsequent fractions, this percentage decreased to 19.0% of all fractions delivered and decreased the percentage of patients with average daily 3D errors >5 mm from 35.7% to 14.3% vs. no image guidance. Using an average of the first 10 CBCT shifts did not significantly improve this outcome. Conclusions: Using the first five CBCT shift measurements as an estimation of the systematic setup error improves daily setup accuracy for a subset of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy and primarily benefited those with large 3D correction vectors (>5 mm). Daily CBCT is still necessary until methods are developed that more accurately determine which patients may benefit from

  15. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Núria, E-mail: nrodriguez@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Dengra, Josefa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Foro, Palmira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with

  16. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  17. Skin toxicity from external beam radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: protective effects of Resveratrol, Lycopene, Vitamin C and anthocianin (Ixor®)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Rossella Di; Calvanese, MariaGrazia; Murino, Paola; Manzo, Roberto; Guida, Cesare; Gennaro, Davide Di; Anania, Caterina; Ravo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    This is an observational study and the aim is to evaluate the effect of dietary supplements based on Resveratrol, Lycopene, Vitamin C and Anthocyanins (Ixor ® ) in reducing skin toxicity due to external beam radiotherapy in patients affected by breast cancer. 71 patients were enrolled and they were divided in two different groups: a control group (CG) of 41 patients treated with prophylactic topical therapy based on hyaluronic acid and topical steroid therapy in case of occurrence of radiodermatitis, and a Ixor-Group (IG) of 30 patients treated also with an oral therapy based on Resveratrol, Lycopene, Vitamin C and Anthocyanin (Ixor ® ) at a dose of 2 tablets/day, starting from 10 days before the radiation treatment until 10 days after the end of treatment. Skin toxicity has been related to PTV, to breast volume that received a radiation dose equal or lower than 107%, included between 107% and 110%, or greater than 110% of the prescribed dose. Moreover it's been studied the relationship between skin toxicity and the chemotherapy schedule used before treatment. We calculated in both groups the percentage of patients who had a skin toxicity of grade 2 or 3 (according to RTOG scale). Absolute risk reduction (ARR), relative risk (RR) and odds ratio (OR) have been calculated for each relationship. Control Group (CG) patients with a PTV > 500 ml presented skin toxicity G2 + G3 in 30% of cases, versus 25% of Ixor-Group (IG) [OR 0.77]. In patients with a PTV < 500 ml G2 + G3 toxicity was 0% in the IG compared to 18% in CG (OR 0.23). When Dmax was less than or equal to 107% of the prescribed dose skin toxicity was G2 + G3 in 12.5% in CG, versus 0% in IG (OR 0.73), instead when Dmax was included between 107 and 110% of the prescribed dose, G2 + G3 skin toxicity was 35% in CG and 21% in IG (OR 0.50). In patients undergoing chemotherapy with anthracyclines and taxanes, G2 + G3 toxicity was 27% in CG, against 20% in IG (OR 0.68). The protective effect of Resveratrol

  18. Different setup errors assessed by weekly cone-beam computed tomography on different registration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiqing; Chen, Wen; Yang, Huiyun; Hong, Jidong; Zhang, Zijian; Yang, Guangzheng; Li, Li; Wei, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the difference of setup errors on different registration in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma based on weekly cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty nasopharyngeal cancer patients scheduled to undergo intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Each patient had a weekly CBCT before radiation therapy. In the entire study, 201 CBCT scans were obtained. The scans were registered to the planning CT to determine the difference of setup errors on different registration sites. Different registration sites were represented by bony landmarks. Nasal septum and pterygoid process represent head, cervical vertebrae 1-3 represent upper neck, and cervical vertebrae 4-6 represent lower neck. Patient positioning errors were recorded in the right-left (RL), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions over the course of radiotherapy. Planning target volume margins were calculated from the systematic and random errors. In this study, we can make a conclusion that there are setup errors in RL, SI, and AP directions of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients undergoing IMRT. In addition, the head and neck setup error has the difference, with statistical significance, while patient setup error of neck is greater than that of head during the course of radiotherapy. In our institution, we recommend a planning target volume margin of 3.0 mm in RL direction, 1.3 mm in SI direction, and 2.6 mm in AP direction for nasopharyngeal cancer patients undergoing IMRT with weekly CBCT scans.

  19. Use of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy(IOERT) in the management of retroperitoneal and pelvic soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Nagorney, David M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Grill, Joseph P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results and tolerance of IOERT in the treatment of intraabdominal soft tissue sarcomas. Materials and Methods: Between (3(81)) and (9(95)) 87 patients with primary(42) and recurrent(45) retroperitoneal and pelvic sarcomas were evaluated and received intraoperative irradiation with electrons(IOERT) as a component of treatment at Mayo Clinic. Primary tumors were high grade in 33(79%) patients and low grade in 9(21%). Recurrent tumors were high grade in 21(47%) patients and low grade in 24(53%). Prior surgery was performed in 10% of the primary and 98% of the recurrent tumors. Prior irradiation had been given in 7% of the primary and 29% of the recurrent lesions. Chemotherapy had only been used in 11% of all patients. Median tumor size for these sarcomas was 10 cm with a range of 2 to 36 cm. All patients underwent maximum surgical resection with IOERT. In 72 patients there was microscopic or no residual tumor after surgical resection. The median IOERT dose was 12.5 Gy for the primary treatment group and 15 Gy for the recurrent group with a overall range of 8.75-30 Gy. External beam irradiation was also given either prior to or following surgery in all but eleven patients. Median external beam dose was 47.28 Gy with a range of 10-65 Gy. All patients were followed prospectively for outcome and toxicity evaluation. Results: With a median follow-up of over 3 years there are 53(61%) patients alive with an overall estimated 5 year survival of 50%. The 5 year survival was not significantly different for the primary vs. recurrent patients with 53% and 48% respectively(p=0.86). Grade did not significantly affect 5 year survival either with 60% of low grade and 45% of high grade sarcoma patients alive (p=0.15). A total of 47 reported failures(including 19 local failures). The analysis assumed 50 failures (and 22 local failures) because of 3 patients with no reported failures who dies either with disease or of unknown causes. Three failures were within

  20. Radiation therapy in the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Jin; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is very rare worldwide. Radical resection is the only prognostic factor for long survival in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Postoperative radiation therapy can improve local control and survival rates for patients with palliative resection, but it remains controversial in patients with radical resection. Biliary drainage can effectively release bile duct obstruction for the majority of patients with locally advanced disease, and may even prolong survival when combined with radiation therapy. Radiation therapy includes extrernal beam therapy alone, external beam therapy with intraluminal brachytheapy and new radiation technique, such as three dimentional conformal therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The propective randomized clinical study is needed for further investigation in the role of combined modality therapy especially for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  1. Development of a versatile algorithm for optimization of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Anders.

    1996-12-01

    A flexible iterative gradient algorithm for radiation therapy optimization has been developed. The algorithm is based on dose calculation using the pencil-beam description of external radiation beams in uniform and heterogeneous patients. The properties of the algorithm are described, including its ability to treat variable bounds and linear constraints, its efficiency in gradient calculation, its convergence properties and termination criteria. 116 refs

  2. Multiobjective evolutionary optimization of the number of beams, their orientations and weights for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Lahanas, Michael; Xing, Lei; Baltas, Dimos

    2004-01-01

    We propose a hybrid multiobjective (MO) evolutionary optimization algorithm (MOEA) for intensity-modulated radiotherapy inverse planning and apply it to optimize the number of incident beams, their orientations and intensity profiles. The algorithm produces a set of efficient solutions, which represent different clinical trade-offs and contains information such as variety of dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. No importance factors are required and solutions can be obtained in regions not accessible by conventional weighted sum approaches. The application of the algorithm using a test case, a prostate and a head and neck tumour case is shown. The results are compared with MO inverse planning using a gradient-based optimization algorithm

  3. Technical advances in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in radiation therapy. Many of these advances can be applied in most radiation therapy departments without expensive improvements in equipment. Changes in radiation fractionation, chemotherapeutic sensitization, intraoperative radiation, and interstitial implants can be performed with experience and improved physician training in most medium-sized departments. Advances that require investments in expensive equipment such as particle radiation and hyperthermia will need to be evaluated at designated treatment centers. 106 references

  4. Outcomes and toxicities in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlussel Markovic, Emily; Buckstein, Michael; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard G

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the cancer control outcomes and long-term treatment-related morbidity of brachytherapy as well as combination brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. A retrospective review was conducted in a prospectively collected database of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated either with brachytherapy or brachytherapy and EBRT, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in the period 1990-2014. Urinary and erectile dysfunction symptoms were measured using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the Mount Sinai erectile function scale and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Cancer control endpoints included biochemical failure and development of distant metastases. All statistical analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Survival curves were calculated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial methods and compared using log-rank tests. Cox regression multivariate analyses were used to test the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcomes. A total of 902 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 91 months. Of these, 390 received brachytherapy and 512 received combination therapy with EBRT. In patients with one intermediate-risk factor, the addition of EBRT did not significantly affect freedom from biochemical failure or distant metastases. Among patients with two or three intermediate-risk factors, added EBRT did not improve freedom from biochemical failure. Significant differences in late toxicity between patients treated with brachytherapy vs combination brachytherapy and EBRT were identified including urge incontinence (P actuarial methods showed that patients receiving combination therapy more frequently experienced loss of potency, as measured by the Mount Sinai erectile function scale (P = 0.040). Brachytherapy monotherapy results in equal biochemical and distant control in both patients with

  5. The basis of the particle beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The particle beam therapy has the excellent physical and biological characteristics that are very different from the X-ray used mainly in conventional radiotherapy. Therefore, the particle therapy can treat loco-regional lesions more strongly with less toxicity than conventional radiotherapy. In recent years in Japan, we can use proton and carbon ion as a particle beam therapy. In this article, we describe the overview of the basis, the advantage and weak points about the particle beam therapy, and the differences between proton and carbon ion therapy. (author)

  6. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Jason A.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Fripp, Jurgen; Menk, Frederick W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  7. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Sun, Jidi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Richardson, Haylea [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Arm, Jameen [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Best, Leah [Department of Radiology, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, New South Wales (Australia); Chandra, Shekhar S. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Fripp, Jurgen [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Menk, Frederick W. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  8. Electron beam instrumentation techniques using coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.X.

    1997-01-01

    Much progress has been made on coherent radiation research since coherent synchrotron radiation was first observed in 1989. The use of coherent radiation as a bunch length diagnostic tool has been studied by several groups. In this paper, brief introductions to coherent radiation and far-infrared measurement are given, the progress and status of their beam diagnostic application are reviewed, different techniques are described, and their advantages and limitations are discussed

  9. Patient Position Verification and Corrective Evaluation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in Intensity modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Gyeong Min; Jeong, Deok Yang; Kim, Young Bum

    2009-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using an on board imager (OBI) can check the movement and setup error in patient position and target volume by comparing with the image of computer simulation treatment in real.time during patient treatment. Thus, this study purposed to check the change and movement of patient position and target volume using CBCT in IMRT and calculate difference from the treatment plan, and then to correct the position using an automated match system and to test the accuracy of position correction using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and examine the usefulness of CBCT in IMRT and the accuracy of the automatic match system. The subjects of this study were 3 head and neck patients and 1 pelvis patient sampled from IMRT patients treated in our hospital. In order to investigate the movement of treatment position and resultant displacement of irradiated volume, we took CBCT using OBI mounted on the linear accelerator. Before each IMRT treatment, we took CBCT and checked difference from the treatment plan by coordinate by comparing it with the image of CT simulation. Then, we made correction through the automatic match system of 3D/3D match to match the treatment plan, and verified and evaluated using electronic portal imaging device. When CBCT was compared with the image of CT simulation before treatment, the average difference by coordinate in the head and neck was 0.99 mm vertically, 1.14 mm longitudinally, 4.91 mm laterally, and 1.07 degrees in the rotational direction, showing somewhat insignificant differences by part. In testing after correction, when the image from the electronic portal imaging device was compared with DRR image, it was found that correction had been made accurately with error less than 0.5 mm. By comparing a CBCT image before treatment with a 3D image reconstructed into a volume instead of a 2D image for the patient's setup error and change in the position of the organs and the target, we could measure and

  10. [Radiation therapy for malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shumei; Konishi, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors, with consideration to minimize harmful damages to health tissues. About 30% of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Radiation therapy may be internal or external. In brachytheraphy as the internal radiation therapy the radioisotope is implanted into or near the tumor by tubes as the container. And it is often used for patients with the tongue cancer. External radiation, the type most often used, comes from a machine outside the body. It is usually used for shrinking tumors with bony invasions such as gingival cancer and improving the pain in patients with bony metastasis. For the primary bone tumor the radiation therapy is not always used because the radiosensitivity of the almost primary bone tumor is low.

  11. Combined Yttrium-90 microsphere selective internal radiation therapy and external beam radiotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: From clinical aspects to dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti-Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT is an effective treatment strategy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients. However, the prognoses of patients with portal vein thrombosis, extra-hepatic metastases, or residual tumors remain poor when treated with SIRT alone. In these patients, sequential external beam radiotherapy (EBRT may offer a chance of salvage. Here, we reported the clinical outcomes and the detailed dosimetry analysis of 22 patients treated with combination therapy.Between October 2011 and May 2015, 22 consecutive patients who underwent EBRT after yttrium-90 (90Y SIRT were included in this study. The post-SIRT 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT of each patient was transferred to dose distribution by adopting the local deposition hypothesis. The patient-specific 3-dimensional biological effective dose distribution of combined SIRT and EBRT was generated. The overall survival and safety were evaluated. The relationship between dosimetric parameters and liver toxicity was analyzed.The mean administered activity of SIRT was 1.50 GBq (range: 0.5-2.8. The mean prescribed dose of EBRT was 42.3 Gy (range: 15-63 in 14 fractions (range: 5-15 and was targeted to the residual liver tumor in 12 patients (55%, portal vein thrombosis in 11 patients (50%, and perihilar lymphadenopathies in 4 patients (18%. The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 59.8%, 47.9%, and 47.9%, respectively. Overall, 8 patients (36% developed > grade 2 liver toxicities, and the Child-Pugh score prior to EBRT strongly affected the toxicity risk. A dosimetry analysis restricted to 18 Child-Pugh A/B patients showed that the V100 (The fraction of normal liver exposed to more than 100 Gy to V140 significance differed between patients who did or did not experience hepatotoxicity. The V110 was the strongest predictor of hepatotoxicity (18.6±11.6% vs 29.5±5.8%; P = 0.030.Combined therapy is feasible and safe if patients are carefully selected

  12. Combined Yttrium-90 microsphere selective internal radiation therapy and external beam radiotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: From clinical aspects to dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ti-Hao; Huang, Pin-I; Hu, Yu-Wen; Lin, Ko-Han; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lin, Yi-Yang; Liu, Chien-An; Tseng, Hsiou-Shan; Liu, Yu-Ming; Lee, Rheun-Chuan

    2018-01-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is an effective treatment strategy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. However, the prognoses of patients with portal vein thrombosis, extra-hepatic metastases, or residual tumors remain poor when treated with SIRT alone. In these patients, sequential external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) may offer a chance of salvage. Here, we reported the clinical outcomes and the detailed dosimetry analysis of 22 patients treated with combination therapy. Between October 2011 and May 2015, 22 consecutive patients who underwent EBRT after yttrium-90 (90Y) SIRT were included in this study. The post-SIRT 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT of each patient was transferred to dose distribution by adopting the local deposition hypothesis. The patient-specific 3-dimensional biological effective dose distribution of combined SIRT and EBRT was generated. The overall survival and safety were evaluated. The relationship between dosimetric parameters and liver toxicity was analyzed. The mean administered activity of SIRT was 1.50 GBq (range: 0.5-2.8). The mean prescribed dose of EBRT was 42.3 Gy (range: 15-63) in 14 fractions (range: 5-15) and was targeted to the residual liver tumor in 12 patients (55%), portal vein thrombosis in 11 patients (50%), and perihilar lymphadenopathies in 4 patients (18%). The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 59.8%, 47.9%, and 47.9%, respectively. Overall, 8 patients (36%) developed > grade 2 liver toxicities, and the Child-Pugh score prior to EBRT strongly affected the toxicity risk. A dosimetry analysis restricted to 18 Child-Pugh A/B patients showed that the V100 (The fraction of normal liver exposed to more than 100 Gy) to V140 significance differed between patients who did or did not experience hepatotoxicity. The V110 was the strongest predictor of hepatotoxicity (18.6±11.6% vs 29.5±5.8%; P = 0.030). Combined therapy is feasible and safe if patients are carefully selected. Specifically

  13. Monitoring T2 and ADC at 9.4 T following fractionated external beam radiation therapy in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocque, Matthew P; Syme, Alasdair; Yahya, Atiyah; Wachowicz, Keith; Fallone, B Gino; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the response of transverse relaxation time (T2) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in human glioma tumor xenografts during and after fractionated radiotherapy. Tumor-bearing mice were divided into four treatment groups (n = 6 per group) that received a total dose of 800 cGy of 200 kVp x-rays, given over two or three fractions, with a fraction spacing of either 24 or 72 h. A fifth treatment group received 800 cGy in a single fraction, and a sixth group of mice served as an untreated control. All mice were scanned pretreatment, before each fraction and at multiple points after treatment using a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Quantitative T2 and ADC maps were produced. All treated groups showed an increase in mean tumor ADC, though the time for this response to reach a maximum and return toward baseline was delayed in the fractionated groups. The highest ADC was measured 7 days after the final fraction of treatment for all groups. There were no significant differences in the maximum measured change in ADC between any of the treated groups, with the average measured maximum value being 20.5% above baseline. After treatment, all groups showed an increase in mean tumor T2, with the average measured maximum T2 being 4.7% above baseline. This increase was followed by a transition to mean T2 values below baseline values, with the average measured tumor T2 being 92.4% of the pretreatment value. The transition between elevated and depressed T2 values was delayed in the cases of fractionated therapies and occurred between 3.6 and 7.3 days after the last fraction of treatment. These results further the understanding of the temporal evolution of T2 and ADC during fractionated radiotherapy and support their potential use as time-sensitive biomarkers for tumor response.

  14. Monitoring T2 and ADC at 9.4 T following fractionated external beam radiation therapy in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Matthew P.; Syme, Alasdair; Yahya, Atiyah; Wachowicz, Keith; Allalunis-Turner, Joan; Fallone, B. Gino

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the response of transverse relaxation time (T2) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in human glioma tumor xenografts during and after fractionated radiotherapy. Tumor-bearing mice were divided into four treatment groups (n = 6 per group) that received a total dose of 800 cGy of 200 kVp x-rays, given over two or three fractions, with a fraction spacing of either 24 or 72 h. A fifth treatment group received 800 cGy in a single fraction, and a sixth group of mice served as an untreated control. All mice were scanned pretreatment, before each fraction and at multiple points after treatment using a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Quantitative T2 and ADC maps were produced. All treated groups showed an increase in mean tumor ADC, though the time for this response to reach a maximum and return toward baseline was delayed in the fractionated groups. The highest ADC was measured 7 days after the final fraction of treatment for all groups. There were no significant differences in the maximum measured change in ADC between any of the treated groups, with the average measured maximum value being 20.5% above baseline. After treatment, all groups showed an increase in mean tumor T2, with the average measured maximum T2 being 4.7% above baseline. This increase was followed by a transition to mean T2 values below baseline values, with the average measured tumor T2 being 92.4% of the pretreatment value. The transition between elevated and depressed T2 values was delayed in the cases of fractionated therapies and occurred between 3.6 and 7.3 days after the last fraction of treatment. These results further the understanding of the temporal evolution of T2 and ADC during fractionated radiotherapy and support their potential use as time-sensitive biomarkers for tumor response.

  15. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  16. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore; Cozzi, Luca; Jamema, Swamidas; Engineer, Reena; Deshpande, Deepak; Sarin, Rajiv; Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV-WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV-Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V 90% > 95%, for PTV-Pelvis: D max < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV-WAR, V 90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV-Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U 5-95% = D 5% -D 95% /D mean ). U 5 - 95% for PTV-WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV-Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAI IMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAI IMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAI RA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAI RA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  17. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  18. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SU-F-T-622: Comparative Analysis of Pencil Beam and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of Thoracic Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Nicolai, W; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Wang, F; Lominskac, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ramanjappa, T [S. K. University, Anantapur, AP (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the impact of Pencil Beam(PB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm(AAA) dose calculation algorithms on OARs and planning target volume (PTV) in thoracic spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Ten Spine SBRT patients were planned on Brainlab iPlan system using hybrid plan consisting of 1–2 non-coplanar conformal-dynamic arcs and few IMRT beams treated on NovalisTx with 6MV photon. Dose prescription varied from 20Gy to 30Gy in 5 fractions depending on the situation of the patient. PB plans were retrospectively recalculated using the Varian Eclipse with AAA algorithm using same MUs, MLC pattern and grid size(3mm).Differences in dose volume parameters for PTV, spinal cord, lung, and esophagus were analyzed and compared for PB and AAA algorithms. OAR constrains were followed per RTOG-0631. Results: Since patients were treated using PB calculation, we compared all the AAA DVH values with respect to PB plan values as standard, although AAA predicts the dose more accurately than PB. PTV(min), PTV(Max), PTV(mean), PTV(D99%), PTV(D90%) were overestimated with AAA calculation on average by 3.5%, 1.84%, 0.95%, 3.98% and 1.55% respectively as compared to PB. All lung DVH parameters were underestimated with AAA algorithm mean deviation of lung V20, V10, V5, and 1000cc were 42.81%,19.83%, 18.79%, and 18.35% respectively. AAA overestimated Cord(0.35cc) by mean of 17.3%; cord (0.03cc) by 12.19% and cord(max) by 10.5% as compared to PB. Esophagus max dose were overestimated by 4.4% and 5cc by 3.26% for AAA algorithm as compared to PB. Conclusion: AAA overestimated the PTV dose values by up to 4%.The lung DVH had the greatest underestimation of dose by AAA versus PB. Spinal cord dose was overestimated by AAA versus PB. Given the critical importance of accuracy of OAR and PTV dose calculation for SBRT spine, more accurate algorithms and validation of calculated doses in phantom models are indicated.

  20. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  1. Interfractional and intrafractional errors assessed by daily cone-beam computed tomography in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Heming; Lin Hui; Feng Guosheng

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study was to assess interfractional and intrafractional errors and to estimate appropriate margins for planning target volume (PTV) by using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Daily pretreatment and post-treatment CBCT scans were acquired separately after initial patient setup and after the completion of each treatment fraction in 10 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Online corrections were made before treatment if any translational setup error was found. Interfractional and intrafractional errors were recorded in the right-left (RL), superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. For the translational shifts, interfractional errors >2 mm occurred in 21.7% of measurements in the RL direction, 12.7% in the SI direction and 34.1% in the AP direction, respectively. Online correction resulted in 100% of residual errors ≤2 mm in the RL and SI directions, and 95.5% of residual errors ≤2 mm in the AP direction. No residual errors >3 mm occurred in the three directions. For the rotational shifts, a significant reduction was found in the magnitudes of residual errors compared with those of interfractional errors. A margin of 4.9 mm, 4.0 mm and 6.3 mm was required in the RL, SI and AP directions, respectively, when daily CBCT scans were not performed. With daily CBCT, the margins were reduced to 1.2 mm in all directions. In conclusion, daily CBCT guidance is an effective modality to improve the accuracy of IMRT for NPC. The online correction could result in a 70-81% reduction in margin size. (author)

  2. Predictors of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Akash; Chen, M.-H.; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical factors associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), adjusting for comorbidity, in elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or in conjunction with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 1,978 men of median age 71 (interquartile range, 66-75) years with intermediate-risk disease (Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 20 ng/mL or less, tumor category T2c or less). Fine and Gray's multivariable competing risks regression was used to assess whether prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), age, treatment, year of brachytherapy, PSA level, or tumor category was associated with the risk of PCSM. Results: After a median follow-up of 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.7-5.4) years, the presence of CVD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI 0.04-0.99; p = 0.05), whereas an increasing PSA level was significantly associated with an increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.27; p = 0.02). In the absence of CVD, cumulative incidence estimates of PCSM were higher (p = 0.03) in men with PSA levels above as compared with the median PSA level (7.3 ng/mL) or less; however, in the setting of CVD there was no difference (p = 0.27) in these estimates stratified by the median PSA level (6.9 ng/mL). Conclusions: In elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, CVD status is a negative predictor of PCSM and affects the prognostic capacity of pretreatment PSA level. These observations support the potential utility of prerandomization stratification by comorbidity to more accurately assess prognostic factors and treatment effects within this population.

  3. Inter- and intrafractional localisation errors in cone-beam CT guided stereotactic radiation therapy of tumours in the liver and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worm, Esben S.; Hansen, Anders T.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Praestegaard, Lars H.; Hoeyer, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Background. Localisation errors in cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) were evaluated and compared to positioning using the external coordinates of a stereotactic body frame (SBF) alone. Possible correlations to patient- or treatment-specific factors such as body mass index (BMI), planning time, treatment delivery time, and distance between tumour and spinal cord were explored to determine whether they influenced on the benefit of image-guidance. Material and methods. A total of 34 patients received SBRT (3 fractions) for tumours in the liver (15 patients) or the lung (19 patients). Immobilisation and positioning was obtained with a SBF. Pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were registered with the bony anatomy of the planning CT to find inter- and intrafractional patient positioning errors (PPE). For lung tumour patients, matching was also performed on the tumours to find the tumour positioning errors (TPE) and baseline shifts relative to bony anatomy. Results. The mean inter- and intrafractional 3D vector PPE was 4.5 ± 2.7 mm (average ± SD) and 1.5 ± 0.6 mm, respectively, for the combined group of patients. For lung tumours, the interfractional misalignment was 5.6 ± 1.8 mm. The baseline shift was 3.9 ± 2.0 mm. Intrafractional TPE and baseline shifts were 2.1 ± 0.7 mm and 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. The magnitude of interfractional baseline shift was closely correlated with the distance between the tumour and the spinal cord. Intrafractional errors were independent of patient BMI, age or gender. Conclusion. Image-guidance reduced setup errors considerably. The study demonstrated the benefit of CBCT-guidance regardless of patient specific factors such as BMI, age or gender. Protection of the spinal cord was facilitated by the correlation between the tumour position relative to the spinal cord and the magnitude of baseline shift.

  4. Equivalent biochemical failure-free survival after external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy in patients with a pretreatment prostate specific antigen of > 4-20 ng/ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Whittington, Richard; Kaplan, Irving; Beard, Clair; Jiroutek, Michael; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Wein, Alan; Coleman, C. Norman

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical failure-free survival stratified by the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and biopsy Gleason score (bGl) is determined for prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A Cox regression multivariable analysis evaluating the variables of PSA, bGl, and clinical stage was used to evaluate the end point of time to PSA failure in 867 and 757 consecutive prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy, respectively. PSA failure-free survival was determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Comparisons were made using the log rank test. Results: The pretreatment PSA, bGl, and clinical stage (T3,4 vs. T1,T2) were found to be independent predictors of time to post-treatment PSA failure for both surgically and radiation managed patients using Cox regression multivariable analysis. Patients with a pretreatment PSA of > 4 ng/ml and ≤ 20 ng/ml could be classified into risk groups for time to post-therapy PSA failure: low = PSA > 4-10 ng/ml and bGl ≤ 4; intermediate = PSA > 4-10 and bGl 5-7; or PSA > 10-20 ng/ml and bGl ≤ 7; high = PSA > 4-20 ng/ml and bGl ≥ 8. Two-year PSA failure-free survival for surgically managed and radiation-managed patients, respectively, were 98% vs. 92% (p = 0.45), 77% vs. 81% (p = 0.86), and 51% vs. 53% (p = 0.48) for patients at low, intermediate, and high risk for post-therapy PSA failure. Conclusions: There was no statistical difference in the 2-year PSA failure-free survival for potentially curable patients managed definitively with surgery or radiation therapy when a retrospective comparison stratifying for the pretreatment PSA and bGl was performed

  5. WE-DE-BRA-10: Development of a Novel Scanning Beam Low-Energy Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (SBIORT) System for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wears, B; Mohiuddin, I; Flynn, R; Waldron, T; Kim, Y; Allen, B; Xia, J [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Developing a compact collimator system and validating a 3D surface imaging module for a scanning beam low-energy x-ray radiation therapy (SBIORT) system that enables delivery of non-uniform radiation dose to targets with irregular shapes intraoperatively. Methods: SBIORT consists of a low energy x-ray source, a custom compact collimator module, a robotic arm, and a 3D surface imaging module. The 3D surface imaging system (structure sensor) is utilized for treatment planning and motion monitoring of the surgical cavity. SBIORT can deliver non-uniform dose distributions by dynamically moving the x-ray source assembly along optimal paths with various collimator apertures. The compact collimator utilizes a dynamic shutter mechanism to form a variable square aperture. The accuracy and reproducibility of the collimator were evaluated using a high accuracy encoder and a high resolution camera platform. The dosimetrical characteristics of the collimator prototype were evaluated using EBT3 films with a Pantak Therapax unit. The accuracy and clinical feasibility of the 3D imaging system were evaluated using a phantom and a cadaver cavity. Results: The SBIORT collimator has a compact size: 66 mm diameter and 10 mm thickness with the maximum aperture of 20 mm. The mechanical experiment indicated the average accuracy of leaf position was 0.08 mm with a reproducibility of 0.25 mm at 95% confidence level. The dosimetry study indicated the collimator had a penumbra of 0.35 mm with a leaf transmission of 0.5%. 3D surface scans can be acquired in 5 seconds. The average difference between the acquired 3D surface and the ground truth is 1 mm with a standard deviation of 0.6 mm. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of the compact collimator and 3D scanning system for the SBIORT. SBIORT is a way of delivering IORT with a compact system that requires minimum shielding of the procedure room. This research is supported by the University of Iowa Internal Funding

  6. Post-prostatectomy image-guided radiation therapy: evaluation of toxicity and inter-fraction variation using online cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldredge, Harriet B.; Studenski, Matthew; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided conformal adjuvant and salvage post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) compared with RT with port films. Sixty-eight patients (group 1) were treated with RT following radical prostatectomy (RP) using CBCT-guided conformal RT to a median dose of 68.4 Gy. CBCT images were acquired three to five times weekly and were automatically co-registered to a reference CT. A comparative group (group 2) included 150 patients who received post-RP RT with weekly port films to a median dose of 64.8 Gy. GU and GI toxicities were graded in both the acute and late settings using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Associations between toxicity and study variables were evaluated by odds ratios (ORs) estimated by logistic regression. Grades 2 and 3 acute GU toxicity were experienced by 13% (n = 9) and 2% (n = 1) of patients in group 1, respectively, while 13% (n = 19) had grade 2 acute GU toxicity in the control group (group 2). Grade 2 acute GI toxicity was experienced by 13% (n = 9) and 15% (n = 23) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Acute GU (P = 0.67) and GI (P = 0.84) toxicities were not significantly different between the two groups. There were no associations detected between CBCT and acute GI toxicity (OR 0.76, P = 0.57) or acute GU (OR 1.16, P = 0.75). Increased odds of acute GU toxicity were observed for doses > 68.4 Gy (OR 12.81, P = 0.04), which were only delivered in the CBCT group. CBCT mean variations (standard deviation) for 1053 fractions were 2.8 mm (2.8), 2.0 mm (2.4) and 3.1 mm (2.9) in the left-to-right, anterior-to-posterior (AP) and superior-to-inferior (SI) axes, respectively. Corrective shifts for variance ≥ 5 mm were required for 15%, 6% and 19% of fractions in the left-to-right, anterior-to-posterior and superior-to-inferior axes, respectively. Rates of acute toxicity with CBCT-guided post-RP RT to

  7. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  8. Treatment optimisation using external beam radiation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of patients with gynaecological cancers present with advanced stages in which external beam radiation forms a major component of the treatment. These patients undergo simulation for treatment planning prior to radiation. Currently the lower extent of the disease is evaluated by vaginal examination and ...

  9. Basic physics of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selman, J.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following chapter headings: simple mathematics gradiation therapy; matter and energy; the nature of radiation;reactions between radiation and matter; x-ray production and control; high-energy therapy units and particle accelerators; quantity of x rays and γ rays; x-ray quality; dosage in x-ray and γ-ray therapy; therapy planning; radioactivity and nuclear physics; implant therapy with radium, radon, and artificial radionuclides; surface therapy with β particles; medical use of radionuclides; radiobiology; radiotherapy with heavy particles; and protection in radiotherapy-health physics

  10. Radiation therapy in palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms with consistently high response rates in the relief and control of bone pain, neurological symptom, obstructive symptoms, and tumor hemorrhage. Over than 80% of patients who developed bone metastasis and superior vena cava syndrome obtained symptom relief by radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is also well established as an effective treatment for brain metastasis, improving symptoms and preventing progressive neurological deficits, and recently stereotactic irradiation had became a alternative treatment of surgery for small metastatic brain tumors. Both radiation therapy and surgery are effective in the initial treatment of malignant spinal cord compression syndrome, and no advantages of surgery over radiation therapy has been demonstrated in published series when patients have a previously conformed diagnosis of malignant disease and no evidence of vertebral collapse. The outcome of treatment depends primarily upon the speed of diagnosis and neurological status at initiation of treatment. It is very important to start radiation therapy before patient become non-ambulant. Low irradiation dose and short treatment period of palliative radiation therapy can minimize disruption and acute morbidity for the patients with advanced cancer with enabling control of symptoms and palliative radiation therapy is applicable to the patient even in poor general condition. (author)

  11. Radiation collimator for use with high energy radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malak, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    A collimator is described for use with a beam of radiation, and in particular, for use in controlling the cross-sectional size and shape of the radiation beam and intercepting undesired off-focus radiation in an x-ray apparatus. The collimator is positioned adjacent to the source of radiation and embodies a plurality longitudinally extending leaves pivotally mounted on and between two supports, the leaves move about their pivots to close overlapping relation to define a hollow cone. The cone defines an aperture at its narrow end which can be adjusted in size and shape by rotation of the two supports which are adaptable to being moved one relative to the other, to cause an expansion or contraction of the hollow cone and correspondingly an increase or decrease of the cross-sectional size and/or shape of the radiation beam passing through the aperture

  12. High-dose-rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy for under 40-year-old patients with invasive uterine cervical carcinoma. Clinical outcomes in 118 patients in a Japanese multi-institutional study, JASTRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Niibe, Yuzuru; Toita, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of curative intent radiation therapy for young patients with invasive uterine cervical carcinoma in Japan. One hundred and eighteen patients aged ≤40 were registered in the multi-institutional study of the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO) from 26 major institutions in Japan. The age range was 24-39 years and the maximum tumor diameter was 2.0-9.2 cm. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics clinical stages were Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb and IVa in 17, 6, 40, 2, 50 and 3, respectively. Curative intent radiation therapy consisted of the combination of external beam radiation therapy and high-dose rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy. The total dose of external beam radiation therapy ranged between 44 and 68 Gy. Both the median and mode of total high-dose-rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy dose to point A were 24 Gy in four fractions. Ninety-six patients (58%) received chemotherapy. The 5-year overall survival rate and local control rate of all patients were 61 and 65%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb and IVa were 88, 100, 75, 100, 37 and 0%, respectively. The 5-year local control rates of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb and IVa were 82, 75, 75, 100, 51 and 0%, respectively. Sixteen patients experienced grade 3 or greater late radiation morbidity. The 5-year overall survival rate of young patients with Stage IIIb was comparatively low at 37%. (author)

  13. A Monte Carlo code for ion beam therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Initially developed for applications in detector and accelerator physics, the modern Fluka Monte Carlo code is now used in many different areas of nuclear science. Over the last 25 years, the code has evolved to include new features, such as ion beam simulations. Given the growing use of these beams in cancer treatment, Fluka simulations are being used to design treatment plans in several hadron-therapy centres in Europe.   Fluka calculates the dose distribution for a patient treated at CNAO with proton beams. The colour-bar displays the normalized dose values. Fluka is a Monte Carlo code that very accurately simulates electromagnetic and nuclear interactions in matter. In the 1990s, in collaboration with NASA, the code was developed to predict potential radiation hazards received by space crews during possible future trips to Mars. Over the years, it has become the standard tool to investigate beam-machine interactions, radiation damage and radioprotection issues in the CERN accelerator com...

  14. Post-prostatectomy image-guided radiation therapy: evaluation of toxicity and inter-fraction variation using online cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Harriet B; Studenski, Matthew; Keith, Scott W; Trabulsi, Edouard; Lallas, Costas D; Gomella, Leonard G; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided conformal adjuvant and salvage post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) compared with RT with port films. Sixty-eight patients (group 1) were treated with RT following radical prostatectomy (RP) using CBCT-guided conformal RT to a median dose of 68.4Gy. CBCT images were acquired three to five times weekly and were automatically co-registered to a reference CT. A comparative group (group 2) included 150 patients who received post-RP RT with weekly port films to a median dose of 64.8Gy. GU and GI toxicities were graded in both the acute and late settings using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Associations between toxicity and study variables were evaluated by odds ratios (ORs) estimated by logistic regression. Grades 2 and 3 acute GU toxicity were experienced by 13% (n=9) and 2% (n=1) of patients in group 1, respectively, while 13% (n=19) had grade 2 acute GU toxicity in the control group (group 2). Grade 2 acute GI toxicity was experienced by 13% (n=9) and 15% (n=23) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Acute GU (P=0.67) and GI (P =0.84) toxicities were not significantly different between the two groups. There were no associations detected between CBCT and acute GI toxicity (OR 0.76, P=0.57) or acute GU (OR 1.16, P=0.75). Increased odds of acute GU toxicity were observed for doses>68.4Gy (OR 12.81, P=0.04), which were only delivered in the CBCT group. CBCT mean variations (standard deviation) for 1053 fractions were 2.8mm (2.8), 2.0mm (2.4) and 3.1mm (2.9) in the left-to-right, anterior-to-posterior (AP) and superior-to-inferior (SI) axes, respectively. Corrective shifts for variance≥5mm were required for 15%, 6% and 19% of fractions in the left-to-right, anterior-to-posterior and superior-to-inferior axes, respectively. Rates of acute toxicity with CBCT-guided post-RP RT to 68.4Gy were similar to

  15. Electron wedges for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Lo, Y.-C.; Humm, John L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Brain tumors can be advantageously treated with electron over photon radiation, by exploiting the rapid fall-off in dose with depth. This advantage could be further enhanced by utilizing multiple electron beams. However, in some beam configurations, wedged dose profiles would be necessary for the dose uniformity. Unlike photons, shaped pieces of material placed in electron beam severely degrade the energy, give additional scattering and, therefore, are suboptimal. The purpose of this study was to create wedged electron fields, using intensity modulation. The combination of electron wedges enables a more uniform coverage of brain tumors with a reduced dose to normal tissue. Methods and Materials: Intensity modulation was performed for 10 to 50 MeV electrons using a narrow scanning elementary beam of a racetrack Microtron accelerator, delivering radiation pulses with coordinates and intensities prescribed by a custom scan matrix. Dispensing more pulses (or longer pulses) within the field to increase the local dose, one can sharpen the penumbra at depth and generate wedged dose distributions of arbitrary angle as well as many other desired profiles. We modulated the electron beams, measured dose distributions using film in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compared the results with conventional techniques. Results: Intensity modulation of electron beams decreases the 50-90% penumbra at depth by 40% and increases the flatness by 80%. Wedged profiles at depth can be created for any angle up to about 70 deg. , depending on the beam energy. Multiple modulated electron beams give smaller 20-70% but larger 70-100% isodose regions than photon beams. Conclusions: Electron beams can improve dose distributions in brain compared to the same number of photon beams, reducing the 20-70% isodoses region in normal tissue by 30%. Intensity modulation significantly improves the dose distribution from combined electron beams providing a sharper penumbra, better conformity, and

  16. Treatment facilities, human resource development, and future prospect of particle beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The number of particle beam therapy facilities is increasing globally. Among the countries practicing particle beam therapy, Japan is one of the leading countries in the field with four operating carbon-ion therapy facilities and ten operating proton therapy facilities. With the increasing number of particle beam therapy facilities, the human resource development is becoming extremely important, and there has been many such efforts including the Gunma University Program for Cultivating Global Leaders in Heavy Ion Therapeutics and Engineering, which aimed to educate and train the radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator engineers, and radiation biologists to become global leaders in the field of particle beam therapy. In the future, the benefit and effectiveness of particle beam therapy should be discussed and elucidated objectively in a framework of comprehensive cancer care. (author)

  17. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Hayes, C; Grow, A [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bahamondes, S.; Zheng, Y; Wu, X [JFK Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Lake Worth, FL (United States); Choi, M; Pai, S [Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Li, J [Doctors Hospital of Augusta, Augusta, GA (United States); Cranford, K [Trident Medical Center, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning.

  18. Image quality of four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography obtained at various gantry rotation speeds for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy with fiducial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Araki, Fujio; Maruyama, Masato; Yonemura, Keisuke; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Kai, Yudai; Toya, Ryo

    2018-01-01

    In this study, qualities of 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images obtained using various gantry rotation speeds (GRSs) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with fiducial markers were quantitatively evaluated. Abdominal phantom containing a fiducial marker was moved along a sinusoidal waveform, and 4D-CBCT images were acquired with GRSs of 50-200° min -1 . We obtained the 4D-CBCT projection data from six patients who underwent liver SBRT and generated 4D-CBCT images at GRSs of 67-200° min -1 , by varying the number of projection data points. The image quality was evaluated based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and structural similarity index (SSIM). The fiducial marker positions with different GRSs were compared with the setup values and a reference position in the phantom and clinical studies, respectively. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) were calculated relative to the reference positions. In the phantom study, the mean SNR, CNR, and SSIM decreased from 37.6 to 10.1, from 39.8 to 10.1, and from 0.9 to 0.7, respectively, as the GRS increased from 50 to 200° min -1 . The fiducial marker positions were within 2.0 mm at all GRSs. Similarly, in the clinical study, the mean SNR, CNR, and SSIM decreased from 50.4 to 13.7, from 24.2 to 6.0, and from 0.92 to 0.73, respectively. The mean RMSEs were 2.0, 2.1, and 3.6 mm for the GRSs of 67, 100, and 200° min -1 , respectively. We conclude that GRSs of 67 and 85° min -1 yield images of acceptable quality for 4D-CBCT in liver SBRT with fiducial markers. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. FIGO IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: an analysis of prognostic factors emphasizing the balance between external beam and intracavitary radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logsdon, Mark D.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To define patient, tumor, and treatment factors that influence the outcome of patients with FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,096 patients treated with radiation therapy between 1960 and 1993 for FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix were reviewed retrospectively. Of these, 983 (90%) were treated with curative intent and 113 were treated only to achieve palliation of symptoms. Of 907 patients who completed the intended curative treatment, 641 (71%) were treated with a combination of external beam irradiation (EBRT) and intracavitary irradiation (ICRT) and 266 (29%) were treated with EBRT only. The median duration of treatment for these 907 patients was 51 days. Between 1966 and 1980, only 52% of patients who completed treatment with curative intent received ICRT, compared with 92% of patients treated during 1981-1993, an increase that reflects an evolution in the philosophy of treatment for advanced tumors. In general, the intensity of ICRT correlated inversely with the dose of EBRT to the central pelvis. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 134 months. Results: For 983 patients treated with initial curative intent, disease-specific survival (DSS) was significantly worse for those who were 52 Gy of EBRT to the central pelvis had DSS rates of 27-34%, compared with 53% for patients treated with lower doses of EBRT to the central pelvis and more intensive ICRT (p 52 Gy of EBRT to the central pelvis (57-68%), compared with those who had 48-52 Gy (28%) and those who had ≤ 47 Gy of EBRT to the central pelvis (15%) (p < 0.0001). Outcome was also compared for four time periods during which different treatment policies were in place for patients with Stage IIIB disease. The highest DSS (51%) and lowest actuarial complication rate (17%) were achieved during the most recent period (1981-1993) when modest doses of EBRT were combined with relatively

  20. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  1. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheek, Gregory [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with

  2. High-dose hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy is safe and effective for central and peripheral early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: results of a 12-year experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, David A; Cheek, Gregory; Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D

    2013-08-01

    We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  3. Phase II trial of combined surgical resection, high dose rate intraoperative radiation therapy, and external beam radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raben, A.; Rusch, V.; Mychalczak, B.; Ginsberg, R.; Burt, M.; Bains, M.; Francois, Damien; Harrison, L.B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combining extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) or pleurectomy / decortication (PD), high dose rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) and postoperative external beam radiation hemithoracic radiation (EBHRT) to treat malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Materials and Methods: From 3/94 through 9/94, 15 patients (pts) were enrolled on this trial. This included 3 females and 12 males with a median age of 59 (Range: 45-75). Eligibility criteria included biopsy proven MPM, no evidence of T4 or N3 disease by exam/CT/MRI, no evidence of metastatic disease, no previous treatment, and a Karnofsky performance status of ≥ 80%. Pts with pulmonary function tests permitting EPP, underwent EPP and HDR-IORT (N=7). The rest underwent PD/HDR-IORT (N=4). An intraoperative dose of 15 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 5 mm in tissue to the ipsilateral mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Postoperatively, 54 Gy of EBHRT was prescribed to the hemithorax, surgical scar and surgical drain site. The median surgical procedure time, median IORT time and median overall operating time was 554 minutes, 240 minutes, and 649 minutes respectively. The median dose of EBHRT was 50.4 Gy (Range 50-54 Gy). The median follow-up time is 8 months (Range: 3.5 to 28 months). Four of 15 pts had unresectable disease at the time of surgery and were taken off study. Results are presented in crude and actuarial analysis. Results: A complete resection of all visible gross disease was accomplished in 10 pts. One pt had a single focus of gross residual disease (less than 5 mm in size) left behind in the chest wall. The overall complication rate was 54%. Treatment related mortality occurred in 2 pts (18%) at 1 and 7 months respectively. This was attributed to ARDS in 1 pt (EPP/HDR-IORT) and radiation pneumonitis combined with a tracheoesophageal fistula in 1 pt (PD/HDR-IORT). Of the 6 remaining pts undergoing EPP/HDR-IORT, 2 pts developed a postoperative empyema with

  4. Radiation Therapy of Suprasellar Germ Cell Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 15 patients with suprasellar germ cell tumors treated by megavoltage external beam irradiation between Feb. 1979 and Dec. 1985. Follow-up period of survivors was 30 to 91 months. Histologic diagnosis was obtained before radiation therapy in 10 patients (9 germinomas and 1 mixed). Five patients were treated without histologic verification. In 9 patients with biopsy-proven germinomas radiation therapy was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 6, to the whole brain in 3. In 5 patients with mixed germ cell tumor or elevated tumor marker, irradiation was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 2, to the whole brain in 2, and to the primary site only in 1. Total doses ranged from 5,000 to 5,500 cGy to the primary site, 3,000 to 4,400 cGy to the whole brain, and 1,300 to 3,000 cGy to the spine. In these 14, local tumor was controlled and primary or spinal failure was not observed. One patient without elevated tumor marker was treated to the whole brain, The tumor was not controlled and he had spinal recurrence. It is proven that radiation therapy is an effective treatment for suprasellar germ cell tumors. The neuroendocrinologic presentation, tumor marker status, early response to radiation measured on CT seem to be useful means for selecting patients for radiation therapy when tissue diagnosis is not available

  5. Radiation therapy in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littman, P.; D'Angio, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used in the management of children with cancer, but neonatal neoplasms are rare. Newborns represent 1.5% of the children with malignant diseases in the Tumor Registry at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia over the last 30 years. Thus, occasionally the pediatrics radiation therapist must consider treating the very young infant. The specific radiation effects on growth and development must be weighed in reaching a therapeutic decision. All children are vulnerable to the late effects of radiation therapy, but the neonates may be more susceptible because of the immaturity of important organs such as the brain, lung, liver, kidney, and bone. In general, radiation therapy, should be avoided during the first several weeks of life because of the potential increased sensitivity of the liver and kidneys during that period. If radiation therapy is used at all during infancy, the benefits must be weighed against the possibility of significant late effects. Increasing knowledge of pediatric neoplasms has shown that some tumors (such as mesoblastic nephroma) require no treatment except for surgical excision; and other tumors, such as Stage IV-S neuroblastoma, may require very little treatment. In those tumors that require radiation therapy, the use of chemotherapy may allow reduction of the radiation dose. Furthermore, alterations of time-dose-fractionation schemes and careful attention to tumor volume with the use of special techniques, such as ''shrinking fields,'' may decrease the late adverse effects of treatment

  6. Key clinical beam parameters for nanoparticle-mediated radiation dose amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detappe, Alexandre; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Drané, Pascal; Kotb, Shady; Myronakis, Marios; Biancur, Douglas E; Ireland, Thomas; Wagar, Matthew; Lux, Francois; Tillement, Olivier; Berbeco, Ross

    2016-09-23

    As nanoparticle solutions move towards human clinical trials in radiation therapy, the influence of key clinical beam parameters on therapeutic efficacy must be considered. In this study, we have investigated the clinical radiation therapy delivery variables that may significantly affect nanoparticle-mediated radiation dose amplification. We found a benefit for situations which increased the proportion of low energy photons in the incident beam. Most notably, "unflattened" photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator results in improved outcomes relative to conventional "flat" beams. This is measured by significant DNA damage, tumor growth suppression, and overall improvement in survival in a pancreatic tumor model. These results, obtained in a clinical setting, clearly demonstrate the influence and importance of radiation therapy parameters that will impact clinical radiation dose amplification with nanoparticles.

  7. Dose reporting in ion beam therapy. Proceedings of a meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    Following the pioneering work in Berkeley, USA, ion beam therapy for cancer treatment is at present offered in Chiba and Hyogo in Japan, and Darmstadt in Germany. Other facilities are coming close to completion or are at various stages of planning in Europe and Japan. In all these facilities, carbon ions have been selected as the ions of choice, at least in the first phase. Taking into account this fast development, the complicated technical and radiobiological research issues involved, and the hope it raises for some types of cancer patients, the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements (ICRU) jointly sponsored a technical meeting held in Vienna, 23-24 June 2004. That first meeting was orientated mainly towards radiobiology: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions versus photons, and related issues. One of the main differences between ion beam therapy and other modern radiotherapy techniques (such as proton beam therapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy) is related to radiobiology and in particular the increased RBE of carbon ions compared to both protons and photons (i.e., high linear energy transfer (LET) versus low LET radiation). Another important issue for international agencies and commissions, such as the IAEA and the ICRU, is a worldwide agreement and harmonisation for reporting the treatments. In order to evaluate the merits of ion beam therapy, it is essential that the treatments be reported in a similar/comparable way in all centres so that the clinical reports and protocols can be understood and interpreted without ambiguity by the radiation therapy community in general. For the last few decades, the ICRU has published several reports containing recommendations on how to report external photon beam or electron beam therapy, and brachytherapy. A report on proton beam therapy, jointly prepared by the ICRU and the IAEA, is now completed and is being published in the ICRU series. In line with this

  8. Bullous pemphigoid after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duschet, P.; Schwarz, T.; Gschnait, F.

    1988-02-01

    Electron beam therapy applied to a lymph node metastasis from a squamous cell carcinoma was followed by the development of histologically and immunologically typical bullous pemphigoid, the lesions being initially strictly confined to the irradiation area. This observation suggests that the bullous pemphigoid antigen may be altered or unmasked by electron beam radiotherapy, leading subsequently to the production of autoantibodies. The disease in this case effectively responded to the administration of tetracycline and niacinamide, a therapeutic regimen described recently.

  9. New modalities in radiation therapy for treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term for a large group of diseases characterized by rapid creation of abnormal cells that grow beyond their usual boundaries, and which can then invade adjoining parts of the body and spread to other organs. Cancer mortality is the second and most common cause of death in the USA and in most European countries. In India, it is the fourth leading disease and the major cause of death. Cancer remains one of the most dreadful disease and approximately ten million cases of cancer occur in the world every year. The course of cancer treatment depends on the type of cancer, its location, and its state of advancement. Cancer is treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, biological therapy and targeted therapy. Radiation therapy is an important an affordable modality for cancer treatment with minimal side effects. Radiation kills cancer cells with high-energy rays targeted directly to the tumor. Radiation therapy works by damaging the DNA and preventing its replication: therefore, it preferentially kills cancer cells, which rapidly divides. Radiation therapy is used for cure, control, and palliation of cancers in more than 60% of cancer patients. The goal of radiotherapy is to treat the cancer and spare the normal tissue as much as possible. Advances have been made in radiotherapy that allow delivery of higher doses of radiation to the tumor while sparing a greater amount of surrounding tissue, thus achieving more cures and fewer acute and long-term side effects. Technological advances and research are being continued to result in improvements in the field. Several new devices and techniques are used these days in radiotherapy for accurate treatment of cancer. Teletherapy (external radiation therapy) used focused radiation beams targeting well defined tumor through extremely detailed imaging scans. Conventional external beam radiation therapy (2DXRT) is delivered via two-dimensional beams using linear accelerator machines (X

  10. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Strobele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-01

    To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10(7) ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy fall off of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a γ-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the γ-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum γ-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed γ-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient

  11. Salvage proton beam therapy in local recurrent uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechardt, Aline I; Cordini, Dino; Dobner, Bianca; Seibel, Ira; Gundlach, Enken; Rehak, Matus; Hager, Annette; Stark, Roland; Moser, Lutz; Joussen, Antonia M

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate survival and ocular outcome in recurrent uveal melanoma treated with proton beam therapy as salvage therapy. Retrospective, interventional case series. We evaluated 48 patients with local recurrence of uveal melanoma after primary treatment with brachytherapy, transpupillary thermotherapy, proton beam therapy, laser photocoagulation, CyberKnife radiation, or photodynamic therapy. All patients received proton beam therapy as a salvage therapy at the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin between July 2000 and December 2010. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to obtain survival rates. The Kaplan-Meier estimator for local tumor control was 92.1% at 10 years after secondary treatment with proton beam therapy. Local recurrence developed in 3 patients; 1 of them underwent enucleation. During follow-up, 20.8% of the patients died (16.7% of metastasis, 4.1% of other causes or not specified). The most frequent surgical interventions were phacoemulsification (20.8%) and pars plana vitrectomy (10.4%). The Kaplan-Meier estimators were 77.4% for survival and 70.1% for the absence of metastasis 10 years after the primary treatment. Proton beam therapy as a salvage treatment resulted in high local tumor control rates in recurrent uveal melanoma, especially if the primary therapy was transpupillary thermotherapy or plaque brachytherapy. Preservation of the globe was possible in most patients. Enucleations were indicated only in case of re-recurrences of uveal melanoma, but not because of secondary complications like intractable pain or secondary glaucoma. Retreatment was associated with vision deterioration, but loss of vision remained exceptional. Further larger prospective studies are needed to confirm the presented results of our retrospective analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  13. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with some form of gynecologic cancer this year. Cancers of the uterus and cervix are most common gynecologic cancers treated ... detected or removed by surgery. Radiation therapy kills ... of the uterus and cervix, called a hysterectomy. The surgeon may ...

  14. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  15. Malignant mesothelioma following radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, J; Mintzer, D; Warhol, M J

    1994-10-01

    Studies of the growing population of long-term survivors of cancer have led to increased recognition of the neoplastic complications of therapy. The causes of secondary malignancies are probably multifactorial, but radiation therapy and chemotherapy have certainly been implicated in the development of posttherapy neoplasia. A case of pleural mesothelioma after successful radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease is described with a review of radiation-associated mesotheliomas reported in the literature. In Hodgkin's disease, patients may receive radiation, chemotherapy, or combined treatment; the most common secondary malignancy is acute nonlymphocytic leukemia while sarcomas are the second most common solid tumors. Although mesothelioma is an uncommon sarcoma, its occurrence has been documented numerous times after exposure to diagnostic or therapeutic radiation.

  16. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy

  17. Treatment of cancer of the pancreas by intraoperative electron beam therapy: physical and biological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagne, F.R.; Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Milligan, A.J.; Bronn, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy has had a significant and an expanded role in the management of cancer of the pancreas during the last decade. In particular, for locally advanced disease, radiation therapy has improved the median survival of patients to 1 year. Intraoperative electron beam therapy has been applied to unresectable and resectable pancreatic cancer in an attempt to enhance local control of disease and to improve patient survival. This paper presents a survey of the role of radiation therapy in treatment of cancer of the pancreas, provides information on the radiobiological aspects of this treatment modality and details the physical and dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. Presented are the design specifics of an applicator system, central axis beam data, applicator parameters, dose distribution data, shielding, treatment planning and means of verification. Emphasis is placed on the collaboration and cooperation necessary for all members of the intraoperative radiation therapy team including surgeons, radiation therapists, medical physicists, anesthesiologists, technologists, and nurses.29 references

  18. Limb-sparing management with surgical resection, external-beam and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy boost for patients with primary soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity. A multicentric pooled analysis of long-term outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Radiomedicina, Service of Radiation Oncology, Santiago (Chile); Polo, Alfredo; Montero, Angel [Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio; Martinez-Monge, Rafael [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Service of Radiation Oncology, Pamplona (Spain); Alvarez, Ana [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Cuervo, Miguel [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Madrid (Spain); Julian, Mikel San [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    A joint analysis of data from three contributing centres within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) Spanish program was performed to investigate the main contributions of IORT to the multidisciplinary treatment of high-risk extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients with an histologic diagnosis of primary extremity STS, with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing surgery with radical intent, external beam radiotherapy (median dose 45 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. From 1986-2012, a total of 159 patients were analysed in the study from three Spanish institutions. With a median follow-up time of 53 months (range 4-316 years), 5-year local control (LC) was 82 %. The 5-year IOERT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 86, 62 and 72 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only microscopically involved margin (R1) resection status retained significance in relation to LC (HR 5.20, p < 0.001). With regard to IOERT in-field control, incomplete resection (HR 4.88, p = 0.001) and higher IOERT dose (≥ 12.5 Gy; HR 0.32, p = 0.02) retained a significant association in multivariate analysis. From this joint analysis emerges the fact that an IOERT dose ≥ 12.5 Gy increases the rate of IOERT in-field control, but DFS remains modest, given the high risk of distant metastases. Intensified local treatment needs to be tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neo- and adjuvant systemic therapy. (orig.) [German] Um den therapeutischen Beitrag einer intraoperativen Bestrahlung mit Elektronen (IOERT) als Teil eines multidisziplinaeren Behandlungskonzepts von Weichteilsarkomen (STS) im Extremitaetenbereich mit hohem Risikoprofil evaluieren zu koennen, wurde anhand des spanischen IOERT-Programms eine gepoolte Datenanalyse von drei teilnehmenden Zentren vorgenommen. Eingeschlossen in diese Studie wurden Patienten mit histologisch

  19. Dosimetry of proton therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andric, S.

    1996-01-01

    Review of basic dosimetry of proton therapy treatment are presented with a goal to further development of the center for proton therapy planed in the frame of accelerator installation TESLA, which construction has been going on in the Vinca Institute. The basic of existing international recommendation for proton dosimetry, related both to dosimeter choice and calibration, as well as to absorbed dose determination methods, are presented. Recommendation statement and supposition in the future proton therapy practice belongs to the basic elements of developed conceptual program for proton therapy usage

  20. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Thompson, Holly M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Seibert, J. Anthony [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vaughan, Andrew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”.

  1. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  2. The Indiana University proton radiation therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, C.; Derenchuk, V.; Cameron, J.; Fasano, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hashemian, R.; Hornback, N.; Low, D.A.; Morphis, J.; Peterson, C.; Rosselot, D.; Sandison, G.; Shen, R.N.; Shidnia, H.

    1993-01-01

    A fixed horizontal beam line at the Indiana University cyclotron facility (IUCF) has been equipped for proton radiation therapy treatment of head, neck, and brain tumors. The complete system will be commissioned and ready to treat patients early in 1993. IUCF can produce external proton beams from 45 to 200 MeV in energy, which corresponds to a maximum range in water of 26 cm. Beam currents over 100 nA are easily attained, allowing dose rates in excess of 200 cGy/min, even for large fields. Beam spreading systems have been tested which provide uniform fields up to 20 cm in diameter. Range modulation is accomplished with a rotating acrylic device, which provides uniform depth dose distributions from 3 to 18 cm in extent. Tests have been conducted on detectors which monitor the beam position and current, and the dose symmetry. This report discusses those devices, as well as the cyclotron characteristics, measured beam properties, safety interlocks, computerized dose delivery/monitoring system, and future plans. (orig.)

  3. Multi-institutional Prospective Evaluation of Bowel Quality of Life After Prostate External Beam Radiation Therapy Identifies Patient and Treatment Factors Associated With Patient-Reported Outcomes: The PROSTQA Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Conlon, Anna S.C.; Daignault, Stephanie; Dunn, Rodney L.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hembroff, A. Larry; Zietman, Anthony L.; Kaplan, Irving; Ciezki, Jay; Kuban, Deborah A.; Wei, John T.; Sanda, Martin G.; Michalski, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patients treated with external beam radiation therapy as part of the multicenter Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment (PROSTQA), to identify factors associated with posttreatment patient-reported bowel health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment characteristics and treatment details among 292 men were evaluated using a general linear mixed model for their association with measured HRQOL by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite instrument through 2 years after enrollment. Results: Bowel HRQOL had a median score of 100 (interquartile range 91.7-100) pretreatment and 95.8 (interquartile range 83.3-100) at 2 years, representing new moderate/big problems in 11% for urgency, 7% for frequency, 4% for bloody stools, and 8% for an overall bowel problems. Baseline bowel score was the strongest predictor for all 2-year endpoints. In multivariable models, a volume of rectum ≥25% treated to 70 Gy (V70) yielded a clinically significant 9.3-point lower bowel score (95% confidence interval [CI] 16.8-1.7, P=.015) and predicted increased risks for moderate to big fecal incontinence (P=.0008). No other radiation therapy treatment-related variables influenced moderate to big changes in rectal HRQOL. However, on multivariate analyses V70 ≥25% was associated with increases in small, moderate, or big problems with the following: incontinence (3.9-fold; 95% CI 1.1-13.4, P=.03), rectal bleeding (3.6-fold; 95% CI 1.3-10.2, P=.018), and bowel urgency (2.9-fold; 95% CI 1.1-7.6, P=.026). Aspirin use correlated with a clinically significant 4.7-point lower bowel summary score (95% CI 9.0-0.4, P=.03) and an increase in small, moderate, or big problems with bloody stools (2.8-fold; 95% CI 1.2-6.4, P=.018). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was associated with higher radiation therapy doses to the prostate and lower doses to the rectum but did not independently correlate with bowel HRQOL

  4. Multi-institutional Prospective Evaluation of Bowel Quality of Life After Prostate External Beam Radiation Therapy Identifies Patient and Treatment Factors Associated With Patient-Reported Outcomes: The PROSTQA Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Conlon, Anna S.C.; Daignault, Stephanie [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dunn, Rodney L. [Department of Urology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hembroff, A. Larry [Office for Survey Research, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaplan, Irving [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ciezki, Jay [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, John T. [Department of Urology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sanda, Martin G. [Department of Urology, Emory University Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patients treated with external beam radiation therapy as part of the multicenter Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment (PROSTQA), to identify factors associated with posttreatment patient-reported bowel health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment characteristics and treatment details among 292 men were evaluated using a general linear mixed model for their association with measured HRQOL by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite instrument through 2 years after enrollment. Results: Bowel HRQOL had a median score of 100 (interquartile range 91.7-100) pretreatment and 95.8 (interquartile range 83.3-100) at 2 years, representing new moderate/big problems in 11% for urgency, 7% for frequency, 4% for bloody stools, and 8% for an overall bowel problems. Baseline bowel score was the strongest predictor for all 2-year endpoints. In multivariable models, a volume of rectum ≥25% treated to 70 Gy (V70) yielded a clinically significant 9.3-point lower bowel score (95% confidence interval [CI] 16.8-1.7, P=.015) and predicted increased risks for moderate to big fecal incontinence (P=.0008). No other radiation therapy treatment-related variables influenced moderate to big changes in rectal HRQOL. However, on multivariate analyses V70 ≥25% was associated with increases in small, moderate, or big problems with the following: incontinence (3.9-fold; 95% CI 1.1-13.4, P=.03), rectal bleeding (3.6-fold; 95% CI 1.3-10.2, P=.018), and bowel urgency (2.9-fold; 95% CI 1.1-7.6, P=.026). Aspirin use correlated with a clinically significant 4.7-point lower bowel summary score (95% CI 9.0-0.4, P=.03) and an increase in small, moderate, or big problems with bloody stools (2.8-fold; 95% CI 1.2-6.4, P=.018). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was associated with higher radiation therapy doses to the prostate and lower doses to the rectum but did not independently correlate with bowel HRQOL

  5. A dosimetric study of a heterogeneous phantom for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy comparing Monte Carlo and pencil beam calculations to dose distributions measured with a 2-D diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Casey Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) calculations are compared to their measured planar dose distributions using a 2-D diode array for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). The planar dose distributions were studied for two different phantom types: an in-house heterogeneous phantom and a homogeneous phantom. The motivation is to mimic the human anatomy during a lung SBRT treatment and incorporate heterogeneities into the pre-treatment Quality Assurance process, where measured and calculated planar dose distributions are compared before the radiation treatment. Individual and combined field dosimetry has been performed for both fixed gantry angle (anterior to posterior) and planned gantry angle delivery. A gamma analysis has been performed for all beam arrangements. The measurements were obtained using the 2-D diode array MapCHECK 2(TM). MC and PB calculations were performed using the BrainLAB iPlan RTRTM Dose software. The results suggest that with the heterogeneous phantom as a quality assurance device, the MC calculations result in closer agreements to the measured values, when using the planned gantry angle delivery method for composite beams. For the homogeneous phantom, the results suggest that the preferred delivery method is at the fixed anterior to posterior gantry angle. Furthermore, the MC and PB calculations do not show significant differences for dose difference and distance to agreement criteria 3%/3mm. However, PB calculations are in better agreement with the measured values for more stringent gamma criteria when considering individual beam whereas MC agreements are closer for composite beam measurements.

  6. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  7. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50∼80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68∼120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin cancer in

  8. Radiation processing of carrageenan using electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, L.V.; Aranilla, C.T.; Relleve, L.; Dela Rosa, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron beam accelerator has been widely employed in the modification of natural polymers for the development of materials used in biomedical and agricultural applications. The carrageenans are among these materials that show a vast potential for these types of applications. Previous studies at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute focused on the utilization of gamma radiation to modify the carrageenans. Radiation degradation of carrageenan found valuable use as plant growth promoter. Hydrogels for burn dressing using blends of carrageenan and synthetic polymers have also been made using gamma radiation. While previous studies have been focused on the use of gamma radiation to modify the carrageenans, recent studies expanded the technology to electron beam. Concretely, researches are along the following two areas: a) Degradation studies of aqueous carrageenan using the LEEB and b) Preparation of blend polysaccharide derivatives such as carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) with kappa-carrageenan (KC) by EB radiation. These works were done at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) by two PNRI colleagues under the nuclear researcher exchange program of the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The first area had already been reported and discussed in the last project meeting held in Malaysia. (author)

  9. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The stomach; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'estomac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberdiac, P. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital de Bellevue, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France); Mineur, L. [Unite d' oncologie digestive et radiotherapie, institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    In the following article, we will discuss general issues relating to acute and late gastric's radiation toxicities. The tolerance of the stomach to complete or partial organ irradiation is more un-appreciated than for most other organs. We consulted the Medline database via PubMed and used the key words gastric - radiotherapy - toxicity. Currently, 60 Gy or less is prescribed in gastric radiation therapy. Acute clinical toxicity symptoms are predominantly nausea and vomiting. Although there is a general agreement that the whole stomach tolerance is for doses of 40 to 45 Gy without unacceptable complication, it is well established that a stomach dose of 35 Gy increases the risk of ulcer complications. (authors)

  10. Injectable Colloidal Gold in a Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate Gelating Matrix with Potential Use in Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Binderup, Tina; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy relies on the ability to deliver high radiation doses to tumor cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. Advanced irradiation techniques, including image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), rely on the ability to locate tumors to optimize the therapeu......External beam radiation therapy relies on the ability to deliver high radiation doses to tumor cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. Advanced irradiation techniques, including image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), rely on the ability to locate tumors to optimize...

  11. Cyclotron for Beam Therapy Application

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G; Karamysheva, G A; Kostromin, S A; Mitsyn, G V; Molokanov, A G; Onishchenko, L M; Samsonov, E V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Zaplatin, N L

    2005-01-01

    The basic parameters of the proton isochronous cyclotron on the fixed energy are considered. The energy of protons is $E_{p}\\sim $ 220~MeV, intensity of the extracted beam is $I_{p}\\sim $ 0.1~$\\mu$A. The cyclotron is projected on the basis of compact magnet with four sectors and the diameter of poles 300 cm. Two dees of the accelerating system are located in valleys.

  12. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients.

  13. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong

    1989-01-01

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients

  14. A beam radiation monitoring and protection system for AGS secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    A commercially available radiation monitor using a scintillation detector was modified for charged particle beam monitoring. The device controls access to secondary beams of the AGS and limits beam intensity

  15. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliwal Bhudatt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are major challenges for the radiotherapy patient dosimetry and delivery verification. Advanced techniques are less tolerant to poor implementation than are standard techniques. Mis-administrations are more difficult to detect and can possibly lead to poor outcomes for some patients. Instead of presenting a manual on quality assurance for radiation therapy, this manuscript provides an overview of dosimetry verification tools and a focused discussion on breath holding, respiratory gating and the applications of four-dimensional computed tomography in motion management. Some of the major challenges in the above areas are discussed.

  16. Generalized Morphea after Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea.

  17. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Spinal cord; Tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: moelle epiniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habrand, J.L. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Centre de protontherapie, institut Curie, 91 - Orsay (France); Drouet, F. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation myelopathy is one of the most dreadful complications of radiation therapy. Despite multiple animal experiments and human autopsic series, its pathogenesis remains largely unknown. In most instances, the classical aspect of myelomalacia combines glial and vascular injuries in various sequences. Recent studies point out the role of oligo-dendrocytes and their precursors, as well as of intercellular mediators (cytokines and stress molecules). The clinical presentation comprises a spectrum of non specific neurological symptoms whose evolution is sometimes regressive but more commonly progressive and life-threatening. Usually, it occurs following a latent period of six months to two years after irradiation of the cervical, thoracic or upper lumbar spine to a dose in excess of 50 Gy, conventionally fractionated. Nonetheless, these typical features can be altered by extrinsic factors, such as hypo fractionation/acceleration of the dose, multiple surgical procedures, chemotherapy especially mega therapy, or neurotoxic drugs. Conversely, hyperfractionated regimens that take into account protracted half-time repair of sublethal damages to the CNS, as well as sophisticated estimates of the dose to the cord and QA programs during the treatment course minimize such risks. (authors)

  18. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Small bowel; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: intestin grele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Pointreau, Y.; Barillot, I. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHRU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Roche-Forestier, S. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France); Barillot, I. [Universite Francois-Rabelais, centre de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France)

    2010-07-15

    The small bowel is a hollow organ involved in the transit and absorption of food. In relation to its anatomical location, a significant amount of this organ is exposed in whole or in part to ionizing radiation in external radiotherapy during abdominal or pelvic irradiation either for primary cancers or metastasis. The acute functional changes during external beam radiation are mainly leading to diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating. The main late side effects of irradiation of the small intestine are chronic diarrhea, malabsorption with steatorrhoea, abdominal spasms, intestinal obstruction, bleeding and fistulas. The architecture of the small intestine may be considered as parallel with a significant correlation between the irradiated volume of small bowel and the likelihood of acute toxicity, whatever the dose. The literature analysis recommends to consider the volume of small bowel receiving 15 Gy (threshold of 100 to 200 cm{sup 3}) but also 30 and 50 Gy (thresholds of 35 to 300 cm{sup 3}, depending on the level of dose considered). Modern techniques of conformal radiotherapy with modulated intensity will probably have beneficial impact on small bowel toxicity. (authors)

  19. Improving Outcomes for Esophageal Cancer using Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuong, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yu, Jen; Badiyan, Shahed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Merrell, Kenneth W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mishra, Mark V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays an essential role in the management of esophageal cancer. Because the esophagus is a centrally located thoracic structure there is a need to balance the delivery of appropriately high dose to the target while minimizing dose to nearby critical structures. Radiation dose received by these critical structures, especially the heart and lungs, may lead to clinically significant toxicities, including pneumonitis, pericarditis, and myocardial infarction. Although technological advancements in photon RT delivery like intensity modulated RT have decreased the risk of such toxicities, a growing body of evidence indicates that further risk reductions are achieved with proton beam therapy (PBT). Herein we review the published dosimetric and clinical PBT literature for esophageal cancer, including motion management considerations, the potential for reirradiation, radiation dose escalation, and ongoing esophageal PBT clinical trials. We also consider the potential cost-effectiveness of PBT relative to photon RT.

  20. Proportional counter measurements in neutron therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    Dosimetry for clinical neutron therapy requires a characterization of radiation quality in addition to the specification of absorbed dose. Generally, a very simple approach has been adopted which consists in separating total absorbed dose into neutron and photon fractions. This is explained by the requirement of clinical dosimetry to apply methods suitable for routine measurements, by the lack of generally accepted improved alternatives, and by the fact that radiation quality is only one of several problems in neutron therapy not sufficiently solved. Spectra measured with low-pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (experimental microdosimetry) provide a detailed description of the physical properties of the radiation field at neutron therapy facilities. These descriptions are suitable for explaining the influence of different parameters (collimation, field size, phantom) on radiation quality. Although the physical properties of the radiation field as described by the measured microdosimetric distributions and quantities are not the only properties relevant for radiation effects, in general there are reasons to believe that they provide a suitable radiation quality characterization for the limited range of applications in neutron therapy. (author)

  1. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  2. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  3. Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Kyu; Kim, Jae Choel [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    Purpose : A retrospective analysis for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma who were treated with radiation was performed to assess the results of treatment and patterns of failure, and to identify the factors that might influence survival. Methods and Materials : From March 1985 through June 1993, 53 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma were treated with either radiation therapy alone or combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Hospital. Patients' ages ranged from 31 to 73 years with a median age of 54 years. There were 47 men and 6 women. Forty-two patients (79.2%) had squamous cell carcinoma, 10 patients (18.9%) had undifferentiated carcinoma and 1 patient (1.9%) had adenoid cystic carcinoma. There were 2 patients with stage I 12 patients with stage II, 12 patients with stage III and 27 patients with stage IV. According to the TNM classification, patients were distributed as follows: T1 7, T2 2, T3 10, T4 7, TX 1, and N0 17, N1 13, N2 21, N3 2. The primary tumor sites were tonsillar region in 36 patients (67.9%) base of the tongue in 12 patients (22.6%), and soft palate in 5 patients (9.4%). Twenty-five patients were treated with radiation therapy alone and twenty-eight patients were treated with one to three courses of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy. Chemotherapeutic regimens used were either CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) or CVB (cisplatin, vincristine and bleomycin), Radiation therapy was delivered 180-200 cGy daily,five times a week using 6 MV X-ray with or without 8-10 MeV electron beams. A tumor dose ranged from 4500 cGy to 7740 cGy with a median dose of 7100 cGy. The follow-up time ranged from 4months to 99 months with a median of 21 months. Results : Thrity-seven patients (69.8%) achieved a CR (complete response) and PR (partial response) in 16 patients (30.2%) after radiation therapy. The overall survival rates were 47% at 2 years and 42% at

  4. Radiation protection at hadron therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelliccioni, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological Hadron-therapy is currently under construction in Pavia. It is designed for the treatment of deep-seated tumours (up to a depth of 27 cm of water equivalent) with proton and C-ion beams as well as for both clinical and radio-biological research. The particles will be accelerated by a 7-MeV u -1 LINAC injector and a 400-MeV u -1 synchrotron. In the first phase of the project, three treatment rooms will be in operation, equipped with four fixed beams, three horizontal and one vertical. The accelerators are currently undergoing commissioning. The main radiation protection problems encountered (shielding, activation, etc.) are hereby illustrated and discussed in relation to the constraints set by the Italian national authorities. (authors)

  5. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  6. Salvage proton beam therapy for recurrent iris melanoma: outcome and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechardt, Aline I; Klein, Julian P; Cordini, Dino; Heufelder, Jens; Rehak, Matus; Seibel, Ira; Joussen, Antonia M

    2018-02-20

    This study aims to analyze the effect of salvage proton beam therapy for the treatment of recurrent iris melanoma. In this clinical case series, we retrospectively analyzed the data of eight patients who underwent proton beam therapy of the whole anterior segment as salvage therapy between 2000 and 2016 for recurrent iris melanoma after resection, ruthenium brachytherapy, or sector proton beam therapy. Two patients received salvage proton beam therapy for repeated tumor relapse. All patients were observed and prepared for proton beam therapy at the Charité and irradiated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin where they received 50 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) in four daily fractions. We investigated survival rates and ocular outcome. Median follow-up after salvage proton beam therapy was 39 months. No local recurrence was detected during follow-up. One patient died from hepatic metastases 5.5 years after salvage therapy. Secondary glaucoma occurred in seven out of eight patients during follow-up. Two patients had chronic corneal erosion and two other patients presented with corneal decompensation, necessitating Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), and perforating keratoplasty. Median visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR before salvage proton beam therapy and 0.7 logMAR at the end of follow-up. Whole anterior segment salvage proton beam therapy has effectively controlled recurrent iris melanoma in our patients, but has been associated with a high incidence of radiation-induced corneal impairment and secondary glaucoma requiring extensive secondary treatment.

  7. Better Efficacy of Synchrotron Spatially Microfractionated Radiation Therapy Than Uniform Radiation Therapy on Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, Audrey, E-mail: audrey.m.bouchet@gmail.com [Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Prezado, Yolanda [Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); El Atifi, Michèle [Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Rogalev, Léonid; Le Clec' h, Céline [Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Laissue, Jean Albert [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Pelletier, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.pelletier@ujf-grenoble.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Le Duc, Géraldine [Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is based on the spatial fractionation of the incident, highly focused synchrotron beam into arrays of parallel microbeams, typically a few tens of microns wide and depositing several hundred grays. This irradiation modality was shown to have a high therapeutic impact on tumors, especially in intracranial locations. However, mechanisms responsible for such a property are not fully understood. Methods and Materials: Thanks to recent progress in dosimetry, we compared the effect of MRT and synchrotron broad beam (BB) radiation therapy delivered at comparable doses (equivalent to MRT valley dose) on tumor growth control and on classical radiobiological functions by histologic evaluation and/or transcriptomic analysis. Results: MRT significantly improved survival of rats bearing 9L intracranial glioma compared with BB radiation therapy delivered at a comparable dose (P<.001); the efficacy of MRT and BB radiation therapy was similar when the MRT dose was half that of BB. The greater efficacy of MRT was not correlated with a difference in cell proliferation (Mki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen) or in transcriptomic stimulation of angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor A or tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 2) but was correlated with a higher cell death rate (factor for apoptosis signals) and higher recruitment of macrophages (tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 1 and CD68 transcripts) a few days after MRT. Conclusions: These results show the superiority of MRT over BB radiation therapy when applied at comparable doses, suggesting that spatial fractionation is responsible for a specific and particularly efficient tissue response. The higher induction of cell death and immune cell activation in brain tumors treated by MRT may be involved in such responses.

  8. Better Efficacy of Synchrotron Spatially Microfractionated Radiation Therapy Than Uniform Radiation Therapy on Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Prezado, Yolanda; El Atifi, Michèle; Rogalev, Léonid; Le Clec'h, Céline; Laissue, Jean Albert; Pelletier, Laurent; Le Duc, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is based on the spatial fractionation of the incident, highly focused synchrotron beam into arrays of parallel microbeams, typically a few tens of microns wide and depositing several hundred grays. This irradiation modality was shown to have a high therapeutic impact on tumors, especially in intracranial locations. However, mechanisms responsible for such a property are not fully understood. Methods and Materials: Thanks to recent progress in dosimetry, we compared the effect of MRT and synchrotron broad beam (BB) radiation therapy delivered at comparable doses (equivalent to MRT valley dose) on tumor growth control and on classical radiobiological functions by histologic evaluation and/or transcriptomic analysis. Results: MRT significantly improved survival of rats bearing 9L intracranial glioma compared with BB radiation therapy delivered at a comparable dose (P<.001); the efficacy of MRT and BB radiation therapy was similar when the MRT dose was half that of BB. The greater efficacy of MRT was not correlated with a difference in cell proliferation (Mki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen) or in transcriptomic stimulation of angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor A or tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 2) but was correlated with a higher cell death rate (factor for apoptosis signals) and higher recruitment of macrophages (tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 1 and CD68 transcripts) a few days after MRT. Conclusions: These results show the superiority of MRT over BB radiation therapy when applied at comparable doses, suggesting that spatial fractionation is responsible for a specific and particularly efficient tissue response. The higher induction of cell death and immune cell activation in brain tumors treated by MRT may be involved in such responses.

  9. Radiation therapy and herpes zoster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Itsuo; Matsushima, Hideno; Yamada, Teruyo; Moriya, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between herpes zoster and radiation therapy was discussed and the combination of herpes zoster with malignancies was observed. Reported were five cases of herpes zoster (four breast and one lung carcinoma) out of 317 cases of malignancies which were irradiated in our clinic and include considerations about the etiologic relationship. (J.P.N.)

  10. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl JR., Robert R.

    1990-03-06

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  11. Weekly monitoring of the effects of conventional external beam radiation therapy on patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer by means of blood cells count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, Maria da Salete Fonseca dos Santos [Hospital Universitario Oswaldo Cruz, Recife, PE (Brazil). Radiotherapy Unit]. E-mail: salete@lundgren.med.br; Cavalcanti, Maria do Socorro de Mendonca [Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Sampaio, Divaldo de Almeida [Centro de Hematologia de Pernambuco (Hemope), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the necessity of weekly monitoring by means of leukocyte and platelet counts of patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer submitted to conventional radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A hundred and one adult patients with cancer of head and neck (n = 11), chest (n = 35) and pelvis (n = 55), submitted to radiotherapy were assessed by means of leukocyte and platelet counts on a weekly basis, with a comparison between the results before and during the treatment and in correlation with the area treated, patient's sex and age group. Results: The most significant decrease in leukocytes was observed in the fourth week, when lymphocytes, total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets presented a decrease of 53.5%, 26.8%, 19.4%, 22.2% and 14.6%, respectively, in comparison with the values found before the beginning of the therapy. Geometric means for pelvis during the treatment were lower than those for chest, and head and neck. Lymphocytes demonstrated to be more sensitive to radiation therapy. No alteration was found in leukocyte or platelet counts in correlation with patients' sex or age. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, weekly leukocyte and platelet counts do not seem to be useful in the assessment patients submitted to conventional radiotherapy for localized cancer. (author)

  12. Radiation dosimetry for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Hee

    2001-01-01

    The radionuclide therapy is a protocol for tumor control by administering radionuclides as the cytotoxic agents. Radionuclides concentrated at the site of cancerous lesion are expected to kill the cancerous cells with minimal injury to the normal tissue. The efficacy of every radionuclide treatment can be evaluated by examining the toxicity to the lesion differentiated from that to the normal tissue. Radiation dosimerty is the procedure of quantitating the energy absorbed by target volumes of interest. Dosimetric information plays an indicator of the expected radiation damage and thus the therapeutic efficacy. This paper summarizes the dosimetric aspects in radionuclide therapy in terms of radionuclides of use, radionuclides of use, radiation dosimetry methodology and considerations for each treatment in practical use

  13. Ultra-High Density Electron Beams for Beam Radiation and Beam Plasma Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Scott; Frigola, Pedro; Gibson, David J; Hartemann, Fred V; Jacob, Jeremy S; Lim, Jae; Musumeci, Pietro; Rosenzweig, James E; Travish, Gil; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    Current and future applications of high brightness electron beams, which include advanced accelerators such as the plasma wake-field accelerator (PWFA) and beam-radiation interactions such as inverse-Compton scattering (ICS), require both transverse and longitudinal beam sizes on the order of tens of microns. Ultra-high density beams may be produced at moderate energy (50 MeV) by compression and subsequent strong focusing of low emittance, photoinjector sources. We describe the implementation of this method used at LLNL's PLEIADES ICS x-ray source in which the photoinjector-generated beam has been compressed to 300 fsec duration using the velocity bunching technique and focused to 20 μm rms size using an extremely high gradient, permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) focusing system.

  14. Nano-scale processes behind ion-beam cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Garcia, Gustavo; Mason, Nigel; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-04-01

    This topical issue collates a series of papers based on new data reported at the third Nano-IBCT Conference of the COST Action MP1002: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy, held in Boppard, Germany, from October 27th to October 31st, 2014. The Nano-IBCT COST Action was launched in December 2010 and brought together more than 300 experts from different disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology) with specialists in radiation damage of biological matter from hadron-therapy centres, and medical institutions. This meeting followed the first and the second conferences of the Action held in October 2011 in Caen, France and in May 2013 in Sopot, Poland respectively. This conference series provided a focus for the European research community and has highlighted the pioneering research into the fundamental processes underpinning ion beam cancer therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo Garcia and Eugene Surdutovich.

  15. Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy ... National Cancer Institute website. Radiation therapy and you: support for people with cancer. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/radiationttherapy.pdf . Updated May 2007. Accessed December ...

  16. Technological progress in radiation therapy for brain tumors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vernimmen, Frederik Jozef

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a good therapeutic ratio the radiation dose to the tumor should be as high as possible with the lowest possible dose to the surrounding normal tissue. This is especially the case for brain tumors. Technological ad- vancements in diagnostic imaging, dose calculations, and radiation delivery systems, combined with a better un- derstanding of the pathophysiology of brain tumors have led to improvements in the therapeutic results. The widely used technology of delivering 3-D conformal therapy with photon beams (gamma rays) produced by Li-near Accelerators has progressed into the use of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Particle beams have been used for several decades for radiotherapy because of their favorable depth dose characteristics. The introduction of clinically dedicated proton beam therapy facilities has improved the access for cancer patients to this treatment. Proton therapy is of particular interest for pediatric malignancies. These technical improvements are further enhanced by the evolution in tumor physiology imaging which allows for improved delineation of the tumor. This in turn opens the potential to adjust the radiation dose to maximize the radiobiological effects. The advances in both imaging and radiation therapy delivery will be discussed.

  17. Results of radiation therapy on cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagai, Teruo; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Tsuchiya, Miwako; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Niibe, Hideo

    1989-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1985, a total of 298 patients with cervical cancer were treated by radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology, Gunma University Hospital. Another 111 patients were treated with irradiation as a follow up to surgery; 69 for prophylactic reasons and 42 to treat residual tumors. Patients treated with irradiation alone were given a combination of external irradiation to the pelvis and low dose rate intracavitary irradiation. Patients treated post-operatively were given intracavitary electron beam irradiation of the resected end of the vagina, and external irradiation of the entire pelvis. The following results were obtained: In patients treated by radiation therapy alone, the relative 5-year survival rates according to clinical stage were: 108% for patients with stage I cancer, 90% for stage II, 62% for stage III, and 31% for stage IV. Stage IV patients with no evidence of hematogenous metastasis could be candidates for radical therapy. Local recurrence was observed in 13% of stage II and III patients, attributed to inadequate intracavitary treatment and the histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Severe complications occurred in only 12 (4%) of the 298 patients treated with irradiation alone. The relative 5-year survival rates for patients treated with post-operative irradiation were 91% for patients treated prophylactically and 49% for patients treated for residual tumor. Patients treated with post-operative irradiation for residual tumor at the resected end of the vagina showed a high cumulative survival rate of 77%. Since urinary sequelae developed in only 4 patients, it would seem that electron beam irradiation of the resected end of the vagina is a safe and effective method of therapy. (author)

  18. Fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor for proton therapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-06-18

    In proton therapy dosimetry, a fiber-optic radiation sensor incorporating a scintillator must undergo complicated correction processes due to the quenching effect of the scintillator. To overcome the drawbacks of the fiber-optic radiation sensor, we proposed an innovative method using the Cerenkov radiation generated in plastic optical fibers. In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor without an organic scintillator to measure Cerenkov radiation induced by therapeutic proton beams. Bragg peaks and spread-out Bragg peaks of proton beams were measured using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and the results were compared with those of an ionization chamber and a fiber-optic radiation sensor incorporating an organic scintillator. From the results, we could obtain the Bragg peak and the spread-out Bragg peak of proton beams without quenching effects induced by the scintillator, and these results were in good agreement with those of the ionization chamber. We also measured the Cerenkov radiation generated from the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor as a function of the dose rate of the proton beam.

  19. Cutaneous complication after electron beam therapy in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jalilian

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the second cause of death among them. There are several treatment methods for breast cancer, one of which is radiation therapy. There are two important methods of radiation therapy: tangential field and single oppositional field. Main goal of this study is evaluation of factors that have a role in producing acute side effects such as skin burning in breast cancer patients treated by electron beam,in order to decrease these side effects. Methods: From 1/2003 through 7/2004, 200 consecutive patients were evaluated during 18 months in seid-al-shohad hospital, whose mean age was 49 years old. In this study a questionnaire was used including some questions about personal profile such as patient's name, address, registration number, age and some other factors. All patients who were candidated to enter in this investigation filled out the questionnaire at the end of radiation therapy. The patients were examined and their skin burning grades were evaluated by RTOG scale. Data were analyzed by chi-square test using SPSS 11 software. Results: None of patients showed grades O or 4 of burning. 31.5 % of Patients showed grade 1, 64.5 % showed grade 2, 4 % showed grade 3 of burning. There was statistically significant correlation between posterior axillary field and skin burning and there wasnot any meaning between the other factors. Conclusion: It is necessary to pay more attention to posterior axillary field planning including field size, location, photon energy, depth and dose of treatment. Keywords: breast cancer, electron beam radiation therapy, skin burning

  20. Analysis of motion of the rectum during preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy for rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Sakumi, Akira; Haga, Akihiro; Otomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to quantify the inter-fractional motion of the rectum and the rectal and bladder volumes using CBCT scans taken during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Also, assessment was made for a better margin for simultaneous integrated boost - intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) for rectal cancer. There were 32 patients in this study undergoing preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. Each rectum and bladder was contoured on all planning CTs and CBCTs (day 1, 7, 13, 19, 25). The target volume was configured by adding margins (0, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 mm) to the rectum on planning CT. The respective percentage of rectal volume that exceeds the target volume was calculated for each of these margins. The percentage of bladder volume that exceeds the bladder volume in the planning CT and motion of the center of gravity of rectum were also analyzed. Planning CTs and series of each 5 CBCTs for 32 patients were analyzed in this study. The rectal volume tended to shrink week after week. The mean values (± SD) in the 32 series per patient of the percentage of rectum on the CBCTs exceeding target volume in which the margins of 0, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 mm were added to the rectum on planning CT were 20.7 ± 12.5%, 7.2 ± 8.3%, 3.9 ± 5.9%, 2.1 ± 3.9%, 0.7 ± 1.8%, and 0.1 ± 0.3%, respectively. No association was seen between the percentage of changes of bladder volume and motion of rectal centroid. In this study, we estimated the motion of the rectum using planning CT and CBCT. Ten to fifteen mm is a sufficient margin for the rectum during SIB-IMRT for rectal cancer in the supine position

  1. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Igaki, Hiroshi; Hata, Masaharu; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A

  2. Fiber-optic dosimeters for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enbang; Archer, James

    2017-10-01

    According to the figures provided by the World Health Organization, cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.8 million deaths in 2015. Radiation therapy, which uses x-rays to destroy or injure cancer cells, has become one of the most important modalities to treat the primary cancer or advanced cancer. The newly developed microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), which uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of x-ray microbeams (typically 50 μm wide and separated by 400 μm) produced by synchrotron sources, represents a new paradigm in radiotherapy and has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies on different animal models. Measurements of the absorbed dose distribution of microbeams are vitally important for clinical acceptance of MRT and for developing quality assurance systems for MRT, hence are a challenging and important task for radiation dosimetry. On the other hand, during the traditional LINAC based radiotherapy and breast cancer brachytherapy, skin dose measurements and treatment planning also require a high spatial resolution, tissue equivalent, on-line dosimeter that is both economical and highly reliable. Such a dosimeter currently does not exist and remains a challenge in the development of radiation dosimetry. High resolution, water equivalent, optical and passive x-ray dosimeters have been developed and constructed by using plastic scintillators and optical fibers. The dosimeters have peak edge-on spatial resolutions ranging from 50 to 500 microns in one dimension, with a 10 micron resolution dosimeter under development. The developed fiber-optic dosimeters have been test with both LINAC and synchrotron x-ray beams. This work demonstrates that water-equivalent and high spatial resolution radiation detection can be achieved with scintillators and optical fiber systems. Among other advantages, the developed fiber-optic probes are also passive, energy independent, and radiation hard.

  3. Transperineal ultrasound-guided implantation of electromagnetic transponders in the prostatic fossa for localization and tracking during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garsa, Adam A; Verma, Vivek; Michalski, Jeff M; Gay, Hiram A

    2014-01-01

    To describe a transperineal ultrasound-guided technique for implantation of electromagnetic transponders into the prostatic fossa. Patients were placed in the dorsal lithotomy position, and local anesthetic was administered. On ultrasound, the bladder, urethra, vesicourethral anastomosis, rectum, and the prostatic fossa were carefully identified. Three transponders were implanted into the prostatic fossa under ultrasound guidance in a triangular configuration and implantation was verified by fluoroscopy. Patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation approximately 1 week later. All patients in this study were subsequently treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the prostatic fossa. From 2008 to 2012, 180 patients received transperineal implantation of electromagnetic transponders into the prostatic fossa and subsequently received IMRT. There were no cases of severe hematuria or rectal bleeding requiring intervention. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Three patients (1.7%) had a transponder missing on the subsequent CT simulation. Thirteen patients (7.3%) had transponder migration with a geometric residual that exceeded 2 mm for 3 consecutive days (5.6%) or rotation that exceeded 10 degrees for 5 consecutive days (1.7%). These patients underwent a resimulation CT scan to identify the new transponder coordinates. A transperineal technique for implantation of electromagnetic transponders into the prostatic fossa is safe and well tolerated, with no severe toxicity after implantation. There is a low rate of transponder loss or migration.

  4. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  5. Radiation therapy of gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of three parts: General Principles; Clinical Applications; and Special Topics. Some of the papers are: Introduction to Basic Radiobiology; Staging and Work-up Procedures for Patients with Gynecological Cancers; Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Cancer of the Cervix; Role of Interstitial Implantation in Gynecological Cancer; Role of Radiocolloids in Gynecological Cancer; Radiosensitizers and Protectors; and Management of Lymphoma Associated with Pregnancy

  6. Treatment charts in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macia, M.; De Blas, R.; Monfa, C.; Bonet, A.; Rubio, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The radiotherapy treatment chart (dose prescription, set-up parameters, dose computation and daily dose recording form) represents an important working tool in radiotherapy, not only as a compilation of data, but also as a method of communication among physicians, physicists and technicians. In addition to administrative and medical data, physical and simulation data that are indispensable for the daily accurate reproduction of the therapy procedures should be recorded, as well as accurate daily entries of the fractional and cumulative absorbed doses. Moreover, any radiation therapy quality assurance programme must rely on the accessibility of the radiation treatment history and a correct record of the therapy protocol in order to be verifiable. We have analysed the treatment charts of 92 European Departments of Radiation Oncology, with the aim of identifying their salient characteristics and data recorded. The study shows strong differences among the charts analysed, not only in the amount of information recorded, but also in the kind of data and concepts used. (author) 6 refs., 1 fig

  7. Multibeam radiation therapy treatment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manens, J.P.; Le Gall, G.; Chenal, C.; Ben Hassel, M.; Fresne, F.; Barillot, C.; Gibaud, B.; Lemoine, D.; Bouliou, A.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A software package has been developed for multibeam radiation therapy treatment application. We present in this study a computer-assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: i), an analytical stage for setting up the large volume via 2D and 3D displays; ii), a planning stage for issue of a treatment strategy including dosimetric simulations; and iii), a treatment stage to drive the target volume to the radiation unit isocenter. The combined use of stereotactic methods and multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes target definition and cognition of structure environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (the stereotactic frame) guarantees optimal distribution of the dose, computed by the original 3D volumetric algorithm. A computer-driven chair-framework cluster was designed to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter [fr

  8. Alanine EPR dosimeter response in proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.; Serago, C.; Desrosiers, M.; Bensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    We report a series of measurements directed to assess the suitability of alanine as a mailable dosimeter for dosimetry quality assurance of proton radiation therapy beams. These measurements include dose-response of alanine at 140 MeV, and comparison of response vs energy with a parallel plate ionization chamber. All irradiations were made at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, and the dosimeters were read at NIST. The results encourage us that alanine could be expected to serve as a mailable dosimeter with systematic error due to differential energy response no greater than 3% when doses of 25 Gy are used. (Author)

  9. Late complications of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki, Norie [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  10. Late complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie

    1998-01-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  11. Smith-Purcell Radiation in View of Particle Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, G

    2003-01-01

    The development of the next generation high quality electron beams which are necessary for future high luminosity linear colliders and short wavelengths free electron lasers requires sensitive and non-destructive beam diagnostic techniques. In this context Smith-Purcell radiation which is generated when a charged particle beam passes close to the surface of a periodic structure (diffraction grating) is under discussion as a compact and inexpensive beam profile monitor. In order to study the basic emission process of Smith-Purcell radiation also in view of possible applications for particle beam diagnostics, experimental studies were performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI in the visible spectral region with a microfocused 855 MeV electron beam. The radiation was separated from background components, as diffracted synchrotron radiation and transition radiation generated by electrons scratching the grating surface, by exploiting their specific emission characteristics. These are the narrow emission cone in the ...

  12. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  13. Applications of Machine Learning for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamoto, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been highly advanced as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) by making advantage of image engineering technologies. Recently, novel frameworks based on image engineering technologies as well as machine learning technologies have been studied for sophisticating the radiation therapy. In this review paper, the author introduces several researches of applications of machine learning for radiation therapy. For examples, a method to determine the threshold values for standardized uptake value (SUV) for estimation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in positron emission tomography (PET) images, an approach to estimate the multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors between treatment plans and radiation delivery time, and prediction frameworks for esophageal stenosis and radiation pneumonitis risk after radiation therapy are described. Finally, the author introduces seven issues that one should consider when applying machine learning models to radiation therapy.

  14. Perineural invasion and Gleason 7-10 tumors predict increased failure in prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml treated with conformal external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Penny R.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Patchefsky, Arthur; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: It has been well established that prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA<10 ng/ml enjoy excellent bNED control when treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy. This report identifies predictors of failure for patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml. These predictors are then used to define favorable and unfavorable prognostic subgroups of patients for which bNED control is compared. Methods and Materials: Between 3/87 and 11/94, 266 patients with T1-T3NXM0 prostate cancer and pretreatment PSA values <10 ng/ml were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy. Median central axis dose and median follow-up for the entire group was 72 Gy (63-79 Gy) and 48 months (2-120 months). Predictors of bNED control were evaluated univariately using Kaplan-Meier methodology and the log-rank test and multivariately using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Covariates considered were pretreatment PSA, palpation stage, Gleason score, presence of perineual invasion (PNI) and central axis dose. Independent predictors based on multivariate results were then used to stratify the patients into two prognostic groups for which bNED control was compared. bNED failure is defined as PSA ≥ 1.5 ng/ml and rising on two consecutive determinations. Results: Univariate analysis according to pretreatment and treatment factors for bNED control demonstrates a statistically significant improvement in 5-year bNED control for patients with Gleason score 2-6 vs. 7-10, patients without evidence of perineural invasion (PNI) vs. those with PNI, and patients with palpation stage T1/T2AB vs. T2C/T3. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that Gleason score (p = 0.0496), PNI (p = 0.0008) and palpation stage (p = 0.0153) are significant independent predictors of bNED control. Based on these factors, patients are stratified into a more favorable prognosis group (Gleason 2-6, no PNI, and stage T1/T2AB, n = 172) and a less favorable prognosis group (Gleason 7-10 or PNI or T2C

  15. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: charged particles produced by 4He and 12C ion beams in a PMMA target at large angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, A.; Battistoni, G.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Patera, V.

    2018-03-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams are used in the clinical practice for external radiotherapy treatments achieving, for selected indications, promising and superior clinical results with respect to x-ray based radiotherapy. Other ions, like \

  16. Automatic optimisation of beam orientations using the simplex algorithm and optimisation of quality control using statistical process control (S.P.C.) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (I.M.R.T.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, K.

    2008-11-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (I.M.R.T.) is currently considered as a technique of choice to increase the local control of the tumour while reducing the dose to surrounding organs at risk. However, its routine clinical implementation is partially held back by the excessive amount of work required to prepare the patient treatment. In order to increase the efficiency of the treatment preparation, two axes of work have been defined. The first axis concerned the automatic optimisation of beam orientations. We integrated the simplex algorithm in the treatment planning system. Starting from the dosimetric objectives set by the user, it can automatically determine the optimal beam orientations that best cover the target volume while sparing organs at risk. In addition to time sparing, the simplex results of three patients with a cancer of the oropharynx, showed that the quality of the plan is also increased compared to a manual beam selection. Indeed, for an equivalent or even a better target coverage, it reduces the dose received by the organs at risk. The second axis of work concerned the optimisation of pre-treatment quality control. We used an industrial method: Statistical Process Control (S.P.C.) to retrospectively analyse the absolute dose quality control results performed using an ionisation chamber at Centre Alexis Vautrin (C.A.V.). This study showed that S.P.C. is an efficient method to reinforce treatment security using control charts. It also showed that our dose delivery process was stable and statistically capable for prostate treatments, which implies that a reduction of the number of controls can be considered for this type of treatment at the C.A.V.. (author)

  17. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Eye structures; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'oeil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, V.; Dendale, R. [Departement d' oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    The radiation dose received by the eye depends on the pathology, tumour location (ocular globe, orbit, neighboring structures) and the radiation technique. The major complication is the complete loss of vision, which is often multi-factorial. This article, based on a literature review, describes the radiation effects and the tolerance doses for all eye structures: cornea, lens, retina, optic nerves, orbit and ocular adnexa. (authors)

  18. Basal cell carcinoma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Ishida, Yasuhisa; Tahara, Shinya; Osaki, Takeo; Nomura, Tadashi; Ejiri, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    We reported two cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that developed after radiation therapy. A 50-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy for the treatment of intracranial germinoma at the age of 22, presented with several tumors around the radiation ulcer. All tumors showed BCC. A 33-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy on the head for the treatment of leukemia at the age of 2, presented with a black nodule within the area of irradiation. The tumor showed BCC. We discuss the occurrence of BCC after radiation therapy. (author)

  19. Radiation therapy of the uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Cervical and endometrial cancer of the uterus, and ovarian cancer are three major malignant diseases in gynecology in Japan. These diagnosis and therapy are almost established. In uterine cervical cancer, radiation therapy and surgery of these diseases are two main treatment methods, and both treatment results are almost the same. And radiation therapy is also used as postoperative treatment to patients with high risk factors. In endometrial cancer, surgery is main therapy. Radiation therapy is undergone only to medically inoperable cases preoperative radiation is widely carried out in Europe and America, but almost none in Japan. Postoperative irradiation is adapted to the cases with high risk factors. But recent advance of chemotherapy changes the importance of radiation therapy in such patients. I review the literatures of radiation therapy of uterine cervical cancer and of endometrial cancer. (author)

  20. Radiation therapy system and its accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuzuru

    1990-01-01

    Three prerequisites for increasing accuracy of radiation therapy are considered. Firstly, every irradiation must be performed without errors according to irradiation conditions. Secondly, accurate quality assurance of equipments for radiation, diagnosis, radiation planning, and dosimetry must be maintained. Thirdly, new radiation planning system and treatment equipments with the introduction of computers are required. The purpose of this report is to discuss accuracy of radiation therapy, focusing on (I) the current status of radiation therapy system developed at the National Institute of Radiation Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and on (II) basic items and quality assurance for increasing accuracy of radiation therapy. Fast neutron therapy has been started with the NIRS cyclotron collimator in November 1975. The advent of X-ray CT has contributed to radiation therapy planning, in that it visualizes the inside structure of the patient stereoscopically. An optical positioning apparatus with CT scanner and a dedicated CT simulator have been developed, allowing the realization of more accurate conformation radiotherapy. Error or uncertainty poses a problem in radiation therapy and treatment system. The ICRU Report 24 describes that standard errors for biological changes in tolerance radiation doses should be within ±5%. The AAPM Report 13 describes that uncertainty for dosimetry with phantoms or dose distribution computation must be less than 2.5% and 4.2%, respectively. It is recommended that quality assurance program be introduced to decrease errors in radiation therapy. (N.K.)

  1. DNA repair related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.

    1979-01-01

    The DNA excision repair capacity of peripheral human lymphocytes after radiation therapy has been analyzed. Different forms of application of the radiation during the therapy have been taken into account. No inhibition of repair was found if cells were allowed a certain amount of accomodation to radiation, either by using lower doses or longer application times. (G.G.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Radiation Therapy for External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: Evaluation of Delivered Dose and Intrafractional Cavity Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Curcuru, Austen; Sona, Karl; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Ochoa, Laura; Mutic, Sasa; Zoberi, Imran; Li, H. Harold; Thomas, Maria A., E-mail: mthomas@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired before each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.

  3. Method of radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodes, L.

    1976-01-01

    A technique of radiation therapy treatment planning designed to allow the assignment of dosage limits directly to chosen points in the computer-displayed cross-section of the patient. These dosage limits are used as constraints in a linear programming attempt to solve for beam strengths, minimizing integral dosage. If a feasible plan exists, the optimized plan will be displayed for approval as an isodose pattern. If there is no feasible plan, the operator/therapist can designate some of the point dosage constraints as ''relaxed.'' Linear programming will then optimize for minimum deviation at the relaxed points. This process can be iterated and new points selected until an acceptable plan is realized. In this manner the plan is optimized for uniformity as well as overall low dosage. 6 claims, 6 drawing figures

  4. Database for radiation therapy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, S.; Cosby, S.; Leszczynski, K.; Chu, T.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a database for images acquired during simulation and verification of radiation treatments. Simulation images originate as planning films that are digitized with a video camera, or through direct digitization of fluoroscopic images. Verification images may also be digitized from portal films or acquired with an on-line portal imaging system. Images are classified by the patient, the fraction, the field direction, static or dynamic (movie) sequences, and the type of processing applied. Additional parameters indicate whether the source is a simulation or treatment, whether images are digitized film or real-time acquisitions, and whether treatment is portal or double exposure for beam localization. Examples are presented for images acquired, processed, stored, and displayed with on-line portal imaging system (OPIUM) and digital simulation system (FLIP)

  5. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishan, Amar U. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S. [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  6. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1996-01-01

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 (by Nordic Association of Clinica Physics) to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ''Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy''. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed

  7. Neutron-Activatable Nanoparticles for Intraperitoneal Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Derek; Lu, Xiuling

    2017-01-01

    Intraperitoneal internal radiation therapy is a cancer treatment option that is employed in situations where surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy are not amenable for patients. However, exposure of noncancerous tissues to radiation continues to be a hindrance to safe and effective treatment of patients. In addition, reducing prolonged radiation exposure of personnel during preparation of internal radiation therapy agents makes their manufacture complicated and hazardous. Developments in nanotechnology have provided a platform for targeted treatments that combine dual imaging and treatment capabilities all in one package, while also being robust enough to withstand the intense stresses faced during neutron activation. Here, we describe a method for synthesizing neutron activatable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for use in radiotherapy of metastatic peritoneal cancers while limiting personal exposure to radioactive materials, limiting the leakage of radioactive isotopes caused by nanoparticle degradation during neutron activation, and increasing cancer tissue specificity of radiation.

  8. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Celis, M.; Larraga, J.

    2004-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields

  9. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J; Hill, G; Spiegel, J; Ye, J; Mehta, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window

  10. The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bell, A. J.; Dabrowski, A.; Guthoff, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hempel, M.; Henschel, H.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Müller, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Pfeiffer, D.; Ryjov, V.; Stickland, D.; Schimdt, R.; Walsh, R.

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the two large, general purpose experiments situated at the LHC at CERN. As with all high energy physics experiments, knowledge of the beam conditions and luminosity is of vital importance. The Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System (BRM) is installed in CMS to protect the detector and to provide feedback to LHC on beam conditions. It is composed of several sub-systems that measure the radiation level close to or inside all sub-detectors, monitor the beam halo conditions with different time resolution, support beam tuning and protect CMS in case of adverse beam conditions by firing a beam abort signal. This paper presents three of the BRM subsystems: the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F), which is designed for fast flux monitoring, measuring with nanosecond time resolution, both the beam halo and collision products; the Beam Scintillator Counters (BSC), that provide hit rates and time information of beam halo and collision products; and the Beam Conditions Monitors (BCM) used as a protection system that can trigger a beam dump when beam losses occur in order to prevent damage to the pixel and tracker detectors. A description of the systems and a characterization on the basis of data collected during LHC operation is presented.

  11. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  12. Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms Blogs and Newsletters Health Communications Publications Reports Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Radiation ... Copy This booklet covers: Questions and Answers About Radiation Therapy. Answers common questions, such as what radiation therapy ...

  13. LHCB: A LHCb-VELO module as beam quality monitor for proton therapy beam at the Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology

    CERN Multimedia

    Casse, G; Patel, G D; Smith, N A; Kacperek, A; Marsland, B

    2010-01-01

    The progress in detector technology, driven by the needs of particle tracking and vertexing in the present LHC and its upgrade (sLHC), has led to the design of silicon sensors with low mass, high granularity, high speed and unprecedented radiation hardness. The sensors designed for such a harsh environment can be profitably used for instrumenting the control systems of therapeutic hadron beams. The high granularity and readout clock speed are well suited for monitoring continuous beam currents. The low mass allows reduced interference with the beam whilst monitoring its profile with high precision. The high resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionising particles allows monitoring of the beam spot position by measurement of the halo in real time, without any interference with the beam spot used in therapy.

  14. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Esophagus; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'oesophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Denis, F.; Dupuis, O. [Centre Jean-Bernard, clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le-Mans (France); Orain, I. [Service d' anatomie et cytologie pathologiques, hopital Trousseau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Crehange, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2010-07-15

    The esophagus is a musculo-membranous tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. Due to its anatomical location, it can be exposed to ionizing radiation in many external radiotherapy indications. Radiation-induced esophageal mucositis is clinically revealed by dysphagia and odynophagia, and usually begins 3 to 4 weeks after the start of radiation treatment. With the rise of multimodality treatments (e.g., concurrent chemoradiotherapy, dose escalation and accelerated fractionation schemes), esophageal toxicity has become a significant dose-limiting issue. Understanding the predictive factors of esophageal injury may improve the optimal delivery of treatment plans. It may help to minimize the risks, hence increasing the therapeutic ratio. Based on a large literature review, our study describes both early and late radiation-induced esophageal injuries and highlights some of the predictive factors for cervical and thoracic esophagus toxicity. These clinical and dosimetric parameters are numerous but none is consensual. The large number of dosimetric parameters strengthens the need of an overall analysis of the dose/volume histograms. The data provided is insufficient to recommend their routine use to prevent radiation-induced esophagitis. Defining guidelines for the tolerance of the esophagus to ionizing radiation remains essential for a safe and efficient treatment. (authors)

  15. Radiation therapy of peritoneal mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, G.; Recht, A.

    1986-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of peritoneal mesotheliomas remains ill-defined despite its association with the few long-term survivals reported for this disease. The rationale for local therapy is clear as the disease most often is confined to the peritoneal cavity at the time of initial diagnosis and remains there for much of the subsequent course. Effective local treatment of this intra-abdominal disease would likely improve survival. The absence of randomized studies has made analysis of the various treatments of the disease and the few reported success difficult. Nonetheless, scrutiny of the available data may offer insights and guide future clinical trials, as well as the clinician responsible for the treatment of current patients with peritoneal mesothelioma. The radiotherapeutic approach to oncology stresses anatomic considerations in an attempt to understand the patterns of spread of the primary tumor. The observed location and bulk of disease by clinical examination, radiologic study, surgical exploration, and autopsy suggest mechanisms of metastases (direct extension, lymphatic or hematogenous). This dictates the administration of radiation that best achieves a successful outcome

  16. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  17. Radiation therapy services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    combined with the components of adequate RT: localis- ing systems (computed tomography (CT) scanners and simulators), planning equipment, radiation machines for both teletherapy and brachytherapy, skilled therapy radiographers, physicists and radiation therapists. A survey was undertaken to determine the adequacy.

  18. Risk analysis of external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvidsson, Marcus

    2011-09-01

    External radiation therapy is carried out via a complex treatment process in which many different groups of staff work together. Much of the work is dependent on and in collaboration with advanced technical equipment. The purpose of the research task has been to identify a process for external radiation therapy and to identify, test and analyze a suitable method for performing risk analysis of external radiation therapy

  19. A Monte Carlo-based treatment-planning tool for ion beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, T T; Dosanjh, M; Ferrari, A; Haberer, T; Parodi, K; Patera, V; Mairan, A

    2013-01-01

    Ion beam therapy, as an emerging radiation therapy modality, requires continuous efforts to develop and improve tools for patient treatment planning (TP) and research applications. Dose and fluence computation algorithms using the Monte Carlo (MC) technique have served for decades as reference tools for accurate dose computations for radiotherapy. In this work, a novel MC-based treatment-planning (MCTP) tool for ion beam therapy using the pencil beam scanning technique is presented. It allows single-field and simultaneous multiple-fields optimization for realistic patient treatment conditions and for dosimetric quality assurance for irradiation conditions at state-of-the-art ion beam therapy facilities. It employs iterative procedures that allow for the optimization of absorbed dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted dose using radiobiological input tables generated by external RBE models. Using a re-implementation of the local effect model (LEM), theMCTP tool is able to perform TP studies u...

  20. Current status of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    External-beam radiation therapy has been one of the treatment options for prostate cancer. The dose response has been observed for a dose range of 64.8-81 Gy. The problem of external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer is that as the dose increases, adverse effects also increase. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) has enabled us to treat patients with up to 72-76 Gy to the prostate, with a relatively acceptable risk of late rectal bleeding. Recently, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to deliver a higher dose to the target with acceptable low rates of rectal and bladder complications. The most important things to keep in mind when using an IMRT technique are that there is a significant trade-off between coverage of the target, avoidance of adjacent critical structures, and the inhomogeneity of the dose within the target. Lastly, even with IMRT, it should be kept in mind that a ''perfect'' plan that creates completely homogeneous coverage of the target volume and zero or small dose to the adjacent organs at risk is not always obtained. Participating in many treatment planning sessions and arranging the beams and beam weights create the best approach to the best IMRT plan. (author)

  1. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16

    treatment volume compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers

  2. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-01-01

    compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18, at

  3. Transverse beam profile reconstruction using synchrotron radiation interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Torino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam size measurements in new generation of synchrotron light sources is a challenging task due to their characteristic small beam emittances and low couplings. Since the late 1990s, synchrotron radiation interferometry (SRI has been used in many accelerators to measure the beam size through the analysis of the spatial coherence of the synchrotron light. However, the standard SRI using a double-aperture system provides the beam size projection in a given direction. For this reason, the beam shape is not fully characterized because information about possible transverse beam tilts is not determined. In this report, we describe a technique to fully reconstruct the transverse beam profile based on a rotating double-pinhole mask, together with experimental results obtained at ALBA under different beam couplings. We also discuss how this method allows us to infer ultrasmall beam sizes in case of limitations of the standard SRI.

  4. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  5. Implementation of MRI gel dosimetry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeck, S.Aa.J.

    1998-12-01

    Gel dosimetry was used together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions in radiation therapy. Two different dosimeters were studied: ferrous- and monomer gel, based on the principles of radiation-induced oxidation and polymerisation, respectively. Single clinical electron and photon beams were evaluated and gel dose distributions were mainly within 2% of conventional detector results. The ferrous-gel was also used for clinical proton beams. A decrease in signal per absorbed dose was found close to the end of the range of the protons (15-20%). This effect was explained as a linear energy transfer dependence, further supported with Monte Carlo simulations. A method for analysing and comparing data from treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurements was developed. The method enables a new pixel by pixel evaluation, isodose comparison and dose volume histogram verification. Two standard clinical radiation therapy procedures were examined using the developed TPS verification method. The treatment regimes included several beams of different radiation qualities. The TPS calculated data were in very good agreement with the dose distribution measured by the ferrous-gel. However, in a beam abutment region, larger dose difference was found. Beam adjustment errors and a minor TPS underestimation of the lateral scatter contribution outside the primary electron beam may explain the discrepancy. The overall uncertainty in the ferrous-gel dose determination was considerably reduced using an optimised MRI acquisition protocol and a new MRI scanner. The relative dose uncertainty was found to be better than 3.3% for all dose levels (95% confidence level). Using the method developed for comparing measured gel data with calculated treatment plans, the gel dosimetry method was proven to be a useful tool for radiation treatment planning verification

  6. Implementation of MRI gel dosimetry in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeck, S.Aa.J

    1998-12-01

    Gel dosimetry was used together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions in radiation therapy. Two different dosimeters were studied: ferrous- and monomer gel, based on the principles of radiation-induced oxidation and polymerisation, respectively. Single clinical electron and photon beams were evaluated and gel dose distributions were mainly within 2% of conventional detector results. The ferrous-gel was also used for clinical proton beams. A decrease in signal per absorbed dose was found close to the end of the range of the protons (15-20%). This effect was explained as a linear energy transfer dependence, further supported with Monte Carlo simulations. A method for analysing and comparing data from treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurements was developed. The method enables a new pixel by pixel evaluation, isodose comparison and dose volume histogram verification. Two standard clinical radiation therapy procedures were examined using the developed TPS verification method. The treatment regimes included several beams of different radiation qualities. The TPS calculated data were in very good agreement with the dose distribution measured by the ferrous-gel. However, in a beam abutment region, larger dose difference was found. Beam adjustment errors and a minor TPS underestimation of the lateral scatter contribution outside the primary electron beam may explain the discrepancy. The overall uncertainty in the ferrous-gel dose determination was considerably reduced using an optimised MRI acquisition protocol and a new MRI scanner. The relative dose uncertainty was found to be better than 3.3% for all dose levels (95% confidence level). Using the method developed for comparing measured gel data with calculated treatment plans, the gel dosimetry method was proven to be a useful tool for radiation treatment planning verification 103 refs, 20 figs, 6 tabs

  7. Role of the ICRU in quality assurance in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.

    1984-01-01

    A short history of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) and its main objectives are presented. They now include the development of internationally acceptable recommendations regarding: (1) quantities and units; (2) procedures suitable for the measurement and application of these quantities (as well as the associated uncertainties); (3) physical data needed in the application of these procedures; and (4) definition of terms and concepts used in radiation therapy. One of the most important actions of the ICRU during the last two decades was its recommendation in favor of the introduction of the SI units (International System of Units) in the field of ionizing radiation. Recently published ICRU reports in the field of radiation therapy are reviewed. Reports 23 and 24 provide recommendations for determining the absorbed dose in a patient irradiated with X or gamma ray beams. High energy electron and neutron beams have been considered in Reports 21 and 26 respectively. Report 31 provides a survey of the available anti W values and Report 29 makes recommendations on dose specification for reporting therapeutic irradiation in external beam therapy

  8. Radiation therapy sources, equipment and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The safety code for Telegamma Therapy Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-1) and safety code for Brachytherapy Sources, Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-3) were issued by AERB in 1986 and 1988 respectively. These codes specified mandatory requirements for radiation therapy facilities, covering the entire spectrum of operations ranging from the setting up of a facility to its ultimate decommissioning, including procedures to be followed during emergency situations. The codes also stipulated requirements of personnel and their responsibilities. With the advent of new techniques and equipment such as 3D-conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, treatment planning system, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, portal imaging, integrated brachytherapy and endovascular brachytherapy during the last two decades, AERB desires that these codes be revised and merged into a single code titled Radiation Therapy Sources, Equipment, and Installations

  9. MO-F-BRA-02: Evaluation of 4D CT to 4D Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, S; Hugo, G; Weiss, E; Jan, N; Roman, N; Sleeman, W; Fatyga, M; Christensen, G; Murphy, M; Lu, J; Keall, P; Williamson, J

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) with 4D cone beam CT (4DCBCT). Eleven locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent one planning 4D fan- beam CT (4DFBCT) and seven weekly 4DCBCT scans. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and carina were delineated by a physician in all 4D images. For day to day registration, the end of inspiration 4DFBCT phase was deformably registered to the corresponding phase in each 4DCBCT image. For phase to phase registration, the end of inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to end of expiration phase. The delineated contours were warped using the resulting transforms and compared to the manual contours through Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), false positive and false negative indices, and, for carina, target registration error (TRE). Two DIR algorithms were tested: 1) small deformation, inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) algorithm and 2) Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS). For day to day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.59 ± 0.16 after rigid registration, 0.72 ± 0.13 with SICLE and to 0.66 ± 0.18 with DEMONS. SICLE and DEMONS reduced TRE to 4.1 ± 2.1 mm and 5.8 ± 3.7 mm respectively, from 6.2 ± 3.5 mm; and reduced false positive index to 0.27 and 0.26 respectively from 0.46. Registration with the cone beam as the fixed image resulted in higher DSC than with the fan beam as fixed (p < 0.001). SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC on average by 10.0% and 8.0% and reduced TRE by 2.8 mm and 2.9 mm respectively for phase to phase DIR. DIR achieved more congruent mapping of target structures to delineations than rigid registration alone, although DIR performance varied with algorithm and patient. This work was supported by National Cancer Institute Grant No. P01 CA 116602. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  11. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  12. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic pa