WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam radiation effects

  1. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  2. Radiomodifying effect of caffeine on mammalian cellular system using gamma radiation and proton beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanth, Sneha P.; Yadav, Usha; Shirsath, K.B.; Desai, Utkarsha N.; Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Bhat, Nagesh N.; Anjaria, K.B.; Sapra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is a commonly consumed neurostimulant in the world. Reports suggest the radiomodifying effects of caffeine against low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation when administered pre and post irradiation by releasing checkpoint arrest. In the present report, the radioprotective and radiosensitizing ability of caffeine (10μM - 2mM) were studied on Chinese Hamster Ovary (CRO) cell line against low as well as high LET radiation when administered pre, post and continuously during radiation. Effect of caffeine treatment on the genotoxicity induced by gamma and proton beam radiation was assessed by micronucleus assay. Effect of caffeine treatment on clonogenic survival of irradiated cells was also assessed

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  4. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  5. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  6. Electron beam radiation effects on recycled polyamide-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, Maria Cecilia; Silva, Leonardo G. de Andrade e

    2001-01-01

    Applications of electron beam processing in the treatment of polymers are commonly used. The interaction of high energy radiation with polymers may cause permanent modifications in the polymer's physicochemical structure. The induced modifications may result in degradation of the polymer or in improvement of its properties (crosslinking), which are simultaneous and competing processes, depending on the radiation dose utilized. Crosslinking occurs more readily in the polymer's amorphous content and this process makes the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the polymers to increase. Successive recycling cycles promote changes in polymers properties, such as breaking of structure, molecular weight reduction, melt index increase and mechanical resistance reduction. The polyamide-6 resin was recycled for three successive recycling cycles and thi polyamide-6 specimens were molded by the process of injection molding. These specimens were irradiated at the Nuclear Energetic Research Institute (IPEN) radiation facility, on a JOB 188 model accelerator, with a 1.5 MeV electron beam, doses of 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 kGy, and dose rate of 22.61 kGy/s. The DMA tests were performed using DMA-983 equipment from TA Instruments and two heatings were adopted in order to eliminate the moisture absorption. The X-ray diffraction analysis wa carried out at the Philips PW 1830 model equipment

  7. Beam size effects in the radiative Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczekowski, M.

    1990-01-01

    In some electromagnetic processes the measured cross section can be substantially smaller than calculated in standard Quantum Electrodynamics. The process of single bremsstrahlung, e + e - → e + e - γ is an example of such effect. If the size of the effect for large angle γ radiation is similar to its magnitude at low angles, then standard calculations of the radiative Bahbha background to e.g. the reaction used in counting the number of neutrino generations, e + e - → νν-barγ, at LEP energies can be overestimated by 10-20%. 5 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  8. Effect of electron beam radiations on anxiety in experimental animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, B; Suchetha Kumari; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Rao, Satheesh

    2013-01-01

    Exposures to ionizing radiation have been an inevitable part of the environment. This type of radiation can disrupt atoms, creating positive and negative charged particles, and cause biological harm. Ionizing radiation includes X-rays, gamma rays, alpha particles, beta particles and neutrons. They have the potential to cause both beneficial and harmful effects. There are concerns about these radiations as they are widely used in hospitals for treatment and diagnosis of various diseases. The present work was designed to test the effect of whole body electron beam radiation on anxiety in mice using the Elevated plus maze and Light dark arena, the commonly used models for assessing anxiety in rodents. Mice were irradiated with three different doses (2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy) of electron beam radiations. Statistical analysis revealed that whole body irradiation of the moderate dose range (2-6 Gy) of electron beam leads to a significant (p<0.001) anxiogenic activity in irradiated mice. Electron beam induced anxiety can be due to radiation induced reactive oxygen species in brain. (author)

  9. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-01-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances

  10. X-ray Radiation Mechanisms and the Beaming Effect of Hot Spots ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Astr. (2011) 32, 193–196 c Indian Academy of Sciences. X-ray Radiation Mechanisms and the Beaming Effect of Hot Spots and Knots in AGN Jets. Jin Zhang1,∗. , Jin-Ming Bai2, Liang Chen2 & Enwei Liang3. 1College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangxi Teachers Education University,. Nanning 530001, China.

  11. Evaluation of the electron beam radiation effects on the mechanical properties of the polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Clecia M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Chinellato, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This paper studied the electron beam radiation effects on the mechanical properties of the polypropylene (PP) resin. The PP resin was submitted to 150-250 kGy radiation dose, at the dose rate of 14 kGy/s, room temperature and presence of air, using a 1.5 MeV electron accelerator. After the irradiation, the irradiated and non irradiated resin samples were submitted to the mechanical testes of traction resistance and impact Izod resistance. The results shown that the traction resistance at drainage of PP samples have not experienced significant modifications (p < 0.05) after the irradiation. However, the original PP rupture resistance (non irradiated samples) presented a gain up to 100 % as function of the applied radiation dose; the percentage of deformation in the rupture presented a reduction up to 65 % and the Izod impact resistance presented a reduction up to 70 % with the increase of the radiation dose (p < 0.05)

  12. Nonlinear effects in the radiation force generated by amplitude-modulated focused beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Nuria; Jiménez, Noé; Redondo, Javier; Roig, Bernardino; Picó, Rubén; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Konofagou, Elisa E.; Camarena, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) uses an amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force before, during and after ablation. In this paper, the findings from a numerical analysis of the effects related with the nonlinear propagation of AM focused ultrasonic beams in water on the radiation force and the location of its maxima will be presented. The numerical modeling is performed using the KZK nonlinear parabolic equation. The radiation force is generated by a focused transducer with a gain of 18, a carrier frequency of 1 MHz and a modulation frequency of 25 kHz. The modulated excitation generates a spatially-invariant force proportional to the intensity. Regarding the nonlinear wave propagation, the force is no longer proportional to the intensity, reaching a factor of eight between the nonlinear and linear estimations. Also, a 9 mm shift in the on-axis force peak occurs when the initial pressure increased from 1 to 300 kPa. This spatial shift, due to the nonlinear effects, becomes dynamic in AM focused beams, as the different signal periods have different amplitudes. This study shows that both the value and the spatial position of the force peak are affected by the nonlinear propagation of the ultrasonic waves.

  13. Effect on the insulation material of a MOSFET device submitted to a standard diagnostic radiation beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Magalhaes, C M S; Dos Santos, L A P; Souza, D do N; Maia, A F

    2010-01-01

    MOSFET electronic devices have been used for dosimetry in radiology and radiotherapy. Several communications show that due to the radiation exposure defects appear on the semiconductor crystal lattice. Actually, the structure of a MOSFET consists of three materials: a semiconductor, a metal and an insulator between them. The MOSFET is a quadripolar device with a common terminal: gate-source is the input; drain-source is the output. The gate controls the electrical current passing through semiconductor medium by the field effect because the silicon oxide acts as insulating material. The proposal of this work is to show some radiation effects on the insulator of a MOSFET device. A 6430 Keithley sub-femtoamp SourceMeter was used to verify how the insulating material layer in the structure of the device varies with the radiation exposure. We have used the IEC 61267 standard radiation X-ray beams generated from a Pantak industrial unit in the radiation energy range of computed tomography. This range was chosen because we are using the MOSFET device as radiation detector for dosimetry in computed tomography. The results showed that the behaviour of the electrical current of the device is different in the insulator and semiconductor structures.

  14. The effect of electron beam radiations on testicular damage in mice, Mus musculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, S.; Nair, Vijay Mala Grover

    2013-01-01

    Adult male Swiss albino mice, Mus musculus (8-10 weeks old) weighing 28±2.5 gm were exposed to varying doses (2-12 Gy) of electron beam radiations and maintained in animal house at 26-28 C. The animals were sacrificed following 35 and 60 days following exposure to electron beam radiations. The LD-50 value, change in the weight and histological details of the testis, sperm count, sperm shape abnormalities and sperm motility were recorded. The data suggests that electron beam radiations is a potential inducer to cause reproductive system dysfunctions which probably may be responsible leading to infertility. (author)

  15. The use of ion beams to study radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Particle accelerators are finding increasing use in the study of materials. This review concentrates on their application to study radiation damage effects. The first section deals with the basic interaction of particle beams with solids, the production of defects and their agglomeration, and phenomena such as irradiation-enhanced diffusion and precipitation. The second part of the review which complements a recent article (Mathews. Contemp. Phys.; 18:(6)571 (1977)), deals with the behaviour of materials in fast reactors. It discusses in some detail the application of particle accelerators to technological problems such as void formation in fast reactor materials and irradiation enhanced creep. (author)

  16. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  17. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  18. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  19. The effect of a metal hip prosthesis on the radiation dose in therapeutic photon beam irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, S.-Y.; Chu, T.-C.; Lin, J.-P.; Liu, M.-T.

    2002-01-01

    Prostate and cervical cancer patients are often treated with external X-ray beams of bi-lateral incidence. Such treatment may incur some dose effect that cannot be predicted precisely in commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for patients having undergone total hip replacement. This study performs a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and an analytical calculation (convolution superposition algorithm which is implemented in ADAC TPS) of a 6 MV, 5x5 cm 2 X-ray beam incident into water with the existence of hip prosthesis, e.g. Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo alloy. The results indicate that ADAC TPS cannot precisely account for the scatter and backscatter radiation that a metal hip prosthesis causes. For percent depth dose (PDD) curves, the maximum underdosage of ADAC TPS up to 5 mm above the interface between dense material and water is 5%, 20% and 27% for PDD Bone , PDD Ti and PDD Co , respectively. The dose re-buildup, which occurs behind the hip region, becomes more and more obvious for denser medium existed in water. Increasing inhomogeneity also enhances the underdosage of ADAC for greater depth (>10 cm), as the figures of nearly 2% in PDD Bone , PDD Ti and 4-5% in PDD Co reveal. Overestimating the attenuated power of high-density non-water material in ADAC TPS causes this underdosage. For dose profiles, no significant differences were found in Profile Bone at any depth. Profile Ti reveals that MC slightly exceeds ADAC at off-axis position 1.0-2.0 cm. Profile Co reveals this more obviously. This finding means that scatter radiation from these denser materials is significant and cannot be predicted precisely in ADAC

  20. The effect of a metal hip prosthesis on the radiation dose in therapeutic photon beam irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.-Y.; Chu, T.-C. E-mail: tcchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw; Lin, J.-P.; Liu, M.-T

    2002-07-01

    Prostate and cervical cancer patients are often treated with external X-ray beams of bi-lateral incidence. Such treatment may incur some dose effect that cannot be predicted precisely in commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for patients having undergone total hip replacement. This study performs a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and an analytical calculation (convolution superposition algorithm which is implemented in ADAC TPS) of a 6 MV, 5x5 cm{sup 2} X-ray beam incident into water with the existence of hip prosthesis, e.g. Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo alloy. The results indicate that ADAC TPS cannot precisely account for the scatter and backscatter radiation that a metal hip prosthesis causes. For percent depth dose (PDD) curves, the maximum underdosage of ADAC TPS up to 5 mm above the interface between dense material and water is 5%, 20% and 27% for PDD{sub Bone}, PDD{sub Ti} and PDD{sub Co}, respectively. The dose re-buildup, which occurs behind the hip region, becomes more and more obvious for denser medium existed in water. Increasing inhomogeneity also enhances the underdosage of ADAC for greater depth (>10 cm), as the figures of nearly 2% in PDD{sub Bone}, PDD{sub Ti} and 4-5% in PDD{sub Co} reveal. Overestimating the attenuated power of high-density non-water material in ADAC TPS causes this underdosage. For dose profiles, no significant differences were found in Profile{sub Bone} at any depth. Profile{sub Ti} reveals that MC slightly exceeds ADAC at off-axis position 1.0-2.0 cm. Profile{sub Co} reveals this more obviously. This finding means that scatter radiation from these denser materials is significant and cannot be predicted precisely in ADAC.

  1. Effect of the thermal spread in a beam on the radiative Pierce instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klochkov, D.N.; Pekar, M.Yu.; Rukhadze, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The linear dynamics of the radiative Pierce instability in a single plane in the case of the relativistic electron beam with T temperature stabilized through a strong magnetic field, is considered. It is shown that the instability increment decreases with the thermal spread growth [ru

  2. Study of radiation-thermal effect of electron beam on steel and cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machurin, E.S.; Lonchin, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Studied is the influence of radiation-heat treatment by high energy (3-4.5 MeV) electron beam on the structure and properties of carbon steels (65G, 90KhF) and cast iron. Metallography and electron microscopy methods are used to study microstructure. It is shown that after the treatment by the electron beam there is observed noticeable structure grinding, sample fracture viscosity (even in a quenched state), increase of hardness and impact strength. The mechanism of metal heating process by electron beam is calculated and temperature field is defined in a heating region accounting for electron beam characteristics, medium and geometric factor. Theoretical data are close to experimental ones obtained in a course of determining the microhardness of irradiated samples for the cases of electron treatment duration up to 10 s

  3. Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, André; Lohse, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

  4. Effect of Film Dressing on Acute Radiation Dermatitis Secondary to Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, Takeshi; Ogino, Takashi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Toi, Yuya; Kawabata, Michiko; Chuman, Ikuko; Wada, Kiyotaka; Kondo, Naoaki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is one of the most common adverse events of proton beam therapy (PBT), and there is currently no effective method to manage ARD. The purpose of this study was to examine the prophylactic effect of a film dressing using Airwall on PBT-induced ARD compared with standard skin managements. Methods and Materials: A total of 271 patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled for PBT at our center were divided into 2 groups based on their own requests: 145 patients (53%) chose Airwall (group A) and 126 patients (47%) received standard treatments (group B). We evaluated irradiated skin every other day during PBT and followed up once a week for a month after completion of PBT. Results: Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis were seen in 2, 122, 21, and 0 and 0, 65, 57, and 4 patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<.001). Numbers of days to grades 1 and 2 ARD development were 34.9 ± 14.3 and 54.7 ± 10.3 and 31.8 ± 11.3 and 54.4 ± 11.6 in groups A and B, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. Eighteen patients (12%) in group A who experienced problems in the region covered with Airwall switched to standard skin care after peeling the film off. Conclusions: Film dressing using Airwall reduced the severity of ARD without delaying the response time of the skin to proton beam irradiation compared with standard skin management. Hence, film dressing is considered a promising measure for preventing ARD secondary to PBT.

  5. Effect of Film Dressing on Acute Radiation Dermatitis Secondary to Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimura, Takeshi, E-mail: arimura-takeshi@medipolis.org [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Ogino, Takashi [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan); Yoshiura, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Toi, Yuya; Kawabata, Michiko; Chuman, Ikuko; Wada, Kiyotaka; Kondo, Naoaki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Hishikawa, Yoshio [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is one of the most common adverse events of proton beam therapy (PBT), and there is currently no effective method to manage ARD. The purpose of this study was to examine the prophylactic effect of a film dressing using Airwall on PBT-induced ARD compared with standard skin managements. Methods and Materials: A total of 271 patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled for PBT at our center were divided into 2 groups based on their own requests: 145 patients (53%) chose Airwall (group A) and 126 patients (47%) received standard treatments (group B). We evaluated irradiated skin every other day during PBT and followed up once a week for a month after completion of PBT. Results: Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis were seen in 2, 122, 21, and 0 and 0, 65, 57, and 4 patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<.001). Numbers of days to grades 1 and 2 ARD development were 34.9 ± 14.3 and 54.7 ± 10.3 and 31.8 ± 11.3 and 54.4 ± 11.6 in groups A and B, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. Eighteen patients (12%) in group A who experienced problems in the region covered with Airwall switched to standard skin care after peeling the film off. Conclusions: Film dressing using Airwall reduced the severity of ARD without delaying the response time of the skin to proton beam irradiation compared with standard skin management. Hence, film dressing is considered a promising measure for preventing ARD secondary to PBT.

  6. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  7. Protective effect of allium sativum ethanol extract on cultured human lymphocytes against electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Shama; Shetty, Sukanya; Suchetha Kumari; Madhu, L.N.

    2013-01-01

    The development of radioprotective agent has been the subject of intense research because exposure to ionizing radiation causes DNA damage which may cause mutation and ultimately leads to cancer, on the other hand radiotherapy has become an integral part in treatment of cancer which uses ionizing radiations like X rays, gamma rays to kill the cancer cells. Amifostine is a well-known radioprotector which is clinically approved. There are many other radioprotectors like cysteine, cystamine, serotine but they are not used because of its normal tissue toxicity. Allium sativum is commonly known as garlic which has already been reported for its medicinal properties. In this study we evaluated radioprotection property of Allium sativum on DNA damage caused by electron beam radiation in cultured human lymphocytes. Allium sativum ethanol extract was used for this study. Cell viability was performed by MTT assay. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay parameters. The cultured lymphocytes were incubated with different concentrations 10, 50 and 100 μg/mL of Allium sativum extracts for 2, 4, 6 and 24 hour time intervals. Treatment of lymphocytes with various concentration of Allium sativum extract resulted in significant decrease in the level of DNA damage (Percentage tail DNA 6%) and increase in cell viability 93% (p>0.05) compare to the radiation control group. Results of this study revealed that Allium sativum protects cultured lymphocytes when exposed to electron beam radiation at its sub lethal dose. (author)

  8. The effectiveness of the microbiological radiation decontamination process of agricultural products with the use of low energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryczka, Urszula; Migdał, Wojciech; Bułka, Sylwester

    2018-02-01

    The effectiveness of the radiation decontamination process was tested for electron beam of energy 200 keV and 300 keV. The energy of electrons was controlled by the measurements of its penetration ability in stack of B3 dosimetric film. In the presented work, the reduction of total aerobic bacteria count was observed, depending on time of irradiation for samples of dried black pepper, onion flakes and bay leaves. The results were compared with the effect observed for the process where high energy electron beam was used.

  9. Ionizing radiation effect study by electron beam on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene - ABS terpolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, Tania Regina Lourenco

    2003-01-01

    The great advantage in the researches involving development has as objective to increase significantly the quality of the products. The ABS (acrylonitrile, butadiene, styrene) resins are terpolymers formed by an elastomer and two thermoplastics amorphous components. The three different monomeric units from the terpolymer ABS contribute separately to the material characteristics exhibited. The molecular stiffness originating from polystyrene and the benzene ring hanging on the chain is responsible for the flexion module ABS. The acrylonitrile and the styrene incorporated butadiene exercises strong influence in the resistance to the impact because it reduces the bonding among them. The engineering use of this terpolymer became important due their mechanical properties and mainly, for the responses of this to tensions or deformations applied. The polymeric materials, when submitted to the ionizing radiation are modified by the transference of energy to these materials, introducing excitation and ionization of the molecules, generating chemical reactions that can produce permanent modifications in the polymeric physicochemical structure. The induced modifications can result in the polymeric material degradation or crosslinking, which can result in the improvement of some properties. This work has, as objective, to study the electron beam ionizing radiation effect, at different doses, in the properties of the polymer ABS. The studied properties were: tensile strength at break, elongation at break, Izod impact strength, flexural strength, melt flow index, Vicat softening temperature and the thermic distortion temperature. Also researches on Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analyses (TGA) were accomplished. From the experimental results, it was showed that for doses until 500 kGy, at 22.6 kGy/s dose rate, in the presence of air, the crosslinking process of ABS prevails. (author)

  10. Measurement of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for the Radiation Beam from Neutron Source Reactor YAYOI -Comparisons with Cyclotron Neutron and 60Co Gamma Ray-

    OpenAIRE

    HIROAKI, WAKABAYASHI; SHOZO, SUZUKI; AKIRA, ITO; Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo; Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo; Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo

    1983-01-01

    Radiation biology and/or therapy research and development for a research reactor beam need specific RBEs of neutrons as well as of specific reactions. RBEs for reactor beams measured in situ condition are interesting because actual radiation effects on each biological system are different depending on detailed conditions of irradiation. A small powered research reactor (Fast Neutron Source Reactor: YAYOI) was examined here as a neutron beam source for obtaining survival curves in a manner usu...

  11. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl JR., Robert R.

    1990-03-06

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  13. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  14. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored

  15. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption

  16. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  17. Effective radiation dose of ProMax 3D cone-beam computerized tomography scanner with different dental protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xing-min; Li, Gang; Ludlow, John B; Zhang, Zu-yan; Ma, Xu-chen

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare effective doses resulting from different scan protocols for cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 and 2007 calculations of dose. Average tissue-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose for a ProMax 3D CBCT with different dental protocols were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a human equivalent phantom. Effective doses were derived using ICRP 1990 and the superseding 2007 recommendations. Effective doses (ICRP 2007) for default patient sizes from small to large ranged from 102 to 298 μSv. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) between tube current and effective dose (ICRP 2007) was 0.90. When scanning with lower resolution settings, the effective doses were reduced significantly (P radiation dose levels. Reduction in radiation dose can be achieved when using lower settings of exposure parameters. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A study on size effect of carboxymethyl starch nanogel crosslinked by electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Binh; Pham Thi Thu Hong; Nguyen Ngoc Duy; Nguyen Thanh Duoc; Nguyen Nguyet Dieu

    2012-01-01

    The formation of carboxymethyl starch (CMS) nanogel with 50 nm less particle size was carried out through a radiation crosslinked process on the electron beam (EB) linear accelerator. Changes of intrinsic viscosities and weight averaged molecular weight in the CMS concentration, which ranged from 3 to 10 mg ml −1 in absorbed doses were investigated. There were some new peaks in the 1 H NMR spectra of CMS nanogel compared with those of CMS polymer. These results were anticipated that the predominant intramolecular crosslinking of dilute CMS aqueous solution occurred while being exposed to a short intense pulse of ionizing radiation. Hydrodynamic radius (often called particle size, R h ) and distribution of particle size were measured by a dynamic light scattering technique. The radiation yield of intermolecular crosslinking of CMS solution was calculated from the expression of G x (). The influence of the “size effect” was demonstrated by testing culture of Lactobacillus bacteria on MRS agar culture medium containing CMS nanogel and polymer. Results showed that the number of Lactobacillus bacteria growing on nanogel containing culture medium is about 170 cfu/ml and on polymer containing culture medium is only 6 cfu/ml. - Highlights: ► Carboxymethyl starch (CMS) nanogel consists of radiation intramolecular cross-linked polymeric particles, which are rather well dispersed and swollen in water. ► The nano-sized particles can be obtained from a high energy electron pulse triggered radiation process in a dilute CMS solution. ► Once Lactobacillus bacteria are cultured on a CMS nanogel containing medium, the “size effect” of the CMS nanogel will prove to be clearly superior to that of a CMS polymer.

  19. Report of the group on beam-beam effects in circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of the discussions and conclusions of the working group on beam-beam effects for circular colliders. This group was part of the larger beam-beam dynamics group at the 7th ICFA Workshop on Beam Dynamics, on the subject ''Beam-Beam and Beam-Radiation Interactions,'' held at UCLA, May 13--16, 1991. 15 refs

  20. Early effect of external beam radiation therapy on the anal sphincter: A study using anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, E.H.; Dreznik, Z.; Myerson, R.J.; Lacey, D.L.; Fry, R.D.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The early of pelvic irradiation on the anal sphincter has not been previously investigated. This study prospectively evaluated the acute effect of preoperative radiation on anal function. Twenty patients with rectal carcinoma received 4,500 cGy of preoperative external beam radiation. The field of radiation included the sphincter in 10 patients and was delivered above the anorectal ring in 10 patients. Anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound were performed before and four weeks after radiotherapy. No significant difference in mean maximal squeeze or resting pressure was found after radiation therapy. An increase in mean minimal sensory threshold was significant. Histologic examination revealed minimal radiation changes at the distal margin in 8 of 10 patients who underwent low anterior resection and in 1 of 3 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection. The authors conclude that preoperative radiation therapy has minimal immediate effect on the anal sphincter and is not a major contributing factor to postoperative incontinence in patients after sphincter-saving operations for rectal cancer

  1. Protective effect of Asparagus racemosus root extract against lethal total - body electron beam radiation induced damage in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharmila, K.P.; Bhandary, B. Satheesh Kumar; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Bhat, Vadish S.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of Asparagus Racemosus Root ethanolic extract (ARE) in Swiss albino mice against acute lethal total - body Electron beam irradiation. Swiss Albino mice were used for the assessment of radiation induced sickness and 30 day survival analysis. Survival studies were determined using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The maximum survival was observed in the experimental mice pretreated with 200 mg/kg.b.wt. of ARE which also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics. This dose was considered as an optimal dose for radioprotection. Treatment of mice with ARE before irradiation delayed the onset of mortality as compared with the untreated irradiated controls. Present findings demonstrate the potential of ARE in mitigating radiation-induced mortality, which may be attributed to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant potential

  2. Physico-chemical effects of electron beam radiation on polypropylene film and its polyphenolic antioxydant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymes-Chodur, C.; Legendre, B.; Yagoubi, N.; Betz, N.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Even though plastics are widely used in various industrial applications, problems have occurred concerning the quality of the packaged products, due to the presence of potentially toxic additives that can migrate out of the polymer and thus contaminate the surrounding medium. This phenomenon is due to the fact that the additives are only mixed with the polymer powder before the plastic is molded, and as no chemical bond keeps them into the polymer matrix, additives are able to migrate as the plastic ages. In order to avoid this phenomenon, which can lead to the rejection of biomaterials, or food or drugs contamination problems, we intend to graft the additives into the polymer matrix by means of ionizing radiation. Indeed, previous studies have shown that radiation induces the formation of free radicals and hydroperoxides that can react with monomers to create covalent bonds. Our work deals with electron beam irradiation of polypropylene (PP) containing a known concentration of Irganox 1010, a polyphenolic antioxidant. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements have been performed in order to evaluate the behavior of the additives under ionizing radiation, but the polymer matrix must also be characterized as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. This present study gives FTIR, high temperature size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results performed on both PP and Irganox 1010. They evidence the formation of oxidative groups such as free alcohols and hydroperoxides, and the formation of double bonds in the PP. SEC results highlight the scission of the polymer chains correlated to the degradation of the crystalline domains observed by DSC. Those physico-chemical modifications must be characterized for the understanding of the grafting and before the antioxidant activity is evaluated

  3. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Caitlin; Bufford, Daniel; Muntifering, Brittany; Senor, David; Steckbeck, Mackenzie; Davis, Justin; Doyle, Barney; Buller, Daniel; Hattar, Khalid

    2017-09-29

    Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia’s in situ ion irradiation TEM (I3TEM) offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs): zirconium alloys and LiAlO2.

  4. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Anne Taylor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia’s in situ ion irradiation TEM (I3TEM offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs: zirconium alloys and LiAlO2.

  5. Coherent effects in relativistic electron beams radiation in the presence of beat waves; Kogerentnye ehffekty v izluchenii relyativistskogo ehlektronnogo sgustka pri nalichii voln bienij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgyan, L A; Shamamian, A N

    1992-12-31

    The problem of relativistic electron beam-laser beat waves interaction is considered. Due to interaction the electron density is changed as opposed to the case, when it interacts with still electron plasma, the change of density gets less. But it is interesting to research the coherent spontaneous radiation of the electron beam interacting with. It is shown that this interaction brings to an increase of the partial coherent effect. The radiation efficiency depends essentially on the beam parameters, i.e. on the radio of the distinctive longitudinal dimension density. The maximum amplification takes place when the beam length makes room for an odd number of wave length quarters. Since the gain factor decreases with the radiation wave length, we offer to use high-current relativistic electron beams to generate micro radio waves. 4 refs.

  6. External Beam Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    External beam radiation therapy is used to treat many types of cancer. it is a local treatment, where a machine aims radiation at your cancer. Learn more about different types of external beam radiation therapy, and what to expect if you're receiving treatment.

  7. Effect of incident beam and diffuse radiation on par absorption, photosynthesis and transpiration of sitka spruce - a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.P.; Jarvis, P.G.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation model, Maestro, is used to study the influence of beam fraction in the incident radiation and the radiance distribution of the sky diffuse radiation on PAR absorption, photosynthesis and transpiration of a Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr) tree crown. It is concluded that inaccurate separation of beam and diffuse radiation leads to significant errors in estimating the amounts of PAR absorbed, photosynthesis and transpiration by a tree in the stand. Much more attention should be paid to adequate descriptions of the radiance distribution of the sky diffuse radiation under different sky conditions. A useful approach is proposed for simulating the incident global radiaiton in a physiological, process-based model

  8. Radioprotective effect of Tamarindus indica pod extract in Swiss albino mice exposed to whole body electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandini, S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Ganesh Sanjeev; D'sa, Prima

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of Tamarindus indica pod extract against radiation induced damage.The effect of 100 mg of hydroalcoholic extract of Tamarindus indica pod was studied in Swiss albino mice exposed to 6 Gy whole body electron beam radiation. Treatment of mice with extract for 15 days before irradiation reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness when compared with the untreated irradiated group. The irradiated animals showed an elevation in lipid peroxidation and reduction in glutathione, total antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities. Radiation induced mice has shown micronucleus in the bone marrow cells. Treatment of mice with Tamarindus indica pod extract before irradiation caused a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation followed by significant elevation in reduced glutathione, total antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. It also showed a reduction in the micronucleus formation in bone marrow cells. Results indicate that the radioprotective activity of Tamarindus indica pod extract may be due to free radical scavenging attributed as a result of increased antioxidant level in mice. (author)

  9. Radiation therapy apparatus having retractable beam stopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coad, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a radiation therapy apparatus which utilized a linear translation mechanism for positioning a beam stopper. An apparatus is described wherein the beam stopper is pivotally attached to the therapy machine with an associated drive motor in such a way that the beam stopper retracts linearly

  10. High peak current operation of x-ray free-electron laser multiple beam lines by suppressing coherent synchrotron radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toru; Kondo, Chikara; Inagaki, Takahiro; Togawa, Kazuaki; Fukami, Kenji; Nakazawa, Shingo; Hasegawa, Taichi; Morimoto, Osamu; Yoshioka, Masamichi; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Otake, Yuji; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2018-04-01

    The parallel operation of multiple beam lines is an important means to expand the opportunity of user experiments at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facilities. At SPring-8 Angstrom free-electron laser (SACLA), the multi-beam-line operation had been tested using two beam lines, but transverse coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects at a dogleg beam transport severely limited the laser performance. To suppress the CSR effects, a new beam optics based on two double bend achromat (DBA) structures was introduced for the dogleg. After the replacement of the beam optics, high peak current bunches of more than 10 kA are now stably transported through the dogleg and the laser pulse output is increased by a factor of 2-3. In the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA, the electron beam parameters, such as the beam energy and peak current, can be adjusted independently for each beam line. Thus the laser output can be optimized and wide spectral tunability is ensured for all beam lines.

  11. Resonance effects of transition radiation emitted from thin foil stacks using electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, Takaaki; Yajima, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; and others

    1997-03-01

    Transition Radiation(TR) X rays are expected to be a high brilliant X-ray source because the interference among TR X rays emitted from many thin foils placed periodically in vacuum can increase their intensity and make them quasi-monochromatic. In order to study the interference (resonance) effects of TR, we measured the energy spectra of TR for several sets of thin-foil stacks at various emission angles. It was found that the resonance effects of TR are classified into intrafoil and interfoil resonances and the intensity of TR X rays increases nonlinearly with increasing foil number, attributing to the interfoil resonance. It became evident that the brilliance of TR is as high as that of SR. (author)

  12. Radiation and shielding around beam absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, A.; Maas, R.

    1978-12-01

    During operational conditions it is anticipated that a fair amount of the total available beam power is dumped in either the slit system on one of the beam dumps. Thses beam absorbers therefore become strong radioactive sources. The radiation level due to the absorption of a 100 kW electron beam is estimated and the problem of residual activity is treated. Proposed shielding materials are discussed. (C.F.)

  13. Effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on samples of the Brazil nuts artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Ednei Assuncao Antunes

    2012-01-01

    The high level of contamination by aflatoxin produced by fungi in lots of Brazil nuts and the strict control by importing countries in relation to the levels of toxins in food, European Union countries decided in 2003 by the return of these lots products from Brazil. Despite the economic loss represented by contamination by toxigenic fungi in Brazil nuts, a major product of extractive Northern of Brazil, studies are still preliminary as the control of contamination aflatoxigenic fungal using methods such as gamma radiation (G.R) and mainly, electron beam (E.B). These facts motivated this research, which aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation and application of electron beam in samples of Brazil nut artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus. This goal, we were studied 50 samples of the Brazil nut previously inoculated with spores of A. flavus and subsequently incubated at 30 °C in relative humidity controlled at 93%. After incubation, period of 15 days, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80, the samples were divided into 5 groups that received the following doses of radiation: control (0 kGy), 5 and 10 kGy 5 E.B and G.R. The mycobiota was performed by serial dilution, plated on surface using potato dextrose agar. The results demonstrated that treatment with E.B using a dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy resulted in reduced growth of A. flavus in 74% (37/50) and 94% (47/50) of samples. The samples treated with G.R at the dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy no fungal growth occurred in 92% (46/50) 100% (50/50) of. The study of aflatoxins showed that doses of E.B of 5 kGy and 10 kGy reduced levels of AFB1 at 53.32% and 65.66% respectively. The application of gamma rays at doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced levels of toxins in 70.61% and 84.15% respectively. This result may be attributed to higher penetrability of gamma radiation. Sensory analysis showed greater acceptance of the judges for the samples irradiated with E.B and G.R at the dose of 10 kGy. We concluded

  14. Prevalence and Predicting Factors for Commonly Neglected Sexual Side Effects to External-Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Anders; Pedersen, Christian; Lindberg, Henriette; Bisbjerg, Rasmus; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2017-04-01

    Changes in sexual function other than erectile dysfunction are sparsely investigated after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. To investigate orgasmic dysfunction, urinary incontinence during sexual activity, changes in penile morphology, and sensory disturbances in the penis in patients with prostate cancer treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). In February 2015, men treated with EBRT at our center 3 months to 5 years previously (N = 519) received a study-specific questionnaire. This was developed from purpose-built questions and validated tools including the Erection Hardness Scale. All patients had received a radiation dose of 78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered according to disease characteristics. Outcome measurements were prevalence rates and predictors of these side effects as identified by multivariate logistic regression analyses. One hundred nine patients were eligible (sexually active and had completed androgen deprivation therapy) for inclusion. Twenty-four percent reported anorgasmia, 44% reported a decreased intensity of their orgasms, and 40% reported that the time it took to reach orgasm had increased. Eleven percent reported anejaculation. Fifteen percent reported orgasm-associated pain. Only 4% reported urinary incontinence during sexual activity. Subjective penile length loss in excess of 1 cm was reported by 42%. Twelve percent reported an altered curvature of their penis after EBRT. Six percent reported painful erections. Twenty-seven percent reported decreased sensitivity in the penis after EBRT, 2% reported a cold sensation, and 2% reported paresthesia. Increasing time since final treatment increased the risk of penile sensory disturbances (odds ratio = 1.05; P = .028). Orgasmic dysfunction, changes in penile morphology, and sensory disturbances in the penis are common side effects of ERBT. Patients should be properly informed of the occurrence of these side effects before deciding which treatment to

  15. Coherent electromagnetic radiation of a modulated beam of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, S G [The State Committee of Standards of the USSR, Moscow, USSR

    1977-12-27

    The intensity of electromagnetic radiation produced by a modulated beam of charged particles is estimated. The coherence effect is due to the modulation, i.e. to periodicity in the particles distribution.

  16. Radiation dermatitis following electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, N.M.

    1978-01-01

    Ten patients, who had been treated for mycosis fungoides with electron beam radiation ten or more years previously, were examined for signs of radiation dermatitis. Although most patients had had acute radiation dermatitis, only a few manifested signs of mild chronic changes after having received between 1,000 and 2,800 rads

  17. Beam size measurement at high radiation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, F.J.

    1991-05-01

    At the end of the Stanford Linear Accelerator the high energy electron and positron beams are quite small. Beam sizes below 100 μm (σ) as well as the transverse distribution, especially tails, have to be determined. Fluorescent screens observed by TV cameras provide a quick two-dimensional picture, which can be analyzed by digitization. For running the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) with low backgrounds at the interaction point, collimators are installed at the end of the linac. This causes a high radiation level so that the nearby cameras die within two weeks and so-called ''radiation hard'' cameras within two months. Therefore an optical system has been built, which guides a 5 mm wide picture with a resolution of about 30 μm over a distance of 12 m to an accessible region. The overall resolution is limited by the screen thickness, optical diffraction and the line resolution of the camera. Vibration, chromatic effects or air fluctuations play a much less important role. The pictures are colored to get fast information about the beam current, size and tails. Beside the emittance, more information about the tail size and betatron phase is obtained by using four screens. This will help to develop tail compensation schemes to decrease the emittance growth in the linac at high currents. 4 refs., 2 figs

  18. Effects of electron beam radiation dose on the compatibilization behaviour in recycled polypropylene/microcrystalline cellulose composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samat, N.; Motsidi, S. N. R.; Lazim, N. H. M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the influence of dose level of electron beam on the compatibilization behavior of recycled polypropylene (rPP) in rPP/microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) composites. Initially, the rPP was irradiated with various dose of electron beam (5 kGy up to 250 kGy) which then mixed with unirradiated rPP (u-rPP) at a ratio of 30:70 respectively. The composites were prepared by incorporating a series wt% of MCC fibers into rPP (u-rPP : i-rPP) using extruder and finally moulded with an injection moulding machine. The compatibility behavior of irradiated rPP (i-rPP) were analysed with mechanical tensile and thermal methods. The results of mechanical analysis showed great improvement in tensile modulus but an increase in radiation dosage gradually decreased this property. Nevertheless, the tensile strength exhibited a minor effect. The thermal stability of composites is lowered with increase in the absorbed dose, more significantly at higher content of MCC. Fracture surface observations reveal adhesion between the cellulose and rPP matrix.

  19. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  20. Effects of cobalt-60 low doses radiation on beam, rice and radish seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, O.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on seeds of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) were studied. Bean and rice seeds were irradiated with 3.5 and 7.7 Gy (32 Gy/h). There was an apparent acceleration on rice seed germination with 3.5 Gy when they were stored for 6 days after irradiation, but the same dose caused a delay when the store time was 1 day. Bean seeds germination was not modified by 3.5 and 7.7 Gy, but the fresh and dry weight of young plants showed an increase, mainly due the major quantity of water in the embryonic axis. Bean seeds were irradiated with 0.5 and 2.0 Gy (30 Gy/h). Seeds germination showed a slight delay irradiating with 0.5 Gy, while height, fresh and dry weight and primary leaves area of the young plants as well as number of nodes, leaves, flowers, beans and seeds were not modified after irradiation with 0.5 and 2.0 Gy. Radish seeds irradiated with 10 and 30 Gy at dose rates of 4.5, 22.5 and 45.0 Gy/h showed a germination delay and fresh and dry weight values for young plants leaves lower than control. Roots of totally developed plants showed no modifications in weight, volume, mean diameter, lenght and in the amount of soluble reducing sugar. (author)

  1. Effects of electron beam radiation on trait mutation in azuki bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dry seeds of azuki bean (Vigna angularisi), Jingnong 6 and Hebei 801 varieties were irradiated by electron beam of 100, 300, 600, 700 and 900 Gy, respectively. Mutations of leaf shape and color, seed size and shape, trailing, more branching, dwarfing, early or late flowering time and high yield were created in M2 and M3 ...

  2. Effect of natural convection and radiation inside of a hollow beam in a standard fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Välikangas, Turo; Pajunen, Sami; Baczkiewicz, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    paid on structural fire design in order to ensure a specified safe time period that the structure can withstand the fire without collapse. In the European design rules, the standard practise assumes uniform temperature for steel beam cross sections while the surrounding area is subjected to the s...

  3. Testing of the effect of the entry beam tube windows of the silicon detectors of the ionisation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopestansky, J.; Tykva, R.; Stanek, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with testing of the entry beam tube windows of the silicon detectors of the ionisation radiation with surface barrier.The influence of the parameters of basic material and modified technologic preparation on the size and homogeneity of the windows was tested

  4. Role of lutein in alleviating the effects of electron beam radiation induced hematological and biochemical changes in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidya, V.; Krishna, A.P.; Patil, Shrikant; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Lutein is a naturally occurring xanthophyll pigment derived from α-carotene. It is abundantly present in Tagetes erecta L. (marigold) and also present in a few vegetables, fruits and in animal sources. Lutein was evaluated for its protective role in electron beam radiation induced damages in Swiss albino mice. The drug was optimized for its radioprotective activity

  5. Chemical effects of ionizing radiations and electron beam in polymers: industrial uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, M.C.R.; Reis, R.V.V. dos; Araujo, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained from the development PVC dose indicator films, from the PE and PP hydrophilization and from the formulations of crosslink able resins and curable inks and varnishes by radiation, are herein discussed. (author)

  6. Electron beam instrumentation techniques using coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.X.

    1997-01-01

    Much progress has been made on coherent radiation research since coherent synchrotron radiation was first observed in 1989. The use of coherent radiation as a bunch length diagnostic tool has been studied by several groups. In this paper, brief introductions to coherent radiation and far-infrared measurement are given, the progress and status of their beam diagnostic application are reviewed, different techniques are described, and their advantages and limitations are discussed

  7. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, R.L.; Whelan, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter investigates the mechanism by which unstable electrostatic waves of an electron-beam plasma system are converted into observed electromagnetic waves. Electromagnetic radiation arises from both natural beam-plasma systems (e.g., type III solar bursts and kilometric radiation), and from man-made electron beams injected from rockets and spacecraft. A pulsed magnetized discharge plasma is produced with a 1 m diam. oxide-coated cathode and the discussed experiment is performed in the quiescent afterglow. The primary beam-plasma instability involves the excitation of electrostatic plasma waves. Electromagnetic radiation from the beam-plasma system is observed with microwave antennas outside the plasma (all probes removed) or with coax-fed dipoles which can be inserted radially and axially into the plasma. The physical process of mode coupling by which electromagnetic radiation is generated in an electrostatic beam-plasma instability is identified. The results are relevant to beam injection experiments from rockets or satellites into space plasmas. The limited penetration of the beam current into the plasma due to instabilities is demonstrated

  8. Cytogenetic effects of electron-beam radiation on dry seed storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baojiang, G.; Qishen, P.; Kohlman, A.

    1989-01-01

    Dry seeds of Viciafaba were exposed to 5 MeV electron beam (10–30 Krad) and stored afterwards during 20,40 and 60 days- Induction of chromosomal aberrations in root-tip cells of irradiated seeds has been found dose-dependent. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations (particularly, the bridges and the rings) and the frequency of micronucleated cells is proportional to the length of storage time, but is not significantly influenced by low temperatures (0–6°C) during storage. (author)

  9. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  10. Short vegetal-fiber reinforced HDPE—A study of electron-beam radiation treatment effects on mechanical and morphological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Guven, Olgun; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HDPE reinforced with short piassava fiber composites were prepared by melt-mixing processing. • Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was tested as a radiation cross-linking agent. • The materials were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. • The better interfacial adhesion between fiber and HDPE matrix was observed for composites with GMA addition irradiated with radiation dose of 200 kGy. - Abstract: The effects of electron-beam radiation treatment on fiber-matrix adhesion and mechanical properties of short piassava fibers reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix were studied. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was added at 2.5% and 5.0% (on piassava fiber wt) as a cross-linking agent and the effects upon the properties of the resulting composites treated by electron-beam radiation were also examined. HDPE reinforced with short piassava fiber composites was prepared by melt-mixing processing, using a twin screw extruder machine. The materials were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. Material samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests and SEM analyses. Correlation between properties was discussed. The comparison of mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the composites showed that electron-beam radiation treatment produced a significant improvement in mechanical properties, when compared with the non-irradiated composite sample and neat HDPE. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies of the composite failure surfaces indicated that there was an improved adhesion between fiber and matrix. Examination of the failure surfaces indicated dependence of the interfacial adhesion upon the radiation dose and GMA content. Better interfacial adhesion between fiber and HDPE matrix was observed for composites with 5.0% GMA addition and treated with electron-beam

  11. Short vegetal-fiber reinforced HDPE—A study of electron-beam radiation treatment effects on mechanical and morphological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, zip code 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Guven, Olgun [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry Division, Beytepe, zip code 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Moura, Esperidiana A.B., E-mail: eabmoura@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, zip code 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HDPE reinforced with short piassava fiber composites were prepared by melt-mixing processing. • Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was tested as a radiation cross-linking agent. • The materials were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. • The better interfacial adhesion between fiber and HDPE matrix was observed for composites with GMA addition irradiated with radiation dose of 200 kGy. - Abstract: The effects of electron-beam radiation treatment on fiber-matrix adhesion and mechanical properties of short piassava fibers reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix were studied. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was added at 2.5% and 5.0% (on piassava fiber wt) as a cross-linking agent and the effects upon the properties of the resulting composites treated by electron-beam radiation were also examined. HDPE reinforced with short piassava fiber composites was prepared by melt-mixing processing, using a twin screw extruder machine. The materials were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. Material samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests and SEM analyses. Correlation between properties was discussed. The comparison of mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the composites showed that electron-beam radiation treatment produced a significant improvement in mechanical properties, when compared with the non-irradiated composite sample and neat HDPE. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies of the composite failure surfaces indicated that there was an improved adhesion between fiber and matrix. Examination of the failure surfaces indicated dependence of the interfacial adhesion upon the radiation dose and GMA content. Better interfacial adhesion between fiber and HDPE matrix was observed for composites with 5.0% GMA addition and treated with electron-beam

  12. The effect of respiratory cycle and radiation beam-on timing on the dose distribution of free-breathing breast treatment using dynamic IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chuxiong; Li Xiang; Huq, M. Saiful; Saw, Cheng B.; Heron, Dwight E.; Yue, Ning J.

    2007-01-01

    In breast cancer treatment, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be utilized to deliver more homogeneous dose to target tissues to minimize the cosmetic impact. We have investigated the effect of the respiratory cycle and radiation beam-on timing on the dose distribution in free-breathing dynamic breast IMRT treatment. Six patients with early stage cancer of the left breast were included in this study. A helical computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for treatment planning. A four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan was obtained right after the helical CT scan with little or no setup uncertainty to simulate patient respiratory motion. After optimizing based on the helical CT scan, the sliding-window dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) leaf sequence was segmented into multiple sections that corresponded to various respiratory phases per respiratory cycle and radiation beam-on timing. The segmented DMLC leaf sections were grouped according to respiratory phases and superimposed over the radiation fields of corresponding 4D CT image set. Dose calculation was then performed for each phase of the 4D CT scan. The total dose distribution was computed by accumulating the contribution of dose from each phase to every voxel in the region of interest. This was tracked by a deformable registration program throughout all of the respiratory phases of the 4D CT scan. A dose heterogeneity index, defined as the ratio between (D 20 -D 80 ) and the prescription dose, was introduced to numerically illustrate the impact of respiratory motion on the dose distribution of treatment volume. A respiratory cycle range of 4-8 s and randomly distributed beam-on timing were assigned to simulate the patient respiratory motion during the free-breathing treatment. The results showed that the respiratory cycle period and radiation beam-on timing presented limited impact on the target dose coverage and slightly increased the target dose heterogeneity. This motion impact

  13. Effect of electron beam radiation processing on mechanical and thermal properties of fully biodegradable crops straw/poly (vinyl alcohol) biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Fully biodegradable biocomposites based on crops straw and poly(vinyl alcohol) was prepared through thermal processing, and the effect of electron beam radiation processing with N,N-methylene double acrylamide as radiation sensitizer on mechanical and thermal properties of the biocomposites were investigated. The results showed that, when the radiation dose were in the range of 0-50 kGy, the mechanical and thermal properties of the biocomposites could be improved significantly through the electron beam radiation processing, and the interface compatibility was also improved because of the formation of stable cross-linked network structure, when the radiation dose were above the optimal value (50 kGy), the comprehensive properties of the biocomposites were gradually destroyed. EB radiation processing could be used as an effective technology to improve the comprehensive performance of the biocomposites, and as a green and efficient processing technology, radiation processing takes place at room temperature, and no contamination and by-product are possible.

  14. Progress report on the neutral beam radiation hardening study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Condit, R.H.; Hoenig, C.L.; Wilcox, T.P.; Erickson, J.

    1978-01-01

    A neutral beam injector as presently conceived directly views the plasma it is sustaining. In turn the injector is exposed to the primary fusion neutrons plus secondary neutrons and gammas streaming back up the neutral beam duct. The intent of this work is to examine representative beam lines to see how performance and lifetimes could be affected by this radiation environment and to determine how unacceptable effects could be alleviated. Potential radiation induced problems addressed in this report have been limited to: (1) overheating of cryopanels and insulators, (2) gamma flux induced electrical conductivity increase of insulators, and (3) neutron and gamma fluence induced damage to insulator materials

  15. Radiation collimator for use with high energy radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malak, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    A collimator is described for use with a beam of radiation, and in particular, for use in controlling the cross-sectional size and shape of the radiation beam and intercepting undesired off-focus radiation in an x-ray apparatus. The collimator is positioned adjacent to the source of radiation and embodies a plurality longitudinally extending leaves pivotally mounted on and between two supports, the leaves move about their pivots to close overlapping relation to define a hollow cone. The cone defines an aperture at its narrow end which can be adjusted in size and shape by rotation of the two supports which are adaptable to being moved one relative to the other, to cause an expansion or contraction of the hollow cone and correspondingly an increase or decrease of the cross-sectional size and/or shape of the radiation beam passing through the aperture

  16. Sugarcane bagasse ash reinforced HDPE composites: effects of electron-beam radiation crosslinking on tensile and morphological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Jaciele G.; Gomes, Michelle G.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Silva, Valquiria A.; Sartori, Mariana M.; Ortiz, Angel V.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental issues have led to the development of polymeric materials reinforced with fibers originated from renewable agricultural sources such as pineapple leaf, sisal, jute, piassava, coir, and sugarcane bagasse. Although sugarcane bagasse fiber residues has been extensively studied and used as a source of reinforcement of polymers, the major portion of these residues is currently burnt for energy supply in the sugar and alcohol industries and as a result of its burning, tons of ashes are produced. Due to the inorganic composition, ashes can be used as reinforcement in polymeric materials. This study presents the preparation and characterization of a composite based on HDPE matrix and sugarcane bagasse ashes as reinforcement cross-linked by electron-beam radiation. The HDPE /Ash composite (95:5 wt %) was obtained by using a twin-screw extruder machine followed by injection molding. After extrusion and injection molding process, the composites were subjected to electron-beam radiation, at radiation doses of 150 kGy and 250 kGy using a Dynamitron electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in the presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated composite specimens were characterization by tensile and MFI tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and sol-gel analysis. In addition, ash from bagasse fiber was characterized by WDXRF. (author)

  17. Sugarcane bagasse ash reinforced HDPE composites: effects of electron-beam radiation crosslinking on tensile and morphological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Jaciele G.; Gomes, Michelle G.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Silva, Valquiria A.; Sartori, Mariana M.; Ortiz, Angel V.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B., E-mail: jacielegteixeira@yahoo.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Environmental issues have led to the development of polymeric materials reinforced with fibers originated from renewable agricultural sources such as pineapple leaf, sisal, jute, piassava, coir, and sugarcane bagasse. Although sugarcane bagasse fiber residues has been extensively studied and used as a source of reinforcement of polymers, the major portion of these residues is currently burnt for energy supply in the sugar and alcohol industries and as a result of its burning, tons of ashes are produced. Due to the inorganic composition, ashes can be used as reinforcement in polymeric materials. This study presents the preparation and characterization of a composite based on HDPE matrix and sugarcane bagasse ashes as reinforcement cross-linked by electron-beam radiation. The HDPE /Ash composite (95:5 wt %) was obtained by using a twin-screw extruder machine followed by injection molding. After extrusion and injection molding process, the composites were subjected to electron-beam radiation, at radiation doses of 150 kGy and 250 kGy using a Dynamitron electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in the presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated composite specimens were characterization by tensile and MFI tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and sol-gel analysis. In addition, ash from bagasse fiber was characterized by WDXRF. (author)

  18. EXAFS-spectroscopy on synchrotron radiation beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aksenov, V L; Kuzmin, A Y; Purans, Y

    2001-01-01

    In the review the basis theoretical principles of EXAFS spectroscopy are given, as one of principal directions of an absorption spectroscopy permitting with a high accuracy to gain parameters of the short-range order in multicomponent amorphous and quasi-crystal mediums. The methods of the analysis of EXAFS spectra with allowance of effects of multiply scattering are featured. The exposition of the experimental set-ups, which realize the method of EXAFS spectroscopy on beams of SR, requirement of the monochromatization of radiation beams are given. For investigation of phase transition and external effects the energy-dispersive EXAFS spectrometer is creating at the National center of SR Kurchatov Institute which can measure the EXAFS spectrum with a time resolution 3-5 ms. The experimental results on investigation (by the EXAFS spectroscopy method) of oxides of tungsten and molybdenum are given, which have unique property: the variable valence of an ion of metal is depending on external action. The most inter...

  19. Radiosensitizing effect of Chitosan on HeLa and LN 18 brain tumor cells exposed to electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Shama; Shetty, Sukanya; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Madhu, L.N.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan has been widely used for multiple applications because it is a non-toxic biocompatible, biodegradable, and adsorptive material. A previous study has shown that low-molecular-weight chitosan (LMWC) exerts a cytotoxic effect on oral cancer cells. Although a higher concentration of LMWC in comparison to cisplatin was needed in order to kill cancer cells, it was relatively less cytotoxic to non-cancer cells. Some of the well known anticancer drugs have the property of sensitizing the cell to radiation, which will be more applicable during combination therapy of cancer. The present study was undertaken to find the radiosensitizing effect of chitosan on Hela and Brain tumor (LN18) cells against electron beam radiation (EBR). Both the cancer cell lines, Hela and LN 18 were treated with different concentration of chitosan (50 and 100 μg/ml) pre and post exposure to 4 Gy EBR. The percentage of cell viability, percentage of apoptosis and ssDNA damage in the treated cells were assessed by MTT assay, DNA diffusion assay and comet assay respectively. The obtained results showed 62.13 1 5.08 and 65.24 1 2.45 percent Hela and LN 18 viable cells at 24 hour after the exposure to 4 Gy EBR. The percentage of viability was found to be decreased in cells exposed to EBR in the presence of chitosan. Supporting to this, percentage of apoptotic cells was found to be more in treated groups (28.13 1 4.34 and 25.13 1 3.76) when compared with control (23.19 1 1.07 and 20.79 1 4.86). Treatment of HeLa and LN18 before and after the exposure of EBR showed significantly (P<0.05) more frequency of micronucleus and % of DNA damage than the 4 Gy EBR control group. These results conclude the sensitizing effect of chitosan on cancer cell line against EBR exposure. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced effects in the electron-beam irradiation of dietary flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamba, M.; Torreggiani, A.

    2004-01-01

    The harmful effects of oxidative processes in living organisms can be reduced by the dietary intake of flavonoids, a class of phenolic compounds ubiquitous in plants and widely found in a number of fruits, vegetables and beverages. Many fruits and vegetables are treated by irradiation to solve preservation problems and a radical-induced degradation of nutrients, including polyphenols, may occur. The free radical chemistry of two abundant flavonoids in food, catechin and quercetin, have been investigated by using pulse radiolysis technique. The central role of the phenoxyl-type radical and the strong influence of the state of protonation of the compounds on the pathway of formation and decay of the corresponding oxidized radicals has been evidenced from the spectral properties and chemical reactivity of the radicals derived from the attack of several oxidizing species ( z.ccirfO H, N 3 z.ccirf∼ SO 4 -z.ccirf )

  1. Deflection of atomic beams with isotope separation by optical resonance radiation using stimulated emission and the ac stark effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkholm, J.E.; Liao, P.F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Improved atomic beam deflection and improved isotope separation, even in vapors, is proposed by substituting the A.C. Stark effect for the baseband chirp of the pushing beam in the prior proposal by I. Nebenzahl et al., Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 25, page 327 (September 1974). The efficiency inherent in re-using the photons as in the Nebenzahl et al proposal is retained; but the external frequency chirpers are avoided. The entire process is performed by two pulses of monochromatic coherent light, thereby avoiding the complication of amplifying frequency-modulated light pulses. The A.C. Stark effect is provided by the second beam of coherent monochromatic light, which is sufficiently intense to chirp the energy levels of the atoms or isotopes of the atomic beam or vapor. Although, in general, the A.C. Stark effect will alter the isotope shift somewhat, it is not eliminated. In fact, the appropriate choice of frequencies of the pushing and chirping beams may even relax the requirements with respect to the isotope absorption line shift for effective separation. That is, it may make the isotope absorption lines more easily resolvable

  2. Calculation of collective effects and beam lifetimes for the LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Zisman, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    In designing a third-generation high brightness synchrotron radiation source, attention must be paid to the various collective effects that can influence beam performance. We report on calculations, performed with the code ZAP, of the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime (from both Touschek and gas scattering) for our 1-2 GeV storage ring. In addition, we estimate the growth times for both longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities. Bunch lengths of about 20 ps should be obtainable and intrabeam scattering emittance growth is small. For a limiting undulator gap of 1 cm and residual gas pressure of 1n Torr, the beam lifetime is about 5 hours in the single-bunch mode; in the multibunch mode, lifetimes in excess of 6 hours are expected. These results indicate that all performance goals for the facility should be achievable

  3. Scattered radiation in fan beam imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, P.C.; Yaffe, M.

    1982-01-01

    Scatter-to-primary energy fluence ratios (S/P) have been studied for fan x-ray beams as used in CT scanners and slit projection radiography systems. The dependence of S/P on phantom diameter, distance from phantom to image receptor, and kilovoltage is presented. An empirical equation is given that predicts S/P over a wide range of fan beam imaging configurations. For CT body scans on a 4th-generation machine, S/P is approximately 5%. Scattered radiation can produce a significant cupping artefact in CT images which is similar to that due to beam hardening. When multiple slices are used in scanned slit radiography, they can be arranged such that the increase in S/P is negligible. Calculations of scatter-to-primary ratios for first order scattering showed that for fan beams the contribution of coherent scatter is comparable to or greater than that of incoherent first scatter

  4. X-RAY RADIATION MECHANISMS AND BEAMING EFFECT OF HOT SPOTS AND KNOTS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEAR JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin; Bai, J. M.; Chen Liang; Liang Enwei

    2010-01-01

    The observed radio-optical-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 22 hot spots and 45 knots in the jets of 35 active galactic nuclei are complied from the literature and modeled with single-zone lepton models. It is found that the observed luminosities at 5 GHz (L 5 G Hz ) and at 1 keV (L 1 k eV ) are tightly correlated, and the two kinds of sources can be roughly separated with a division of L 1 k eV = L 5 G Hz . Our SED fits show that the mechanisms of the X-rays are diverse. While the X-ray emission of a small fraction of the sources is a simple extrapolation of the synchrotron radiation for the radio-to-optical emission, an inverse Compton (IC) scattering component is necessary to model the X-rays for most of the sources. Considering the sources at rest (the Doppler factor δ = 1), the synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) scattering would dominate the IC process. This model can interpret the X-rays of some hot spots with a magnetic field strength (B δ= 1 ssc ) being consistent with the equipartition magnetic field (B δ= 1 eq ) in 1 order of magnitude, but an unreasonably low B δ= 1 ssc is required to model the X-rays for all knots. Measuring the deviation between B δ= 1 ssc and B δ= 1 eq with ratio R B ≡ B δ= 1 eq /B δ= 1 ssc , we find that R B is greater than 1 and it is tightly anti-correlated with ratio R L ≡ L 1 k eV /L 5 G Hz for both the knots and the hot spots. We propose that the deviation may be due to the neglect of the relativistic bulk motion for these sources. Considering this effect, the IC/cosmic microwave background (CMB) component would dominate the IC process. We show that the IC/CMB model well explains the X-ray emission for most sources under the equipartition condition. Although the derived beaming factor (δ) and co-moving equipartition magnetic field (B' eq ) of some hot spots are comparable to the knots, the δ values of the hot spots tend to be smaller and their B' eq values tend to be larger than that of the knots, favoring

  5. Radiation processing of carrageenan using electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, L.V.; Aranilla, C.T.; Relleve, L.; Dela Rosa, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron beam accelerator has been widely employed in the modification of natural polymers for the development of materials used in biomedical and agricultural applications. The carrageenans are among these materials that show a vast potential for these types of applications. Previous studies at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute focused on the utilization of gamma radiation to modify the carrageenans. Radiation degradation of carrageenan found valuable use as plant growth promoter. Hydrogels for burn dressing using blends of carrageenan and synthetic polymers have also been made using gamma radiation. While previous studies have been focused on the use of gamma radiation to modify the carrageenans, recent studies expanded the technology to electron beam. Concretely, researches are along the following two areas: a) Degradation studies of aqueous carrageenan using the LEEB and b) Preparation of blend polysaccharide derivatives such as carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) with kappa-carrageenan (KC) by EB radiation. These works were done at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) by two PNRI colleagues under the nuclear researcher exchange program of the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The first area had already been reported and discussed in the last project meeting held in Malaysia. (author)

  6. Dosimetric effect of beam arrangement for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuchuan [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiaojuan [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Lin, Qiang; Du, Bin [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Tian, Xue; Xu, Yong; Wang, Jin; Lu, You [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Gong, Youling, E-mail: gongyouling@hotmail.com [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the lung sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with upper thoracic esophageal tumors extending inferiorly to the thorax by different beam arrangement. Overall, 15 patient cases with cancer of upper thoracic esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans using 4, 5, and 7 beams (4B, 5B, and 7B) were developed for each patient by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). All plans were evaluated with respect to dose volumes to irradiated targets and normal structures, with statistical comparisons made between 4B with 5B and 7B intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans. Differences among plans were evaluated using a two-tailed Friedman test at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The maximum dose, average dose, and the conformity index (CI) of planning target volume 1 (PTV1) were similar for 3 plans for each case. No significant difference of coverage for planning target volume 1 and maximum dose for spinal cords were observed among 3 plans in present study (p > 0.05). The average V{sub 5}, V{sub 13}, V{sub 20}, mean lung dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for the total lung were significantly lower in 4B-plans than those data in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.01). Although the average V{sub 30} for the total lung were significantly higher in 4B-plans than those in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.05). In addition, when comparing with the 4B-plans, the conformity/heterogeneity index of the 5B- and 7B-plans were significantly superior (p < 0.05). The 4B-intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan has advantage to address the specialized problem of lung sparing to low- and intermediate-dose exposure in the thorax when dealing with relative long tumors extended inferiorly to the thoracic esophagus for upper esophageal carcinoma with the cost for less conformity. Studies are needed to compare the superiority of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  7. Dosimetric effect of beam arrangement for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yuchuan; Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Lin, Qiang; Du, Bin; Tian, Xue; Xu, Yong; Wang, Jin; Lu, You; Gong, Youling

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the lung sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with upper thoracic esophageal tumors extending inferiorly to the thorax by different beam arrangement. Overall, 15 patient cases with cancer of upper thoracic esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans using 4, 5, and 7 beams (4B, 5B, and 7B) were developed for each patient by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). All plans were evaluated with respect to dose volumes to irradiated targets and normal structures, with statistical comparisons made between 4B with 5B and 7B intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans. Differences among plans were evaluated using a two-tailed Friedman test at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The maximum dose, average dose, and the conformity index (CI) of planning target volume 1 (PTV1) were similar for 3 plans for each case. No significant difference of coverage for planning target volume 1 and maximum dose for spinal cords were observed among 3 plans in present study (p > 0.05). The average V 5 , V 13 , V 20 , mean lung dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for the total lung were significantly lower in 4B-plans than those data in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.01). Although the average V 30 for the total lung were significantly higher in 4B-plans than those in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.05). In addition, when comparing with the 4B-plans, the conformity/heterogeneity index of the 5B- and 7B-plans were significantly superior (p < 0.05). The 4B-intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan has advantage to address the specialized problem of lung sparing to low- and intermediate-dose exposure in the thorax when dealing with relative long tumors extended inferiorly to the thoracic esophagus for upper esophageal carcinoma with the cost for less conformity. Studies are needed to compare the superiority of volumetric modulated arc therapy with intensity

  8. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battum, L J van; Zee, W van der; Huizenga, H

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight change of the intensity of the primary beam. The scattered radiation from an applicator changes with the field size and distance from the applicator. The amount of scattered radiation is dependent on the applicator design and on the formation of the electron beam in the treatment head. Electron applicators currently applied in most treatment machines are essentially a set of diaphragms, but still do produce scattered radiation. This paper investigates the present level of scattered dose from electron applicators, and as such provides an extensive set of measured data. The data provided could for instance serve as example input data or benchmark data for advanced treatment planning algorithms which employ a parametrized initial phase space to characterize the clinical electron beam. Central axis depth dose curves of the electron beams have been measured with and without applicators in place, for various applicator sizes and energies, for a Siemens Primus, a Varian 2300 C/D and an Elekta SLi accelerator. Scattered radiation generated by the applicator has been found by subtraction of the central axis depth dose curves, obtained with and without applicator. Scattered radiation from Siemens, Varian and Elekta electron applicators is still significant and cannot be neglected in advanced treatment planning. Scattered radiation at the surface of a water phantom can be as high as 12%. Scattered radiation decreases almost linearly with depth. Scattered radiation from Varian applicators shows clear dependence on beam energy. The Elekta applicators produce less scattered radiation than those of Varian and Siemens, but feature a higher effective angular variance. The scattered

  9. A beam radiation monitoring and protection system for AGS secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    A commercially available radiation monitor using a scintillation detector was modified for charged particle beam monitoring. The device controls access to secondary beams of the AGS and limits beam intensity

  10. Proton-beam radiation therapy dosimetry standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Beams of protons have been used for radiation therapy applications for over 40 years. In the last decade the number of facilities treating patients and the total number of patients being treated has begun go grow rapidly. Due to the limited and experimental nature of the early programs, dosimetry protocols tended to be locally defined. With the publication of the AAPM Task Group 20 report open-quotes Protocol for Dosimetry of Heavy Charged Particlesclose quotes and the open-quotes European Code of Practice for Proton-Beam Dosimetryclose quotes the practice of determining dose in proton-beam therapy was somewhat unified. The ICRU has also recently commissioned a report on recommendations for proton-beam dosimetry. There have been three main methods of determining proton dose; the Faraday cup technique, the ionization chamber technique, and the calorimeter technique. For practical reasons the ionization chamber technique has become the most widely used. However, due to large errors in basic parameters (e.g., W-value) is also has a large uncertainty for absolute dose. It has been proposed that the development of water calorimeter absorbed dose standards would reduce the uncertainty in absolute proton dose as well as the relative dose between megavoltage X-ray beams and proton beams. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  11. Fetal dose from radiotherapy photon beams: Physical basis, techniques to estimate radiation dose outside of the treatment field, biological effects and professional considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovell, Marilyn; Blackwell, C. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The presentation will review: 1. The physical basis of radiation dose outside of the treatment field. 2. Techniques to estimate and reduce fetal dose. 3. Clinical examples of fetal dose estimation and reduction. 4. Biological effects of fetal irradiation. 5. Professional considerations. Approximately 4000 women per year in the United States require radiotherapy during pregnancy. This report presents data and techniques that allow the medical physicist to estimate the radiation dose the fetus will receive and to reduce this dose with appropriate shielding. Out-of-beam data are presented for a variety of photon beams, including cobalt-60 gamma rays and x rays from 4 to 18 MV. Designs for simple and inexpensive to more complex and expensive types of shielding equipment are described. Clinical examples show that proper shielding can reduce the radiation dose to the fetus by 50%. In addition, a review of the biological aspects of irradiation enables estimates of the risks of lethality, growth retardation, mental retardation, malformation, sterility, cancer induction, and genetic defects to the fetus. A summary of professional considerations/recommendations is also provided as a guide for the radiation oncologist and medical physicist

  12. The Theory of Coherent Radiation by Intense Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Buts, Vyacheslav A; Kurilko, V.I

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by the development of high-current, high-energy relativistic electron beams this books delves into the foundations of a device and geometry independent theoretical treatment of a large collection of interacting and radiating electron bunches. Part I deals with the basics of the radiation emission of a single charged particle, paying particular attention to the effect of radiation reaction and dwelling on the corresponding well-known paradoxes. Part II investigates the collective behaviour of a high-density electron bunch where both discrete and continous beam modelling is explored. Part III treats the application to modern systems while still keeping the treatment as general as possible. This book will be mandatory reading for anyone working on the foundations of modern devices such as free electron lasers, plasma accelerators, synchroton sources and other modern sources of bright, coherent radiation with high spectral density.

  13. Cryopump behavior in the presence of beam or nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, P.K.

    1977-12-01

    Cryocondensation pumping has been proposed to be the method of gas removal for neutral-beam refueled fusion reactors. A cryocondensation pumping unit has been constructed to test design concepts and compatibility with conditions under actual beam operation and nuclear radiation environment. Various operating parameters for this test pumping unit have been measured, including pumping speeds for various gases and beam desorption effects. An experiment has been planned at the Berkeley Research Reactor to measure the desorption effects of high energy neutrons and gamma radiation. A foil activation method has been devised to accurately assess the energy spectrum of this neutron source, which is expected to be comparable to that of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  14. Over-the-air Radiated Testing of Millimeter-Wave Beam-steerable Devices in a Cost-Effective Measurement Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Kyösti, Pekka; Rumney, Moray

    2018-01-01

    antenna selection scheme is proposed. This setup is suitable for evaluation of beam-steerable devices, including both base station (BS) and user equipment (UE) devices. The requirements for the test system design are analyzed, including the measurement range, number of OTA antennas, number of active OTA...... conditions. In this article, radiated testing methods are reviewed, with a focus on their principle and applicability for beam steerable mmWave devices. To explore the spatial sparsity of mmWave channel profiles, a cost-effective simplified 3D sectored multi-probe anechoic chamber (MPAC) system with an OTA......With the severe spectrum congestion of sub-6GHz cellular systems, large-scale antenna systems in the millimeter-wave (mmWave) bands can potentially meet the high data rate envisioned for fifth generation (5G) communications. Performance evaluation of antenna systems is an essential step...

  15. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim-Reinders, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Physics (Canada); Keller, B; McCann, C; Sahgal, A; Lee, J; Kim, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.

  16. Radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    An important cause of deterioration in superconducting magnets intended for high-energy physics and fusion-reactor applications is radiation damage. The present chapter deals chiefly with the effects of electron, proton, gamma and neutron irradiation on the properties of stabilized Ti-Nb-base composite superconductors. The authors examine the particle-accelerator environment, electron irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor, proton irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor and its stabilizer, and deuteron irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor. A section discussing the fusion reactor environment in general is presented, and the two principal classes of fusion reactor based on the magnetic-confinement concept, namely the tokamak and the mirrormachine are examined. Also discussed is neutron irradiation of Cu/TiNb composite superconductors and critical current density of neutronirradiated Ti-Nb. Finally, radiation damage to stabilizer and insulating materials is described

  17. Effect of electron beam radiation on the structure and mechanical properties of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shujun; Sun Weijun; Liu Xiuju; Gao Yongzhong; Li Huisheng

    1998-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene fibers have been crosslinked by electron beam. The structure and mechanical properties of them have been investigated in different irradiation atmospheres. The obtained results show that the gel content and crosslinking density increase with the increase of dose, the swelling ratio and average molecular weight of crosslinked net decrease with the increase of dose, the tensile strength and failure elongation decrease with the increase of dose, the tensile modulus increases with the increase of dose. When the samples are irradiated in air, vacuum and acetylene atmospheres, the effect of irradiation in acetylene atmosphere is best

  18. Ultra-High Density Electron Beams for Beam Radiation and Beam Plasma Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Scott; Frigola, Pedro; Gibson, David J; Hartemann, Fred V; Jacob, Jeremy S; Lim, Jae; Musumeci, Pietro; Rosenzweig, James E; Travish, Gil; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    Current and future applications of high brightness electron beams, which include advanced accelerators such as the plasma wake-field accelerator (PWFA) and beam-radiation interactions such as inverse-Compton scattering (ICS), require both transverse and longitudinal beam sizes on the order of tens of microns. Ultra-high density beams may be produced at moderate energy (50 MeV) by compression and subsequent strong focusing of low emittance, photoinjector sources. We describe the implementation of this method used at LLNL's PLEIADES ICS x-ray source in which the photoinjector-generated beam has been compressed to 300 fsec duration using the velocity bunching technique and focused to 20 μm rms size using an extremely high gradient, permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) focusing system.

  19. Effective radiation dose and eye lens dose in dental cone beam CT: effect of field of view and angle of rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, R; Zhang, G; Theodorakou, C; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Jacobs, R; Bogaerts, R; Horner, K

    2014-10-01

    To quantify the effect of field of view (FOV) and angle of rotation on radiation dose in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and to define a preliminary volume-dose model. Organ and effective doses were estimated using 148 thermoluminescent dosemeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Dose measurements were undertaken on a 3D Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT unit (J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) using six FOVs as well as full-rotation (360°) and half-rotation (180°) protocols. For the 360° rotation protocols, effective dose ranged between 54 µSv (4 × 4 cm, upper canine) and 303 µSv (17 × 12 cm, maxillofacial). An empirical relationship between FOV dimension and effective dose was derived. The use of a 180° rotation resulted in an average dose reduction of 45% compared with a 360° rotation. Eye lens doses ranged between 95 and 6861 µGy. Significant dose reduction can be achieved by reducing the FOV size, particularly the FOV height, of CBCT examinations to the actual region of interest. In some cases, a 180° rotation can be preferred, as it has the added value of reducing the scan time. Eye lens doses should be reduced by decreasing the height of the FOV rather than using inferior FOV positioning, as the latter would increase the effective dose considerably. The effect of the FOV and rotation angle on the effective dose in dental CBCT was quantified. The dominant effect of FOV height was demonstrated. A preliminary model has been proposed, which could be used to predict effective dose as a function of FOV size and position.

  20. Beam structure of Jupiter's decametric radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K; Carr, T D

    1984-03-08

    The well-defined zones of central meridian longitude within which the probability of jovian radio emission at frequencies near 22 MHz is relatively high are known as sources A, B and C. Each consists of a component for which the emission probability is strongly correlated with Io's orbital position, and another that is Io-unrelated. The paper presents convincing evidence based on concurrent observations from two Voyager spacecraft and a terrestrial observatory that the component of source A radiation that is not correlated with Io's position is generally emitted in co-rotating searchlight beams of distinctive cross-sectional shape.

  1. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  2. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eunpi [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mostaghel, Elahe A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Marck, Brett T. [Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Matsumoto, Alvin M. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dalkin, Bruce L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Montgomery, R. Bruce, E-mail: rbmontgo@uw.edu [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  3. Multi-scale approach to radiation damage induced by ion beams: complex DNA damage and effects of thermal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances of the multi-scale approach to radiation damage caused by irradiation of a tissue with energetic ions and report the calculations of complex DNA damage and the effects of thermal spikes on biomolecules. The multi-scale approach aims to quantify the most important physical, chemical, and biological phenomena taking place during and following irradiation with ions and provide a better means for clinically-necessary calculations with adequate accuracy. We suggest a way of quantifying the complex clustered damage, one of the most important features of the radiation damage caused by ions. This quantification allows the studying of how the clusterization of DNA lesions affects the lethality of damage. We discuss the first results of molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in the environment of thermal spikes, predicted to occur in tissue for a short time after an ion's passage in the vicinity of the ions' tracks. (authors)

  4. Coherent electromagnetic radiation of a combined electron-ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, S G; Samoshenkov, Yu K [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Optiko-Fizicheskikh Izmerenij, Moscow (USSR)

    1977-07-01

    The intensity of coherent electromagnetic radiation due to interaction of a modulated electron beam with a modulated ion beam is calculated. It is shown that the radiation intensity has a sharp maximum at the frequency equal to the difference of the modulation frequency of the electron and ion beams. The results obtained are compared with those corresponding to the scattering of a modulated electron beam on randomly distributed gas ions.

  5. Design and development of radiation absorber for sighting beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, R.; Shukla, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    During the commissioning of Indus-2 , it is necessary to view the synchrotron radiation that will be emanating from the dipole exit ports. The 10 0 beam line from dipole 11 was earmarked for sighting beam line. The synchrotron radiation power density would be around 340 watts on the photon absorber inside the radiation absorber module, at the specified beam power of Indus-2. The beam striking on this photon absorber produces x-rays and Bremsstrahlung radiation. These are to be stopped and absorbed by radiation absorber. The photon absorber and the radiation absorber are integrated in a single vacuum chamber and actuated by a pneumatic cylinder connected using a bellow. Radiation absorber was needed to isolate the diagnostic components and to protect them from radiation a well as heat when they were not in use. The paper describes the design, calculation and development of the dynamic photon cum radiation absorber. The ultimate vacuum performance is also described. (author)

  6. Transition radiation electron beam diagnostic study at ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, X.Z.; Wang, X.J.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-01-01

    Recently we have started a program to develop transition radiation based electron beam diagnostics at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we will discuss a technique to estimate the lower limit in electron beam divergence measurement with single foil transition radiation and two-foil transition radiation interferometer. Preliminary experimental data from 4.5 MeV electron beam will be presented

  7. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  8. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  9. Effect of Gamma Radiation and Electron Beam on Microbiological Quality and Protein Patterns of 4 Selected Beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chookaew, S.; Eamsir, J.; Pewlong, W.; Sajjabut, S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of gamma ray and electron beam on microbiological quality and protein pattern of four selected beans: mung beans, soy beans, peanuts and black beans. All beans samples were exposed to irradiation at doses of 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 kGy before evaluated for their microbiological quality using AOAC method and protein analysis by gel electrophoresis. Results showed that the amount of bacteria, yeast and mold of irradiated mung beans and peanuts were reduced, whereas these microbiological quality values remained relatively the same for irradiated soy beans and black beans compared to non-irradiated samples. In terms of protein analysis, the protein patterns of the irradiated beans were of the same quality as the non-irradiated samples. To further tested the effect of irradiation on the bean's protein at higher doses, all four selected beans were exposed to gamma ray at 10, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kGy. We found that the protein patterns of mung beans, peanuts and black beans were altered at doses above 50 kGy.

  10. Influence of beam divergence on form-factor in X-ray diffraction radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeeva, D.Yu.; Tishchenko, A.A.; Strikhanov, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction radiation from divergent beam is considered in terms of radiation in UV and X-ray range. Scedastic form of Gaussian distribution of the particle in the bunch, i.e. Gaussian distribution with changing dispersion has been used, which is more adequate for description of divergent beams than often used Gaussian distribution with constant dispersion. Both coherent and incoherent form-factors are taken into account. The conical diffraction effect in diffraction radiation is proved to make essential contribution in spectral-angular characteristics of radiation from a divergent beam

  11. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage effects in a 316LN austenitic alloy for a high power spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Hunn, J.D.; Rice, P.M.; Lewis, M.B.; Cook, S.W.; Farrell, K.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-09-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe ++ , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of ∼ 1 microm. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss

  12. Triple Ion-Beam Studies of Radiation Damage Effects in a 316LN Austenitic Alloy for a High Power Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.

    2001-01-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe 2 , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of ∼ 1 microm. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss

  13. A simple method of dosimetry for E-beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, D.S.; Thalacker, V.P.; Chasman, J.N.; Siegel, S.

    1985-01-01

    A simple method utilizing a photochromic 'intensity label' for monitoring electron-beam sources was evaluated. The labels exhibit a color change upon exposure to UV or e-beam radiation. A correlation was found between absorbed energy and Gardner Color Index at low electron-beam doses. (author)

  14. Diffusion effects in undulator radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Agapov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum diffusion effects in undulator radiation in semiclassical approximation are considered. Short-term effects on the electron beam motion are discussed and it is shown that approaches based on diffusion approximation with drift-diffusion coefficients derived from undulator or bending magnet radiation spectrum, and on Poisson statistics with radiation spectrum defined by the local beding field, all lead to similar results in terms of electron energy spread for cases of practical interest. An analytical estimate of the influence of quantum diffusion on the undulator radiation spectrum is derived.

  15. Anomalous x-ray radiation of beam plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, S.K.; Zavyalov, M.A.; Mikhin, S.G.; Tarasenkov, V.A.; Telkovskij, V.G.; Khrabrov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of non-equilibrium stationary plasma under the conditions of the planned plasma-chemical reactors based on beam-plasma discharge were investigated. The x-ray spectrum of the beam-plasma was measured and anomalous spectral properties were analyzed. Starting with some critical pressure the anomalous radiation was added to the classical bremsstrahlung spectrum. The occurrence of anomalous radiation can be used to diagnose the condition of beam transportation in such systems. (D.Gy.)

  16. Can We Advance Proton Therapy for Prostate? Considering Alternative Beam Angles and Relative Biological Effectiveness Variations When Comparing Against Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Tracy, E-mail: tunderwood@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Moteabbed, Maryam; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: For prostate treatments, robust evidence regarding the superiority of either intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy is currently lacking. In this study we investigated the circumstances under which proton therapy should be expected to outperform IMRT, particularly the proton beam orientations and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) assumptions. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 4 treatment planning strategies were considered: (A) IMRT; (B) passively scattered standard bilateral (SB) proton beams; (C) passively scattered anterior oblique (AO) proton beams, and (D) AO intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). For modalities (B)-(D) the dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions were simulated using the TOPAS Monte Carlo platform and RBE was calculated according to 3 different models. Results: Assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1, our implementation of IMRT outperformed SB proton therapy across most normal tissue metrics. For the scattered AO proton plans, application of the variable RBE models resulted in substantial hotspots in rectal RBE weighted dose. For AO IMPT, it was typically not possible to find a plan that simultaneously met the tumor and rectal constraints for both fixed and variable RBE models. Conclusion: If either a fixed RBE of 1.1 or a variable RBE model could be validated in vivo, then it would always be possible to use AO IMPT to dose-boost the prostate and improve normal tissue sparing relative to IMRT. For a cohort without rectum spacer gels, this study (1) underlines the importance of resolving the question of proton RBE within the framework of an IMRT versus proton debate for the prostate and (2) highlights that without further LET/RBE model validation, great care must be taken if AO proton fields are to be considered for prostate treatments.

  17. Electron Beam Induced Radiation Damage of the Semiconductor Radiation Detector based on Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Yong Kyun; Park, Se Hwan; Haa, Jang Ho; Kang, Sang Mook; Chung, Chong Eun; Cho, Seung Yeon; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Tae Hyung

    2005-01-01

    A Silicon Surface Barrier (SSB) semiconductor detector which is generally used to detect a charged particle such as an alpha particle was developed. The performance of the developed SSB semiconductor detector was measured with an I-V curve and an alpha spectrum. The response for an alpha particle was measured by Pu-238 sources. A SSB semiconductor detector was irradiated firstly at 30sec, at 30μA and secondly 40sec, 40μA with a 2MeV pulsed electron beam generator in KAERI. And the electron beam induced radiation damage of a homemade SSB detector and the commercially available PIN photodiode were investigated. An annealing effect of the damaged SSB and PIN diode detector were also investigated using a Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). This data may assist in designing the silicon based semiconductor radiation detector when it is operated in a high radiation field such as space or a nuclear power plant

  18. Radiation processing of natural polymers using low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2004-01-01

    Radiation processing is widely used in Japan and the economic scale of radiation application amounted to about 71 b$ (ratio relative to GDP: 1.7%) in total. It consisted of 60 b$ (85%) in industry, 10 b$ (14%) in medicine and 1 b$ (1%) in agriculture. Irradiation using gamma-ray from 60 Co and electron beam is commercially used for the sterilization and modification of materials. Utilization of natural polymers by radiation has been investigated for recycling the natural resources and reducing the environmental pollution. Polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities, i.e. anti-bacterial activity, elicitor activity, plant growth promotion, suppression of environmental stress on plants. Radiation degraded chitosan was effective to enhance the growth of plants in tissue culture. Low energy electron beam (EB) irradiation has a variety of applications and good safety. A self-shielded low energy electron accelerator system needs an initial investment much lower than a 60 Co facility. It was demonstrated that the liquid sample irradiation system using low energy EB was effective not only for the preparation of degraded polysaccharides but also for radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL). Some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), carboxymethyl-starch and carboxymethyl-chitin/chitosan, can be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produced the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use. Treatment of soybean seeds by low energy EB enhanced the growth and the number of rhizobia on the root. (author)

  19. Observations of beam-beam effects in the LHC 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W.; Alemany, R.; Buffat, X.; Calaga, R.; Giachino, R.; Papotti, G.; Pieloni, T.; Trad, G.; Schaumann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported on the first studies of beam-beam effects in the LHC with high intensity, high brightness beams and can summarize the results as follows. The effect of the beam-beam interaction on the beam dynamics is clearly established. The LHC allows very large head-on tune shifts above nominal. The effect of long range interactions on the beam lifetime and losses (dynamic aperture) is clearly visible. The number of head-on and/or long range interactions important for losses and all predicted PACMAN effects have been observed. All observations are in good agreement with the expectations

  20. The effect of customized beam shaping on normal tissue complications in radiation therapy of parotid gland tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keus, R.; Boer, R. de; Lebesque, J.; Noach, P.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of customized beam shaping was studied for 5 patients with parotid tumors treated with a paired wedged field technique. For each patient 2 plans were generated. The standard plan had unblocked portals with field sizes defined by the largest target contour found in any CT slice. In the 2nd plan customized beam's view (BEV) designed blocks were added to both beams. The differences in those distributions between the 2 types of plans were evaluated using dose-volume histograms (DVH). As expected, the dose distribution within the target volume showed no difference. However, a considerable sparing of normal tissue was observed for the plans with customized blocks. The volume of un-necessary exposed normal tissue that received more than 90 percent of the prescribed dose, was reduced by a factor of about 4: from 165 to 44 percent on an average, if the volume is expressed as a percentage of the target volume in each patient. In particular, the homolateral mandible showed a mean decrease of 21 percent of integral dose when blocks were used. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were calculated. For a tumor dose of 70 Gy, the average bone necrosis probability was reduced from 8.4 percent (no blocks) to 4.1. percent (blocks). For other normal tissues such as nervous tissue, other soft tissues and bones a substantial reduction of integral dose was found for al patients when individual blocks were used. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Radiation disinfestation of used packagings: irradiation trials with electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.; Zaedee, I.

    1994-01-01

    Used bags, sacks and other packagings are often infested with insects and mites - pest of stored products. Such packagings provide a source of infestation of a new lot or unit of agricultural products. Cleaning of repeatedly used packages is the most important preventive method. After using, the bags and sacks should be carefully beaten with a mechanical or hand beater. When pests are found, the packages should be disinfested with hot air or hot water. Larger numbers of bags are usually fumigated in a special fumigation chamber. Disinfestation by radiation processing is potentially a feasible substitute for chemical fumigation. In the present paper trials of radiation disinfestation of used bags are described and discussed. Information about using electron beams for pest disinfestation of jute and polyvinyl chloride bags (plastic bags) is provided. The absorbed dose is the most important irradiation process parameter. The lethal effects equivalent to chemical insecticides are obtained by high doses of ionizing radiation. Control of insect and/or mite infestation of the repeatedly used packagings may be secured by ionizing radiation applied at 2-3 kGy. These doses result in complete mortality of stored product pests within a few days. The radiation must penetrate deeply into the target product at sufficient level. Gamma rays and X-rays penetrate into the treated products easily but electron radiation penetrating is much lower, depending on electron energy applied. The results of this study indicate that bags made of polyvinyl chloride may be disinfested with electron beams when are created as separate units or batches up to 50 bags. Penetrability of jute bags is lower than the plastic bags. Therefore the jute bags should be irradiated with electrons as batches containing no more than 30 bags. (author)

  2. Observation of the undulator radiation from the positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, Hideki.

    1986-02-01

    A spectral measurement of the 1st harmonic of the undulator radiation emitted from positron beam was made on Dec. 21, 1985 during a test operation of the Photon Factory storage ring with the 2.5 GeV positron beam which was stored up to 5.5 mA. In comparison to the same measurement performed with the electron beam, no appreciable difference in the spectral properties of the undulator radiation was found between the two cases under the condition of the low beam current of a few mA. (author)

  3. Dissipative effects in the beam-beam interaction of intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.; Vivaldi, F.

    1982-01-01

    This proposal seeks continuing support for an ongoing research investigation of various dynamical instabilities which arise in high energy intersecting storage rings due to the beam-beam interaction. Although the dissipative effect of radiation in beam-beam machines is anticipated to be a dominant feature affecting stability in the dynamics of colliding beams of heavy particles, almost nothing is known regarding the stability problem in many-dimensional dissipative systems. The work proposed here will extend the earlier computations on weak instabilities in many-dimensional beam-beam models to include the effect of dissipation. The object of this research is to obtain conditions for global beam stability over long time scales as a function of the machine parameters

  4. Beam-beam-induced orbit effects at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaumann, M; Fernandez, R Alemany

    2014-01-01

    For high bunch intensities the long-range beam-beam interactions are strong enough to provoke effects on the orbit. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are presented in this paper

  5. Online external beam radiation treatment simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix G.; Sopin, Ivan; Zeidan, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective and widely accepted form of treatment for many types of cancer that requires extensive computerized planning. Unfortunately, current treatment planning systems have limited or no visual aid that combines patient volumetric models extracted from patient-specific CT data with the treatment device geometry in a 3D interactive simulation. We illustrate the potential of 3D simulation in radiation therapy with a web-based interactive system that combines novel standards and technologies. We discuss related research efforts in this area and present in detail several components of the simulator. An objective assessment of the accuracy of the simulator and a usability study prove the potential of such a system for simulation and training. (orig.)

  6. Restenosis Prevention Using Photon External Beam Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    During transluminal coronary angioplasty, the balloon procedure is designed to crush the plaque and to support the weakened arterial wall by using the stent (an expandable metallic mesh). This procedure often tears the arterial wall as well. Some of the cells in the blood vessel respond to this injury by initiating repair which often leads to restenosis (reclosing) of the artery. In many cases restenosis occur despite the stent which become incorporated into the poliferative tissue that form around the lesion. But if the lesion is treated with radiation (8-30 Gy) the restenosis effect is inhibited. In this paper, the Adjoint Monte Carlo (AMC) method is used for external radiation treatment planning of the stent volume (the volume covered by the stent during a full cardiac cycle), while minimizing the damage to the organs at risk (OAR) and surrounding healthy tissue

  7. Influence of plasma-induced energy deposition effects, the equation of state, thermal ionization, pulse shaping, and radiation on ion-beam-driven expansions of plane metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, K.A.; Tahir, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper by Long and Tahir [Phys. Fluids 29, 275 (1986)], the motion of plane targets irradiated by ion beams whose energy deposition was assumed to be independent of the ion energy, and the temperature and density of the plasma, was analyzed. In this paper, the analytic solution is extended in order to include the effects of a temperature-and density-dependent energy deposition as a result of electron excitation, an improved equation of state, thermal ionization, a pulse shape, and radiation losses. The change in the energy deposition with temperature and density leads to range shortening and an increased power deposition in the target. It is shown how the analytic theory can be used to analyze experiments to measure the enhanced energy deposition. In order to further analyze experiments, numerical simulations are presented which include the plasma-induced effects on the energy deposition. It is shown that since the change in the range is due to both decrease in density and the increase in temperature, it is not possible to separate these two effects in present experiments. Therefore, the experiments which measure the time-dependent energy of the ions emerging from the back side of a plane target do not as yet measure the energy loss as a function of the density and temperature of the plasma or of the energy of the ion, but only an averaged loss over certain ranges of these physical quantities

  8. Effect of ionizing electron beam radiation on properties of edible biopolymers based on isolated soybean protein and cassava starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Vanessa Bernardo

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a substantial increase in the amount of research focusing on the development and characterization of biodegradable materials, particularly edible films. The use of polymers from renewable sources, prepared from plant products, has gained importance in this approach. Soy protein concentrate and cassava starch may be considered an alternative to petrochemical polymers. Processing by ionizing radiation can be used for the modification of polymers and macromolecules, resulting in new materials with great prospects of industrial use. The food industry, one of the traditionally most innovative industries, requires the constant development of new products. The widely known ability of film forming proteins and polysaccharides is a starting point for the development of new materials that meet the varying requirements of this pungent industry. In this work, films based on manioc starch and isolated soy protein were prepared in two different proportions and later irradiated and analyzed for their mechanical properties, color, water absorption, water vapor permeability, TGA and DSC thermal analysis between others. The films became apparently more soluble and less resistant to drilling with the increased radiation dose applied. Regarding the thermal properties, it was observed that the films with greater protein orientation are more resistant. Properties such as water vapor permeability and water absorption, the films were less permeable at the 40 kGy dose. With regard to water absorption, it was reduced as a function of the radiation dose. Films with good resistance to water vapor and with low absorption are considered efficient for food packaging. Radiation has proven to be a convenient tool in the modification of polymeric materials mainly for the production of soluble films where it is a new trend for bioactive packaging. (author)

  9. Observed Orbit Effects during Long Range Beam-Beam Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Hemelsoet, GH; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Poyer, M; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    Possible limitations due to long range beam-beam effects at the LHC have been studied and are presented in this note. With a larger number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, the crossing angles were reduced to enhance long range beam-beam effects. The analysis of the effects on the dynamic aperture and losses are documented in [1]. This note concentrates on the bunch-by-bunch orbit effects observed during the experiment.

  10. Beam-beam effects under the influence of external noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K

    2014-01-01

    Fast external noise, which gives fluctuation into the beam orbit, is discussed in connection with beam-beam effects. Phase noise from crab cavities and detection devices (position monitor) and kicker noise from the bunch by bunch feedback system are the sources. Beam-beam collisions with fast orbit fluctuations with turn by turn or multi-turn correlations, cause emittance growth and luminosity degradation. We discuss the tolerance of the noise amplitude for LHC and HL-LHC

  11. Effects of electron beam radiation on mechanical properties and on the resistance to punctures caused by Plodia interpunctella in cereal bar packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Juliana N.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Oliveira, Vitor M.; Potenza, Marcos R.; Arthur, Valter

    2009-01-01

    Plodia interpunctella is an important pest in stored products in the tropical and subtropical regions, infesting grains and flours. The adult of P. interpunctella is a small butterfly with about 15 - 20mm of spread and the female places separately of 100 the 400 eggs in groups on the grains whose hard incubation some days. This insect infesting diverse types of food packaging, depreciating the products and causing economic losses. It is therefore critical for these products a packaging that presents, in addition to good mechanical, barrier and machinability properties, a good resistance to puncture by insects, in order to prevent the contact and spread of pests in the packaged food. This study evaluates the changes on mechanical properties and puncture resistance by P. interpunctella in BOPPmet/BOPP structure, used commercially as cereal bar packaging, after electron beam irradiation. The material samples were irradiated up to 120 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electrostatic accelerator, at room temperature, in air, dose rate 11.22 kGy/s. Irradiation doses were measured using cellulose triacetate film dosimeters 'CTA-FTR-125' from Fuji Photo Film Co. Ltd. After irradiation the BOPPmet/BOPP samples were subjected to tests of puncture resistance by P. interpunctella, tensile tests and penetration resistance. The results showed significant decreases (p<0.05) in the original mechanical properties of the structures according to the radiation doses applied and effective resistance against punctures by P. interpunctella for irradiated and nonirradiated BOPPmet/BOPP samples. These results indicate that non-irradiated and irradiated BOPPmet/BOPP structure presents puncture resistance against P. interpunctella and that electron-beam irradiation, in conditions studied in this work, may turn the structure inappropriate for cereal bar packaging, due to high reduction its mechanical properties after irradiation. (author)

  12. Stabilization of synchrotron radiation x-ray beam by MOSTAB

    CERN Document Server

    Kudo, T P; Tanida, H; Furukawa, Y; Hirono, T; Ishikawa, T; Nishino, Y

    2003-01-01

    Monochromator stabilization (MOSTAB) is a feedback control system to stabilize an x-ray beam of synchrotron radiation. It applies a feedback voltage to a piezo electric transducer attached to a double-crystal monochromator. We developed MOSTAB modules and examined their performances using SPring-8 beamlines. The x-ray beam position stabilization using MOSTAB was realized simultaneously with the x-ray beam intensity stabilization. As an example of its application, we performed EXAFS measurement with MOSTAB. (author)

  13. PEP radiation shielding tests in SLAC A Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, W.; DeStaebler, H.; Harris, J.; Jenkins, T.; Murray, J.

    1977-09-01

    Radiation shielding tests designed to simulate possible conditions in and around the PEP experimental halls were conducted. The SLAC A Beam was targeted in the block tunnel at a point about midway between End Station A and Beam Dump East. At that site it was relatively easy to rearrange the concrete block structure to simulate the various shielding configurations under consideration for PEP. Extensive surveys of neutron and ionizing radiation were made. Complete results of the shielding tests are given

  14. Prevalence and Predicting Factors for Commonly Neglected Sexual Side Effects to External-Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders; Pedersen, Christian; Lindberg, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Changes in sexual function other than erectile dysfunction are sparsely investigated after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. AIM: To investigate orgasmic dysfunction, urinary incontinence during sexual activity, changes in penile morphology, and sensory disturbances in the penis...... regression analyses. RESULTS: One hundred nine patients were eligible (sexually active and had completed androgen deprivation therapy) for inclusion. Twenty-four percent reported anorgasmia, 44% reported a decreased intensity of their orgasms, and 40% reported that the time it took to reach orgasm had...... increased. Eleven percent reported anejaculation. Fifteen percent reported orgasm-associated pain. Only 4% reported urinary incontinence during sexual activity. Subjective penile length loss in excess of 1 cm was reported by 42%. Twelve percent reported an altered curvature of their penis after EBRT. Six...

  15. Beam Loss Detection at Radiation Source ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, P; Schurig, R; Langenhagen, H

    2003-01-01

    The Rossendorf superconducting Electron Linac of high Brilliance and low Emittance (ELBE) delivers an 40 MeV, 1 mA cw-beam for different applications such as bremsstrahlung production, electron channelling, free-electron lasers or secondary particle beam generation. In this energy region in case of collisions of the electron beam with the pipe nearly all beam power will be deposited into the pipe material. Therefore a reliable beam loss monitoring is essential for machine protection at ELBE. Different systems basing on photo multipliers, compton diodes and long ionization chambers were studied. The pros and cons of the different systems will be discussed. Ionization chambers based on air-isolated RF cables installed some cm away parallel to the beam line turned out to be the optimal solution. The beam shut-off threshold was adjusted to 1 μC integral charge loss during a 100 ms time interval. Due to the favourable geometry the monitor sensitivity varies less than ±50% along the beam line (di...

  16. Radiation effects at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanger, P.A.; Danby, G.T.

    1975-01-01

    Shielding, radiation damage, and radiation heating at the planned ISABELLE storage rings were considered. Radiation shielding studies were reviewed and were found to be adequate for present day dosage limits. Radiation damage could be encountered in some extreme cases, but is not expected to limit the performance of the superconducting magnets. Experiments to study the effect of radiation heating on actual magnets are recommended

  17. Beam-limiting and radiation-limiting interlocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews several aspects of beam-limiting and radiation- limiting interlocks used for personnel protection at high-intensity accelerators. It is based heavily on the experience at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) where instrumentation-based protection is used extensively. Topics include the need for ''active'' protection systems, system requirements, design criteria, and means of achieving and assessing acceptable reliability. The experience with several specific devices (ion chamber-based beam loss interlock, beam current limiter interlock, and neutron radiation interlock) designed and/or deployed to these requirements and criteria is evaluated

  18. Medium-energy ion-beam simulation of the effect of ionizing radiation and displacement damage on SiO{sub 2}-based memristive nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Alexey; Mikhaylov, Alexey; Korolev, Dmitry; Guseinov, Davud; Gryaznov, Eugeny; Okulich, Eugenia; Sergeev, Victor; Antonov, Ivan; Kasatkin, Alexandr; Gorshkov, Oleg [Lobachevsky University, 23/3 Gagarin prospect, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Tetelbaum, David, E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Lobachevsky University, 23/3 Gagarin prospect, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kozlovski, Vitali [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 29 Polytechnicheskaya street, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The principles of ion-beam simulation of the effect of fast (fission) neutrons and high-energy protons based on medium-energy ion irradiation have been developed for the Au/Zr/SiO{sub 2}/TiN/Ti capacitor-like memristive nanostructures demonstrating the repeatable resistive switching phenomenon. By using the Monte-Carlo approach, the irradiation fluences of H{sup +}, Si{sup +} and O{sup +} ions at the energy of 150 keV are determined that provide the ionization and displacement damage equivalent to the cases of space protons (15 MeV) and fission neutrons (1 MeV) irradiation. No significant change in the resistive switching parameters is observed under ion irradiation up to the fluences corresponding to the extreme fluence of 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} of space protons or fission neutrons. The high-level radiation tolerance of the memristive nanostructures is experimentally confirmed with the application of 15 MeV proton irradiation and is interpreted as related to the local nature of conducting filaments and high concentration of the initial field-induced defects in oxide film.

  19. High power beam profile monitor with optical transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denard, J.C.; Piot, P.; Capek, K.; Feldl, E.

    1997-01-01

    A simple monitor has been built to measure the profile of the high power beam (800 kW) delivered by the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab. The monitor uses the optical part of the forward transition radiation emitted from a thin carbon foil. The small beam size to be measured, about 100 μm, is challenging not only for the power density involved but also for the resolution the instrument must achieve. An important part of the beam instrumentation community believes the radiation being emitted into a cone of characteristic angle 1/γ is originated from a region of transverse dimension roughly λγ; thus the apparent size of the source of transition radiation would become very large for highly relativistic particles. This monitor measures 100 μm beam sizes that are much smaller than the 3.2 mm λγ limit; it confirms the statement of Rule and Fiorito that optical transition radiation can be used to image small beams at high energy. The present paper describes the instrument and its performance. The authors tested the foil in, up to 180 μA of CW beam without causing noticeable beam loss, even at 800 MeV, the lowest CEBAF energy

  20. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  1. Method and apparatus to monitor a beam of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Brandon W.; Chichester, David L.; Watson, Scott M.; Johnson, James T.; Kinlaw, Mathew T.

    2015-06-02

    Methods and apparatus to capture images of fluorescence generated by ionizing radiation and determine a position of a beam of ionizing radiation generating the fluorescence from the captured images. In one embodiment, the fluorescence is the result of ionization and recombination of nitrogen in air.

  2. Ionizing radiation effect study by electron beam on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene virgin and recycled industrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Salmo Cordeiro do

    2006-01-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) is an engineering plastic which has several applications, chiefly, in specific areas of the industry and medicine. UHMWPE can be even for other applications such as: port fenders, current guide, bucket coating, silos and gutters, plugs, pulleys and surgical prosthesis. This range of applications is due to the excellent technical characteristics that this material owns, such as; high resistance to wear, high resistance to impact, anti-adherence, non toxic, excellent chemical resistance, low specific weight, easy mill processing, and high resistance to fatigue. The UHMWPE type used in this work were UTEC 3041 and UTEC 6541 of the Braskem. The recycling process of UHMWPE raised much interest, because the utilization of this raw material grew over 600% in the last decade, becoming one of the most used engineering plastics for attainment of mill processed parts after polyamide. As the utilization of this polymer in the manufacturing of parts for machinery has grown, its waste is very big, because the rest of this material is thrown out, usually not being reused. The goal of this work is to recycle the UHMWPE UTEC 3041 and study the properties of this recycled and virgin material and compare the results between both with these materials submitted to different radiation dose. (author)

  3. Fast infrared detectors for beam diagnostics with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocci, A.; Marcelli, A.; Pace, E.; Drago, A.; Piccinini, M.; Cestelli Guidi, M.; De Sio, A.; Sali, D.; Morini, P.; Piotrowski, J.

    2007-01-01

    Beam diagnostic is a fundamental constituent of any particle accelerators either dedicated to high-energy physics or to synchrotron radiation experiments. All storage rings emit radiations. Actually they are high brilliant sources of radiation: the synchrotron radiation emission covers from the infrared range to the X-ray domain with a pulsed structure depending on the temporal characteristics of the stored beam. The time structure of the emitted radiation is extremely useful as a tool to perform time-resolved experiments. However, this radiation can be also used for beam diagnostic to determine the beam stability and to measure the dimensions of the e - or e + beam. Because of the temporal structure of the synchrotron radiation to perform diagnostic, we need very fast detectors. Indeed, the detectors required for the diagnostics of the stored particle bunches at third generation synchrotron radiation sources and FEL need response times in the sub-ns and even ps range. To resolve the bunch length and detect bunch instabilities, X-ray and visible photon detectors may be used achieving response times of a few picoseconds. Recently, photon uncooled infrared devices optimized for the mid-IR range realized with HgCdTe semiconductors allowed to obtain sub-nanosecond response times. These devices can be used for fast detection of intense IRSR sources and for beam diagnostic. We present here preliminary experimental data of the pulsed synchrotron radiation emission of DAΦNE, the electron positron collider of the LNF laboratory of the INFN, performed with new uncooled IR detectors with a time resolution of a few hundreds of picoseconds

  4. Charged particle beam monitoring by means of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasyuk, V.S.; Anevskij, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    Optical methods for monitoring the number of accelerated electrons and electron energy by means of beam synchrotron radiation (SR) as well as peculiarities of SR characteristics of beams with a small radius of the orbit are considered. Optical methods for charged particle beam monitoring are shown to ensure operative and precise monitoring the number of particles and particle energy. SR sources with large axial dimensions of an electron beam have specific spectral angular and polarization characteristics. If electron angular distribution at deflection from the median plane is noticeably wider than angular distribution of SR of a certain electron, relative SR characteristics of these soUrces are calculated with high accuracy

  5. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengfelder, E.; Forst, D.; Feist, H.; Pratzel, H.

    1988-01-01

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix [de

  6. Photoelectric effect photon beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is of critical importance at the NSLS. Many experimenters utilizing the NSLS photon beams can take full advantage of the small transverse dimensions of the source only if the electron orbit variation is kept below 10 to 20% of the transverse electron bunch size. Clearly the first step in a program to stabilize the orbit is to develop position monitors with the required sensitivity, reliability and dynamic range. Of great importance are monitors detecting the photon beams themselves, and also monitors measuring the position of the electron beam. In this section the authors discuss photon beam position monitors utilizing the photoelectric effects, and in the following section the use of capacitively coupled pick-up electrodes to detect electron beam position will be described. In what follows they shall proceed to consider two generic types of monitor geometries (1) Gap monitors, which are designed with the idea that the fringes of the synchrotron radiation will be measured, and the hot or fundamental beam will pass through the monitor unimpeded. (2) Area monitors, which are comprised of two triangular elements nested together similar to the electrodes of a split ion chamber or the diodes described by Siddons and Kraner or Mitsuhashi et al

  7. Performance of a pencil ionization chamber in various radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, A.F.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Pencil ionization chambers were recommended for use exclusively in the computed tomography (CT) dosimetry, and, from the start, they were developed only with this application in view. In this work, we studied the behavior of a pencil ionization chamber in various radiation beams with the objective of extending its application. Stability tests were performed, and calibration coefficients were obtained for several standard radiation qualities of the therapeutical and diagnostic levels. The results show that the pencil ionization chamber can be used in several radiation beams other than those used in CT

  8. Beam-beam effect and luminosity in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1980-01-01

    Many measurements on the beam-beam limit in SPEAR have been performed over the past years. The goal for these measurements was to find the proper parameterization of the beam-beam effect. All measurements presented were done with both beams equally blown up by control of the flip-flop phenomenon. Colliding beam measurements were made at energies as low as 600 MeV and together with earlier measurements the author presents the scaling of some relevant storage ring parameters from 600 MeV up to almost 4 GeV. (Auth.)

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  10. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hayeon; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  11. Beam diagnostics using transition radiation produced by a 100 Mev electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonka, M.; Leroy, J.; Hanus, X.; Derost, J.C.; Wartski, L.

    1991-01-01

    We report on several experiments using the optical transition radiation (OTR) produced by a 100 MeV electron beam. In using a sensitive video camera coupled with a digital image processing system an accurate and simple beam profile monitor has been devised. In measuring with a photo-multiplier the radiation emitted in a small solid angle around the direction of the OTR emission, a signal very sensitive to beam energy variations has been obtained. These experiments have been carried out on the Saclay ALS linac

  12. Radiation effect on polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Pengyang; Zhong Xiaoguang; Sun Jiazhen

    1999-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has always been regarded as a typical kind of radiation degradation polymer. But, in fact, PTFE can be induced crosslinking by γ-ray or electron beam at some special conditions (free oxygen and a narrow temperature region at 335 +- 5 degree C). Compared with radiation degradiation PTFE, cosslinking PTFE owns a lot of new properties. Some articles concerning with these have been published, which will be systematically reviewed in this

  13. The effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on the mechanical properties of polypropylene dominant natural rubber blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar Mar Oo; Khairul Zaman; Tin Hlaing

    2001-01-01

    The effects of irradiation, with dose ranging from 20 to 100 kGy on the mechanical properties of polypropylene and natural rubber blends (PP/NR blends) were investigated. Crosslinking of the PP/NR blends proved to play a major role in the improvement of the mechanical properties of the blend. The results also revealed that the blend composition the enhancement in properties depend on the irradiation dose and on the concentration of the crosslinking agent. (author)

  14. Emission of electromagnetic radiation from beam driven plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two production mechanisms for electromagnetic radiation from a plasma containing electron-beam-driven weak Langmuir turbulence are studied: induced Compton conversion and two-Langmuir-wave coalescence. Induced Compton conversion in which a Langmuir wave scatters off a relativistic electron while converting into a transversely polarized electromagnetic wave is considered as a means for producing amplified electromagnetic radiation from a beam-plasma system at frequencies well above the electron plasma frequency. The induced emission growth rates of the radiation produced by a monoenergetic ultrarelativistic electron beam are determined as a function of the Langmuir turbulence spectrum in the background plasma and are numerically evaluated for a range of model Langmuir spectra. Induced Compton conversion can play a role in emission from astrophysical beam-plasma systems if the electron beam is highly relativistic and sufficiently narrow. However, it is found that the growth rates for this process are too small in all cases studied to account for the intense high-frequency radiation observed in laboratory experiments. Two-Langmuir-wave coalescence as a means of producing radiation at 2omega/sub p/ is investigated in the setting of the earth's foreshock

  15. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A method to evaluate chemical element concentrations in samples by generating an effective polychromatic beam using as initial input real monochromatic beam data is presented. There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s)

  16. POWER BEAMING LEAKAGE RADIATION AS A SETI OBSERVABLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benford, James N. [Microwave Sciences, 1041 Los Arabis Lane, Lafayette, CA 94549 (United States); Benford, Dominic J., E-mail: jimbenford@gmail.com [NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-07-10

    The most observable leakage radiation from an advanced civilization may well be from the use of power beaming to transfer energy and accelerate spacecraft. Applications suggested for power beaming involve launching spacecraft to orbit, raising satellites to a higher orbit, and interplanetary concepts involving space-to-space transfers of cargo or passengers. We also quantify beam-driven launch to the outer solar system, interstellar precursors, and ultimately starships. We estimate the principal observable parameters of power beaming leakage. Extraterrestrial civilizations would know their power beams could be observed, and so could put a message on the power beam and broadcast it for our receipt at little additional energy or cost. By observing leakage from power beams we may find a message embedded on the beam. Recent observations of the anomalous star KIC 8462852 by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) set some limits on extraterrestrial power beaming in that system. We show that most power beaming applications commensurate with those suggested for our solar system would be detectable if using the frequency range monitored by the ATA, and so the lack of detection is a meaningful, if modest, constraint on extraterrestrial power beaming in that system. Until more extensive observations are made, the limited observation time and frequency coverage are not sufficiently broad in frequency and duration to produce firm conclusions. Such beams would be visible over large interstellar distances. This implies a new approach to the SETI search: instead of focusing on narrowband beacon transmissions generated by another civilization, look for more powerful beams with much wider bandwidth. This requires a new approach for their discovery by telescopes on Earth. Further studies of power beaming applications should be performed, potentially broadening the parameter space of the observable features that we have discussed here.

  17. Skin toxicity from external beam radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: protective effects of Resveratrol, Lycopene, Vitamin C and anthocianin (Ixor®)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Rossella Di; Calvanese, MariaGrazia; Murino, Paola; Manzo, Roberto; Guida, Cesare; Gennaro, Davide Di; Anania, Caterina; Ravo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    This is an observational study and the aim is to evaluate the effect of dietary supplements based on Resveratrol, Lycopene, Vitamin C and Anthocyanins (Ixor ® ) in reducing skin toxicity due to external beam radiotherapy in patients affected by breast cancer. 71 patients were enrolled and they were divided in two different groups: a control group (CG) of 41 patients treated with prophylactic topical therapy based on hyaluronic acid and topical steroid therapy in case of occurrence of radiodermatitis, and a Ixor-Group (IG) of 30 patients treated also with an oral therapy based on Resveratrol, Lycopene, Vitamin C and Anthocyanin (Ixor ® ) at a dose of 2 tablets/day, starting from 10 days before the radiation treatment until 10 days after the end of treatment. Skin toxicity has been related to PTV, to breast volume that received a radiation dose equal or lower than 107%, included between 107% and 110%, or greater than 110% of the prescribed dose. Moreover it's been studied the relationship between skin toxicity and the chemotherapy schedule used before treatment. We calculated in both groups the percentage of patients who had a skin toxicity of grade 2 or 3 (according to RTOG scale). Absolute risk reduction (ARR), relative risk (RR) and odds ratio (OR) have been calculated for each relationship. Control Group (CG) patients with a PTV > 500 ml presented skin toxicity G2 + G3 in 30% of cases, versus 25% of Ixor-Group (IG) [OR 0.77]. In patients with a PTV < 500 ml G2 + G3 toxicity was 0% in the IG compared to 18% in CG (OR 0.23). When Dmax was less than or equal to 107% of the prescribed dose skin toxicity was G2 + G3 in 12.5% in CG, versus 0% in IG (OR 0.73), instead when Dmax was included between 107 and 110% of the prescribed dose, G2 + G3 skin toxicity was 35% in CG and 21% in IG (OR 0.50). In patients undergoing chemotherapy with anthracyclines and taxanes, G2 + G3 toxicity was 27% in CG, against 20% in IG (OR 0.68). The protective effect of Resveratrol

  18. Dosimetric Impact of the Interplay Effect During Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy Delivery Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of the interplay effect during RapidArc stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors using flattening filter-free (FFF) beams with different dose rates. Methods and Materials: Seven tumors with motion ≤20 mm, treated with 10-MV FFF RapidArc, were analyzed. A programmable phantom with sinusoidal longitudinal motion (30-mm diameter “tumor” insert; period = 5 s; individualized amplitude from planning 4-dimensional computed tomography) was used for dynamic dose measurements. Measurements were made with GafChromic EBT III films. Plans delivered the prescribed dose to 95% of the planning target volume, created by a 5-mm expansion of the internal target volume. They comprised 2 arcs and maximum dose rates of 400 and 2400 MU/min. For 2400 MU/min plans, measurements were repeated at 3 different initial breathing phases to model interplay over 2 to 3 fractions. For 3 cases, 2 extra plans were created using 1 full rotational arc (with contralateral lung avoidance sector) and 1 partial arc of 224° to 244°. Dynamic and convolved static measurements were compared by use of gamma analysis of 3% dose difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement. Results: For 2-arc 2400 MU/min plans, maximum dose deviation of 9.4% was found in a single arc; 7.4% for 2 arcs (single fraction) and 99% of the area within the region of interest passed the gamma criteria when all 3 measurements with different initial phases were combined. Single-fraction single-arc plans showed higher dose deviations, which diminished when dose distributions were summed over 2 fractions. All 400 MU/min plans showed good agreement in a single fraction measurement. Conclusion: Under phantom conditions, single-arc and single-fraction 2400 MU/min FFF RapidArc lung stereotactic body radiation therapy is susceptible to interplay. Two arcs and ≥2 fractions reduced the effect to a level that appeared unlikely to be clinically significant

  19. Beam expansion of electromagnetic radiation in waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenberg, Ariel.

    1994-05-01

    Guided propagation has different features in the near and in the far Fresnel zones of the guiding structure. In the near zone, the field maintains the local characteristics of the source, as expressed most efficiently by the ray representation. In the far zone, on the other hand, the field adapts the global characteristics of the waveguide and the structure of guided modes. Thus the most fundamental representation at a given range is obtained if the spectral components that still maintain the local features of the source are described by rays, whereas those that have already been adapted to the global guiding environment are described by modes. This representation has also been used in order to replace transitional ray fields by an equivalent group of modes. In the hybrid beam mode representation presented here, we use Norris theorem to describe the field by a spectrum of Gaussian beams emanating radially from the source in all directions and propagating along the ray trajectories. We then show how a group of these beam basis function can be replaced by a spectrally equivalent group of modes. We therefore describe the field by an appropriately parametrized hybrid combination of modes and 'beams. The former account essentially for those spectral components that have already been adapted to the guiding environment, while the latter account for the spectral components that still maintain the local features of the source. The beam representation has certain advantages over the ray representation: It avoids the need to solve the two point problems and to calculate all the rays that pass exactly through the observation point. Instead one tracks beams that pass near, but not necessarily through, the observation point. The beam propagators are also insensitive to ray transition regions and to small artifacts of a numerically approximated medium. It therefore combines the algorithmic ease of the ray representation with the uniform features of the spectral representation. In

  20. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  1. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  2. Dosimetry of beams for negative pi-meson radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Several new facilities have been built in the last few years which can produce high intensity beams of pions. As a result, a significant amount of new data related to pion dosimetry is available. Results of beam composition, beam shaping, and collimation are given along with depth dose curves and isodose contours. Experimental data which describe the radiation quality of pion beams and the change in radiation quality with position are presented. Experimental data determining the fraction of the dose resulting from neutrons are discussed. The present techniques used in pion dosimetry are summarized, and those areas of pion dosimetry which require additional effort in order to achieve routine treatment planning for patients are reviewed

  3. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  4. Insulating materials resistance in intense radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oproiu, Constantin; Martin, Diana; Scarlat, Florin; Timus, Dan; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The paper emphasizes the main changes of the mechanical and electrical properties of some organic insulating materials exposed to accelerated electron beams. These materials are liable to be used in nuclear plants and particle accelerators. The principal mechanical and electrical properties analyzed were: tensile strength, fracture strength, tearing on fracture, dielectric strength, electrical resistivity, dielectric constant and tangent angle of dielectric losses. (authors)

  5. Silicon radiation detector analysis using back electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guye, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique for the observation and analysis of defects in silicon radiation detectors is described. This method uses an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) impinging on the rear side of the p + n junction of the silicon detector, which itself is active and detects the electron beam induced current (EBIC). It is shown that this current is a sensitive probe of localized trapping centers, either at the junction surface or somewhere in the volume of the silicon crystal. (orig.)

  6. Study of Beam-Beam Effects at PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narsky, I

    2004-01-01

    Using a self-consistent three-dimensional simulation running on parallel supercomputers, we have modeled the beam-beam interaction at the PEP-II asymmetric e + e - collider. To provide guidance for luminosity improvement, we scanned the tunes and currents in both rings and computed their impact on the luminosity and transverse beam sizes. We also studied the effects of colliding the beams with a small crossing angle. Where possible, the code was benchmarked against experimental measurements of luminosity and beam sizes, yielding an acceptable agreement

  7. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C.L.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H{sup -}, H{sup o}, and H{sup +} beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 {mu}s to 500 {mu}s length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 {sigma}) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  8. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C.L.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H - , H/sup o/, and H + beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  9. Responses of diode detectors to radiation beams from teletherapy machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinda, Lora; Nasukha

    2003-01-01

    Responses of diode detectors to radiation beams from teletherapy machines. It has been carried out responses to two sets of diode detector by using the beams of teletherapy Co-60 and medical linear accelerator. Each set of consist of 8 diode detectors was irradiated by using gamma beams from teletherapy Co-60 machines and 6 MV and 10 MV foron beams from medical linear accelerator and 6.9.12.16. and 20 MeV electron beams from medical linear accelerator. The detectors were positioned on the phantom circularly and radially and electronic equilibrium condition for all type and energy beams. It was found that every detectors had own individual response and it is not to be uniformity, since the fluctuation in between 16.6 % to 30.9 %. All detectors responses are linear to gamma and foron beams, and also for energy above 6 MeV for electron beams. Nonlinearity response occurs for 6 MeV electron beam, it is probably from the assumption of electronic equilibrium

  10. Radiation degradation of marine polysaccharides by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-01-01

    The radiation degradations of marine polysaccharides by both gamma Co-60 and electron beam irradiations are investigated. Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides can be produced by degradation of corresponding polysaccharides including marine polysaccharides such as alginates, chitin chitosan and carrageenan. The viscosity of alginate, chitosan and carrageenan solution decreases markedly with increase of the low energy electron beam irradiation time and the beam current. Furthermore, the viscosity is reduced sharply in short time for polysaccharide solution with low concentration, for instance carrageenan solution of 1%. (author)

  11. Radiation effects on Fischer-Tropsch syntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, M.; Matsuda, K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has been examined using high dose rate electron beams and Fe-Cu-diatomaceous earth catalyst. Yields of saturated hydrocarbons were found to increase by irradiation, but the yields of these compounds were decreased by raising reaction temperature without irradiation, suggesting the presence of radiation chemical process in catalytic reactions. (author)

  12. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances of mechanically de boned chicken meat irradiated with ionizing radiation: cobalt-60 and electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Pomarico Neto, Walter; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Brusqui, Armando Luiz; Haguiwara, Marcia Mayumi Harada; Miyagusku, Luciana

    2011-01-01

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 - A1 (0.3% Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Erythorbate 0.05%) and Antioxidant 2 - A2 (Rosemary Extract 0.02% and α-Tocopherol 0.01%). The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (Cn/I), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1n/I), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2n/I) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (CCo), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). Each 100 g sample was conditioned in a transparent, low density polyethylene oxygen permeable bag, frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 +- 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state, maintaining the temperature low with dry ice. The samples were irradiated with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy.h -1 ) and electron beam (2.9 kGy.s -1 ). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 +- 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychotropic bacteria count, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The addition of antioxidants was able to reduce lipid oxidation caused by the irradiation. There were no differences between the radiation sources used in the same parameters. The better antioxidants mixture in the TBARS reducing it was rosemary extract and α-tocopherol (A2). (author)

  13. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances of mechanically de boned chicken meat irradiated with ionizing radiation: cobalt-60 and electron beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Pomarico Neto, Walter; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Brusqui, Armando Luiz, E-mail: hgomes@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: abrusqui@cnen.gov.b [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Haguiwara, Marcia Mayumi Harada; Miyagusku, Luciana, E-mail: marciamh@ital.gov.b, E-mail: lucianam@ital.gov.b [Food Technology Institute (ITAL), SP (Brazil). Meat Technology Center

    2011-07-01

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 - A1 (0.3% Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Erythorbate 0.05%) and Antioxidant 2 - A2 (Rosemary Extract 0.02% and {alpha}-Tocopherol 0.01%). The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (Cn/I), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1n/I), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2n/I) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (CCo), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). Each 100 g sample was conditioned in a transparent, low density polyethylene oxygen permeable bag, frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 +- 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state, maintaining the temperature low with dry ice. The samples were irradiated with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy.h{sup -1}) and electron beam (2.9 kGy.s{sup -1}). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 +- 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychotropic bacteria count, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The addition of antioxidants was able to reduce lipid oxidation caused by the irradiation. There were no differences between the radiation sources used in the same parameters. The better antioxidants mixture in the TBARS reducing it was rosemary extract and {alpha}-tocopherol (A2). (author)

  14. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shiqing; Yan Heping

    1995-01-01

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  15. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented

  16. Simulation of beam-beam effects in tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.; Assadi, S.; Talman, R.

    1995-08-01

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of an upgrade plan Fermilab III. In the last phase of this upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron will increase by at least one order of magnitude. In order to keep the number of interactions per crossing manageable for experiments, the number of bunches will be increased from 6 x 6 to 36 x 36 and finally to ∼100 x 100 bunches. The beam dynamics of the Tevatron has been studied from Beam-Beam effect point of view in a ''Strong-Weak'' representation with a single particle being tracked in presence of other beam. This paper describes the beam-beam effect in 6 x 6 operation of Tevatron

  17. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battum, L.J. van; Zee, W. van der; Huizenga, H.

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight

  18. Radiation-beam technologies of structural materials treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    Considered in the paper are the most advanced and prospective radiation-beam technologies (RBT) for treatment of structural materials, as applied to modifying the structural-phase state in the surface layers of half-finished products and articles with the purpose to improve their service properties. Ion-beam, plasma, and ion-plasma, as well as the technologies based on the use of concentrated fluxes of energy, generated by laser radiation, high-power pulsed electron and ion beams, and high-temperature pulsed plasma fluxes are analysed. As applied to improvement of the corrosion and erosion resistance, breaking strength, friction and wear resistance, and crack resistance, the directions of the choice and the use of RBT have been considered for changes of the surface layer state by applying covers and films, and by a change of the surface topography (relief), surface structure and defects, and the element composition and phase state of materials [ru

  19. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  20. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-01-01

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as 'organs of sense' or 'eyes of the accelerator.' Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  1. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed [pt

  2. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  3. Radiation quality of beams of negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.; Brenner, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    As a negative pion stops in tissue, it attaches itself to an adjacent atom to form a mesonic atom. Subsequently, the wave function of the pion interacts with that of the nucleus and the pion is absorbed. Because the energy associated with the rest mass of the pion is greater than the separation energy of the nuclear particles, the nucleus disintegrates (pion star). In tissue, approximately 40 MeV goes into overcoming the binding energies; 20 MeV goes into kinetic energy of charged particles; 80 MeV goes into kinetic energy of neutrons. In cases where biological studies are performed with beams of negative pions, as much as 20% of the total absorbed dose in the treatment volume and about 50% of the high-LET dose (> 100 keV/μm) can result from neutrons. The degree of biological response and the variation of that response throughout the treatment volume can be altered by the neutron dose

  4. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  5. Beam-Beam effects at the CMS BRIL van-der-Meer scans

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is devoted to the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS Experiment at CERN. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors, compatible with the high luminosity experimental environments at the LHC. BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. The detectors are calibrated using van-der-Meer scans to measure the luminosity that is a fundamental quantity of the LHC beam. In van-der-Meer scans the count rate in a detector is measured as a function of the distance between beams in the plane perpendicular to beam direction, to extract the underlying beam overlap area. The goal of the van-der-Meer scans is to obtain the calibration constant for each luminometer to be used at calibration then in physics data taking runs. The note presents the overview of beam-beam effects at the van-der-Meer scan and the corresponding corrections that sh...

  6. Study of the Hollow Waveguides Physical Parameters Determined the Beam Shape Conservation of the Delivered Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-David, M.; Inberg, A.; Katzir, A.; Croitoru, N.

    1999-01-01

    The modification of the laser source beam quality is one of the important factors effect the delivery of laser radiation by a waveguide. In this paper the results of input radiation coupling, radius of bending, length, cross section diameter, waveguide internal wall roughness and coupling lens focal length influence on the beam shape delivered from the flexible hollow waveguides are presented. The conditions for which the beam shape is near to that of the source were found. A theoretical model for the radiation propagation gives quantitative representation of relation between attenuation, beam profile, divergence and above indicated parameters was developed. In this model was supposed that the guiding is produced by multiple incidences on a metal (silver) layer and a dielectric (silver iodine) over layer, by refraction and reflection. The propagation of the rays was calculated using the physical laws of the geometrical optics. For the scattering calculations a random distribution of roughness centers on dielectric layer surface was considered. It was also supposed that the value of the cross section internal diameter (ID=d) was much larger than the transmitted wavelength. The experimental results have shown that losses due to absorption of the propagated radiation in the guiding layers, mainly (AgI), generate satellites of the laser source delivered fundamental Gaussian beam. Increasing of the hollow waveguide internal diameter decreases the attenuation and increases the deviation of beam shape from Gaussian. Off center coupling produce decreasing of the fundamental mode height and generation of the coupled Gaussian beam satellites. The waveguide internal wall roughness produce losses of the coupled radiation and beam profile deviations from that of the laser source. A good correspondence between the theoretical and experimental results obtained

  7. Measurement of microwave radiation from electron beam in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, I.S.; Akimune, H. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Inome, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Matthews, J.N. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 4112-0830 (United States); Ogio, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Sako, T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Shibata, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, T., E-mail: tokonatu@konan-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan)

    2016-02-21

    We report the use of an electron light source (ELS) located at the Telescope Array Observatory in Utah, USA, to measure the isotropic microwave radiation from air showers. To simulate extensive air showers, the ELS emits an electron beam into the atmosphere and a parabola antenna system for the satellite communication is used to measure the microwave radiation from the electron beam. Based on this measurement, an upper limit on the intensity of a 12.5 GHz microwave radiation at 0.5 m from a 10{sup 18} eV air shower was estimated to be 3.96×10{sup −16} W m{sup −2} Hz{sup −1} with a 95% confidence level.

  8. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  9. INFLUENCE OF INCUBATION TIME, GAMMA RAYS AND ELECTRON BEAM ON RADIATION RESISTANCE OF SOME SELECTED PATHOGENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-HIFNAWI, H.N.; EL-TABLAWY, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of different growth phases on the radiation resistance, antibiotic susceptibility and pathogenicity of certain selected pathogens (Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus) was studied in mice. The obtained results showed that Escherichia coli was slightly more resistant to gamma radiation in 18 h than 24 h or 48 h but it was relatively more resistant to electron beam in 24 h and 48 h than 18 h. Candida albicans showed radiation resistance nearly the same in all incubation times in the case of gamma radiation while for electron beam, its radiation resistance was slightly more in 24 h and 48 h than in 18 h. On the other hand, Staphylococcus aureus recorded much more resistance to gamma radiation in the 48 h than in 24 h or 18 h whereas in the case of electron beam, it was slightly more resistant in 18 h than in 24 h and 48 h.The antibiotic susceptibility of Escherichia coli reported that the exposure to gamma radiation at 3 kGy and electron beam at 6 kGy increase the susceptibility to the nalidixic acid and nitrofurantoin. When Candida albicans was exposed to 3 kGy gamma radiation and 6 kGy electron beam, the same sensitivity to nystatin was observed in comparison with the unexposed one while the sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to some antibiotics (amoxicillin, nitrofurantoin and tetracycline) was decreased after exposure to gamma radiation at 0.75 and 2 kGy and electron beam at 6 kGy, but for other antibiotics (trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole), the sensitivity was increased at 6 kGy electron beam.The lethality percent recorded after the oral ingestion of the mice with the unexposed Escherichia coli and Candida albicans were 25% and 100%, respectively, and for 6 kGy exposure to electron beam was 0% . The cotaneous disease and abscesses caused by the intradermal injection of the mice with unexposed Staphylococcus aureus was 75% and for 6 kGy exposure to electron beam was 25%.

  10. Cherenkov Radiation from a Pseudospark-sourced Electron Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.D.R.; Yin, H.; Cross, A.W.; He, W.; Ronald, K.

    2003-01-01

    Electron beam generation from a multi-gap pseudospark discharge was investigated. A pseudospark-sourced electron beam has two phases, an initial hollow cathode phase (HCP) beam followed by a conductive phase (CP) beam. The beam brightness was measured by a field-free collimator to be 109 and 1011 Am-2rad-2 for the hollow cathode phase (HCP) beam and the conductive phase (CP) beam respectively. The initial HCP beam from an eight-gap pseudospark discharge was applied in a Cherenkov interaction between the electron beam and the TM01 mode of a 60-cm long alumina-lined waveguide. It was found experimentally that significant microwave radiation was generated only when the dielectric was present in the interaction space. If there was no dielectric in the cylindrical waveguide, then a very small background microwave output was detected even when the guide B-field was absent. This demonstrated, in conjunction with the observation that the microwave output signal was independent of the guide magnetic field over the range 0.13 to 0.26 T, that the radiation from the experiment was due to the Cherenkov interaction mechanism. In addition, two components of the microwave pulse were observed corresponding to the two energy components of the electron beam during the pseudospark discharge breakdown. These results demonstrated that the microwave radiation was generated by Cherenkov amplification of the broadband emission from the pseudospark discharge itself. A background signal level of around 100 W was measured in the frequency range 20 - 50 GHz with a percentage of (2.7 ± 0.6)% in the frequency range 25.5 - 28.6 GHz, when the dielectric lining was removed from the maser. The frequency of the microwave output after the Cherenkov maser interaction was measured to be mainly around 25.5 GHz and the dominating mode was identified as being TM01. The duration of the microwave pulse was approximately 80 ns, with a peak power of around 2 ± 0.2 kW. The gain of this amplifier was measured

  11. Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy has side effects because it not only kills or slows the growth of cancer cells, it can also affect nearby healthy cells. Many people who get radiation therapy experience fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of the body that is being treated. Learn more about possible side effects.

  12. External Beam Radiation in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Billan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC is surgery followed in some cases by adjuvant treatment, mostly with radioactive iodine (RAI. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is less common and not a well-established treatment modality in DTC. The risk of recurrence depends on three major prognostic factors: extra-thyroid extension, patient’s age, and tumor with reduced iodine uptake. Increased risk for recurrence is a major factor in the decision whether to treat the patient with EBRT. Data about the use of EBRT in DTC are limited to small retrospective studies. Most series have demonstrated an increase in loco-regional control. The risk/benefit from giving EBRT requires careful patient selection. Different scoring systems have been proposed by different investigators and centers. The authors encourage clinicians treating DTC to become familiarized with those scoring systems and to use them in the management of different cases. The irradiated volume should include areas of risk for microscopic disease. Determining those areas in each case can be difficult and requires detailed knowledge of the surgery and pathological results, and also understanding of the disease-spreading pattern. Treatment with EBRT in DTC can be beneficial, and data support the use of EBRT in high-risk patients. Randomized controlled trials are needed for better confirmation of the role of EBRT.

  13. Influence of filling pattern structure on synchrotron radiation and beam spectrum at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, Johannes; Brosi, Miriam; Bruendermann, Erik; Caselle, Michele; Blomley, Edmund; Hiller, Nicole; Kehrer, Benjamin; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Schoenfeldt, Patrik; Schuh, Marcel; Schwarz, Markus; Siegel, Michael [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We present the effects of the filling pattern structure in multi-bunch mode on the beam spectrum. This effects can be seen by all detectors whose resolution is better than the RF frequency, ranging from stripline and Schottky measurements to high resolution synchrotron radiation measurements. Our heterodyne measurements of the emitted coherent synchrotron radiation at 270 GHz reveal the discrete frequency harmonics around the 100'000 revolution harmonic of ANKA, the synchrotron radiation facility in Karlsruhe, Germany. Significant effects of bunch spacing, gaps between bunch trains and variations in individual bunch currents on the emitted CSR spectrum are described by theory and supported by observations.

  14. Optical breakdown of helium in Bessel laser radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N E; Pleshanov, I V; Margolin, L Ya; Pyatnitskii, Lev N

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used to investigate the dynamics of formation of a helium plasma in Bessel beams, shaped by an axicon and a phase converter from a laser radiation pulse with Gaussian temporal and radial intensity profiles. The beam intensities at the breakdown threshold are determined as a function of the pulse duration for various radial field distributions in a beam characterised by Bessel functions of order m (m = 0 - 5). It is shown that in the investigated range of parameters the threshold intensity is independent of m. The temporal and spatial evolution of the resultant plasma, and the dependence of the plasma characteristics on the pulse parameters are considered. Conditions are found for the formation of tubular plasma channels in beams of orders m≥1. The adopted model of the optical breakdown of helium is shown to be satisfactory because of a good agreement between the results of calculations of the moment of breakdown in a zeroth-order Bessel beam and experimental results. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  15. Single beam stability, incoherent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.; Bassetti, M.; Faugeras, P.; Hilaire, A.; Montague, B.; Potaux, D.; Scandale, W.; Vos, L.; Zyngier, H.

    1980-01-01

    The group first realized that it was difficult in the available time to make an overall review of the many subjects implied by the group's heading. It therefore restricted itself to a few separate topics, which are: 1. Working point. 2. Non-linear coupling. 3. Effect of octupoles. 4. Chromaticity correction and tracking. 5. Vertical dispersion. 6. Beam separation. 7. Remark on non-linear lens experiments. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Rice Husk Modification with Liquid Natural Rubber and Exposure to Electron Beam Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of NR/ HDPE/ Rice Husk Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, C.E.; Ishak Ahmad; Ibrahim Abdullah; Dahlan Mohd

    2011-01-01

    Rice husk (RH) powder is a natural fibre capable of reinforcing natural rubber thermoplastic (TPNR) NR/ HDPE composites on specific modification of the particle surface. In this study the modification of RH powder involved pre-treatment with 5 % sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, soaking in LNR solution and exposure of LNR coated RH to electron beam (EB) irradiation. Preparation of NR/ HDPE/ RH composites was via melt-mixing in an internal mixer at predetermined conditions. Morphology study of the composites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a homogeneous distribution of modified RH particles and particle-matrix interaction in the composite. Modified RH filled composites exhibited a significant change in mechanical properties. The maximum stress and impact strength were 6.7 MPa and 13.2 kJ/ m 2 , respectively at 20 kGy radiation, while the tensile modulus was 79 MPa at 30 kGy dose. The interfacial RH-TPNR interaction for the LNR-EB treated RH particles had improved in the EB dosage range of 20-30 kGy. However, over exposure to radiation caused degradation of rubber coat and interaction between particles to increase. Agglomeration of filler particles would occur and caused inhomogeneous distribution of filler in the composite. (author)

  17. Radiation optic neuropathy after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Hoving, Marjanke A.; Links, Thera P.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Weeme, Cees A. ter; Canrinus, Alof A.; Szabo, Ben G.; Pott, Jan-Willem R.

    2003-01-01

    For diagnosing radiation optic neuropathy (RON) ophthalmological and imaging data were evaluated from 63 acromegalic patients, irradiated between 1967 and 1998. Two patients developed RON: one patient in one optic nerve 10 years and another patient in both optic nerves 5 months after radiation therapy. RON is a rare complication after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly, which can occur after a considerable latency period

  18. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  19. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-01-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ( 37 Cs and 60 Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ( 90 Sr+ 9' 0Y e 204 Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  20. Gelatin/piassava composites treated by Electron Beam Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takinami, Patricia Yoko Inamura; Shimazaki, Kleber; Moura, Esperidiana Augusta Barretos de; Mastro, Nelida Lucia del; Colombo, Maria Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    Piassava (Attalea funifera Mart) fiber has been investigated as reinforcement for polymer composites with potential for practical applications. The purpose of the present work was to assess the behavior of specimens of piassava fiber and gelatin irradiated with electron beam at different doses and percentage. The piassava/gelatin specimens were made with 5 and 10% (w/w) piassava fiber, gelatin 25% (w/w), glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer. The samples were irradiated up to 40 kGy using an electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. Preliminary results showed mechanical properties enhancement with the increase in radiation dose. (author)

  1. Beam Angular Divergence Effects in Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsky, T. N.; Hahto, S. K.; Bilbrough, D. G.; Jacobson, D. C.; Krull, W. A.; Goldberg, R. D.; Current, M. I.; Hamamoto, N.; Umisedo, S.

    2008-01-01

    An important difference between monomer ion beams and heavy molecular beams is a significant reduction in beam angular divergence and increased on-wafer angular accuracy for molecular beams. This advantage in beam quality stems from a reduction in space-charge effects within the beam. Such improved angular accuracy has been shown to have a significant impact on the quality and yield of transistor devices [1,12]. In this study, B 18 H x + beam current and angular divergence data collected on a hybrid scanned beam line that magnetically scans the beam across the wafer is presented. Angular divergence is kept below 0.5 deg from an effective boron energy of 200 eV to 3000 eV. Under these conditions, the beam current is shown analytically to be limited by space charge below about 1 keV, but by the matching of the beam emittance to the acceptance of the beam line above 1 keV. In addition, results of a beam transport model which includes variable space charge compensation are presented, in which a drift mode B 18 H x + beam is compared to an otherwise identical boron beam after deceleration. Deceleration is shown to introduce significant space-charge blow up resulting in a large on-wafer angular divergence. The divergence effects introduced by wafer charging are also discussed.

  2. Radiation effects on polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Yuichi; Kondo, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Takenori; Numajiri, Masaharu; Miura, Taichi; Doi, Shuji; Ohnishi, Toshihiro.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of γ-irradiation on electrical conductivity of polyaniline were investigated. A drastic increase of the conductivity due to radiation-induced doping was observed in combined systems of polyaniline films and halogen-containing polymers. This effect can be applied to measure an integrated radiation dose. (author)

  3. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  4. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  5. A detector for localizing diverging beams of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, Robert.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a detector for localizing diverging radiation beams, adapted to provide the angular distribution of nuclear events. That detector comprises a casing filled with a fluid adapted to produce electric charges under radiations and provided with a front-side and a rear-side, means for generating an electric field at right angles to portions of parallel surfaces of revolution having in common an axis of revolution contained in the place of symmetry, and a plane unit for localizing electric charges mounted at the rear of said means, the initial portion of the beam being on the axis of revolution. This can be applied to X-ray diffraction and to neutron diffraction [fr

  6. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, R.K., E-mail: dr_rajendra_purohit@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Govt. Dungar College, Bikaner (India); Bugalia, Saroj [Department of Zoology, S.K. Kalyan College, Sikar (India); Dakshene, Monika [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College, Kota (India)

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  7. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Bugalia, Saroj; Dakshene, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  8. Generating AN Optimum Treatment Plan for External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabus, Irwin

    1990-01-01

    The application of linear programming to the generation of an optimum external beam radiation treatment plan is investigated. MPSX, an IBM linear programming software package was used. All data originated from the CAT scan of an actual patient who was treated for a pancreatic malignant tumor before this study began. An examination of several alternatives for representing the cross section of the patient showed that it was sufficient to use a set of strategically placed points in the vital organs and tumor and a grid of points spaced about one half inch apart for the healthy tissue. Optimum treatment plans were generated from objective functions representing various treatment philosophies. The optimum plans were based on allowing for 216 external radiation beams which accounted for wedges of any size. A beam reduction scheme then reduced the number of beams in the optimum plan to a number of beams small enough for implementation. Regardless of the objective function, the linear programming treatment plan preserved about 95% of the patient's right kidney vs. 59% for the plan the hospital actually administered to the patient. The clinician, on the case, found most of the linear programming treatment plans to be superior to the hospital plan. An investigation was made, using parametric linear programming, concerning any possible benefits derived from generating treatment plans based on objective functions made up of convex combinations of two objective functions, however, this proved to have only limited value. This study also found, through dual variable analysis, that there was no benefit gained from relaxing some of the constraints on the healthy regions of the anatomy. This conclusion was supported by the clinician. Finally several schemes were found that, under certain conditions, can further reduce the number of beams in the final linear programming treatment plan.

  9. Impurity radiation from a beam-plasma neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    Impurity radiation, in a worst case evaluation for a beam-plasma neutron source (BPNS), does not limit performance. Impurities originate from four sources: (a) sputtering from walls by charge exchange or alpha particle bombardment, (b) sputtering from limiters, (c) plasma desorption of gas from walls and (d) injection with neutral beams. Sources (c) and (d) are negligible; adsorbed gas on the walls of the confinement chamber and the neutral beam sources is removed by the steady state discharge. Source (b) is negligible for impinging ion energies below the sputtering threshold (T i ≤ 0.025 keV on tungsten) and for power densities to the limiter within the capabilities of water cooling (30-40 MW/m 2 ); both conditions can be satisfied in the BPNS. Source (a) radiates 0.025 MW/m 2 to the neutron irradiation samples, compared with 5 to 10 MW/m 2 of neutrons; and radiates a total of 0.08 MW from the plasma column, compared with 60 MW of injected power. The particle bombardment that yields source (a) deposits an average of 2.7 MW/m 2 on the samples, within the capabilities of helium gas cooling (10 MW/m 2 ). An additional worst case for source (d) is evaluated for present day 2 to 5 s pulsed neutral beams with 0.1% impurity density and is benchmarked against 2XIIB. The total radiation would increase a factor of 1.5 to ≤ 0.12 MW, supporting the conclusion that impurities will not have a significant impact on a BPN. (author). 61 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Man and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the effects of ionizing radiation on man in a simple, popular, detailed and generally valid manner and gives a comprehensive picture of the concepts, elements, principles of function, and perspectives of medical radiobiology. Radiobiology in general is explained, and its application in research on the causes of radiolesions and radiation diseases as well as a radiotherapy and radiation protection is discussed in popular form. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book covers all aspects of biological radiation effects. The physical basis is dealt with in some detail, and the effects at the subcellular and the cellular level are discussed, taking into account modern developments and techniques. The effects on the human organism are reviewed, both from the point of view of applications in medicine as well as with regard to radiation hazards (teratogenic, gonadal and carcinogenic effects)

  12. Transverse resonance-radiation pressure on atomic beams and the influence of fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Ashkin, A.; Pearson, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated that a beam of neutral sodium atoms can be focused to a spot diameter of approx. 50 μ using the transverse dipole resonance-radiation pressure exerted by a 40 mW laser beam. Simple analysis shows that in some cases the spot sizes are limited by the random fluctuations of the spontaneous radiation pressure; with 1 W of laser power, spot sizes less than 10 μ should be attainable. The effects of heating by spontaneous scattering can have important detrimental effects in other applications of resonance - radiation pressure on atoms, such as the slowing or guiding of atoms. Consideration of heating effects is of paramount importance in the design of optical traps for neutral atoms. (KBE)

  13. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  14. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  15. Biophysical radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidorra, J.

    1982-07-01

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.) [de

  16. Beam loading effects for two-beam ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lanfa; Lin Yuzheng; Tong Dechun

    1999-01-01

    An analytic treatment of multi-bunch potential well distortion for a two-beam storage ring is presented. The longitudinal wake effects are separated into: the mode loss, the synchrotron tune shift (both due to potential well distortion) and the coherent multi-bunch coupling. Here, only the first two effects are studied. Resulting simple analytic formulas describe the mode loss and the synchrotron tune shift experienced by a given bunch within the two-beam, as a function of the high order mode's parameters. One can get immediately a simple quantitative answer in term of the mode loss and the synchrotron tune shift experienced by each bunch from these formulas, so the authors can know how to modify the existing configuration of parasitic cavity resonance (via frequency tuning) so that the resulting potential well distortion effects are minimized. When the RF cavities are symmetrically distributed about the interaction points, the two beams will have same beam loading effects, so the authors can compensate the phase shift of the two beam using the same method as in one beam case

  17. Radiation effects in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in the studies of radiation effects in gases are discussed. By means of ionization- excitation- and electron-capture yields various applications are characterized: ionization detectors, X-ray detectors, radionuclide battery, and radiation-induced chemical gas-phase reactions. Some new results of basic research in respect to the SO 2 oxidation are discussed. (author)

  18. Effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.

    1984-08-01

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs [fr

  19. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam TM STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy

  20. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul national university Bundang hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam{sup TM} STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy.

  1. Beam tests of proton-irradiated PbWO$_4$ crystals and evaluation of double-sided read-out technique for mitigation of radiation damage effects

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchini, Marco Toliman

    2016-01-01

    The harsh radiation environment in which detectors will have to operate during the High Luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) represents a crucial challenge for many calorimeter technologies. In the CMS forward calorimeters, ionizing doses and hadron fluences will reach up to 300 kGy (at a dose rate of 30 Gy/h) and $2\\times10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$, respectively, at the pseudorapidity region of $\\lvert \\eta\\rvert=2.6$. To evaluate the evolution of the CMS ECAL performance in such conditions, a set of PbWO$_4$ crystals, exposed to 24 GeV protons up to integrated fluences between $2.1\\times10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $1.3\\times10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$, has been studied in beam tests. A degradation of the energy resolution and a non-linear response to electron showers are observed in damaged crystals. Direct measurements of the light output from the crystals show the amplitude decreasing and pulse becoming faster as the fluence increases. The evolution of the performance of the PbWO$_4$ crystals has been well understood and parame...

  2. A study about the effects of gamma radiation and electron beam irradiation in the detection of genetically modified maize (Zea Mays)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crede, Ricardo Gandara

    2005-01-01

    Cell-220 and electron beam irradiation (Radiation Dynamics Inc. USA) were used (Atomic Energy of Canada, LTD), applying doses of 1, 25 and 50 kGy. After irradiating the samples, the detection results were compared with non-irradiated samples, showing that, when the PCR technique, was used, the irradiation does not affect the perception of the genetically modified maize. (author)

  3. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  4. Effect of electron beam on in vitro cultured orchid organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jaihyunk; Bae, Seho; Bae, Changhyu [Sunchon National Univ., Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Suk; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Ionizing radiations have been effective mutagen sources to overcome the limitation of the useful genetic resources in natural environment. The study was conducted to investigate an effect of electron beam on organogenesis, growth patterns and genetic variation in the irradiated orchid organs. The in utero cultured rhizomes of orchids were irradiated with the electron beam in the dose range of 15Gy to 2240Gy under the condition of various beam energy and beam current. Significant decreases in survival, growth and organogenesis were observed by increase of intensity of electron beam irradiation. The irradiation intensity of lethal dose 50 of the in utero cultured orchid was estimated as approximately 500Gy to 1000Gy under 10MeV/n, and 1000Gy was optimal for growth and organogenesis of the cultures under 10MeV/n with 0.05mA treatment, and 15Gy {approx} 48Gy under 2MeV/n and 0.5mA electron beam condition. RAPD and ISSR analyses for the electron beam irradiated organs were performed to analyze genetic variation under the electron beam condition. Both of RAPD and ISSR analyses showed higher polymorphic rate in the electron-beam irradiated C. gangrene and C. Kaner.

  5. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D y is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10 10 particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 μm horizontally and 0.55 μm vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H D of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit

  6. Simulating Transient Effects of Pulsed Beams on Beam Intercepting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Herta; Noah Messomo, Etam

    2011-01-01

    The development in the physics community towards higher beam power through the possibilities of particle accelerators lead to challenges for the developers of elements which are exposed to effect of particle beams (beam intercepting devices = BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases - their highly pulsed nature has to be taken into account. The physics requirements are sometimes opposed to the current state of the art. As one possibility of many in combining the different aspects for these ambitious demands, two highly developed computer programs, namely FLUKA and ANSYS AUTODYN, were joined for this dissertation. The former is a widely enhanced Monte-Carlo-code which specializes on the interaction of particles with static matter, while the latter is a versatile explicit code for the simulation of highly dynamic processes. Both computer programs were developed intensively over years and are still continuously enhanced in o...

  7. Dose estimation of heavy ion beam by microdosimetry. Examination of the method to estimate biological effect from physical measurement of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Yuki; Sakama, Makoto; Tsuzuki, Daigo; Abe, Kyoko; Saotome, Naoya; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Matsumoto, Kouki; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2007-01-01

    The absorbed dose (AD) of heavy ion (HI) beam (here, carbon beam) in HI therapy (unit, EGy) (D st ) to exert the actual clinical effect is for the irradiation of tumors deep in the body and is thus estimated by AD corrected with the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of clinical endpoint: i.e., the relation is expressed by the equation RBE=D st /D rad | same-effect (D rad is AD of the reference X-ray to yield the same effect as the HI used for the intended clinical endpoint). This paper describes the process of the estimation in the title with consideration of depth dependences of AD of HI in accordance to Bragg curve, and of biological AD as determined by colony assay of human salivary gland tumor cells: in NIRS, the desired AD in HI therapy is calculated by multiplying 1.5 to physically measured AD of HI at RBE 10% (10% survival of the cells). This factor has been obtained by microdosimetry of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) ions in NIRS with a small spherical proportional counter (LET-1/2, Far West Technology) of the diameter 1.27 cm having the tissue equivalent plastic wall and chamber filled with 4.4 kPa of propane-based gas to make the tissue-equivalence size 1.0 μm diameter. The measuring principle is based on the microdosimetric kinetic model reported previously. The calculated dose is found to agree with AD in HI therapeutic planning within 10% fluctuation. (R.T.)

  8. Ionizing radiation, radiation sources, radiation exposure, radiation effects. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 deals with radiation exposure due to artificial radiation sources. The article describes X-ray diagnosis complete with an analysis of major methods, nuclear-medical diagnosis, percutaneous radiation therapy, isotope therapy, radiation from industrial generation of nucler energy and other sources of ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the authors attempt to asses total dose, genetically significant dose and various hazards of total radiation exposure by means of a summation of all radiation impacts. (orig./WU) [de

  9. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  10. Echo-enabled tunable terahertz radiation generation with a laser-modulated relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme to generate narrow-band tunable terahertz (THz radiation using a variant of the echo-enabled harmonic generation is analyzed. We show that by using an energy chirped beam, THz density modulation in the beam phase space can be produced with two lasers having the same wavelength. This removes the need for an optical parametric amplifier system to provide a wavelength-tunable laser to vary the central frequency of the THz radiation. The practical feasibility and applications of this scheme are demonstrated numerically with a start-to-end simulation using the beam parameters at the Shanghai Deep Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser facility (SDUV. The central frequency of the density modulation can be continuously tuned by either varying the chirp of the beam or the momentum compactions of the chicanes. The influence of nonlinear rf chirp and longitudinal space charge effect have also been studied in our article. The methods to generate the THz radiation in SDUV with the new scheme and the estimation of the radiation power are also discussed briefly.

  11. Theory for beam-plasma millimeter-wave radiation source experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on theoretical studies for millimeter-wave plasma source experiments. In the device, millimeter-wave radiation is generated in a plasma-filled waveguide driven by counter-streaming electron beams. The beams excite electron plasma waves which couple to produce radiation at twice the plasma frequency. Physics topics relevant to the high electron beam current regime are discussed

  12. E-Beam Effects on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Ook; Jo, Gyu Seong; Kim, Hyeon Daek; Kim, Hyunk Taek; Kim, Jong Yeol; Kim, Chan Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Three different CMOS active pixel structures manufactured in a deep submicron process have been evaluated with electron beam. The devices were exposed to 1 MeV electron beam up to 5kGy. Dark current increased after E-beam irradiation differently at each pixel structure. Dark current change is dependent on CMOS pixel structures. CMOS image sensors are now good candidates in demanding applications such as medical image sensor, particle detection and space remote sensing. In these situations, CISs are exposed to high doses of radiation. In fact radiation is known to generate trapped charge in CMOS oxides. It can lead to threshold voltage shifts and current leakages in MOSFETs and dark current increase in photodiodes. We studied ionizing effects in three types of CMOS APSs fabricated by 0.25 CMOS process. The devices were irradiated by a Co 60 source up to 50kGy. All irradiation took place at room temperature. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. From the above figure, the change of dark current is dependent on the pixel structure. Double junction structure has shown relatively small increase of dark current after electron beam irradiation. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. The contribution of the total ionizing dose to the dark current increase is small here, since the devices were left unbiased during the electron beam irradiation. Radiation hardness in dependent on the pixel structures. Pixel2 is relatively vulnerable to radiation exposure. Pixel3 has radiation hardened structure

  13. Space charge effect in an accelerated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually assumed that the space charge effects in relativistic beams scale with the energy of the beam as γ^{-2}, where γ is the relativistic factor. We show that for a beam accelerated in the longitudinal direction there is an additional space charge effect in free space that scales as E/γ, where E is the accelerating field. This field has the same origin as the “electromagnetic mass of the electron” discussed in textbooks on electrodynamics. It keeps the balance between the kinetic energy of the beam and the energy of the electromagnetic field of the beam. We then consider the effect of this field on a beam generated in an rf gun and calculate the energy spread produced by this field in the beam.

  14. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  15. Treatment of local recurrent breast cancer by divided dose electron beam radiation twice a week

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Ichiro; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Miyaishi, Kazuo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Kimura, Makoto

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of divided dose electron beam radiation twice a week (with a focal dose of 600 rads at a time) on local recurrent tumors of postoperative breast cancer and to compare it with the conventional photon radiation in the hope that it might be better tolerated by the patients, with less damage to normal skin and lung tissues. Out of 261 patients with breast cancer who came to the Department of Radiology, at Gunma Univ. Hospital, Maebashi, during the period Jan., 1970, through Jun., 1976, 41 patients who received electron beam radiation for local recurrence (in 81 sites) and 31 who received prophylactic radiation over the chest wall postoperatively. Tumors completely disappeared from 73 out of 81 sites irradiated for local recurrence (accounting 90% of the 81 sites). The local recurrent lesions were classified to the ''disseminated'' and the ''focal'' type to compare the effects of the radiation, and it was found that the radiation eliminated the tumors from all (100%) of the 63 sites of the former type, while the radiation was capable of eliminating the tumors from only 10 out of the 18 sites of the latter type (56%). When the focal type tumors were classified by histopathologic typing to compare the effects of the radiation, the radiation was assessed effective in papillotubular carcinoma, medullary tubular carcinoma and scirrhous carcinoma in the decreasing sequence of significance. Pulmonary disorders occurred in 12% of all the observed sites. However, it is possible to further reduce this incidence by the adequate use of the tissue compensating filter, Mix-R. A skin disorder (erosion) was observed in 59% of all the sites observed. However, it may be anticipated that the topical application of a suitable corticoid (Beta-methasone-17-valerate cream) preparation will by prophylactically effective. (auth.)

  16. An adaptive crystal bender for high power synchrotron radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Perfect crystal monochromators cannot diffract x-rays efficiently, nor transmit the high source brightness available at synchrotron radiation facilities, unless surface strains within the beam footprint are maintained within a few arcseconds. Insertion devices at existing synchrotron sources already produce x-ray power density levels that can induce surface slope errors of several arcseconds on silicon monochromator crystals at room temperature, no matter how well the crystal is cooled. The power density levels that will be produced by insertion devices at the third-generation sources will be as much as a factor of 100 higher still. One method of restoring ideal x-ray diffraction behavior, while coping with high power levels, involves adaptive compensation of the induced thermal strain field. The design and performance, using the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), of a silicon crystal bender constructed for this purpose are described

  17. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  18. Radiation. Doses, effect, risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapirev, E.; Todorov, P.

    1994-12-01

    This book outlines in a popular form the topic of ionizing radiation impacts on living organisms. It contains data gathered by ICRP for a period of 35 years. The essential dosimetry terms and units are presented. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are described. Possible biological radiation effects and diseases as a consequence of external and internal irradiation at normal and accidental conditions are considered. An assessment of genetic risk for human populations is presented and the concept of 'acceptable risk' is discussed

  19. Study of hard braking x-ray radiation on the radiation-beam complex ''TEMP''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batrakov, A.B.; Glushko, E.G.; Egorov, A.M.; Zinchenko, A.A.; Litvinenko, V.V.; Lonin, Yu.F.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Rybka, A.V.; Fedotov, S.I.; Uvarov, V.T.

    2015-01-01

    A calculation over of basic parameters of the hard brake x-rayed radiation for the microsecond accelerating of relativistic electronic beam T EMP . Optimization of converters is conducted for these aims. Maximal doses are experimentally got brake x-rayed radiation on beam-radiation complex T EMP . The diagrams of orientation of the brake x-rayed radiation are taken off depending on energies of bunches and forms of electrodes.

  20. Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e - colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e - colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e - machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e - collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields

  1. Long radiation detector system for beam loss monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balsamo, J.; Fewell, N.M.; Klein, J.D.; Witkover, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Long Radiation Monitor (LRM) system installed at the 200 MeV linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. This system allows observation of both the spatial and temporal character of the losses in the linac and its transport lines. An array of large diameter gas filled coaxial cables are used as extended ion chambers to detect the losses. The output signals are available as a histogram, video waveforms, and numerical data via the computer. A fast beam interrupt is also provided. The detector characteristics and details of the processing electronics are presented. Results of studies of longitudinal, steering and focusing losses are described

  2. Long radiation detector system for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsamo, J.; Fewell, N.M.; Klein, J.D.; Witkover, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Long Radiation Monitor (LRM) system installed at the 200 MeV linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. This system allows observation of both the spatial and temporal character of the losses in the linac and its transport lines. An array of large diameter gas filled coaxial cables are used as extended ion chambers to detect the losses. The output signals are available as a histogram, video waveforms, and numerical data via the computer. A fast beam interrupt is also provided. The detector characteristics and details of the processing electronics are presented. Results of studies of longitudinal, steering and focusing losses are described.

  3. Weak-beam electron microscopy of radiation-induced segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saka, H.

    1983-01-01

    The segregation of solute atoms to dislocations during irradiation by 1 MeV electrons in a HVEM was studied by measuring the dissociation width of extended dislocations in Cu-5.1 at.%Si, Cu-5.3 at.%Ge, Ag-9.4 at.% In and Ag-9.6 at.%Al alloys. 'Weak-beam' electron microscopy was used. In Cu-Si (oversized solute), Cu-Ge (oversize) and Ag-Al (undersize), solute enrichment was observed near dislocations, while in Ag-In (oversize) solute depletion was observed. The results are discussed in terms of current mechanisms for radiation-induced segregation. (author)

  4. Transverse phase space mapping of relativistic electron beams using optical transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Le Sage

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical transition radiation (OTR has proven to be a versatile and effective diagnostic for measuring the profile, divergence, and emittance of relativistic electron beams with a wide range of parameters. Diagnosis of the divergence of modern high brightness beams is especially well suited to OTR interference (OTRI techniques, where multiple dielectric or metal foils are used to generate a spatially coherent interference pattern. Theoretical analysis of measured OTR and OTRI patterns allows precise measurement of electron beam emittance characteristics. Here we describe an extension of this technique to allow mapping of divergence characteristics as a function of transverse coordinates within a measured beam. We present the first experimental analysis of the transverse phase space of an electron beam using all optical techniques. Comparing an optically masked portion of the beam to the entire beam, we measure different angular spread and average direction of the particles. Direct measurement of the phase-space ellipse tilt angle has been demonstrated using this optical masking technique.

  5. SU-F-P-28: A Method of Maximize the Noncoplanar Beam Orientations and Assure the Beam Delivery Clearance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J [Presence St. Joseph Medical Ctr., Joliet, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to maximize the noncoplanar beam orientations and assure the beam delivery clearance for SBRT, therefore, optimize the dose conformality to the target, increase the dose sparing to the critical normal organs and reduce the hot spots in the body. Methods: A SBRT body frame (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) was used for patient immobilization and target localization. The SBRT body frame has CT fiducials on its side frames. After patient’s CT scan, the radiation treatment isocenter was defined and its coordinators referring to the body frame was calculated in the radiation treatment planning process. Meanwhile, initial beam orientations were designed based on the patient target and critical organ anatomy. The body frame was put on the linear accelerator couch and positioned to the calculated isocenter. Initially designed beam orientations were manually measured by tuning the body frame position on the couch, the gantry and couch angles. The finalized beam orientations were put into the treatment planning for dosimetric calculations. Results: Without patient presence, an optimal set of beam orientations were designed and validated. The radiation treatment plan was optimized and guaranteed for delivery clearance. Conclusion: The developed method is beneficial and effective in SBRT treatment planning for individual patient. It first allows maximizing the achievable noncoplanar beam orientation space, therefore, optimize the treatment plan for specific patient. It eliminates the risk that a plan needs to be modified due to the gantry and couch collision during patient setup.

  6. Pertinence analysis of intensity-modulated radiation therapy dosimetry error and parameters of beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zifeng; Liu Dan; Cao Yankun; Li Runxiao; Han Chun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between parameter settings in the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in order to explore the effect of parameters on absolute dose verification. Methods: Forty-three esophageal carcinoma cases were optimized with Pinnacle 7.6c by experienced physicist using appropriate optimization parameters and dose constraints with a number of iterations to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were copied to water-phantom, 0.13 cc ion Farmer chamber and DOSE1 dosimeter was used to measure the absolute dose. The statistical data of the parameters of beams for the 43 cases were collected, and the relationships among them were analyzed. The statistical data of the dosimetry error were collected, and comparative analysis was made for the relation between the parameters of beams and ion chamber absolute dose verification results. Results: The parameters of beams were correlated among each other. Obvious affiliation existed between the dose accuracy and parameter settings. When the beam segment number of IMRT plan was more than 80, the dose deviation would be greater than 3%; however, if the beam segment number was less than 80, the dose deviation was smaller than 3%. When the beam segment number was more than 100, part of the dose deviation of this plan was greater than 4%. On the contrary, if the beam segment number was less than 100, the dose deviation was smaller than 4% definitely. Conclusions: In order to decrease the absolute dose verification error, less beam angles and less beam segments are needed and the beam segment number should be controlled within the range of 80. (authors)

  7. Beam orientation optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy using adaptive l2,1-minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xun; Men Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B; Lou Yifei

    2011-01-01

    Beam orientation optimization (BOO) is a key component in the process of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. It determines to what degree one can achieve a good treatment plan in the subsequent plan optimization process. In this paper, we have developed a BOO algorithm via adaptive l 2,1 -minimization. Specifically, we introduce a sparsity objective function term into our model which contains weighting factors for each beam angle adaptively adjusted during the optimization process. Such an objective function favors a small number of beam angles. By optimizing a total objective function consisting of a dosimetric term and the sparsity term, we are able to identify unimportant beam angles and gradually remove them without largely sacrificing the dosimetric objective. In one typical prostate case, the convergence property of our algorithm, as well as how beam angles are selected during the optimization process, is demonstrated. Fluence map optimization (FMO) is then performed based on the optimized beam angles. The resulting plan quality is presented and is found to be better than that of equiangular beam orientations. We have further systematically validated our algorithm in the contexts of 5-9 coplanar beams for five prostate cases and one head and neck case. For each case, the final FMO objective function value is used to compare the optimized beam orientations with the equiangular ones. It is found that, in the majority of cases tested, our BOO algorithm leads to beam configurations which attain lower FMO objective function values than those of corresponding equiangular cases, indicating the effectiveness of our BOO algorithm. Superior plan qualities are also demonstrated by comparing DVH curves between BOO plans and equiangular plans.

  8. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation: 2016 project annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, Sergei O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 3, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) the demonstration of the measurement of thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques and (ii) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  9. Biological effects of high-energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.

    1976-01-01

    The biological effects of high-energy radiation are reviewed, with emphasis on the effects of the hadronic component. Proton and helium ion effects are similar to those of the more conventional and sparsely ionizing x- and γ-radiation. Heavy-ions are known to be more biologically effective, but the long term hazard from accumulated damage has yet to be assessed. Some evidence of widely varying but dramatically increased effectiveness of very high-energy (approximately 70 GeV) hadron beams is reviewed. Finally, the importance of the neutron component in many situations around high-energy accelerators is pointed out

  10. Characteristics of kilovoltage x-ray beams used for cone-beam computed tomography in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, George X; Duggan, Dennis M; Coffey, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the beams produced by a kilovoltage (kV) imager integrated into a linear accelerator (Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator) for acquiring high resolution volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the patient on the treatment table. The x-ray tube is capable of generating photon spectra with kVp values between 40 and 125 kV. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristics of kV beams and the properties of imaged target scatters. The Monte Carlo results were benchmarked against measurements, and excellent agreements were obtained. We also studied the effect of including the electron impact ionization (EII), and the simulation showed that the characteristic radiation is increased significantly in the energy spectra when EII is included. Although only slight beam hardening is observed in the spectra of all photons after passing through the phantom target, there is a significant difference in the spectra and angular distributions between scattered and primary photons. The results also show that the photon fluence distributions are significantly altered by adding bow tie filters. The results indicate that a combination of large cone-beam field size and large imaged target significantly increases scatter-to-primary ratios for photons that reach the detector panel. For phantoms 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm thick of water placed at the isocentre, the scatter-to-primary ratios are 0.94, 3.0 and 7.6 respectively for an open 125 kVp CBCT beam. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the increase of the scatter is proportional to the increase of the imaged volume, and this also applies to scatter-to-primary ratios. This study shows both the magnitude and the characteristics of scattered x-rays. The knowledge obtained from this investigation may be useful in the future design of the image detector to improve the image quality

  11. Handbook of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes-Siedle, A.; Adams, L.

    1993-01-01

    This handbook is intended to serve as a tool for designers of equipment and scientific instruments in cases where they are required to ensure the survival of the equipment in radiation environments. High-technology materials, especially semiconductors and optics, tend to degrade on exposure to radiation in many different ways. Intense high-energy radiation environments are found in nuclear reactors and accelerators, machines for radiation therapy, industrial sterilization, and space. Some engineers have to build equipment which will survive a nuclear explosion from a hostile source. Proper handling of a disaster with radioactive materials requires equipment which depends utterly on semiconductor microelectronics and imaging devices. Thus the technology of radiation-tolerant electronics is an instrument for good social spheres as diverse as disaster planning and the exploration of Mars. In order to design equipment for intense environments like those described above, then degradation from high-energy irradiation must be seen as a basic design parameter. The aim of this handbook is to assist the engineer or student in that thought; to make it possible to write intelligent specifications; to offer some understanding of the complex variety of effects which occur when high-technology components encounter high-energy radiation; and to go thoroughly into the balance of choices of how to alleviate the effects and hence achieve the design aims of the project. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 chapters of this book

  12. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  13. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R and D Energy Recovery Linac.

  14. A new non intercepting beam size diagnostics using diffraction radiation from a Slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, M.

    1996-09-01

    A new non interpreting beam size diagnostic for high charge electron beams is presented. This diagnostics is based on the analysis of the angular distribution of the 'diffracted' transition radiation emitted by the beam when crossing a slit cut in metallic foil. It allows a resolution better then the radiation transverse formation zone. Numerical results based on the parameters of the TTF FEL beam are given as example

  15. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M.; Esteve, F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  16. Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatau, B.D.; Garba, N.N.; Yusuf, A.M.; Yamusa, Y. A.; Musa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In earlier studies, researchers aimed a single particle at the nucleus of the cell where DNA is located. Eighty percent of the cells shot through the nucleus survived. This contradicts the belief that if radiation slams through the nucleus, the cell will die. But the bad news is that the surviving cells contained mutations. Cells have a great capacity to repair DNA, but they cannot do it perfectly. The damage left behind in these studies from a single particle of alpha radiation doubled the damage that is already there. This proved, beyond a shadow of doubt, those there biological effects occur as a result of exposure to radiation, Radiation is harmful to living tissue because of its ionizing power in matter. This ionization can damage living cells directly, by breaking the chemical bonds of important biological molecules (particularly DNA), or indirectly, by creating chemical radicals from water molecules in the cells, which can then attack the biological molecules chemically. At some extent these molecules are repaired by natural biological processes, however, the effectiveness of this repair depends on the extent of the damage. The interaction of ionizing with the human body, arising either from external sources outside the body or from internal contamination of the body by radioactive materials, leads to the biological effects which may later show up as a clinical symptoms. Basically, this formed the baseline of this research to serve as a yardstick for creating awareness about radiation and its resulting effects.

  17. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  18. Effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on samples of the Brazil nuts artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus; Efeitos da radiacao gama e feixe de eletrons sobre amostras de castanhas-do-Brasil inoculadas artificialmente com Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Ednei Assuncao Antunes

    2012-07-01

    The high level of contamination by aflatoxin produced by fungi in lots of Brazil nuts and the strict control by importing countries in relation to the levels of toxins in food, European Union countries decided in 2003 by the return of these lots products from Brazil. Despite the economic loss represented by contamination by toxigenic fungi in Brazil nuts, a major product of extractive Northern of Brazil, studies are still preliminary as the control of contamination aflatoxigenic fungal using methods such as gamma radiation (G.R) and mainly, electron beam (E.B). These facts motivated this research, which aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation and application of electron beam in samples of Brazil nut artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus. This goal, we were studied 50 samples of the Brazil nut previously inoculated with spores of A. flavus and subsequently incubated at 30 °C in relative humidity controlled at 93%. After incubation, period of 15 days, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80, the samples were divided into 5 groups that received the following doses of radiation: control (0 kGy), 5 and 10 kGy 5 E.B and G.R. The mycobiota was performed by serial dilution, plated on surface using potato dextrose agar. The results demonstrated that treatment with E.B using a dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy resulted in reduced growth of A. flavus in 74% (37/50) and 94% (47/50) of samples. The samples treated with G.R at the dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy no fungal growth occurred in 92% (46/50) 100% (50/50) of. The study of aflatoxins showed that doses of E.B of 5 kGy and 10 kGy reduced levels of AFB1 at 53.32% and 65.66% respectively. The application of gamma rays at doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced levels of toxins in 70.61% and 84.15% respectively. This result may be attributed to higher penetrability of gamma radiation. Sensory analysis showed greater acceptance of the judges for the samples irradiated with E.B and G.R at the dose of 10 kGy. We concluded

  19. Evaluation of the spectral distribution of X-ray beams from measurements on the scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casnati, E.; Baraldi, C.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the phenomena activated by photons with energies below 100 keV show an apparent or real dependence on the quantum energy. Therefore, knowledge of the beam energy characteristics is of primary importance for interpretation of the irradiation results. The greatest difficulty arises from the high flux density of the beams usually employed which does not allow direct measurements of the beam. A method was developed which permits evaluation of the spectral distribution of the X-ray beam from a spectrometric measurement of the radiation scattered by a thin foil of a suitable metal. This makes possible a new and more rational approach to the measurement of X-rays in the energy range where the interaction parameters show a large photon energy dependence. The corrections required by the presence of some collateral effects, among which the most important is the coexistence of the coherent and incoherent scattering, must be evaluated. The knowledge of the spectral distribution is of immediate usefulness for studies of radiation damage in biological and other materials, for the calibration of radiation measuring instruments and for the improvement of the radiological instrumentation response which contributes to reducing the patient's dose. (H.K.)

  20. Dosimetry study for electron beam irradiation in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaga, Hiromi; Haruyama, Yasuyuki; Takizawa, Haruki; Kojima, Takuji; Yotsumoto, Keiichi

    1995-01-01

    For certain critical applications such as medical device sterilization and food irradiation, accurate calibration of electron energy and absorbed dose is required to assure the quality of irradiated products. To meet this requirement, TRCRE, JAERI has carried out research and development on high dose radiation dosimetry for electron beams in the energy range used in radiation processing (0.15 - 3.0 MeV). JAERI has developed a simultaneous electron beam energy and dosimeter calibration system that consist of a total absorption calorimeter, an electron current density meter, and a stacked thin-film dosimeter set. For low energy electrons, where it is important to measure the depth-dose profile in materials with high depth resolution, we studied the feasibility of a method using Gafchromic film dosimeters. This film, which has an 8-μm thick sensitive layer, is combined with a stepped array of absorber films of the same thickness to produce a high-resolution depth-dose profile on the Gafchromic film. The depth-dose profile obtained in this manner has about five times greater resolution than conventional radiochromic film dosimetry. (author)

  1. Optical Protection Filters for Harmful Laser Beams and UV Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim M., Osama A.

    2007-02-01

    Due to the rapid growth of radiation protection applications in various devices and instruments, it is essential to use suitable filters for eye protection of the personal working in the radiation field. Different protection filters were produced to protect from four laser beam wavelengths (at 532nm, 632.8nm, 694nm and 1064nm) and block three UV bands (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The design structure of the required dielectric multilayer filters used optical thin film technology. The computer analyses of the multilayer filter formulas were prepared using Macleod Software for the production filter processes. The deposition technique was achieved on optical substrates (Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301) by dielectric material combinations including Dralo (mixture of oxides TiO2/Al2O3), and Lima (mixture of oxides SiO2/Al2O3); deposition by an electron beam gun. The output transmittance curves for both theoretical and experimental values of all filters are presented. To validate the suitability for use in a `real world', rather than laboratory test application, full environmental assessment was also carried out. These filters exhibited high endurance after exposing them to the durability tests (adhesion, abrasion resistance and humidity) according to military standards MIL-C-675C and MIL-C-48497A.

  2. Optical Protection Filters for Harmful Laser Beams and UV Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azim M, Osama A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the rapid growth of radiation protection applications in various devices and instruments, it is essential to use suitable filters for eye protection of the personal working in the radiation field. Different protection filters were produced to protect from four laser beam wavelengths (at 532nm, 632.8nm, 694nm and 1064nm) and block three UV bands (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The design structure of the required dielectric multilayer filters used optical thin film technology. The computer analyses of the multilayer filter formulas were prepared using Macleod Software for the production filter processes. The deposition technique was achieved on optical substrates (Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301) by dielectric material combinations including Dralo (mixture of oxides TiO2/Al2O3), and Lima (mixture of oxides SiO2/Al2O3); deposition by an electron beam gun. The output transmittance curves for both theoretical and experimental values of all filters are presented. To validate the suitability for use in a 'real world', rather than laboratory test application, full environmental assessment was also carried out. These filters exhibited high endurance after exposing them to the durability tests (adhesion, abrasion resistance and humidity) according to military standards MIL-C-675C and MIL-C-48497A

  3. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-01-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  4. Radiation effects on optical data transmission systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides and receivers in both steady state and pulsed radiation environments is reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of irradiation on the performance of light emitting and laser diodes, optical fiber waveguides and photodiodes. The influence of radiation-induced attenuation of optical fibers due to total dose, dose rate, time after irradiation, temperature, radiation history, photobleaching, OH and impurity content, dopant type and concentration is described. The performance of candidate components of the transmission system intended for deployment in the Superconducting Super Collider Detector and primary beam tunnel nuclear environment is discussed

  5. Very small beam-size measurement by a reflective synchrotron radiation interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Naito

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A synchrotron radiation (SR interferometer with Herschelian reflective optics has been developed for the measurement of beams of several μm in size. In a conventional refractive SR interferometer, the dispersion effect of the objective lens limits the instrument to a smaller range of beam-size measurements. To avoid this problem, we designed a Herschelian arrangement of reflective optics for the interferometer. The effectiveness of the reflective SR interferometer was confirmed at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF damping ring. The measured vertical beam size obtained using the reflective SR interferometer was 4.7   μm and the estimated vertical emittance was 0.97×10^{-11}   m.

  6. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; MONTAG, C.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far

  7. Synchrotron radiation leakage from the B-factory beam pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.M.; Nelson, W.R.; Ipe, N.

    1990-01-01

    The high-energy ring (HER) of the B-Factory, running at an energy of 9 GeV, generates the synchrotron spectrum when applied to a ring with the PEP bending radius. The B-Factory HER may also run at 12 GeV, producing the harder spectrum. Depending upon beam-pipe material and thickness, some of this radiation may escape and deposit energy in the surrounding material. This was originally pointed out in PEP-109 during the initial design of PEP, and subsequently verified by measurements at both PEP and PETRA at DESY. Of concern to the B Factory is magnet insulation, though other adjacent materials such as wire insulation and cooling water hoses are even more radiosensitive. Radiation damage to magnets is a function of the type of material used in the potting compound. The PEP magnets, which hopefully can be used for the high-energy ring of the B-Factory, are insulated with an epoxy composed of DER-332, DER-732, NMA and aluminum oxide. It is estimated that this epoxy compound should tolerate doses near the 10 10 rad range. To summarize the results of these calculations, 0.87 cm of copper is needed at the point of maximum dose from 12-GeV operation in order to reach the dose criterion if a rectangular beam pipe is used. The copper needs to be only 0.7-cm thick for an octagonal beam pipe and the same energy. For 9-GeV operation, an octagonal copper pipe needs only to be 0.25-cm thick. An octagonal aluminum pipe that is 0.5-cm thick also needs 0.3 cm of lead on the outside to reach the same criterion for 12-GeV operation. For 9-GeV operation, the aluminum pipe still requires a lead liner

  8. On radiation emission from a microbunched beam with wavefront tilt and its experimental observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper we compare experimental observations and theory of radiation emission from a microbunched beam with microbunching wavefront tilt with respect to the direction of motion. The theory refers to the work of T. Tanaka, H. Kitamura, and T. Shintake (2004), which predicts, in this case, exponential suppression of coherent radiation along the kicked direction. The observations refer to a recent experiment performed at the LCLS, where a microbunched beam was kicked by a bend and sent to a radiator undulator. The experiment resulted in the emission of strong coherent radiation that had its maximum along the kicked direction of motion, when the undulator parameter was detuned to a value larger than the nominal one. We first analyze the theory in detail, and we confirm the correctness of its derivation according to the conventional theory of radiation emission from charged particles. Subsequently, we look for possible peculiarities in the experiment, which may not be modeled by the theory. We show that only spurious effects are not accounted for. We conclude that the experiment defies explanation in terms of the conventional theory of radiation emission.

  9. On radiation emission from a microbunched beam with wavefront tilt and its experimental observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we compare experimental observations and theory of radiation emission from a microbunched beam with microbunching wavefront tilt with respect to the direction of motion. The theory refers to the work Tanaka et al. (2004) , which predicts, in this case, exponential suppression of coherent radiation along the kicked direction. The observations refer to a recent experiment performed at the LCLS (Nuhn et al., 2015; Lutman etal., 2016), where a microbunched beam was kicked by a bend and sent to a radiator undulator. The experiment resulted in the emission of strong coherent radiation that had its maximum along the kicked direction of motion, when the undulator parameter was detuned to a value larger than the nominal one. We first analyze the theory in detail, and we confirm the correctness of its derivation according to the conventional theory of radiation emission from charged particles. Subsequently, we look for possible peculiarities in the experiment, which may not be modeled by the theory. We show that only spurious effects are not accounted for. We conclude that the experiment defies explanation in terms of the conventional theory of radiation emission.

  10. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1980-10-01

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  11. Investigation of beam effect on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotai, E. E-mail: kotai@rmki.kfki.hu; Paszti, F.; Szilagyi, E

    2000-03-01

    When performing Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurements combined with channeling on 'columnar' porous silicon (PS) samples with beam aligned to the direction of the pores, a strong beam effect was observed. The minimum yield as a function of the beam dose for different porous samples was compared with the yield measured on single crystal silicon. It was demonstrated that the beam effect strongly depends on the porosity of the sample. Bombardment in the random direction caused about 10% higher change in the minimum yield than in the channel direction.

  12. Investigation of beam effect on porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotai, E.; Paszti, F.; Szilagyi, E.

    2000-01-01

    When performing Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurements combined with channeling on 'columnar' porous silicon (PS) samples with beam aligned to the direction of the pores, a strong beam effect was observed. The minimum yield as a function of the beam dose for different porous samples was compared with the yield measured on single crystal silicon. It was demonstrated that the beam effect strongly depends on the porosity of the sample. Bombardment in the random direction caused about 10% higher change in the minimum yield than in the channel direction

  13. Radioprotective efficacy of bisarylidene cyclopentanone on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darshan Raj, C.G.; Sarojini, B.K.; Musthafa Khaleel, V.; Ramesh, S.R.; Ramakrishna, M.K.; Narayana, B.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Present study was carried out for evaluating the radioprotective effect of bischalcone (2E, 5E) - 2,5-bis (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzylidene) cyclopentanone (curcumin analog (CA)), on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster adults. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants included superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The oxidative stress was induced at 1.5 Gy. (author)

  14. Modelling radiation fields of ion beams in tissue-like materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burigo, Lucas Norberto

    2014-01-01

    Fast nuclei are ionizing radiation which can cause deleterious effects to irradiated cells. The modelling of the interactions of such ions with matter and the related effects are very important to physics, radiobiology, medicine and space science and technology. A powerful method to study the interactions of ionizing radiation with biological systems was developed in the field of microdosimetry. Microdosimetry spectra characterize the energy deposition to objects of cellular size, i.e., a few micrometers. In the present thesis the interaction of ions with tissue-like media was investigated using the Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) developed at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies. MCHIT is a Geant4-based application intended to benchmark the physical models of Geant4 and investigate the physical properties of therapeutic ion beams. We have implemented new features in MCHIT in order to calculate microdosimetric quantities characterizing the radiation fields of accelerated nucleons and nuclei. The results of our Monte Carlo simulations were compared with recent experimental microdosimetry data. In addition to microdosimetry calculations with MCHIT, we also investigated the biological properties of ion beams, e.g. their relative biological effectiveness (RBE), by means of the modified Microdosimetric-Kinetic model (MKM). The MKM uses microdosimetry spectra in describing cell response to radiation. MCHIT+MKM allowed us to study the physical and biological properties of ion beams. The main results of the thesis are as follows: MCHIT is able to describe the spatial distribution of the physical dose in tissue-like media and microdosimetry spectra for ions with energies relevant to space research and ion-beam cancer therapy; MCHIT+MKM predicts a reduction of the biological effectiveness of ions propagating in extended medium due to nuclear fragmentation reactions; We predicted favourable biological dose-depth profiles for monoenergetic helium and

  15. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  16. Evaluation of electron beam radiation effects in the incorporation of Piassava fibers (Attalea funifera Mart.) on ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Beatriz Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the contribution of ionizing radiation in the incorporation of piassava fibers (derived from wastes from broom factories) in the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH), to obtain a composite material, E VOH-Piassava , for packaging applications. The interest in this fiber is due to its inherent properties and morphology as well as being biodegradable. The EVOH composite reinforced with 5% or 10%, by weight of piassava fiber powder with a particle size equal to or less than 125 μm, untreated or treated with 1% silane, were obtained by extrusion, using a twin screw extruder. For carrying out the tensile tests and oxygen barrier of the materials obtained, films were produced from composite materials and EVOH resin was obtained using the process of flat extrusion. Samples of EVOH and the composites were irradiated using an electron accelerator, at doses from 0 to 500 kGy. The results of SEM analysis and X-ray diffraction of composites suggest a good fiber-matrix adhesion, which can be also confirmed by its higher tensile strength at break, compared to that of neat EVOH. The results showed that the incorporation of piassava fibers can promote better oxygen barrier compared to the neat EVOH, in conditions of high humidity. It was observed that, after irradiation, the EVOH film showed better oxygen barrier in high humidity condition, when compared to the non-irradiated EVOH under the same condition, indicating radiation as an effective treatment to improve oxygen barrier in the studied conditions. (author)

  17. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heribanova, A.

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles and pathways of effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms and cells are outlined. The following topics are covered: effects of radiation on living matter (direct effects, radical or indirect effects, dual radiation action, and molecular biological theories); effects of radiation on cells and tissues (cell depletion, changes in the cytogenetic information, reparation mechanisms), dose-response relationship (deterministic effects, stochastic effects), and the effects of radiation on man (acute radiation sickness, acute local changes, fetus injuries, non-tumorous late injuries, malignant tumors, genetic changes). (P.A.). 3 tabs., 2 figs., 5 refs

  18. Bystander effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Neethu Fathima; Daniel, Nittu

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect is the phenomenon in which unirradiated cells show irradiated effects due to the signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Evidence suggests that targeted cytoplasmic irradiation results in mutation in the nucleus of the hit cells. Cells that are not directly hit by an alpha particle, but are in the vicinity of one that is hit, also contribute to the genotoxic response of the cell population. When cells are irradiated, and the medium is transferred to unirradiated cells, these unirradiated cells show bystander responses when assayed for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation. The demonstration of a bystander effect in human tissues and, more recently, in whole organisms have clear implication of the potential relevance of the non-targeted response to human health. This effect may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. The radiation-induced bystander effect represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation, in that extranuclear and extracellular events may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon, and different cell types respond differently to bystander signalling. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signalling genes, including cyclooxygenase-2 (CQX-2), have been shown to be casually linked to the bystander phenomenon. The observation that inhibition of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) suppressed the bystander response further confirmed the important role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in the bystander process. The cells deficient in mitochondrial DNA showed a significantly reduced response to bystander signalling, suggesting a functional role of mitochondria in the signalling process. (author)

  19. Radiation effects on superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the superconducting transition temperature (T/sub c/), upper critical field (H/sub c2/), and volume-pinning-force density (F/sub p/) were discussed for the three kinds of superconducting material (elements, alloys, and compounds). 11 figures, 3 tables, 86 references

  20. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental shielding to the NSLS-II accelerators and the lessons learned from this process are presented.

  1. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the most important findings concerning the genetic effects of radiation have been obtained in the Biology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The paper focuses on some of the major discoveries made in the Biology Division and on a new method of research that assesses damage to the skeletons of mice whose fathers were irradiated. The results discussed have considerable influence upon estimates of genetic risk in humans from radiation, and an attempt is made to put the estimated amount of genetic damage caused by projected nuclear power development into its proper perspective

  2. Simulations of Beam Optics and Bremsstrahlung for High Intensity and Brightness Channeling Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, J. [Sokendai, Tsukuba; Piot, P. [NIU, DeKalb; Sen, T. [Fermilab

    2018-04-12

    This paper presents X-ray spectra of channeling radiation expected at the FAST (Fermi Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. Our purpose is to produce high brightness quasi-monochromatic X-rays in an energy range from 40 keV to 110 keV. We will use a diamond crystal and low emittance electrons with an energy of around 43 MeV. The quality of emitted X-rays depends on parameters of the electron beam at the crystal. We present simulations of the beam optics for high brightness and high yield operations for a range of bunch charges. We estimate the X-ray spectra including bremsstrahlung background. We discuss how the electron beam distributions after the diamond crystal are affected by channeling. We discuss an X-ray detector system to avoid pile-up effects during high charge operations.

  3. System for detecting neutrons in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, L.W.

    1978-06-01

    Newly developed detectors and procedures allow measurement of neutron yield and energy in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. A new photomultiplier tube design and special gating methods provide the basis for novel time-of-flight and total-yield detectors. The technique of activation analysis is expanded to provide a neutron energy spectrometer. There is a demonstrated potential in the use of the integrated system as a valuable diagnostic tool to study particle-beam fusion, intense ion-beam interactions, and pulsed neutron sources for simulating weapons effects. A physical lower limit of 10 8 neutrons into 4π is established for accurate and meaningful measurements in the REB environment

  4. Radiation effect of polyether-urethane under action of different ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Chen Xiaojun; Gao Xiaoling; Xu Yunshu; Fu Yibei

    2006-01-01

    The research concerns in the radiation effect of γ-ray and electron beam on polyether-urethane. The thermal property and radical intensity were determined by differential thermal gravimetric analysis and electron spin resonance. The composition and content of gas products from samples irradiated by different ionizing radiation were analyzed by gas chromatography. The action mechanism of these two radiation resources of γ-ray and electron beam are same, but the means of energy deposit is different. It results in the differences of radical intensity and the thermal property of polyether-urethane as well as its gas products from the radiation decomposition. (authors)

  5. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Souza, Clecia de M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Mastro, Nelida L. del, E-mail: patyoko@yahoo.co [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Colombo, Maria A., E-mail: mascolombo@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Tecnologia da Zona Leste, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  6. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Souza, Clecia de M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Mastro, Nelida L. del; Colombo, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  7. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Adult bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargos, P.; Mamou, N.; Dejean, C.; Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Kantor, G.; Huchet, A.; Italiano, A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation tolerance for bone tissue has been mostly evaluated with regard to bone fracture. Main circumstances are mandibula osteoradionecrosis, hip and costal fracture, and patent or radiologic fractures in the treated volume. After radiation therapy of bone metastasis, the analysis of related radiation fracture is difficult to individualize from a pathologic fracture. Frequency of clinical fracture is less than 5% in the large series or cohorts and is probably under-evaluated for the asymptomatic lesions. Women older than 50 years and with osteoporosis are probably the main population at risk. Dose-effect relations are difficult to qualify in older series. Recent models evaluating radiations toxicity on diaphysa suggest an important risk after 60 Gy, for high dose-fraction and for a large volume. (authors)

  8. Performance of ionization chambers in X radiation beams, radioprotection level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana C.M.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2005-01-01

    Narrow beams, radioprotection level, were implanted in an X ray system, based on ISO 4037-1, as recommended by IAEA (SRS 16). Energy dependency tests were carried out and short-term stability in ionization chambers for use in radiation protection of trademark Physikalisch-Technische Werkstaetten (PTW), 32002 and 23361 models. The ionization chambers were studied with regard to short-term stability within the program of quality control of the laboratory, with a 90 Sr + 90 Y. The results of the short-term stability test were compared with the recommendations of IEC 60731, respect to dosemeters used in radiotherapy, since this standard presents the more restrictive limits with regard to the behaviour of ionization chambers. All cameras showed results within the limits recommended by this standard. With respect to the energy dependency of the response, the model Chamber 32002 presented a maximum dependence of only 2.7%, and the model Chamber 23361, 4.5%

  9. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  10. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2015-01-01

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations

  11. Transverse velocity modulator and generator schemes based on non-collinear radiation and electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Varfolomeev, A A

    2000-01-01

    New non-collinear schemes are suggested for transverse velocity modulation of electron beams and for the generation of coherent spontaneous radiation by these transversely modulated beams. It is shown that due to the non-collinearity some orders of magnitude enhancement can be achieved for the coherent spontaneous radiation (CSR) power at both the fundamental and harmonic frequencies.

  12. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710 Section 892.5710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a highly...

  13. Radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry with high energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Halina; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Zimek, Zbigniew; Kałuska, Iwona; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    The research was carried out to assess the efficiency of radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry of different density using the high energy electron beam based on the inactivation rate of Salmonella ssp, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Ascaris suum eggs. The experiment was conducted with use of the linear electron accelerator Elektronika 10/10 in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The inoculated slurry samples underwent hygienization with high energy electron beam of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. Numbers of reisolated bacteria were determined according to the MPN method, using typical microbiological media. Theoretical lethal doses, D 90 doses and hygienization efficiency of high energy electron beam were determined. The theoretical lethal doses for all tested bacteria ranged from 3.63 to 8.84 kGy and for A. suum eggs from 4.07 to 5.83 kGy. Salmonella rods turned out to be the most sensitive and Enterococcus spp were the most resistant to electron beam hygienization. The effectiveness or radiation hygienization was lower in cattle than in swine slurry and in thick than in thin one. Also the species or even the serotype of bacteria determined the dose needed to inactivation of microorganisms. - Highlights: ► The hygienic efficiency of electron beam against slurry was researched. ► The hygienization efficiency depended on the slurry characteristics and microorganism species. ► In most of the cases 7 kGy dose was sufficient for slurry hygienization. ► Dose below 1 kGy allowed for 90% elimination of microorganism population. ► The radiation hygienization is a good alternative for typical slurry treatment methods

  14. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  15. Disinfestation of agricultural products with electron beams and their radiation tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru

    1996-01-01

    Some agricultural products contaminated with insect pests are fumigated with methyl bromide for quarantine purposes. However, the use of methyl bromide is preferably restricted because of its ozone depleting effect. Therefore, establishing alternative quarantine techniques is highly desirable; one such technique is exposure to ionizing radiation. Few data are available on the effects of radiation on insect pests other than fruit flies and stored-product insects and on the radiation tolerance of host commodities. Radiation technology as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation will be used to inactivate not only insects but also mites, spider mites, thrips, nematodes, scales, mealybugs and thrips contaminating fruits, grains, cut flowers, vegetables, timbers, seedlings and seeds. In order to collect data on the effects of irradiation on pests and host commodities, IAEA and FAO have conducted an international project, 'FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Mites, Nematodes and Insects other than Fruit Fly' since 1992. The project determines the minimum doses necessary to inactivate pests and the maximum doses host commodities tolerate. All pests except nematodes can be inactivated at doses 400Gy or lower. Various varieties of cut flowers and herbs are tolerant to 400Gy of radiation, although some flowers and herbs such as chrysanthemum, rose, lily, calla, anthurium, sweet pea, iris, dill, basil and arugula are intolerant to 200Gy of radiation. Japanese research project on treatment of cut flowers with electron beams carried out mainly by Yokohama Plant Protection Station greatly contributes to these conclusions. Aqueous solution (2%) of sucrose, glucose, fructose or maltose prevents radiation-induced detrimental effects of radiation on chrysanthemums. Sugars reduce radiation-induced physiological deterioration of chrysanthemums. (author)

  16. Radiation effects on two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.C. II; Robinson, J.A. [Department of Materials Science, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Center for Two-Dimensional Layered Materials, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Shi, T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Silva, E.C. [GlobalFoundries, Malta, NY (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The effects of electromagnetic and particle irradiation on two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are discussed in this review. Radiation creates defects that impact the structure and electronic performance of materials. Determining the impact of these defects is important for developing 2DM-based devices for use in high-radiation environments, such as space or nuclear reactors. As such, most experimental studies have been focused on determining total ionizing dose damage to 2DMs and devices. Total dose experiments using X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and heavy ions are summarized in this review. We briefly discuss the possibility of investigating single event effects in 2DMs based on initial ion beam irradiation experiments and the development of 2DM-based integrated circuits. Additionally, beneficial uses of irradiation such as ion implantation to dope materials or electron-beam and helium-beam etching to shape materials have begun to be used on 2DMs and are reviewed as well. For non-ionizing radiation, such as low-energy photons, we review the literature on 2DM-based photo-detection from terahertz to UV. The majority of photo-detecting devices operate in the visible and UV range, and for this reason they are the focus of this review. However, we review the progress in developing 2DMs for detecting infrared and terahertz radiation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Radiation Bystander Effects Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokohzaman Soleymanifard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation Induced Bystander Effect (RIBE which cause radiation effects in non-irradiated cells, has challenged the principle according to which radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is necessary for producing biological responses. What is the mechanism of this phenomenon? To have a better understanding of this rather ambiguous concept substantial number of original and reviewed article were carefully examined. Results: Irradiated cells release molecules which can propagate in cell environment and/or transmit through gap junction intercellular communication. These molecules can reach to non-irradiated cells and transmit bystander signals. In many investigations, it has been confirmed that these molecules are growth factors, cytokines, nitric oxide and free radicals like reactive oxygen species (ROS. Transmission of by stander signal to neighboring cells persuades them to produce secondary growth factors which in their turn cause further cell injuries. Some investigators suggest, organelles other than nucleus (mitochondria and cell membrane are the origin of these signals.  There is another opinion which suggests double strand breaks (DSB are not directly generated in bystander cells, rather they are due to smaller damage like single strand breaks which accumulate and end up to DSB. Although bystander mechanisms have not been exactly known, it can be confirmed that multiple mechanisms and various pathways are responsible for this effect. Cell type, radiation type, experimental conditions and end points identify the dominant mechanism. Conclusion: Molecules and pathways which are responsible for RIBE, also cause systemic responses to other non-irradiation stresses. So RIBE is a kind of systemic stress or innate immune responses, which are performed by cell microenvironment. Irradiated cells and their signals are components of microenvironment for creating bystander effects.

  18. Radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leteurtre Jean.

    1978-01-01

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  19. When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewin, T B [Institute of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology, Glasgow (UK)

    1977-06-01

    The difficulty that many trainees, including those medically qualified, have in achieving a sound working grasp of certain basic principles of radiation beam dosage is often underestimated. Since any failure of understanding may seriously impair the efficiency of the team treating the patient, the discussion of these problems (and especially the monitoring of the results of such discussion by means of oral and written tests) deserves a high priority. Contrary to traditional practice, there would seem to be no good reason why teaching of radiation beam dosage, and the effect on dose-rate of changes in the treatment distance or in the amount of scattered radiation, should not begin in the very first week of training and be immediately integrated with discussion of the dose-rate information available at every radiotherapy unit when the patient is treated. A preliminary course of physics lectures does not usually make the understanding of these principles any easier and can be done either concurrently or later. For many radiotherapy trainees and for many doctors in other fields, comparison with drug dosage and with the brightness and scatter of ordinary light beams, avoiding technical terms so far as possible, may achieve a better initial understanding of basic principles than is achieved by mathematical equations and theoretical physics.

  20. When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewin, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    The difficulty that many trainees, including those medically qualified, have in achieving a sound working grasp of certain basic principles of radiation beam dosage is often underestimated. Since any failure of understanding may seriously impair the efficiency of the team treating the patient, the discussion of these problems (and especially the monitoring of the results of such discussion by means of oral and written tests) deserves a high priority. Contrary to traditional practice, there would seem to be no good reason why teaching of radiation beam dosage, and the effect on dose-rate of changes in the treatment distance or in the amount of scattered radiation, should not begin in the very first week of training and be immediately integrated with discussion of the dose-rate information available at every radiotherapy unit when the patient is treated. A preliminary course of physics lectures does not usually make the understanding of these principles any easier and can be done either concurrently or later. For many radiotherapy trainees and for many doctors in other fields, comparison with drug dosage and with the brightness and scatter of ordinary light beams, avoiding technical terms so far as possible, may achieve a better initial understanding of basic principles than is achieved by mathematical equations and theoretical physics. (author)

  1. Design, construction and characterization of special ionization chambers for X radiation beams monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizumi, Maira Tiemi

    2010-01-01

    X radiation equipment may show fluctuations in the radiation beam intensity, as they are connected to the power net. These intensity variations can, in turn, modify the air kerma rate produced by this radiation beam. In a calibration laboratory, where radiation detectors (from clinics and hospital services) are calibrated, variations in the radiation beam intensity may cause an error in the absorbed dose determination. The monitor ionization chambers are used to verify the radiation beam intensity constancy, and to provide a correction for possible fluctuations. In this work, monitor ionization chambers for X radiation beams were designed, assembled and characterized. The developed ionization chambers have an innovative design, ring-shaped, with aluminium or graphite electrodes. These ring-shaped ionization chambers have the advantage of not interfering in the direct radiation beams. A double-volume ionization chamber with graphite electrodes was also developed. This ionization chamber is similar to the commercial monitor ionization chamber used in the Calibration Laboratory of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. All developed ionization chambers were tested in several standardized radiation beams and their performances were compared with those of commercial ionization chambers. The results show that two of the four ionization chambers developed showed performance comparable to that of the commercial ionization chambers tested. Besides presenting good results, the ionization chambers were designed and manufactured using low cost materials, which are easily found on the Brazilian market. (author)

  2. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  3. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kodama, Yasko, E-mail: ykodama@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz, E-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br, E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18{+-}1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  4. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18±1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  5. Beam and radiation tests of a fast, warm liquid open-quotes swimming poolclose quotes calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyk, J.

    1993-09-01

    A fast, warm liquid calorimeter module with lead absorber immersed in tetramethyl pentane (TMP) as the liquid medium (i.e. a open-quotes swimming poolclose quotes configuration) has been built and tested in a high energy beam at FNAL, and exposed to intense radiation from a strong Co 60 source. A two-tower prototype, incorporating the concept of the electrostatic transformer for fast readout, exhibited very good uniformity and small cross-talk in the beam test. This same calorimeter was exposed to over 10 Mrad of radiation from the Co 60 source, and the electron drift lifetime was measured as a function of accumulated dose. The lifetime improved significantly with small doses of radiation, up to a few hundred krad, then decreased gradually at higher doses, and extrapolated to a minimum useful lifetime of 0.1 μs at over 150 Mrad. This result was confirmed by measurements on a small single-electrode test cell which was irradiated to more than 25 Mrad. In this case, the lifetime decreased from 10μs to 0.1 μs when extrapolated to a dose of over 600 Mrad. This cell was also used to measure the effect of positive ion open-quotes space chargeclose quotes buildup under intense radiation. The results suggest that such effects are small even at the highest intensity available, about 1.3 Mrad/day, for applied fields ≥25 kV/cm

  6. Generation of linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Awata, Takaaki; Ikeda, Mitsuharu; Ikeda, Kenichi; Yogo, Akifumi; Itoh, Akio; Imanishi, Nobutsugu

    2000-01-01

    We have proposed a method to generate almost linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X rays by using a rectangular slit placed on an electron beam axis. Our calculation predicted that the linearity is 93.5% for the resonant transition radiation X-ray beam extracted through a slit of 0.5 mrad long and 0.2 mrad wide in case of 1-GeV electron beam irradiating a 7.5-μm thick Kapton foil stack. (author)

  7. Generation of linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Awata, Takaaki; Ikeda, Mitsuharu; Ikeda, Kenichi; Yogo, Akifumi; Itoh, Akio; Imanishi, Nobutsugu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2000-03-01

    We have proposed a method to generate almost linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X rays by using a rectangular slit placed on an electron beam axis. Our calculation predicted that the linearity is 93.5% for the resonant transition radiation X-ray beam extracted through a slit of 0.5 mrad long and 0.2 mrad wide in case of 1-GeV electron beam irradiating a 7.5-{mu}m thick Kapton foil stack. (author)

  8. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P wall , P stem , and P cel ) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude of

  9. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Opalka, Lukas [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jakubek, Jan [Advacam, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-07

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF SHORT UNDULATORS FOR ELECTRON-BEAM-RADIATION INTERACTION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Fagerberg, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Figora, M. [Northern Illinois U.; Sturtz, A. [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-10-19

    Interaction of an electron beam with external field or its own radiation has widespread applications ranging from coherent-radiation generation, phase space cooling or formation of temporally-structured beams. An efficient coupling mechanism between an electron beam and radiation field relies on the use of a magnetic undulator. In this contribution we detail our plans to build short (11-period) undulators with 7-cm period refurbishing parts of the aladdin U3 undulator [1]. Possible use of these undulators at available test facilities to support experiments relevant to cooling techniques and radiation sources are outlined.

  11. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granja, Carlos; Opalka, Lukas; Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus; Jakubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  12. Schemes of Superradiant Emission from Electron Beams and "Spin-Flip Emission of Radiation"

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A

    2005-01-01

    A unified analysis for Superradiant emission from bunched electron beams in various kinds of radiation scheme is presented. Radiation schemes that can be described by the formulation include Pre-bunched FEL (PB-FEL), Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR), Smith-Purcell Radiation, Cerenkov-Radiation, Transition-Radiation and more. The theory is based on mode excitation formulation - either discrete or continuous (the latter - in open structures). The discrete mode formulation permits simple evaluation of the spatially coherent power and spectral power of the source. These figures of merit of the radiation source are useful for characterizing and comparing the performance of different radiation schemes. When the bunched electron beam emits superradiantly, these parameters scale like the square of the number of electrons, orders of magnitude more than spontaneous emission. The formulation applies to emission from single electron bunches, periodically bunched beams, or emission from a finite number of bunches in a...

  13. tion using external beam radiation in gynaecological cancers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The purpose of the modified technique is: (i) to accurately assess the lower extent of the disease and define the lower border of the external radiation field in both the anteropos- terior/ posteroanterior (AP/PA) and lateral fields; and (ii) to decrease the field size and reduce treatment-related side-effects. Methods and materials.

  14. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.; Gray, W.M.; Watson, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  15. Radiation effects on microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Applications of radiation-hardened microelectronics in nuclear power systems include (a) light water reactor (LWR) containment building, postaccident instrumentation that can operate through the beta and gamma radiation released in a design basis loss-of-coolant accident; (b) advanced LWR instrumentation and control systems employing distributed digital integrated circuit (IC) technology to achieve a high degree of artificial intelligence and thereby reduce the probability of operator error under accident conditions; (c) instrumentation, command, control and communication systems for space nuclear power applications that must operate during the neutron and gamma-ray core leakage environments as well as the background electron, proton, and heavy charged particle environments of space; and (d) robotics systems designed for the described functions. Advanced microelectronics offer advantages in cost and reliability over alternative approaches to instrumentation and control. No semiconductor technology is hard to all classes of radiation effects phenomena. As the effects have become better understood, however, significant progress has been made in hardening IC technology. Application of hardened microelectronics to nuclear power systems has lagged military applications because of the limited market potential of hardened instruments and numerous institutional impediments

  16. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator

  17. Radiation effects on polyethylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Oki, Y.; Numajiri, M.; Miura, T.; Kondo, K.; Tanabe, Y.; Ishiyama, M.; Ito, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation effects on four kinds of polyethylenes were studied from the viewpoints of mechanical properties, free radicals and free volumes. The samples were irradiated using a cobalt 60 gamma source to give doses up to 3MGy. The degradation of mechanical strength due to gamma-irradiation was evaluated by the elongation at break and its tensile strength. Radiation induced free radicals were measured by ESR. Free volumes observed by the o-Ps component of the positron annihilation spectrum are normally the large ones located in the amorphous regions and after irradiation these are created in crystalline regions, too. The sizes and the relative numbers of free volumes were evaluated by lifetimes and intensities of a long-lived component of positronium, respectively. Using these data, the properties of polyethylenes before and after irradiation are discussed. (author)

  18. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, Charles, E-mail: c.dupin@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux (France); Lang, Philippe [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France); Dessard-Diana, Bernadette [Department of Radiotherapy, Hopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.9-243 cm{sup 3}) and 116 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-731 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas.

  19. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, Charles; Lang, Philippe; Dessard-Diana, Bernadette; Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm 3 (range, 0.9-243 cm 3 ) and 116 cm 3 (range, 24-731 cm 3 ), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas

  20. Analysis of radiation pressure force exerted on a biological cell induced by high-order Bessel beams using Debye series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Renxian; Ren, Kuan Fang; Han, Xiang'e; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Shuxi

    2013-01-01

    Debye series expansion (DSE) is employed to the analysis of radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted on biological cells induced by high-order Bessel beams (BB). The beam shape coefficients (BSCs) for high-order Bessel beams are calculated using analytical expressions obtained by the integral localized approximation (ILA). Different types of cells, including a real Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell and a lymphocyte which are respectively modeled by a coated and five-layered sphere, are considered. The RPF induced by high-order Bessel beams is compared with that by Gaussian beams and zeroth-order Bessel beams, and the effect of different scattering processes on RPF is studied. Numerical calculations show that high-order Bessel beams with zero central intensity can also transversely trap particle in the beam center, and some scattering processes can provide longitudinal pulling force. -- Highlights: ► BSCs for high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) is derived using ILA. ► DSE is employed to study the RPF induced by HOBB exerted on multilayered cells. ► RPF is decided by radius relative to the interval of peaks in intensity profile. ► HOBB can also transversely trap high-index particle in the vicinity of beam axis. ► RPF for some scattering processes can longitudinally pull particles back

  1. Biological effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the proceedings of a conference organised jointly by Friends of the Earth (U.K.) and Greenpeace (International). The aim of the conference was to discuss the effects of low level radiation, particularly on man, within the terms of dose/risk relationships. The topics discussed included: sources of radiation, radiation discharges from nuclear establishments, predictive modelling of radiation hazards, radiation effects at Hiroshima, low dose effects and ICRP dose limits, variation in sensitivity to radiation, and the link between childhood cancer and nuclear power. (U.K.)

  2. Development and optimization of the LHC and the SPS beam diagnostics based on synchrotron radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trad, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing the description of an SR monitor from its source up to the detector. The simulations were confirmed by direct observations, and a detailed performance studies of the operational SR imaging monitor in the LHC, where different techniques for experimentally validating the system were applied, such as cross-calibrations with the wire scanners at low intensity (that are considered as a reference) and direct comparison with beam sizes de-convoluted from the LHC luminosity measurements. In 2015, the beam sizes to be measured with the further increase of the LHC beam energy to 7 TeV will decrease down to ∼190 μm. In these conditions, the SR imaging technique was found at its limits of applicability since the error on the beam size determination is proportional to the ratio of the system resolution and the measured beam size. Therefore, various solutions were probed to improve the system's performance such as the choice of one light polarization, the reduction of

  3. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  4. Biological response to radiation. Studies of model organism, C. elegans, with micro-ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashitani, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    Described are mainly author's studies on radiation response and its biological significance in a nematode, C. elegans, particularly focusing its germ cells. The model organism is bisexual and the mature one is suitable to observe the development, differentiation and concomitant chromosome dynamics of male and female germ cells, and accordingly, the responses occurring in those cells at different stages post irradiation of the whole worm. Authors have shown in the organism irradiated by 100 Gy X-ray that pachytene cells in meiosis have high radio-resistance due to their increased expression of enzymes related with homologous recombination. They have also presented the apoptotic cascade in germ cells triggered by radiation by comparison of wild type and ab1-1-gene-deleted worms. Micro-beam of 12 C 5+ ion in Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA) has been used to irradiate the body parts of the worm to study the bystander effects, which has revealed that germ cells are shielded from the effect in the worm. It is thought important to use the micro-beam, with which the irradiation area can be precisely controllable, for studying the bystander effect in a body of higher animals like a mouse as well as in worm somatic cells. (T.I.)

  5. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the beam transport of short bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, R.

    1999-01-01

    Designs for next-generation accelerator, such as future linear colliders and short-wavelength FEL drivers, require beams of short (mm-length or smaller) bunches and high charge (nC-regime). As such a high charge microbunch traverses magnetic bends, the curvature effect on the bunch self-interaction, by way of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and space charge force, may cause serious emittance degradation. This impact of CSR on the beam transport of short bunches has raised significant concern in the design of future machines and led to extensive investigations. This paper reviews some of the recent progress in the understanding of the CSR effect, presents analysis of and computational work on the CSR impact on short bunch transport, and addresses remaining issues

  6. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koggl, D.; Dedenkov, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    All nowadays problems of radio biology are considered: types of ionizing radiations, their interaction with material; damage of molecular structures and their reparation; reaction of cells and their recovery from radiation damage; reaction of the whole organism and its separate systems. Particular attention is given to the problems of radiation carcinogenesis and radiation hazard for man

  7. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.; Cain, O.; Gray, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) represents a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Computer calculations have been used to simplify the evaluation of problems associated with the applications of the CRE-system in radiotherapy. In a general appraisal of the applications of computers to the CRE-system, the various problems encountered in clinical radiotherapy have been categorised into those involving the evaluation of a CRE at a point in tissue and those involving the calculation of CRE distributions. As a general guide, the computer techniques adopted at the Glasgow Institute of Radiotherapeutics for the solution of CRE problems are presented, and consist basically of a package of three interactive programs for point CRE calculations and a Fortran program which calculates CRE distributions for iso-effect treatment planning. Many examples are given to demonstrate the applications of these programs, and special emphasis has been laid on the problem of treating a point in tissue with different doses per fraction on alternate treatment days. The wide range of possible clinical applications of the CRE-system has been outlined and described under the categories of routine clinical applications, retrospective and prospective surveys of patient treatment, and experimental and theoretical research. Some of these applications such as the results of surveys and studies of time optimisation of treatment schedules could have far-reaching consequences and lead to significant improvements in treatment and cure rates with the minimum damage to normal tissue. (author)

  8. Effects of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, E.G.; Stewart, A.M.; Gilman, E.A.; Kneale, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to measure the relationship between exposure to different levels of background gamma radiation in different parts of the country, and different Relative Risks for leukaemias and cancers in children. The investigation is linked to an earlier analysis of the effects of prenatal medical x-rays upon leukaemia and cancer risk; the prior hypothesis on which the background-study was based, is derived from the earlier results. In a third analysis, the authors attempted to measure varying potency of medical x-rays delivered at different stages of gestation and the results supply a link between the other two estimates. (author)

  9. Radiation effects on vasoproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Hirotsugu; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1975-01-01

    The authors quantitatively examined radiation effects on vascular proliferarion, using the rat transparent chamber technique to observe the living microcirculation. We studied the process of vasoproliferation and revascularization from the surrounding pre-existing vessels into the surgically avascularized area in the chamber, by measuring the vascular lenght photographically. A hyper-vascularized zone, about 0.5 mm in with, was formed on the vascularizing frontier, the significance of which is so far not known. When the chambers were irradiated with various doses of 60 Co γ-rays, a dose dependent inhibition of vasoproliferation was observed. (auth.)

  10. Radiation effects on vasoproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, H; Matsuzawa, T [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Cancer

    1975-06-01

    The authors quantitatively examined radiation effects on vascular proliferarion, using the rat transparent chamber technique to observe the living microcirculation. We studied the process of vasoproliferation and revascularization from the surrounding pre-existing vessels into the surgically avascularized area in the chamber, by measuring the vascular lenght photographically. A hyper-vascularized zone, about 0.5 mm in with, was formed on the vascularizing frontier, the significance of which is so far not known. When the chambers were irradiated with various doses of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, a dose dependent inhibition of vasoproliferation was observed.

  11. Calculation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Impedance for a Beam Moving in a Curved Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Demin; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Oide, Katsunobu; Zang, Lei; Stupakov, Gennady

    2012-01-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) fields are generated when a bunched beam moves along a curved trajectory. A new code, named CSRZ, was developed using finite difference method to calculate the longitudinal CSR impedance for a beam moving along a curved chamber. The method adopted in the code was originated by Agoh and Yokoya [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7 (2004) 054403]. It solves the parabolic equation in the frequency domain in a curvilinear coordinate system. The chamber considered has uniform rectangular cross-section along the beam trajectory. The code was used to investigate the properties of CSR impedance of a single or a series of bending magnets. The calculation results indicate that the shielding effect due to outer chamber wall can be well explained by a simple optical approximation model at high frequencies. The CSR fields reflected by the outer wall may interfere with each other along a series of bending magnets and lead to sharp narrow peaks in the CSR impedance. In a small storage ring, such interference effect can be significant and may cause microwave instability, according to a simple estimate of instability threshold.

  12. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejourne, Michele.

    1977-01-01

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man [fr

  13. Quantum radiation reaction in head-on laser-electron beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the energy spread and the divergence of electron beams while they interact with different laser pulses at intensities where quantum effects and radiation reaction are of relevance. The interaction is modelled with a quantum electrodynamic (QED)-PIC code and the results are compared with those obtained using a standard PIC code with a classical radiation reaction module. In addition, an analytical model is presented that estimates the value of the final electron energy spread after the interaction with the laser has finished. While classical radiation reaction is a continuous process, in QED, radiation emission is stochastic. The two pictures reconcile in the limit when the emitted photons energy is small compared to the energy of the emitting electrons. The energy spread of the electron distribution function always tends to decrease with classical radiation reaction, whereas the stochastic QED emission can also enlarge it. These two tendencies compete in the QED-dominated regime. Our analysis, supported by the QED module, reveals an upper limit to the maximal attainable energy spread due to stochasticity that depends on laser intensity and the electron beam average energy. Beyond this limit, the energy spread decreases. These findings are verified for different laser pulse lengths ranging from short ∼30 fs pulses presently available to the long ∼150 fs pulses expected in the near-future laser facilities, and compared with a theoretical model. Our results also show that near future experiments will be able to probe this transition and to demonstrate the competition between enhanced QED induced energy spread and energy spectrum narrowing from classical radiation reaction. (paper)

  14. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengfelder, E.; Forst, D.; Feist, H.; Pratzel, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix [de

  15. Definitive proton beam radiation therapy for inoperable gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo; Sharma, N.; Iwasaki, Yoji; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsujii, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy using 250 MeV protons was carried out on two patients with early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0). One patient was an 85-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIa + IIc. The other one was a 70-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIc. In both cases histological examination of biopsy specimens showed differential adenocarcinoma; distant metastasis was not found by other examinations. Both patients were considered inoperable due to their poor cardiac and/or respiratory functions. Therefore, it was decided to treat them by definitive proton irradiation, delivering total doses of 86 Gy and 83 Gy, respectively. In both patients, skin erythema that did not require any special treatment was found in the irradiation field. Hematobiological examinations did not show any abnormality. Although endoscopic examination at two years after irradiation in the former case and at seven months in the latter case showed persistent gastric ulcer at the site of the cancerous lesions, cancer cells were not found histologically. Therefore, we concluded that proton irradiation therapy was useful for inoperable early gastric cancers. (author)

  16. Computer controlled vacuum control system for synchrotron radiation beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, S.M.; Wang, C.; Yang, J.

    1983-01-01

    The increasing number and complexity of vacuum control systems at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory has resulted in the need to computerize its operations in order to lower costs and increase efficiency of operation. Status signals are transmitted through digital and analog serial data links which use microprocessors to monitor vacuum status continuously. Each microprocessor has a unique address and up to 256 can be connected to the host computer over a single RS232 data line. A FORTRAN program on the host computer will request status messages and send control messages via only one RS232 line per beam line, signal the operator when a fault condition occurs, take automatic corrective actions, warn of impending valve failure, and keep a running log of all changes in vacuum status for later recall. Wiring costs are thus greatly reduced and more status conditions can be monitored without adding excessively to the complexity of the system. Operators can then obtain status reports at various locations in the lab quickly without having to read a large number of meter and LED's

  17. Ionized carbon investigation (spectroscopic terms, radiative lifetimes) using ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchet-Poulizac, M.-C.

    1974-01-01

    The spectra of carbon in all its ionization states were studied by the beam-foil technique, from the far ultraviolet (30A) to 6000A. This excitation process gives the spectra of strongly charged ions with great intensity and favours population of the high levels of these ions. It has led to new identifications, mainly in the CIV, CV, and CVI spectra. The results of radiative lifetime measurements are given for many levels of C II, C III, C IV and C V. The chief cause of error on these measurements is the cascade phenomenon. Various methods of decay curve analysis accounting for these processes were examined and showed that lifetime values of precision better than 10% can be obtained. The transition probabilities were estimated from the lifetime measurements whenever possible. The spectra obtained in the laboratory were compared with those observed in the Wolf-Rayet stars of the carbon sequence. The similarities and dissimilarities which appear yield information on the physical conditions prevailing in the atmosphere of these stars [fr

  18. Effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  19. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Bambade, P [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Moenig, K [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Schulte, D [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  20. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbault, C; Mönig, K; Schulte, D

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  1. Impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on beam qualities in a Chicane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Dao; Huang Wenhui; He Xiaozhong

    2004-01-01

    When the bunch goes through a Chicane, the energy will be redistributed within the bunch due to CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation), which would cause nonlinearity. Present theory states that this nonlinearity would add a huge amount to emittance growth. Based on simulation results, this paper would point out that the theory is only valid under an ideal condition that the bunch initially has no nonlinearity and under some given parameters there could be a cancellation between the nonlinearity caused by CSR and the initial nonlinearity. So under these circumstances authors can expect CSR to improve the beam quality. This paper provides a brief information about CSR and a full estimation of effects of CSR on beam qualities

  2. Effects of beam, target and substrate potentials in ion beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam etching and deposition are normally carried out with beam, target and substrate potentials near ground potential. In this paper, the effects of intentional or unintentional changes in these potentials are described. Examples include beam neutralization, a single extraction grid, substrate bias, and target bias. Each example is described in terms of beam plasma parameters. (Auth.)

  3. Transient pulse analysis of ionized electronics exposed to γ-radiation generated from a relativistic electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sun-Hong; Kwon, Ohjoon; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; Hong, Dongpyo; Jeong, Jin-Young; Jang, Jungmin; Bera, Anirban; Barik, Ranjan Kumar; Bhattacharya, Ranajoy; Cho, Ilsung; Kim, Byungsu; Park, Chawon; Jung, Wongyun; Park, Seunghyuk; Park, Gun-Sik

    2018-02-01

    When a semiconductor element is irradiated with radiation in the form of a transient pulse emitted from a nuclear explosion, a large amount of charge is generated in a short time in the device. A photocurrent amplified in a certain direction by these types of charges cause the device to break down and malfunction or in extreme cases causes them to burn out. In this study, a pulse-type γ-ray generator based on a relativistic electron beam accelerator (γ=2.2, β=0.89) which functions by means of tungsten impingement was constructed and tested in an effort to investigate the process and effects of the photocurrent formed by electron hole pairs (EHP) generated in a pMOSFET device when a transient radiation pulse is incident in the device. The pulse-type γ-ray irradiating device used here to generate the electron beam current in a short time was devised to allow an increase in the irradiation dose. A precise signal processing circuit was constructed to measure the photocurrent of the small signal generated by the pMOSFET due to the electron beam accelerator pulse signal from the large noise stemming from the electromagnetic field around the relativistic electron beam accelerator. The pulse-type γ-ray generator was installed to meet the requirements of relativistic electron beam accelerators, and beam irradiation was conducted after a beam commissioning step.

  4. Beam-dynamic effects at the CMS BRIL van der Meer scans

    CERN Document Server

    Babaev, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is responsible for the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS experiment. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors (luminometers), adequate for the experimental conditions associated with high values of instantaneous luminosity delivered by the CERN LHC. BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. Precise and accurate measurements of the delivered luminosity is of paramount importance for the CMS physics program. The absolute calibration of luminosity is achieved by the van der Meer method, which is carried out under specially tailored conditions. This paper presents models used to simulate of beam-dynamic effects arising due to the electromagnetic interaction of colliding bunches. These effects include beam-beam deflection and dynamic-beta effect. Both effects are important to luminosity measurements and influence calibrat...

  5. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J L; Webb, S

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans

  6. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1984-04-01

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  7. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.

    1977-03-01

    A summary is given of studies on radiation effects in light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, detectors, optical isolators and optical fibers. It is shown that the study of radiation damage in these devices can provide valuable information concerning the nature of the devices themselves, as well as methods of hardening these devices for applications in radiation environments

  8. Genetic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.A.H.

    1991-12-01

    Ionizing radiation effects on the gem cells, which can result in genetic abnormalities, are described. The basic mechanisms of radiation interactions with chromosomes, or specifically DNA, which can result in radiation induced mutation are discussed. Methods of estimating genetic risks, and some values for quantitative risk estimates are given. (U.K.). 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Biological effects of particle radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1988-01-01

    Conventional radiations such as photons, gamma rays or electrons show several physical or biological disadvantages to bring tumors to cure, therefore, more and more attentions is being paid to new modalitie such as fast neutrons, protons, negative pions and heavy ions, which are expected to overcome some of the defects of the conventional radiations. Except for fast neutrons, these particle radiations show excellet physical dose localization in tissue, moreover, in terms of biological effects, they demonstrate several features compared to conventional radiations, namely low oxygen enhancement ratio, high value of relative biological effectiveness, smaller cellular recovery, larger therapeutic gain factor and less cell cycle dependency in radiation sensitivity. In present paper the biological effects of particle radiations are shown comparing to the effects of conventional radiations. (author)

  10. Beam-beam effects for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Eden, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    We present a summary of a fairly extensive study of beam-beam issues that arise in the design of PEP-II. Most of these studies are carried out with ''strong-strong'' multiparticle tracking simulations. We focus on: choice of nominal beam-beam parameter, strength of the parasitic collisions, injection issues, performance and tradeoffs with unequal beam-beam parameters. We comment only briefly on beam lifetime. We conclude that: the beams are sufficiently well separated so that the parasitic collisions are effectively weak; that small inequalities in the beam-beam parameters may imply more comfortable performance margins; and that vertical injection with vertical beam separation is more comfortable than horizontal

  11. Computer modelling of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostunov, Igor K.; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects are now well established consequences of exposure of living cells to ionising radiation. It has been observed that cells not directly hit by radiation tracks may still exhibit radiation effects. We present a quantitative modelling of the radiation-induced bystander effect based on a diffusion model of spreading the bystander signal. The model assumes the bystander factor to be a protein of low molecular weight, given out by the hit cell, diffusing in the medium and reacting with non-hit cells. The model calculations successfully predict the results of cell survival in an irradiated conditioned medium. The model predicts the shape of dose-effect relationship for cell survival and oncogenic transformation induced by broad-beam and micro-beam irradiation by alpha-particles. (author)

  12. Radiation processing of polymers with high energy electron beams: novel materials and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, K.S.S.; Sabharwal, Sunil

    2002-01-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation available from electron beam (EB) accelerators has the ability to create extremely reactive species like free radicals or ions at room temperature or even at low temperature in any phase and in a variety of substrates without addition of external additives. This unique advantage of high energy has been utilized in the recent years to produce better quality materials in an environment friendly and cost-effective manner. The availability of high power and reliable EB accelerators has provided new tools to modify the materials and/or processes for a variety of applications. At BARC, a 2 MeV, 20 kW electron beam accelerator has been the nucleus of developing industrial applications of radiation processing in India for last 10 years. The focus has been on developing technologies that are of relevance to Indian socio-economic conditions and also provide economic benefits to the industry. In the areas of polymer processing industry, commercial success has already been achieved while for exploring its applications in the areas of food and agriculture and environment, technology demonstration plants are being set up. The current status of the programme, the new developments and future direction of radiation processing technology shall be presented in this paper. (author)

  13. Biology of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.; Pucheault, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present trends in biology of ionizing radiation are reviewed. The following topics are investigated: interaction of ionizing radiations with matter; the radiolysis of water and aqueous solutions; properties of the free radicals intervening in the couples O 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O/H 2 ; radiation chemistry of biological compounds; biological effects of ionizing radiations; biochemical mechanisms involving free radicals as intermediates; applications (biotechnological applications, origins of life) [fr

  14. Two-parametric model of electron beam in computational dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazurik, V.M.; Lazurik, V.T.; Popov, G.; Zimek, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulation of irradiation process of various materials with electron beam (EB) can be applied to correct and control the performances of radiation processing installations. Electron beam energy measurements methods are described in the international standards. The obtained results of measurements can be extended by implementation computational dosimetry. Authors have developed the computational method for determination of EB energy on the base of two-parametric fitting of semi-empirical model for the depth dose distribution initiated by mono-energetic electron beam. The analysis of number experiments show that described method can effectively consider random displacements arising from the use of aluminum wedge with a continuous strip of dosimetric film and minimize the magnitude uncertainty value of the electron energy evaluation, calculated from the experimental data. Two-parametric fitting method is proposed for determination of the electron beam model parameters. These model parameters are as follow: E 0 – energy mono-energetic and mono-directional electron source, X 0 – the thickness of the aluminum layer, located in front of irradiated object. That allows obtain baseline data related to the characteristic of the electron beam, which can be later on applied for computer modeling of the irradiation process. Model parameters which are defined in the international standards (like E p – the most probably energy and R p – practical range) can be linked with characteristics of two-parametric model (E 0 , X 0 ), which allows to simulate the electron irradiation process. The obtained data from semi-empirical model were checked together with the set of experimental results. The proposed two-parametric model for electron beam energy evaluation and estimation of accuracy for computational dosimetry methods on the base of developed model are discussed. - Highlights: • Experimental and computational methods of electron energy evaluation. • Development

  15. The biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards of radiations to man are briefly covered in this paper. The natural background sources of radiations are stated and their resulting doses are compared to those received voluntarily by man. The basis of how radiations cause biological damage is given and the resulting somatic effects are shown for varying magnitude of dose. Risk estimates are given for cancer induction and genetic effects are briefly discussed. Finally four case studies of radiation damage to humans are examined exemplifying the symptoms of large doses of radiations [af

  16. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation Cu Beam Dump

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Susana; Boles, Jason; Stein, Werner; Wirth, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Within the scope of conceptual R&D activities in support of the Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be not a significant issue. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (dpa) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 dpa, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 100 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks...

  17. Radiation-Induced Graft Polymerization: Gamma Radiation and Electron Beam Technology for Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Cabalar, Patrick Jay; Lopez, Girlie Eunice; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of functional hybrid materials by attaching polymer chains with advantageous tailored properties to the surface of a base polymer with desirable bulk character is an attractive application of graft copolymerization. Radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) has been a popular approach for surface modification of polymers because of its merits over conventional chemical processes. RIGP, which proceeds primarily via free radical polymerization process, has the advantages such as simplicity, low cost, control over process and adjustment of the materials composition and structure. RIGP can be performed using either electron beam or gamma radiation and it can be applied to both synthetic and natural polymers. These merits make RIGP a popular research topic worldwide. Moreover, the materials synthesized and produced via RIGP has found applications, and were proposed to produce continuous impact, in the fields of medicine, agriculture, pollution remediation, rare earth and valuable metals recovery, fuel cell membrane synthesis and catalysis to name a few. From 2012 our group has performed electron beam and gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of various monomers onto polymers of natural and synthetic origins (e.g. monomers - glycidyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylonitrile, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate; base polymers – polyethylene/polypropylene nonwoven fabric, polypropylene nonwoven fabric pineapple fibers, cellulose nonwoven fabric microcrystalline cellulose). We tested these grafted materials for heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu) and organic molecule removal from aqueous solutions and E. coli activity (using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer RAFT mediated grafting). The results clearly showed the success of materials modified via FIGP in these applications. Currently, we are studying the applications of grafted materials on treatment of waste waters from tanning industry, value addition to abaca nonwoven fabrics cell sheet

  18. Process for hardening an alkyd resin composition using ionizing radiation. [electron beams, gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T; Murata, K; Maruyama, T

    1969-11-27

    In an alkyd resin composition having free hydroxide radicals and containing a conjugated unsaturated fatty acid and/or oil as a component thereof, a process for hardening an alkyd resin composition comprises the steps of dissolving into a vinyl monomer, the product obtained by the semi-esterification reaction of said hydroxide radicals with acid anhydrides having polymerizable radicals and hardening by ionizing radiation to provide a coating with a high degree of cross-linking, with favorable properties such as toughness, hardness, chemical resistance and resistance to weather and with the feasibility of being applied as the ground and finish coat on metals, wood, paper, outdoor construction or the like. Any kind of ionization radiation, particularly accelerated electron beams, ..gamma.. radiation can be used at 50/sup 0/C to -5/sup 0/C for a few seconds or minutes, permitting continuous operation. In one example, 384 parts of phthalic anhydride, 115 parts of pentaerythritol, 233 parts of trimethylol ethane, 288 parts of tung fatty acid and 49 parts of para-tertiary-butyl benzoic acid are mixed and heated with 60 parts of xylene to an acid value of 12. In addition, 271 parts of maleic anhydride and 0.6 parts of hydroquinone are admixed with the content and heated to terminate the reaction. 100 parts of a 50% stylene solution of this alkyd resin are mixed with 1 part of a 60% toluene solution of cobalt naphthenate, and then coated on a glass plate and irradiated with high energy electron beams of 300 kV with a dose of 5 Mrad for 1 sec.

  19. Radiation effects on lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, B.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the ontogeny of lymphocyte populations concentrates on sites of production, rates of production, and the factors governing the differentiation and longevity of the various lymphocyte pools. The physiology of the lymphocyte pools is described with particular emphasis on recirculation from blood to lymph through lymphoid tissues. The separate routes of recirculation of both thymus-derived and nonthymus-derived lymphocytes and the possible anatomical sites and mechanisms of lymphocyte cooperation are discussed. Radiation effects on lymphocyte populations are divided into two sections. First, the effects of whole-body irradiation on the total lymphocyte pools are discussed including the differential effects of irradiation on T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, lymphoblasts, and plasma cells. The differential sensitivity of various types of immune response is correlated, where possible, with the differential sensitivity of the lymphocyte types involved. Second, experimental attempts to selectively deplete discrete subpopulations of the total lymphocyte pools, e.g., recirculating cells, are briefly discussed with particular emphasis on studies on the effects of the localization of radionuclides in lymphoid tissue

  20. Weekly monitoring of the effects of conventional external beam radiation therapy on patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer by means of blood cells count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, Maria da Salete Fonseca dos Santos [Hospital Universitario Oswaldo Cruz, Recife, PE (Brazil). Radiotherapy Unit]. E-mail: salete@lundgren.med.br; Cavalcanti, Maria do Socorro de Mendonca [Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Sampaio, Divaldo de Almeida [Centro de Hematologia de Pernambuco (Hemope), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the necessity of weekly monitoring by means of leukocyte and platelet counts of patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer submitted to conventional radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A hundred and one adult patients with cancer of head and neck (n = 11), chest (n = 35) and pelvis (n = 55), submitted to radiotherapy were assessed by means of leukocyte and platelet counts on a weekly basis, with a comparison between the results before and during the treatment and in correlation with the area treated, patient's sex and age group. Results: The most significant decrease in leukocytes was observed in the fourth week, when lymphocytes, total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets presented a decrease of 53.5%, 26.8%, 19.4%, 22.2% and 14.6%, respectively, in comparison with the values found before the beginning of the therapy. Geometric means for pelvis during the treatment were lower than those for chest, and head and neck. Lymphocytes demonstrated to be more sensitive to radiation therapy. No alteration was found in leukocyte or platelet counts in correlation with patients' sex or age. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, weekly leukocyte and platelet counts do not seem to be useful in the assessment patients submitted to conventional radiotherapy for localized cancer. (author)

  1. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, M. F.; Moraes, M. C. F.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay.

  2. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments with small animals, tissue cultures, and inanimate materials help with understanding the effects of ionizing radiation that occur at the molecular level and cause the gross effects observed in man. Topics covered in this chapter include the following: Radiolysis of Water; Radiolysis of Organic Compounds; Radiolysis in Cells; Radiation Exposure and Dose Units; Dose Response Curves; Radiation Effects in Animals; Factors Affecting Health Risks. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Radiation dose of cone-beam computed tomography compared to conventional radiographs in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Luca; Patcas, Raphael; Peltomäki, Timo; Schätzle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine radiation doses of different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan modes in comparison to a conventional set of orthodontic radiographs (COR) by means of phantom dosimetry. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips (3 × 1 × 1 mm) were used on an adult male tissue-equivalent phantom to record the distribution of the absorbed radiation dose. Three different scanning modes (i.e., portrait, normal landscape, and fast scan landscape) were compared to CORs [i.e., conventional lateral (LC) and posteroanterior (PA) cephalograms and digital panoramic radiograph (OPG)]. The following radiation levels were measured: 131.7, 91, and 77 μSv in the portrait, normal landscape, and fast landscape modes, respectively. The overall effective dose for a COR was 35.81 μSv (PA: 8.90 μSv; OPG: 21.87 μSv; LC: 5.03 μSv). Although one CBCT scan may replace all CORs, one set of CORs still entails 2-4 times less radiation than one CBCT. Depending on the scan mode, the radiation dose of a CBCT is about 3-6 times an OPG, 8-14 times a PA, and 15-26 times a lateral LC. Finally, in order to fully reconstruct cephalograms including the cranial base and other important structures, the CBCT portrait mode must be chosen, rendering the difference in radiation exposure even clearer (131.7 vs. 35.81 μSv). Shielding radiation-sensitive organs can reduce the effective dose considerably. CBCT should not be recommended for use in all orthodontic patients as a substitute for a conventional set of radiographs. In CBCT, reducing the height of the field of view and shielding the thyroid are advisable methods and must be implemented to lower the exposure dose.

  4. Sensor device for X-ray beam to evaluate the radiation focal spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Lara H.E. dos; Schiabel, Homero; Silva, Aderbal A.B. da; Marques, Paulo M.A.; Campos, Marcelo; Slaets, Annie F.F.

    1996-01-01

    A new electronic device to determine the position of the central ray of the radiation beam is proposed. The device aims to provide a perfect alignment of test objects used for evaluating focal spots with this reference axis

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of an energy-reinforced braking radiation photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, Pierre-Yves

    1966-01-01

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of a photon beam raised towards high energies, its experimental implementation, the definition of a gamma spectrometry method which aimed at checking various hypotheses used in the beam theoretical study. After a presentation of the theory of phenomena of electron braking radiation, of materialisation of photons into positon-negaton pair, and of issues related to multiple Coulomb diffusion, the author reports the study of the different solutions which allow a photon beam to be obtained. A braking radiation of mono-kinetic electron has been used. This braking radiation is reinforced by absorption of low energy protons in a column of lithium hydride. The author describes how the beam is built up, and the experimental approach. He describes how raw data are processed to get rid of the influence of the multiple Coulomb diffusion and of the braking radiation. Experimental results are compared with those obtained by convolution of photon spectra and differential cross section

  6. Effects of radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.A.H.

    1981-01-01

    The available evidence on the effects of radiation on man and the predictions that have been made of possible low level effects are reviewed. Data from United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) and the committee on the Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation (BEIR) is used to illustrate the acute, delayed and hereditary effects of high dose levels. The effects of low dose levels are discussed on the assumption that both somatic and hereditary effects can be predicted on the basis of linear extrapolation from high dose effects. (U.K.)

  7. An implantable radiation dosimeter for use in external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, Charles W.; Ruslander, David M.; Rini, Christopher J.; Mann, Gregory G.; Nagle, H. Troy; Black, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    An implantable radiation dosimeter for use with external beam therapy has been developed and tested both in vitro and in canines. The device uses a MOSFET dosimeter and is polled telemetrically every day during the course of therapy. The device is designed for permanent implantation and also acts as a radiographic fiducial marker. Ten dogs (companion animals) that presented with spontaneous, malignant tumors were enrolled in the study and received an implant in the tumor CTV. Three dogs received an additional implant in collateral normal tissue. Radiation therapy plans were created for the animals and they were treated with roughly 300 cGy daily fractions until completion of the prescribed cumulative dose. The primary endpoints of the study were to record any adverse events due to sensor placement and to monitor any movement away from the point of placement. No adverse events were recorded. Unacceptable device migration was experienced in two subjects and a retention mechanism was developed to prevent movement in the future. Daily dose readings were successfully acquired in all subjects. A rigorous in vitro calibration methodology has been developed to ensure that the implanted devices maintain an accuracy of ±3.5% relative to an ionization chamber standard. The authors believe that an implantable radiation dosimeter is a practical and powerful tool that fosters individualized patient QA on a daily basis

  8. Experiment for dose measurement during beam killing at Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, M.K.; Dev, Vipin; Haridas, G.; Thakkar, K.K.; Sarkar, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental measurement of radiation dose likely to be received by an occupational worker in the experimental hall of Indus-1 during accidental beam killing was carried out. Various accidental beam-killing scenarios were experimentally simulated for the measurement. The measurement was carried out using direct reading dosimeters. Result shows that in the event of accidental beam killing, dose likely to be received by an occupational worker outside the shield is negligible. (author)

  9. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, B.

    1989-12-01

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  10. Radiation protection clothing in X-ray diagnostics. Comparison of attenuation equivalents in narrow beam and inverse broad-beam geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, Thomas; Schoepf, T.; Ennemoser, O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Standard DIN EN 61 331-1 for attenuation measurements in the narrow and broad beam as well as DIN 6857-1 for the determination of shielding properties in the inverse broad-beam geometry are available for testing the attenuation of protection clothing. The attenuation measurements in the narrow beam don't consider scattered radiation and fluorescence due to the arrangement. This leads to the fact that the protective effect of lead-free materials will be misestimated when compared to lead. Therefore, the differences in attenuation equivalents, determined by both test methods for topical radiation protection aprons, were examined. Materials and Methods: The attenuations in inverse broad-beam geometry according to DIN 6857-1 and in the narrow beam according to DIN EN 61 331-1 were measured using commercially available aprons. They were made of lead, lead-reduced and lead-free materials. For determination of the attenuation equivalents, certificated lead-foils with high purity and a precise thickness of 0.1 to 1.25 mm were used. Results: The measurements in the narrow beam according to DIN EN 61 331-1 showed that nearly all aprons reach the required lead equivalent at mid-range tube voltages of 100 kV. At higher and lower tube voltages, the requirements of DIN EN 61 331-3 were largely not met. In contrast, the testing of the same aprons in inverse broad-beam geometry according to DIN 6857-1 showed that only a few aprons meet the requirements for being classified in the nominal protection class. Conclusion: The measurements suggest that testing method DIN 6857-1 has yet to prevail and that manufacturers are just beginning to develop the appropriate protective materials. (orig.)

  11. Control of the beam-internal target interaction at the nuclotron by means of light radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artiomov, A.S. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: artiomov@moonhe.jinr.ru; Anisimov, Yu.S. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Afanasiev, S.V. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Bazilev, S.N. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Zolin, L.S. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Issinsky, I.B. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kliman, J. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Malakhov, A.I. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Matousek, V. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Morhac, M. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Nikitin, V.A. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, A.S. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Nomokonov, P.V. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Pilyar, A.V. [Laboratory of High Energies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Turzo, I. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2005-02-11

    The light radiation from various internal targets at the nuclotron can be utilized for the operative control and time optimization of the interaction intensity of the beam. The examples presented in the paper illustrate information about the space characteristics of the circulating beam during one cycle of the accelerator run at the stages of injection, acceleration and during the physical experiments, respectively.

  12. Spatial resolution in optical transition radiation (OTR) beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, M.; Verzilov, V. A.

    1998-06-01

    An evaluation of the OTR single particle image dimension is obtained using diffraction theory based on a realistic description of the radiation source. This approach allows the analysis of the effect of the finite size of the emitting screen and of the imaging system. The role of practical experimental conditions in treating the intensity tail problem is estimated. It is shown that by exploiting the polarization properties of OTR, a considerable enhancement in the spatial resolution can be achieved, which becomes very similar to that of a standard point source

  13. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips, G.O.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  14. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: new methods for mini-beams radiation therapy and treatment follow-up by functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, P.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative method of synchrotron radiation therapy, called mini-beams, was proposed by A. Dilmanian et al. in 2006. Mini-beams consists in tumor irradiation with monochromatic sub-millimetric x-ray beams spatially fractionated produced by a synchrotron source. To obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume, an interleaving is realized using two orthogonal incidences. Adjacent healthy tissue is only partially irradiated by mini-beams, the areas between the beams only receive scattered radiation and therefore the energy deposited is 10 to 15 times lower than on one mini-beam axis, leading to a sparing effect of healthy tissue even when a high dose is deposited in the target volume. The thesis project is the development of this experimental method of monochromatic mini-beams, which involves the control of the irradiation geometry, the control of dosimetry and its modeling by Monte Carlo simulations. To evaluate the method, preclinical experiments on models of brain tumors implanted in rats (F98) are performed. Follow-up by anatomical and functional imaging is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Functional imaging of cerebral perfusion (volume and cerebral blood flow, mean transit time of heavy elements) appears to be associated in the literature as a relevant method for monitoring prognostic. The key parameters of the cerebral vasculature are mainly studied in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because of the harmlessness of this imaging modality. The relation between MRI signal and contrast agent concentration is very complex and no quantitative relationship is well known. Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) is an imaging modality with performances to measure absolute contrast agent concentration very close to the theoretical limits and can be used as gold-standard. The used pharmacokinetic models need as input parameters a contrast agent concentration versus time. A comparison of perfusion measurements between MRI and SRCT

  15. Study of the properties of inverted liquid sugar processed with gamma radiation and electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podadera, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    Brazil occupies position of prominence in the sugar market and high consumption of this ingredient in the liquid form, in special for the beverages and food industries. The liquid sugar presents advantages in relation to the bulk granulated system such as easiness of the handling and dosage, reduced space for the storage, reduction of the losses, costs and hand of workmanship, improvement of the sanitizing and great possible variation in the ratios of different mixtures of sugars. The inverted liquid sugar is a solution of sucrose, glucose and fructose in water. This ingredient receives this name because during its production it has an inversion of the optic power of rotation of the solution. In the productive process of the inverted sugar some points occur that can generate contamination by microorganisms, so its become important the development of techniques that propitiate the efficient sanitizing of this raw material. This work aims at to consider two alternative techniques of microbiologic control: gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 and radiation with electron beam. The study was lead in the doses of 5, 10, 20, 30 and 50 kGy. Concentration of sucrose presented in syrup decreased with the radiation indicating the scission of glycosidic linkage in addition with the glucose and fructose formation, generating the increase in solids soluble. The acid compounds formation occurred, confirmed by the reduction of pH, that it was proportional with the increase of the radiation dose. The biggest doses had provoked change of color in the syrup by the long molecular chain polymers formation. Viscosity in the samples processed by gamma radiation increased in relation to the control, indicating the prevalence of polymerization of molecules, whereas in the radiation with electron beam the polymerization was only observed in the sample that received the dose of 50 kGy, In the sensorial analysis, the judges had pointed significant difference (5%) in the flavor among

  16. An analysis of whistler mode radiation from a 100 mA electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerke, R.T.; Kellogg, P.J.; Monson, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of whistler mode radiation generated by 2-, 4-, and 8-keV electron beams with a current of 100 mA, are analyzed. The electron accelerator was carried to ionospheric heights by a Nike Black Brant V rocket (National Research Council of Canada NVB-06). The instability causing the whistler mode radiation is investigated. Spectral measurements (0.1-13.0 MHz), from a sweeping receiver located on the ejected forward payload, are used to determine the nature of the instability. The sweeping receiver was connected alternatively to an electric or a magnetic dipole antenna. Most of the whistler mode radiation detected was consistent with Cerenkov radiation. The radiation fields observed were too large (cB ∼ 0.1 μV/m Hz 1/2 ) to be explained by incoherent processes. If electrostatic bunching in the beam at the plasma frequency is responsible for the whistler radiation, there would be a correlation between the plasma frequency radiation, and the whistler mode radiation for electron beams that are fired toward the detector. The observed correlation is minimal. Hence no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that electrostatic bunching at the plasma frequency was responsible for the enhancement of the whistler mode radiation produced by the NVB-06 electron beam

  17. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, G., E-mail: gmishra_dauniv@yahoo.co.in; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-21

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  18. Role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugachev, Andrei; Li, Jonathan G.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Hancock, Steven L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Lei Xing

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to examine the potential benefits of noncoplanar intensity-modulated beams. Methods and Materials: A beam orientation optimization algorithm was implemented. For this purpose, system variables were divided into two groups: beam position (gantry and table angles) and beam profile (beamlet weights). Simulated annealing was used for beam orientation optimization and the simultaneous iterative inverse treatment planning algorithm (SIITP) for beam intensity profile optimization. Three clinical cases were studied: a localized prostate cancer, a nasopharyngeal cancer, and a paraspinal tumor. Nine fields were used for all treatments. For each case, 3 types of treatment plan optimization were performed: (1) beam intensity profiles were optimized for 9 equiangular spaced coplanar beams; (2) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 coplanar beams; (3) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 noncoplanar beams. Results: For the localized prostate case, all 3 types of optimization described above resulted in dose distributions of a similar quality. For the nasopharynx case, optimized noncoplanar beams provided a significant gain in the gross tumor volume coverage. For the paraspinal case, orientation optimization using noncoplanar beams resulted in better kidney sparing and improved gross tumor volume coverage. Conclusion: The sensitivity of an IMRT treatment plan with respect to the selection of beam orientations varies from site to site. For some cases, the choice of beam orientations is important even when the number of beams is as large as 9. Noncoplanar beams provide an additional degree of freedom for IMRT treatment optimization and may allow for notable improvement in the quality of some complicated plans

  19. Development and Optimisation of the SPS and LHC beam diagnostics based on Synchrotron Radiation monitors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081364; Roncarolo, Federico

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams.
 Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing t...

  20. Relationships between cone beam CT value and physical density in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaoqin; Bai Sen; Zhong Renming; Tang Zhiquan; Jiang Qinfeng; Li Tao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the main factors affecting the relationship between physical density and CT value in cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) for imaging guided radiation therapy(IGRT) by comparing the CT value in the image from cone-beam scanner and from fan-beam (FBCT) scanner of a reference phantom. Methods: A taking-park reference phantom with a set of tissue equivalent inserts was scanned at different energies different fields of view (FOV) for IGRT-CBCT and FBCT. The CT value of every insert was measured and compared. Results: The position of inserts in phantom, the size of phantom, the FOV of scanner and different energies had more effect on the relationships between physical density and the CT value from IGRT-CBCT than those from the normal FBCT. The higher the energy was, the less effect of the position of inserts in phantom, the size of phantom and the FOV of scanner on CT value, and the poorer density contrast was observed. Conclusion: At present, the CT value of IGRT-CBCT is not in the true HU value since the manufacturer has not corrected its number. Therefore, we are not able to use the CT value of CBCT for dose calculation in TPS. (authors)

  1. Effect of radiation damage on luminescence of erbium-implanted SiO sub 2 /Si studied by slow positron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kawasuso, A; Hirata, K; Sekiguchi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Okada, S

    2000-01-01

    The effect of damage on 1.54 mu m luminescence for 30 keV-Er-implanted SiO sub 2 films has been studied by positron annihilation and cathodoluminescence. It was found that S-parameter in the films decreased after implantation, indicating the suppression of positronium formation. The luminescence appeared with the recovery of the S-parameter after 600 deg. C annealing. The intensity reached a maximum at 900 deg. C annealing whereas the S-parameter did not change significantly. It seems that most damages recover at 600 deg. C and thereafter Er ions transform to an optically active state at 900 deg. C.

  2. Influence of γ ionizing radiation on anti-oxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuyck, S.; Connaulte, J.; Lesgards, G.; Prost, M.; Raffi, J.

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of vegetables is a cleaning up and preservation physical treatment which consists in submitting them to γ radiation, X radiation or electrons beam. This study deals with the influence of γ radiation on anti-oxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts. In that purpose, we use a simple biological test based on erythrocytes hemolysis. (authors)

  3. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Beam and Radiation Generation, Monitoring, and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, Mike; Kim, Kiyong

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  4. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  5. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Aberle, O.; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cornelis, K.; Dallocchio, A.; Deboy, D.; Lari, L.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2014-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs) in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat) facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  6. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-01-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  7. In vitro studies to evaluate the antioxidant property of salidroside and rosavin and protective effects of electron beam radiation induced damages in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejashvi, Kedilaya R.; Padma, Shetty K.; Suchetha Kumari, N.

    2014-01-01

    Rosavin and Salidroside are active component of Rhodiola rosea, it is a phenylpropanoid derivative of plant. Rhodiola rosea, also known as 'golden root' or 'roseroot' belongs to the plant family Crassulaceae. Rhodiola grows primarily in dry sandy ground at high altitudes in the arctic areas of Europe and Asia. Plant is rich with phenolic compounds, known to have a strong antioxidant property. Studies have shown that Rhodiola rosea has a capacity to decrease toxicity of Adriamycin (anti-cancer drugs), while it enhances their anti-carcinogenic effects. Enhanced antioxidant activity of Rhodiola rosea play role in the prevention of both chronic disease and aging. Present study is aimed to determine the antioxidant property of Rosavin and Salidroside and dose determination on human dermal fibroblast against dermal fibroblast. Rosavin and Salidroside were dissolved in 10% DMSO. Invitro biochemical assays like DPPH radical scavenging assay, Ferric Anion Reducing Potential using TPTZ, Nitric Oxide scavenging assay, Total antioxidant determination assay, Super Anion Radical Scavenging assays were carried out to know property of the extract. Extracts were then treated on monolayer dermal fibroblast cells survival assay was performed. Salidroside has shown 80% total antioxidant property compare to Rosavin with respect Ascorbic acid as a standard. 100'R concentration of Salidroside and Rosavin has quite equal potential to scavenging DPPH similar like Ascorbic acid. Ferric Anion Reducing Potential using TPTZ, Nitric Oxide scavenging assays have also shown both Salidroside and Rosavin has a good antioxidant property. Invitro studies on dermal fibroblast have shown remarkable protective effect on normal and irradiated groups. (author)

  8. SU-F-T-174: Patient-Specific Point Dose Measurement Using Fiber Optic Radiation Sensor Using Cerenkov Radiation for Proton Therapeutic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [Korea University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M [Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov radiation (FOCR) has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for proton therapeutic beam. We developed the FOCR, and it applied to patient-specific point dose measurement in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the FOCR system for proton therapy QA. Methods: Calibration of FOCR was performed with an ionization chamber whose absolute doses were determined according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. To determine the calibration curve, the FOCR was irradiated perpendicularly to the proton beam at the 13 dose levels steps. We selected five actual patient treatment plans performed at proton therapy center and compared the resulting FOCR measurements with the ionization chamber measurements. Results: The Cerenkov light yield of the FOCR increases linearly with as the dose measured using the ionization chamber increases from 0 cGy to 500 cGy. The results indicate that the fitting curve is linear, suggesting that dose measurement based on the light yield of the FOCR is possible. The results of proton radiation dose QA performed using the FOCR for 10 proton fields and five patients are good agreement with an ionization chamber. Conclusion: We carried out the patient QA using the FOCR for proton therapeutic beam and evaluated the effectiveness of the FOCR as a proton therapy QA tool. Our results indicate that the FOCR is suitable for use in patient QA of clinical proton beams.

  9. Beam-beam effect and luminosity in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Measurements performed at SPEAR have been discussed and scaling laws for the maximum luminosity and the maximum linear tune shift parameter with energy are shown. There are two distinct regimes, one below 2 GeV where the linear tune shift parameter scales like xi/sub y/ approx. E 2 4 and the other regime where this parameter is constant xi/sub y/ approx. = 0.05 to 0.06. In the lower energy regime the limit is reached when the vertical beam size is blown up to the acceptance of the storage ring. A significant (< 10%) horizontal beam blow up is not observed and the value of the horizontal linear tune shift parameter xi/sub x/ does not seem to be related to the beam-beam limit

  10. Beam profile effects on NPB [neutral particle beam] performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs

  11. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  12. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  13. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOEBRT) for carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Konski, A.A.; Merrick, H.W. III; Bronn, D.G.; Schifeling, D.; Kamen, C.

    1991-01-01

    The abdominal cavities of 50 patients were explored in a specially constructed intraoperative radiotherapy operating amphitheater at the Medical College of Ohio. Twenty-six patients were treated with intraoperative and postoperative precision high dose external beam therapy, 12 with intraoperative irradiation but no external beam therapy, and 12 with palliative surgery alone. All but two patients completed the postoperative external beam radiation therapy as initially prescribed. The median survival time for patients treated with palliative surgery alone was 4 months, and that for patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy without external beam therapy was 3.5 months. Patients undergoing intraoperative irradiation and external beam radiation therapy had a median survival time of 10.5 months. Four patients died within 30 days of surgery and two patients died of gastrointestinal hemorrhage 5 months posttreatment

  14. WE-D-210-04: Radiation-Induced Polymerization of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in View of Non-Invasive Dosimetry in External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callens, M; Verboven, E; Van Den Abeele, K [Department of Physics, Wave Propagation and Signal Processing, KU Leuven KULAK, Kortrijk (Belgium); D’Agostino, E [DoseVue NV, Hasselt (Belgium); Pfeiffer, H [Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); D’hooge, J [Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Bio-Medical Science Group, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound contrast agents (UCA’s) based on gas-filled microbubbles encapsulated by an amphiphilic shell are well established as safe and effective echo-enhancers in diagnostic imaging. In view of an alternative application of UCA’s, we investigated the use of targeted microbubbles as radiation sensors for external beam radiation therapy. As radiation induces permanent changes in the microbubble’s physico-chemical properties, a robust measure of these changes can provide a direct or indirect estimate of the applied radiation dose. For instance, by analyzing the ultrasonic dispersion characteristics of microbubble distributions before and after radiation treatment, an estimate of the radiation dose at the location of the irradiated volume can be made. To increase the radiation sensitivity of microbubbles, polymerizable diacetylene molecules can be incorporated into the shell. This study focuses on characterizing the acoustic response and quantifying the chemical modifications as a function of radiation dose. Methods: Lipid/diacetylene microbubbles were irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam using dose levels in the range of 0–150 Gy. The acoustic response of the microbubbles was monitored by ultrasonic through-transmission measurements in the range of 500 kHz to 20 MHz, thereby providing the dispersion relations of the phase velocity, attenuation and nonlinear coefficient. In addition, the radiation-induced chemical modifications were quantified using UV-VIS spectroscopy. Results: UV-VIS spectroscopy measurements indicate that ionizing radiation induces the polymerization of diacetylenes incorporated in the microbubble shell. The polymer yield strongly depends on the shell composition and the radiation-dose. The acoustic response is inherently related to the visco-elastic properties of the shell and is strongly influenced by the shell composition and the physico-chemical changes in the environment. Conclusion: Diacetylene-containing microbubbles are

  15. Incidence of primary hypothyroidism in patients exposed to therapeutic external beam radiation, where radiation portals include a part or whole of the thyroid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Laway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypothyroidism is a known consequence of external-beam radiotherapy to the neck encompassing a part or whole of the thyroid gland. In this non-randomized prospective study, we have tried to evaluate the response of the thyroid gland to radiation by assessing thyroid function before irradiation and at regular intervals after irradiation. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study were to assess in the cancer patients, who were exposed to the therapeutic external beam radiation, where radiation portals include a part or whole of the thyroid gland: the incidence of primary hypothyroidism, the time required to become hypothyroid, any relation between the total dose for the development of hypothyroidism, and whether there are any patient or treatment-related factors that are predictive for the development of hypothyroidism, including the use of concurrent chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: This non-randomized, prospective study was conducted for a period of 2 years in which thyroid function was assessed in 59 patients (cases of head and neck cancer, breast cancer, lymphoma patients and other malignancies, who had received radiotherapy to the neck region. 59 euthyroid healthy patients (controls were also taken, who had not received the neck irradiation. These patients/controls were assessed periodically for 2 years. Results: The incidence of hypothyroidism after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT to neck where radiation portals include part or whole of the thyroid gland was 16.94%, seven cases had subclinical hypothyroidism (11.86% and three cases had clinical hypothyroidism (5.08%. Mean time for development of hypothyroidism was 4.5 months. There was no effect of age, gender, primary tumor site, radiation dose and chemotherapy, whether neoadjuvant or concurrent with the development of hypothyroidism. Conclusion: In summary, we found that thyroid dysfunction is a prevalent, yet easily treatable source of morbidity in patients

  16. LIPAc personnel protection system for realizing radiation licensing conditions on injector commissioning with deuteron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroki, E-mail: takahashi.hiroki@jaea.go.jp [IFMIF/EVEDA Accelerator Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Narita, Takahiro; Kasugai, Atsushi [IFMIF/EVEDA Accelerator Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Kojima, Toshiyuki [Gitec Co. Ltd., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Marqueta, Alvaro; Nishiyama, Koichi [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Sakaki, Hironao [Quantum Beam Science Center, JAEA, Kizu, Kyoto (Japan); Gobin, Raphael [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, Gif/Yvette (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Personnel Protection System (PPS) is developed to adapt the radiation licensing. • PPS achieves the target performance to secure the personnel safety. • Pulse Duty Management System (PDMS) is developed to manage the beam-operation-time. • Satisfying performance of PDMS is confirmed by injector operation with H+ beam. • By the result of PPS and PDMS tests, the radiation license was successfully obtained. - Abstract: The performance validation of the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc), up to the energy of 9 MeV deuteron beam with 125 mA continuous wave (CW), is planned in Rokkasho, Japan. There are three main phases of LIPAc performance validation: Injector commissioning, RFQ commissioning and LIPAc commissioning. Injector commissioning was started by H{sup +} and D{sup +} beam. To apply the radiation licensing for the Injector commissioning, the entering/leaving to/from accelerator vault should be under control, and access to the accelerator vault has to be prohibited for any person during the beam operation. The Personnel Protection System (PPS) was developed to adapt the radiation licensing conditions. The licensing requests that PPS must manage the accumulated D{sup +} current. So, to manage the overall D{sup +} beam time during injector operation, Pulse Duty Management System (PDMS) was developed as a configurable subsystem as part of the PPS. The PDMS was tested during H{sup +} beam (as simulated D{sup +}) operation, to confirm that it can handle the beam inhibit from Injector before the beam accumulation is above the threshold value specified in the radiation licensing condition. In this paper, the design and configuration of these systems and the result of the tests are presented.

  17. Effects of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1986-08-01

    Synchrotron light facilities are making ever increasing use of wigglers and undulators, to the extent that these devices are becoming a significant part of the beam optical system of the storage ring itself. This paper presents a theoretical formulation for investigating the effect of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics in the approximation that the wiggler parameter, K, divided by γ is a small number and that the number of wiggler periods in one device is large. In addition to the linear forces which must be taken into account when tuning and matching the ring, nonlinear stop bends are created, with even orders more serious than odd orders. Some numerical examples are given for devices similar to those proposed for the 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  18. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials

  19. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Wang, Lumin; Hess, Nancy J.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials

  20. Optimal starting gantry angles using equiangular-spaced beams with intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 0126: A clinical study of 5 and 7 fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Butler, James B.; El-Gubtan, Adel S.; Nugent, Zoann

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the effects of starting gantry angle and number of equiangular-spaced beams for prostate cancer radiotherapy on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0126 protocol using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: Ten localized prostate cancer patients were prescribed to 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Static IMRT plans using five and seven equiangular-spaced beams were generated. The starting gantry angles were incremented by 5 o resulting in 15 (5 beams) and 11 (7 beams) plans per patient. Constant target coverage was ensured for all plans in order to isolate the variation in the rectal and bladder metrics as a function of starting gantry angle. Results: The variation with starting gantry angle in rectal metrics using 5 beams was statistically significant (p o and 50 o . Statistically insignificant differences were observed for the bladder metrics using 5 beams. There was little dosimetric variation in the rectal and bladder metrics with 7 beams. Nearly equivalent rectal V 75 Gy was achieved between 5 optimal equiangular-spaced beams starting at 20 o (class solution) and 7 equiangular-spaced beams starting at 0 o for most patients. Conclusions: The use of an optimal starting gantry angle for 5 equiangular-spaced beams, as indicated by a class solution in this study, will facilitate rectal sparing and can produce plans that are equivalent to those employing 7 equiangular-spaced beams

  1. Radiation effects on cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental data are presented concerning the effects of relatively low doses of x radiation and low concentration of tritiated water (HTO) on various receptor functions - concanavalin A, cationized ferritin, poliovirus of plasma membranes of animal and human cells which point to early and temporary disturbances of the composite structures and functions of membranes. References are given to the manifold influence of radiation-induced membrane phenomenon on the development and regeneration of radiation injuries. (author)

  2. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  3. Enhanced coherent undulator radiation from bunched electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Crosson, E.R.; Ricci, K.N.; Smith, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    When energetic bunches of electrons traverse an undulator field, they can spontaneously emit radiation both coherently and incoherently. Although it has generally been assumed that undulator radiation is incoherent at wavelengths short compared to the longitudinal size of the electron bunch, several recent observations have proved this assumption false. Furthermore, the appearance of coherent radiation is often accompanied by a significant increase in radiated power. Here we report observations of strongly enhanced coherent spontaneous radiation together with direct measurements, using transition radiation techniques, of the electron distributions responsible for the coherent emission. We also report demonstrated enhancements in the predicted spontaneous radiated power by as much as 6x10 4 using electron bunch compression. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. TE/TM field solver for particle beam simulations without numerical Cherenkov radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Zagorodnov

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The Yee finite-difference time domain method (FDTD is commonly used in wake field and particle-in-cell simulations. However, in accelerator modeling the high energy particles can travel in vacuum faster than their own radiation. This effect is commonly referred to as numerical Cherenkov radiation and is a consequence of numerical grid dispersion. Several numerical approaches are proposed to reduce the dispersion for all angles and for a given frequency range, that justifies itself for domains big in all three directions. On the contrary, in accelerator modeling the transverse dimensions and transverse beam velocity are small, but it is extremely important to eliminate the dispersion error in the well-defined direction of the beam motion for all frequencies. In this paper we propose a new two-level economical conservative scheme for electromagnetic field calculations in three dimensions. The scheme does not have dispersion in the longitudinal direction and is staircase-free (second order convergent. Unlike the FDTD method, it is based on a “transversal-electric/transversal-magnetic” (TE/TM-like splitting of the field components in time. The scheme assures energy and charge conservation. Additionally, the usage of damping terms allows suppressing high frequency noise generated due to the transverse dispersion and the current fluctuations. The dispersion relation of the damping scheme is analyzed. As numerical examples show, the new scheme is much more accurate on the long-time scale than the conventional FDTD approach.

  5. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Dejean, C.; Sargos, P.; Kantor, G.; Huchet, A.; Mamou, N.; Loiseau, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plexopathies and peripheral neuropathies appear progressively and with several years delay after radiotherapy. These lesions are observed principally after three clinical situations: supraclavicular and axillar irradiations for breast cancer, pelvic irradiations for various pathologies and limb irradiations for soft tissue sarcomas. Peripheral nerves and plexus (brachial and lumbosacral) are described as serial structures and are supposed to receive less than a given maximum dose linked to the occurrence of late injury. Literature data, mostly ancient, define the maximum tolerable dose to a threshold of 60 Gy and highlight also a great influence of fractionation and high fraction doses. For peripheral nerves, most frequent late effects are pain with significant differences of occurrence between 50 and 60 Gy. At last, associated pathologies (diabetes, vascular pathology, neuropathy) and associated treatments have probably to be taken into account as additional factors, which may increase the risk of these late radiation complications. (authors)

  6. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.; Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  7. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 [mu]s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  8. Effect of laser radiation on rat radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laprun, I.B.

    1979-03-01

    Quite a few experimental data have been obtained to date indicating that radioresistance of the organism is enhanced under the influence of electromagnetic emissions in the radiofrequency and optical ranges. But no studies were made of the possible radioprotective properties of coherent laser radiation. At the same time, it was demonstrated that the low-energy emission of optical quantum generators (lasers) in the red band stimulates the protective forces of the organism and accelerates regenerative processes; i.e., it induces effects that are the opposite of that of ionizing radiation. Moreover, it was recently demonstrated that there is activation of catalase, a radiosensitive enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of peroxide compounds, under the influence of lasers. For this reason, the effect of pre-exposure to laser beams on radiosensitivity of rats was tested.

  9. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  10. The technology and economics of treating waste water with electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation from electron beam accelerators is considered in this paper for the disinfection of waste water. Combinations of radiation with oxygen, chlorine, heat and retention media are discussed as possible methods to reduce the dosage requirements and the treatment costs. The production of ozone by the irradiation of oxygen is also evaluated as an alternative method of using this form of energy. The capital and operating costs for large electron beam facilities are analyzed to show the favorable trends with rising power levels. Cost comparisons between conventional disinfection processes and two radiation processes are presented and discussed. The results of these cost analyses support the premise that electron beam radiation should be evaluated as a likely competitor to ozonation or carbon filtration for large sewage treatment plants. (author)

  11. The technology and economics of treating waste water with electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation from electron beam accelerators is considered in this paper for the disinfection of waste water. Combinations of radiation with oxygen, chlorine, heat and retention media are discussed as possible methods to reduce the dosage requirements and the treatment costs. The production of ozone by the irradiation of oxygen is also evaluated as an alternative method of using this form of energy. The capital and operating costs for large electron beam facilities are analyzed to show the favorable trends with rising power levels. Cost comparisons between 'conventional' disinfection processes and two radiation processes are presented and discussed. The results of these cost analyses support the premise that electron beam radiation should be evaluated as a likely competitor to ozonation or carbon filtration for large sewage treatment plants. (orig.) [de

  12. Gamma, electron beam and ultraviolet radiation on control of storage rots and quality of Walla Walla onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.Y.; Stevens, C.; Yakubu, P.; Loretan, P.A.; Eakin, D.

    1988-01-01

    Walla Walla onions were irradiated with doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 kGy of gamma rays; 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 kGy of electron beams; or 0.44 × 10 4 1.32 × 10 4 , 3.52 × 10 4 , 7.33 × 10 4 and 19.1 × 10 4 erg/mm± of UV. The onions were stored up to four weeks at 20–25 C. UV irradiated onions exhibited the greatest percentage of marketable onions and reduction in postharvest rots. Sprouting was obsened with control, UV and electron beam irradiated onions but not with gamma irradiated onions. Effect of gamma, electron beams and UV on pH, moisture, ascorbic acid and color were not significant. Onions became soft with the high dose of gamma radiation (3.0 kGy). Total sugar content was not affected by UV and electron beam but tended to be greatest at the 1.0 kGy gamma radiation. The effect of the radiation on the onion sensory scores was not clearly indicated except that 3.0 kGy gamma ray irradiated onions had the lowest firmness score

  13. The suppression of radiation reaction and laser field depletion in laser-electron beam interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, J. F.; Moritaka, T.; Takabe, H.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of radiation reaction (RR) have been studied extensively by using the interaction of ultraintense lasers with a counter-propagating relativistic electron. At the laser intensity at the order of 1023 W/cm2, the effects of RR are significant in a few laser periods for a relativistic electron. However, a laser at such intensity is tightly focused and the laser energy is usually assumed to be fixed. Then, the signal of RR and energy conservation cannot be guaranteed. To assess the effects of RR in a tightly focused laser pulse and the evolution of the laser energy, we simulated this interaction with a beam of 109 electrons by means of a Particle-In-Cell method. We observe that the effects of RR are suppressed due to the ponderomotive force and accompanied by a non-negligible amount of laser field energy reduction. This is because the ponderomotive force prevents the electrons from approaching the center of the laser pulse and leads to an interaction at the weaker field region. At the same time, the laser energy is absorbed through ponderomotive acceleration. Thus, the kinetic energy of the electron beam has to be carefully selected such that the effects of RR become obvious.

  14. Intense Ion Pulses for Radiation Effects Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    induction linear accelerator that has been developed to deliver intense, up to 50 nC/pulse/mm2, sub-ns pulses of light ions with kinetic energy up to 1.2...II induction linear accelerator for intense ion beam pulses at Berkeley Lab. Figure 3. Helium current and integrated charge versus time at the...under contracts DE-AC02-205CH11231 and DE-AC52-07NA27344. JOURNAL OF RADIATION EFFECTS, Research and Engineering Vol. 35, No. 1, April 2017 158 INTENSE

  15. Diffraction Effects in Directed Radiation Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-03

    cosP acosO )/sin a sinJ], 0 / ’V< a , and Oga cos’ j (a-ct)/Yj, ()< 13 a < Rt/2, and where (r, t) is ident ical to t (I- t ) e:.:cep• that a i1 IepIac ed...Toraldo di Francia , NuoVo Cimento, Suppl. 9, 426 (1952)> 3. W T. Welford, Qptics, (Onfordi University Press, New York, 1981), chap. 3. 4. C.. J. Bouwkarnp

  16. Transistor Small Signal Analysis under Radiation Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharshar, K.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    A Small signal transistor parameters dedicate the operation of bipolar transistor before and after exposed to gamma radiation (1 Mrad up to 5 Mrads) and electron beam(1 MeV, 25 mA) with the same doses as a radiation sources, the electrical parameters of the device are changed. The circuit Model has been discussed.Parameters, such as internal emitter resistance (re), internal base resistance, internal collector resistance (re), emitter base photocurrent (Ippe) and base collector photocurrent (Ippe). These parameters affect on the operation of the device in its applications, which work as an effective element, such as current gain (hFE≡β)degradation it's and effective parameter in the device operation. Also the leakage currents (IcBO) and (IEBO) are most important parameters, Which increased with radiation doses. Theoretical representation of the change in the equivalent circuit for NPN and PNP bipolar transistor were discussed, the input and output parameters of the two types were discussed due to the change in small signal input resistance of the two types. The emitter resistance(re) were changed by the effect of gamma and electron beam irradiation, which makes a change in the role of matching impedances between transistor stages. Also the transistor stability factors S(Ico), S(VBE) and S(β are detected to indicate the transistor operations after exposed to radiation fields. In low doses the gain stability is modified due to recombination of induced charge generated during device fabrication. Also the load resistance values are connected to compensate the effect

  17. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  18. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  19. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  20. Visualizing Electron Beam Dynamics and Instabilities with Synchrotron Radiation at the APS

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Bing Xin

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third generation hard x-ray source serving a large user community. In order to characterize the high-brilliance beams, the APS diagnostics beamlines have been developed into a full photon diagnostics suite. We will describe the design and capabilities of the APS visible light imaging line, the bend magnet x-ray pinhole camera, and a unique diagnostics undulator beamline. Their primary functions are to support the APS user operations by providing information on beam sizes (20 - 100 micrometers), divergence (3 – 25 microradians), and bunch length (20 – 50 ps). Through the use of examples, we will show how these complementary imaging tools are used to visualize the electron dynamics and investigate beam instabilities. Special emphasis will be put on the use of undulator radiation, which is uniquely suitable for time-resolved imaging of electron beam with high spatial resolution, and for measurements of longitudinal beam properties such as beam energy spread...

  1. Ionizing radiations: effects and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, S.; Nenot, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Having first mentioned the effects of ionizing radiations in cancerogenisis, pre-natal, and genetic fields, the authors present the different sources of radiations and estimate their respective contributions to the total irradiation dose. Their paper makes reference to the main elements of a report issued by the United Nations Scientific Committee in 1977 [fr

  2. Genetic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.

    1981-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of ionising radiation on germ cells with resulting genetic abnormalities in subsequent generations, are considered. Having examined a simple model to explain the interaction of ionising radiation with genetic material and discussed its limitations, the methods whereby mutations are transmitted are discussed. Methods of estimating genetic risks and the results of such studies are examined. (U.K.)

  3. Epigenetic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Naggar, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Data generated during the last three decades provide evidence of Epigenetic Effects that ave-induced by ionizing radiation, particularly those of high LET values, and low level dose exposures. Epigenesist is defined as the stepwise process by which genetic information, as modified by environmental influences, is translated into the substance and behavior of cells, tissues, organism.The epigenetic effects cited in the literature are essentially classified into fine types depending on the type and nature of the effect induced.The most accepted postulation, for the occurrence of these epigenetic effects, is a radiation induced bio electric disturbances in the environment of the non-irradiated cellular volume. This will trigger signals that will induce effects in the unirradiated cells.The epigenetic effects referenced in the literature up to date are five types; namely, Genomic Instability, Bystander. Effects, Clastogenic Plasma Factors,, Abscopal Effects, and Tran generational Effects.The demonstration of Epigenetic Effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation indicates the need to re- examine the concept of radiation dose and target size. Also an improved understanding of qualifiring and quantifying radiation risk estimates may be attained. Also, a more logical means to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation induced carcinogenic transformation of cells

  4. Beam-Beam Effects in the SPS Proton-Anti Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelis, K.

    2014-01-01

    During the proton-anti proton collider run several experiments were carried out in order to understand the effect of the beam-beam interaction on backgrounds and lifetimes. In this talk a selection of these experiments will be presented. From these experiments, the importance of relative beam sizes and tune ripple could be demonstrated.

  5. Concept of a tunable source of coherent THz radiation driven by a plasma modulated electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Konoplev, I. V.; Doucas, G.; Smith, J.

    2018-04-01

    We have carried out numerical studies which consider the modulation of a picosecond long relativistic electron beam in a plasma channel and the generation of a micro-bunched train. The subsequent propagation of the micro-bunched beam in the vacuum area was also investigated. The same numerical model was then used to simulate the radiation arising from the interaction of the micro-bunched beam with a metallic grating. The dependence of the radiation spectrum on the parameters of the micro-bunched beam has been studied and the tunability of the radiation by the variation of the micro-bunch spacing has been demonstrated. The micro-bunch spacing can be changed easily by altering the plasma density without changing the beam energy or current. Using the results of these studies, we develop a conceptual design of a tunable source of coherent terahertz (THz) radiation driven by a plasma modulated beam. Such a source would be a potential and useful alternative to conventional vacuum THz tubes and THz free-electron laser sources.

  6. Radiation hazards and biological effects of ionising radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Najila Mohd Janib

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this chapter are follows - Mechanism of damage: direct action of radiation, indirect action of radiation. Classification of effects: somatic effect, induction of cancer, factors, affecting somatic effects, genetic effect, inherited abnormalities, induced effects, early effects, late effects, deterministic effect, stochastic effect. Effect of specific group: development abnormality, childhood Cancer, fertile women, risk and uncertainty, comparison of risk

  7. Effect of domperidone on radiation sickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakibara, T; Sato, K [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. School of Medicine; Watari, T; Tanaka, T; Furuta, A

    1981-07-01

    Domperidone was administered to 95 patients with radiation sickness following radiotherapy for various cancers. The chest and the mediastinum were irradiated in 43 patients, the upper and lower abdomen in 40 patients, and the head, neck, and supraclavicular region in 12 patients. As to radiation source, x-ray was used for 46 patients, ..gamma..-ray for 41 patients, electron beam for 3 patients, and more than one radiation was used for 5 patients. The dose given before the onset of radiation sickness totaled 3000 rad in 20 patients, 1000 rad -- 3000 rad in 41, and less than 1000 rad in 34. Domperidone was given to the patients one tablet (5 mg or 10 mg) P.O., 3 times per day before meals, for 1 -- 2 weeks. The overall effective rate of the drug was 68.4%. The 10 mg tablets were slightly more effective than the 5 mg ones. In the patients who were given the drug in a dose of 10 mg, the ameliorating rate of subjective symptoms was 68.1% for nausea, 88.9% for vomiting, 44.6% for anorexia, 17.5% for general fatigue, and 69.2% for dizziness. Laboratory findings showed no abnormal effects of the drug. One patient had itching with eruptions, which, however, was mild and disappeared immediately after withdrawal of the medication.

  8. Radiation and radiation effects; Strahlung und Strahlenwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, S. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Strahlenschutz; Janssen, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Ionisierende Strahlung

    2006-12-15

    The average dose incurred by the German population is about 4 millisievert p.a., about half of which results from natural radiation sources. The second half is caused nearly completely by medical applications. Only a very small fraction of the annual dose results from technical applications. This special issue of PTB focuses on the measuring problems relating to natural radiation sources and technical applications of ionizing radiation. The current contribution also outlines some important aspects of radiation exposure from medical applications. (orig.)

  9. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  10. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  11. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depauw, Nicolas, E-mail: ndepauw@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  12. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depauw, Nicolas; Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  13. Visible-light beam size monitors using synchrotron radiation at CESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.T., E-mail: sw565@cornell.edu [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Science and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Rubin, D.L.; Conway, J.; Palmer, M.; Hartill, D. [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Science and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Campbell, R.; Holtzapple, R. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    A beam profile monitor utilizing visible synchrotron radiation (SR) from a bending magnet has been designed and installed in Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR). The monitor employs a double-slit interferometer to measure both the horizontal and vertical beam sizes over a wide range of beam currents. By varying the separation of the slits, beam sizes ranging from 50 to 500 μm can be measured with a resolution of approximately 5 μm. To measure larger beam size (>500 μm), direct imaging can be employed by rotating the double slits away from SR beam path. By imaging the π-polarized component of SR, a small vertical beam size (∼70 μm) was measured during an undulator test run in CESR, which was consistent with the interferometer measurement. To measure the bunch length, a beam splitter is inserted to direct a fraction of light into a streak camera setup. This beam size monitor measures the transverse and longitudinal beam sizes simultaneously, which is successfully used for intrabeam scattering studies. Detailed error analysis is discussed.

  14. Crosslinking of thermoplastic composites using electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, A.B.; Black, S.R.; Bryce, G.R.; Olcott, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    The crosslinking of thermoset materials has been clearly demonstrated to improve many desirable physical and chemical properties for composite applications. While thermoplastic resins also offer many advantages for composite applications, they are not crosslinked and, therefore, may not meet the same property criteria as crosslinked thermosets. Electron beams have been used successfully for crosslinking non-reinforced thermoplastic materials. Electron beams have also been used for curing composite thermoset materials. This research utilizes electron beams to crosslink high performance thermoplastic composite materials (PEEK and PPS with glass and carbon fibers). The tensile strength and tensile modulus are compared under various crosslinking conditions. The method is found to have some advantages in potentially improving physical properties of thermoplastic composite materials

  15. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  16. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Bruce, R. [CERN; Papotti, G [CERN; Redaelli, S. [CERN; Valentino, G. [Malta U.; Valentino, G. [CERN; Valuch, D. [CERN; Xu, C. [CERN

    2017-06-13

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  17. Experimental investigation of dynamic pressure in a cryosorbing beam tube exposed to synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Malyshev, O.B.; Osipov, V.N.; Maslennikov, I.L.; Turner, W.C.

    1994-06-01

    Results of photodesorption experiments on a 4.2-K beam tube irradiated with synchrotron radiation from the VEPP-2M storage ring are being reported. The experiments have been performed on SSC1 and SSC2 beamlines. Synchrotron radiation parameters of the SSC1 beamline are the same as the SSCL 20 TeV proton collider; critical energy = 284 eV, photon intensity 1·10 16 photons/m/s. Photon intensity of the SSC2 beamline is eight times higher than intensity of the SSC1 beamline. We have used two experimental configurations to observe the density increase due to: (1) photodesorption of tightly bound molecules not previously desorbed and (2) photodesorption of weakly bound cryosorbed molecules. The two configurations used were a simple 4.2-K beam tube and a 4.2-K tube with a coaxial perforated liner. The photo-desorption coefficient of tightly bound H 2 measured on the SSC1 beamline was observed to decrease monotonically with photon exposure, reaching η4·10 -4 molecules per photon at the end of exposure (∼1·10 22 photons/m). The same experiment on the SSC2 beamline gave a similar result at photon dose 3.5·10 22 photons/m. The photodesorption coefficient of cryosorbed H 2 increased with increasing H 2 surface density, reaching η'σ w ∼7 molecules/photon at one monolayer surface density (s m ∼3·10 15 H 2 /cm 2 ), where σ w is the sticking coefficient. The liner was shown to effectively shield cryosorbed molecules from synchrotron radiation

  18. External beam radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medini, Eitan; Medini, Allen; Gapany, Markus; Levitt, Seymour H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy for carcinoma of the soft palate aims to achieve loco-regional control with normal speech, nasal function, swallowing mechanism, and minimal side effects such as nasal speech and regurgitation of food into the nasopharynx. In this report we present our results of radiotherapy in the treatment of 24 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate were treated at the Veterans Administration Medical Center Minneapolis, MN, between February 1977 and May 1992. Of the 24 patients 2 had T1, 19 T2, 1 T3, and 2 had T4 lesions. Nineteen patients did not have clinical nodal disease, stage (N0), 1 had N1, 2 N2, and 2 N3 disease (Table 1). All the patients were treated by 4 MeV linear accelerator. A 1.75 Gy median dose was administered per fraction to a total of 70 Gy median dose. Bilateral opposed compensated shrinking fields technique was used. Results: The 3-year disease free survival rate after external beam radiation therapy was 100% (1 out of 1), 64.7% (11 out of 17), 100% (1 out of 1), and 0%, for patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease, respectively. Salvage surgery for recurrent disease was successful in 57.1% (4 out of 7 patients). The ultimate 3-year disease free survival rate for the entire group, including surgical salvage, was 81% (17 out of 21). Conclusion: Radiation therapy alone in our institution resulted in tumor control and survival rates compare favorably to previously published reports in the literature. Surgery can be reserved as salvage procedure

  19. Relativistic and nonlinear radiation interaction between laser beams and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, E.L.; Hora, H.

    1981-01-01

    Starting from a combination of Maxwell's laws for the electromagnetic field and the conservation equations for a fully ionized plasma, the appropriate equations describing electrodynamic laser propagation and plasma dynamic particle motion are developed and solved. Calculations for multiply ionized transient conditions are carried out to yield electric field amplitudes, radial electron number density distributions and the progress of formation of a self-focused beam filament as a function of the target plasma density distribution and the laser pulse power-time history, among other parameters. Separate solutions emphasizing field-induced plasma motion on the one hand and significant beam contraction on the other are illustrated

  20. Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation

  1. Characterization of a Cs-137 radiation beam for dosimeter calibrations in the CRCN-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista Neto, Annibal T.; Soares, Carlos M. de A.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Correa, Rosangela da S.

    2009-01-01

    The Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO) has played an important role in the environmental radiation monitoring program in Goiania city. The reduce its dependence of others monitoring laboratories, the CRCN-CO acquired a model 28 JL Shepherd and Associates irradiation system with a 137 Cs source for calibrations and frequent quality control checks of radiation dosimeters. A characterization of the irradiation system was carried out with the reference standard dosimeters that are maintained by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN). The laboratory surrounding areas were monitored to demonstrate the adequate radiation protection conditions and parameters as the radiation field size, beam uniformity and the level of the scatter radiation were investigated. Dosimetry of the 137 Cs radiation beam in terms of air kerma rate was carried out at many source-detector distances with 4 (four) different beam lead attenuators. Results demonstrated that in spite of the radiation shutter automation is strongly recommended, the irradiation system is adequate and it complies with the requirements to be used for dosimeter irradiations and calibrations for the purpose of radiation protection. (author)

  2. Radiation effects on structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  3. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  4. Effects after prenatal radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian organism is highly radiosensitive during all prenatal developmental periods. For most effects a dose relationship with a threshold is observed. These threshold doses are generally above the exposures from medical diagnostic procedures. The quality and extent of radiation effects are very much dependent on the developmental stage during which an exposure takes place and on the radiation dose. An exposure during the preimplantation period will cause lethality. Malformations are usually induced after exposures during the major organogenesis. Growth retardation is also possible during the late organogenesis and foetal periods. The lower limits of threshold doses for these effects are in the range of 100 mGy. A radiation exposure during the early foetal period can lead to severe mental retardation and impairment of intelligence. There are very serious effects with radiation doses above 0.3 Gy. Carcinogenesis can apparently occur after radiation exposures during the total prenatal development period. The radiation risk factor up to now has not been clear, but it seems that it is in the range of risk factors for cancer that are observed after exposures during childhood. For radiation doses that are used in radiological diagnostics the risk is zero or very low. A termination of pregnancy after doses below 100 mGy should not be considered. (author)

  5. Effects of radiation on erythropoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harriss, E B

    1971-04-01

    Since the pioneer work of Heineke (1903; 1905) many workers have studied the effect of radiation on haemopoiesis. Their work has been reviewed by Bloom (1948), by Jacobson (1954) and more recently by Bond et al. (1965). The subject continues to stimulate much interest but is now more concerned with the effects of radiation on the multipotential stem cell pool than on radiation damage to the erythropoietic cells themselves. Death from haemopoietic failure following an LD{sub 50/30} dose of radiation is probably not attributable to failure of erythropoiesis; while damage to the erythropoietic system certainly plays a part in the syndrome, it is not a major factor contributing to the death of the animal. Although the severity and time course of the response vary with the species studied, the general effects of radiation on erythropoiesis are similar in all mammalian bone marrow studied to date. Likewise, though the severity of the reaction varies somewhat with the energy of the radiation and has been used to compare the relative biological effectiveness of different types of radiation (Sinclair et al., 1962; Sztanyik, 1967), the response is different only in degree and not in its fundamental pattern. The initial syndrome of depression and recovery will therefore be described largely by reference to work performed on the response of the rat to single acute exposures of either whole-body or partial-body irradiation with conventional X-rays.

  6. Correlation of microdosimetric measurements with relative biological effectiveness from clinical experience for two neutron therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Horton, J.L. Jr.; Roberts, W.K.

    1986-01-01

    Microdosimetric measurements were made for the neutron therapy beams at the University of Chicago and at the Cleveland Clinic with the same geometry and phantom material using the same tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter and standard techniques. The energy deposition spectra (dose distributions in lineal energy) are compared for these beams and for their scattered components (direct beam blocked). The model of dual radiation action (DRA) of Kellerer and Rossi is employed to interpret these data in terms of biological effectiveness over this limited range of radiation qualities. The site-diameter parameter of the DRA theory is determined for the Cleveland beam by setting the biological effectiveness (relative to 60 Co gamma radiation) equal to the relative biological effectiveness value deduced from radiobiology experiments and clinical experience. The resulting value of this site-diameter parameter is then used to predict the biological effectiveness of the Chicago beam. The prediction agrees with the value deduced from radiobiology and clinical experience. The biological effectiveness of the scattered components of both beams is also estimated using the model

  7. Protective role of Carica papaya (Linn.) in electron beam radiation induced hematological and cytogenetic damages in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yogish Somayaji, T.; Suchetha Kumari, N.

    2014-01-01

    Carica papaya (Linn.) is known to possess various biomedical applications. It has remarkable antioxidant properties. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the leaf extracts of Carica papaya (Linn.) on hematologic and cytogenetic changes occurring due to irradiation of mice to sub-lethal doses of Electron Beam Radiation (EBR). Analysis of hematological changes occurring due to irradiation of mice to sub-lethal doses of EBR, and the effects of Carica papaya (Linn.) extract on the same. The Assessment of hematopoietic stress by spleen colony forming unit and spleen body weight index. The analysis of cell proliferation and immunomodulation with response to the effects of Carica papaya (Linn.) extract by estimation of IL-6. The estimation of serum total antioxidants, lipid peroxidation and analyzing the activities of enzymes like SOD, ALP, and AST. Male Swiss albino mice were fed orally with papaya aqueous leaf extract for 15 days. They were irradiated with a whole body dose of 6 Gy Electron Beam radiation. The mice were dissected for liver, kidney, bone marrow, spleen and brain. The hematological studies were done using blood cell count in an automated cell counter. The biochemical estimations like urea, creatinine, SGOT, SGPT, Total Protein, Albumin, Bilirubin were done using the serum and homogenates. The total antioxidant capacity, the antioxidant enzymes were estimated. The Interleukin-6 levels were estimated in serum to assess immune modulation. The results show a decrease in the hematological parameters in radiated animals. The papaya treated groups have shown modulation in the hematological parameters. The extract has also reduced the suppression of the bone marrow induced by radiation. The radiation induced liver damage is also reduced in papaya treated groups. The aqueous extract of Carica papaya (Linn.) has shown protective effects in electron beam radiation induced tissue damages in Swiss Albino mice (author)

  8. Acoustical radiation torque and force for spheres and Bessel beam extinction efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L.; Zhang, Likun

    2014-11-01

    The scattering of optical and acoustical beams is relevant to the levitation and manipulation of drops. Here we examine theoretical developments in the acoustical case. We previously showed how the optical theorem for extinction can be extended to invariant beams. The example of a sphere in a Bessel beam facilitates the direct comparison with a circular disc computed using Babinet's principle and the Kirchhoff approximation. In related work, by considering traveling or standing wave first-order vortex beams we previously showed that the radiation torque is the ratio of the absorbed power and the radian acoustic frequency. By modifying the scattering to account for the viscosity of the surrounding fluid in the analysis of the absorbed power, approximations for radiation torque and force are obtained at long wavelengths in special cases and these can be compared with results published elsewhere.

  9. Aerosol effects in radiation transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binenko, V.I.; Harshvardhan, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative properties and effects of aerosols are assessed for the following aerosol sources: relatively clean background aerosol, dust storms and dust outbreaks, anthropogenic pollution, and polluted cloud layers. Studies show it is the submicron aerosol fraction that plays a dominant radiative role in the atmosphere. The radiative effect of the aerosol depends not only on its loading but also on the underlying surface albedo and on solar zenith angle. It is only with highly reflecting surfaces such as Arctic ice that aerosols have a warming effect. Radiometric, microphysical, mineral composition, and refractive index measurements are presented for dust and in particular for the Saharan aerosol layer (SAL). Short-wave radiative heating of the atmosphere is caused by the SAL and is due mainly to absorption. However, the SAL does not contribute significantly to the long-wave thermal radiation budget. Field program studies of the radiative effects of aerosols are described. Anthropogenic aerosols deplete the incoming solar radiation. A case field study for a regional Ukrainian center is discussed. The urban aerosol causes a cooling of metropolitan centers, compared with outlying areas, during the day, which is followed by a warming trend at night. In another study, an increase in turbidity by a factor of 3 due to increased industrialization for Mexico City is noted, together with a drop in atmospheric transmission by 10% over a 50-year period. Numerous studies are cited that demonstrate that anthropogenic aerosols affect both the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds, which in turn affect regional climate. Particles acting as cloud nuclei are considered to have the greatest indirect effect on cloud absorptivity of short-wave radiation. Satellite observations show that low-level stratus clouds contaminated by ship exhaust at sea lead to an increase in cloud albedo

  10. Some results of simulation on radiation effects in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, T.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk

    1993-05-01

    Simulations concerning radiation in oriented silicon and tungsten crystals of different thicknesses are developed. Conditions are those of experiments done at Kharkov (Ukraine) and Tomsk (Russia) with electron beams in the 1 GeV range. Systematic comparisons between experimental and simulated spectra associated to real spectrum, radiation energy and angular distribution of the photons are developed. The ability of the simulation program to describe crystal effects in the considered energy range is analysed. (author) 11 refs.; 8 figs

  11. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.

    2008-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO 2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the 'classical' spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive 'tip detectors' of electronically excited nanostructures

  12. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Cohen, H.; Maniv, T.

    2008-07-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating ( SiO2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the “classical” spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive “tip detectors” of electronically excited nanostructures.

  13. Beam-centric algorithm for pretreatment patient position correction in external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu; Maltz, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In current image guided pretreatment patient position adjustment methods, image registration is used to determine alignment parameters. Since most positioning hardware lacks the full six degrees of freedom (DOF), accuracy is compromised. The authors show that such compromises are often unnecessary when one models the planned treatment beams as part of the adjustment calculation process. The authors present a flexible algorithm for determining optimal realizable adjustments for both step-and-shoot and arc delivery methods. Methods: The beam shape model is based on the polygonal intersection of each beam segment with the plane in pretreatment image volume that passes through machine isocenter perpendicular to the central axis of the beam. Under a virtual six-DOF correction, ideal positions of these polygon vertices are computed. The proposed method determines the couch, gantry, and collimator adjustments that minimize the total mismatch of all vertices over all segments with respect to their ideal positions. Using this geometric error metric as a function of the number of available DOF, the user may select the most desirable correction regime. Results: For a simulated treatment plan consisting of three equally weighted coplanar fixed beams, the authors achieve a 7% residual geometric error (with respect to the ideal correction, considered 0% error) by applying gantry rotation as well as translation and isocentric rotation of the couch. For a clinical head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy plan with seven beams and five segments per beam, the corresponding error is 6%. Correction involving only couch translation (typical clinical practice) leads to a much larger 18% mismatch. Clinically significant consequences of more accurate adjustment are apparent in the dose volume histograms of target and critical structures. Conclusions: The algorithm achieves improvements in delivery accuracy using standard delivery hardware without significantly increasing

  14. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuglik, Z; Zvara, I; Yakushev, A B; Timokhin, S N [Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna (Russian Federation). Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research

    1994-05-01

    The facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments installed on the beam line of the U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, is described. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions ranging from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of the Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol by {sup 11}B, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 40}Ca ions are presented. (author).

  15. Seeing the invisible: direct visualization of therapeutic radiation beams using air scintillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Ceballos, Andrew; Türkcan, Silvan; Kapp, Daniel S; Pratx, Guillem

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether air scintillation produced during standard radiation treatments can be visualized and used to monitor a beam in a nonperturbing manner. Air scintillation is caused by the excitation of nitrogen gas by ionizing radiation. This weak emission occurs predominantly in the 300-430 nm range. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera, outfitted with an f/0.95 lens, was used to capture air scintillation produced by kilovoltage photon beams and megavoltage electron beams used in radiation therapy. The treatment rooms were prepared to block background light and a short-pass filter was utilized to block light above 440 nm. Air scintillation from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) was visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s) and showed an inverse falloff (r(2) = 0.89). Electron beams were also imaged. For a fixed exposure time (100 s), air scintillation was proportional to dose rate (r(2) = 0.9998). As energy increased, the divergence of the electron beam decreased and the penumbra improved. By irradiating a transparent phantom, the authors also showed that Cherenkov luminescence did not interfere with the detection of air scintillation. In a final illustration of the capabilities of this new technique, the authors visualized air scintillation produced during a total skin irradiation treatment. Air scintillation can be measured to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and nonperturbing manner. This physical phenomenon could be useful for dosimetry of therapeutic radiation beams or for online detection of gross errors during fractionated treatments.

  16. Seeing the invisible: Direct visualization of therapeutic radiation beams using air scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Türkcan, Silvan; Kapp, Daniel S.; Pratx, Guillem, E-mail: pratx@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Ceballos, Andrew [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To assess whether air scintillation produced during standard radiation treatments can be visualized and used to monitor a beam in a nonperturbing manner. Methods: Air scintillation is caused by the excitation of nitrogen gas by ionizing radiation. This weak emission occurs predominantly in the 300–430 nm range. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera, outfitted with an f/0.95 lens, was used to capture air scintillation produced by kilovoltage photon beams and megavoltage electron beams used in radiation therapy. The treatment rooms were prepared to block background light and a short-pass filter was utilized to block light above 440 nm. Results: Air scintillation from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) was visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s) and showed an inverse falloff (r{sup 2} = 0.89). Electron beams were also imaged. For a fixed exposure time (100 s), air scintillation was proportional to dose rate (r{sup 2} = 0.9998). As energy increased, the divergence of the electron beam decreased and the penumbra improved. By irradiating a transparent phantom, the authors also showed that Cherenkov luminescence did not interfere with the detection of air scintillation. In a final illustration of the capabilities of this new technique, the authors visualized air scintillation produced during a total skin irradiation treatment. Conclusions: Air scintillation can be measured to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and nonperturbing manner. This physical phenomenon could be useful for dosimetry of therapeutic radiation beams or for online detection of gross errors during fractionated treatments.

  17. Low level radiation: biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  18. A NOVEL, REMOVABLE, CERROBEND, BEAM-BLOCKING DEVICE FOR RADIATION THERAPY OF THE CANINE HEAD AND NECK: PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael S; Berlato, Davide; Vanhaezebrouck, Isabelle; Gordon, Ira K; Hansen, Katherine S; Theon, Alain P; Holt, Randall W; Trestrail, Earl A

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the head and neck can result in mucositis and other acute affects in the oral cavity. This prospective pilot study evaluated a novel, intraoral, beam-blocking device for use during imaging and therapeutic procedures. The beam-blocking device was made from a metal alloy inserted into a coated frozen dessert mold (Popsicle® Mold, Cost Plus World Market, Oakland, CA). The device was designed so that it could be inserted into an outer shell, which in turn allowed it to be placed or removed depending on the need due to beam configuration. A Farmer type ionization chamber and virtual water phantom were used to assess effects of field size on transmission. Six large breed cadaver dogs, donated by the owner after death, were recruited for the study. Delivered dose at the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the device, with and without the alloy block in place, were measured using radiochromic film. It was determined that transmission was field size dependent with larger field sizes leading to decreased attenuation of the beam, likely secondary to scatter. The mean and median transmission on the ventral surface without the beam-blocking device was 0.94 [range 0.94-0.96]. The mean and median transmission with the beam-blocking device was 0.52 [range 0.50-0.57]. The mean and median increase in dose due to backscatter on the dorsal surface of the beam-blocking device was 0.04 [range 0.02-0.04]. Findings indicated that this novel device can help attenuate radiation dose ventral to the block in dogs, with minimal backscatter. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Image-guided small animal radiation research platform: calibration of treatment beam alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter; Ford, Eric; Wong, John

    2009-01-01

    Small animal research allows detailed study of biological processes, disease progression and response to therapy with the potential to provide a natural bridge to the clinical environment. The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) is a portable system for precision irradiation with beam sizes down to approximately 0.5 mm and optimally planned radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. This paper focuses on the geometric calibration of the system for high-precision irradiation. A novel technique for the calibration of the treatment beam is presented, which employs an x-ray camera whose precise positioning need not be known. Using the camera system we acquired a digitally reconstructed 3D 'star shot' for gantry calibration and then developed a technique to align each beam to a common isocenter with the robotic animal positioning stages. The calibration incorporates localization by cone-beam CT guidance. Uncorrected offsets of the beams with respect to the calibration origin ranged from 0.4 mm to 5.2 mm. With corrections, these alignment errors can be reduced to the sub-millimeter range. The calibration technique was used to deliver a stereotactic-like arc treatment to a phantom constructed with EBT Gafchromic films. All beams were shown to intersect at a common isocenter with a measured beam (FWHM) of approximately 1.07 mm using the 0.5 mm collimated beam. The desired positioning accuracy of the SARRP is 0.25 mm and the results indicate an accuracy of 0.2 mm. To fully realize the radiation localization capabilities of the SARRP, precise geometric calibration is required, as with any such system. The x-ray camera-based technique presented here provides a straightforward and semi-automatic method for system calibration.

  20. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.; Dupuis, O.; Orain, I.; Crehange, G.

    2010-01-01

    The esophagus is a musculo-membranous tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. Due to its anatomical location, it can be exposed to ionizing radiation in many external radiotherapy indications. Radiation-induced esophageal mucositis is clinically revealed by dysphagia and odynophagia, and usually begins 3 to 4 weeks after the start of radiation treatment. With the rise of multimodality treatments (e.g., concurrent chemoradiotherapy, dose escalation and accelerated fractionation schemes), esophageal toxicity has become a significant dose-limiting issue. Understanding the predictive factors of esophageal injury may improve the optimal delivery of treatment plans. It may help to minimize the risks, hence increasing the therapeutic ratio. Based on a large literature review, our study describes both early and late radiation-induced esophageal injuries and highlights some of the predictive factors for cervical and thoracic esophagus toxicity. These clinical and dosimetric parameters are numerous but none is consensual. The large number of dosimetric parameters strengthens the need of an overall analysis of the dose/volume histograms. The data provided is insufficient to recommend their routine use to prevent radiation-induced esophagitis. Defining guidelines for the tolerance of the esophagus to ionizing radiation remains essential for a safe and efficient treatment. (authors)

  1. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A.R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  2. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  3. Radiation synthesis of chitosan stabilized gold nanoparticles comparison between e− beam and γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, Khoa Dang Nguyen; Kowandy, Christelle; Dupont, Laurent; Coqueret, Xavier; Hien, Nguyen Quoc

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized via radiolytic reduction of Au(III) salts induced by e − beam or γ-irradiation, using chitosan as a stabilizer. The effect of irradiation dose, chitosan concentration and the conditioning of HAuCl 4 –chitosan solutions were studied. UV–visible absorption measurements reveal that the size of Au clusters formed immediately after irradiation is correlated with the extent of chitosan scission chain of chitosan and fall with the increase of dose absorbed. This effect is more pronounced with solution conditioned under Argon (Ar). Au clusters coalesce to form stable nanoparticles after two weeks. - Highlights: • This paper underlines the potential of ionizing radiations in the synthesis of AuNps. • The size of the nanoparticles, and their stability are controlled by the ratio [GLA]/[Au(III)] • This paper compares results obtained with e − beam and γ irradiation for the AuNps synthesis. • This paper points the influence of dose rate on the size of preformed Au clusters

  4. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, Alison; Saratsopoulos, John; Deura, Michael; Kenny, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  5. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  6. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-01-01

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  7. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of different LET radiation in A. oryzae. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced base substitutions, frameshifts, deletions. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced genome-wide large-scale mutations in A. oryzae. ► Some differences in the types and frequencies of mutations were found. ► Our results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae. - Abstract: Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was 12 C 5+ ion beams with an LET of 121 keV/μm. The 12 C 5+ ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2 keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. 12 C 6+ ion beams with an LET of 86 keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to 12 C 6+ ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47 × 10 −3 at 700 Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700 Gy, 12 C 5+ ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67 × 10 −3 ) at 400 Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between 12 C 5+ ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2 bp was generally low

  8. Ten Thousand Years of Environment Assessment Using Synchrotron Radiation Micro Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, K.; Ide-Ektessabi, A.; Koizumi, A.; Azechi, M.

    2003-08-01

    The environment surrounding human has changed through civilization and industrialization, and through these developments, problems including the pollution from heavy metals such as lead and mercury have arisen. In this study, we analyzed major and trace elements in modern and prehistoric teeth by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis using synchrotron radiation micro beam, in order to assess the changes of the environment through the civilization and the industrialization and their affects to the human. It is suggested that teeth accumulate elements in the mineral phase, hydroxiapatite, during their formation, and because there are no significant turnovers, teeth are concerned to be indicators of the environment of the donor. We first analyzed the elements on the surface of tooth from modern individual and tooth from human remains of Jomon period to assess the heavy metal concentration and effect of the diagenesis. The adhering ground elements on the prehistoric teeth showed high amount of Ti, Fe, Mn and other metallic elements.

  9. Use of E-beam radiation to eliminate Listeria monocytogenes from surface mould cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Raquel; Ordóñez, Juan A; Cambero, M Isabel; Cabeza, M Concepción

    2015-03-01

    Camembert and Brie soft cheese varieties were subjected to E-beam irradiation as a sanitation treatment. The effects of treatments on microbiota and selected physicochemical properties were also studied. The absorbed doses required to meet the food safety objective (FSO) according to EU and USDA criteria for Listeria monocytogenes were 1.27 and 2.59 kGy, respectively. The bacterial load, mainly lactic acid bacteria, was reduced by the treatment but injured cells were recovered during storage at 14°C. The radiation treatment gave rise to negligible changes in the pH and water activity at doses required to achieve microbial safety. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  10. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-06-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm.

  11. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm. (paper)

  12. Audit of high energy therapy beams in hospital oncology departments by the National Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, V.G.

    1994-02-01

    In 1993 the output of every high energy radiotherapy beam used clinically in New Zealand was measured by National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) staff using independent dosimetry equipment. The purpose of this was to audit the dosimetry that is used by hospital physicists for the basis of patient treatments, and to uncover any errors that may be clinically significant. This report analyses the uncertainties involved in comparing the NRL and hospital measurements, and presents the results of the 1993 audit. The overall uncertainty turns out to be about 1.5%. The results for linear accelerator photon beams are consistent with a purely random variation within this uncertainty. Electron beams show some small errors beyond the expected uncertainty. Gamma beams have the potential to be the most accurately measured, but in practice are less accurately measured than linear accelerator beams. None of the disagreements indicated an error of clinical significance. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-01-01

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described

  14. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  15. Feasibility of Optical Transition Radiation Imaging for Laser-driven Plasma Accelerator Electron-Beam Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Rule, D. W. [Unlisted, US, MD; Downer, M. C. [Texas U.

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/γ and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.

  16. On radiation forces acting on a transparent nanoparticle in the field of a focused laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanas' ev, A A; Rubinov, A N [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Gaida, L S; Guzatov, D V; Svistun, A Ch [Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, Grodno (Belarus)

    2015-10-31

    Radiation forces acting on a transparent spherical nanoparticle in the field of a focused Gaussian laser beam are studied theoretically in the Rayleigh scattering regime. Expressions are derived for the scattering force and Cartesian components of the gradient force. The resultant force acting on a nanoparticle located in the centre of a laser beam is found. The parameters of the focused beam and optical properties of the nanoparticle for which the longitudinal component of the gradient force exceeds the scattering force are determined. Characteristics of the transverse gradient force are discussed. (nanophotonics)

  17. Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex using 250 keV electron beam machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirinos, H.; Yoshii, F.; Makuuchi, K.; Lugao, A. E-mail: ablugao@net.ipen.br

    2003-08-01

    The sensitized radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex has been carried out with 250 keV electrons. Latex was irradiated over a range of the beam current from 5 to 20 mA in the presence of sensitizers like the n-butyl acrylate (n-BA). The vulcanization dose decreases with increasing beam current condition. The rate of vulcanization (R{sub vul}) depends on the beam current (I) as given by the equation R{sub vul}=kI{sup 0.6}.

  18. Study of the effect of the gamma radiation in polycarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.J.; Araujo, E.S. de; Silveira, S.V. da

    1990-01-01

    To estimate the radiation effects in the DUROLON polycarbonate, samples were irradiated with 60 Co gamma beam with doses between 0,2KGy and 50KGy. The results obtained shown variations in the yellowed index above 1KGy dose. Their mechanical proprieties are not changed at interval of this doses. (author) [pt

  19. Tolerance doses of cutaneous and mucosal tissues in ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri) for external beam megavoltage radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Heather W; Roberts, Royce E; Latimer, Kenneth S; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen; Northrup, Nicole C

    2009-03-01

    Currently used dosages for external-beam megavoltage radiation therapy in birds have been extrapolated from mammalian patients and often appear to provide inadequate doses of radiation for effective tumor control. To determine the tolerance doses of cutaneous and mucosal tissues of normal birds in order to provide more effective radiation treatment for tumors that have been shown to be radiation responsive in other species, ingluvial mucosa and the skin over the ingluvies of 9 ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri) were irradiated in 4-Gy fractions to a total dose of either 48, 60, or 72 Gy using an isocentric cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. Minimal radiation-induced epidermal changes were present in the high-dose group histologically. Neither dose-related acute nor chronic radiation effects could be detected in any group grossly in cutaneous or mucosal tissue over a 9-month period. Radiation doses of 72 Gy in 4-Gy fractions were well tolerated in the small number of ring-necked parakeets in this initial tolerance dose study.

  20. Effects of radiation-counselling convergence education on radiation awareness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoung, Youl Hun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of study was to analysis on the effects of radiation-counselling convergence education on radiation awareness. The survey objects were students of radiation-counselling convergence education from 12th May to 22th June in 2016. The questionnaires were education satisfactions and radiation awareness (risk, benefit, control) by Likert-type 5 scales. The analysis results revealed that education satisfactions of men students showed a significant higher female students and correlation coefficient of education satisfactions were the best high in the benefit and control of radiation. Finally radiation-counselling convergence education had a significant effect on radiation benefit. This convergence education influenced positive recognition on radiation benefit and it was indicated that radiation-counselors could treat clients on the basis of radiation benefit.

  1. Effects of radiation-counselling convergence education on radiation awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoung, Youl Hun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of study was to analysis on the effects of radiation-counselling convergence education on radiation awareness. The survey objects were students of radiation-counselling convergence education from 12th May to 22th June in 2016. The questionnaires were education satisfactions and radiation awareness (risk, benefit, control) by Likert-type 5 scales. The analysis results revealed that education satisfactions of men students showed a significant higher female students and correlation coefficient of education satisfactions were the best high in the benefit and control of radiation. Finally radiation-counselling convergence education had a significant effect on radiation benefit. This convergence education influenced positive recognition on radiation benefit and it was indicated that radiation-counselors could treat clients on the basis of radiation benefit

  2. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers. - Highlights: • Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. • Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. • However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. • Optical tweezers can trap, move and positioned micron size particles with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. • One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. • Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the force scales as the field intensity divided by its propagation speed. • However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. • We propose a review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical

  3. Radiation, chemicals and combined effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1991-01-01

    A brief background has been provided on current carcinogenic risks from ionizing radiation and their magnitude in background circumstances. The magnitude of the risks from possibly carcinogenic chemicals at background levels in air, water and food are surprisingly similar. The exception is, perhaps, for the single source of radon which, while variable, on the average stands out above all other sources. Some basic principles concerning the interaction of combined radiation and chemicals and some practical examples where the two interact synergistically to enhance radiation effects has also been provided. Areas for human research in the future are discussed. (Author)

  4. Computer-assisted selection of coplanar beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugachev, A.; Xing, L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2001-09-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the incident beam orientations are often determined by a trial and error search. The conventional beam's-eye view (BEV) tool becomes less helpful in IMRT because it is frequently required that beams go through organs at risk (OARs) in order to achieve a compromise between the dosimetric objectives of the planning target volume (PTV) and the OARs. In this paper, we report a beam's-eye view dosimetrics (BEVD) technique to assist in the selection of beam orientations in IMRT. In our method, each beam portal is divided into a grid of beamlets. A score function is introduced to measure the 'goodness' of each beamlet at a given gantry angle. The score is determined by the maximum PTV dose deliverable by the beamlet without exceeding the tolerance doses of the OARs and normal tissue located in the path of the beamlet. The overall score of the gantry angle is given by a sum of the scores of all beamlets. For a given patient, the score function is evaluated for each possible beam orientation. The directions with the highest scores are then selected as the candidates for beam placement. This procedure is similar to the BEV approach used in conventional radiation therapy, except that the evaluation by a human is replaced by a score function to take into account the intensity modulation. This technique allows one to select beam orientations without the excessive computing overhead of computer optimization of beam orientation. It also provides useful insight into the problem of selection of beam orientation and is especially valuable for complicated cases where the PTV is surrounded by several sensitive structures and where it is difficult to select a set of 'good' beam orientations. Several two-dimensional (2D) model cases were used to test the proposed technique. The plans obtained using the BEVD-selected beam orientations were compared with the plans obtained using equiangular spaced beams. For

  5. Fusion-relevant basic radiation effects: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Coghlan, W.A.; Farrell, K.; Horton, L.L.; Lee, E.H.; Lewis, M.B.; Packan, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is given of results of the basic radiation effects program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which are relevant to fusion reactor materials applications. The basic radiation effects program at ORNL is a large effort with the dual objectives of understanding the atomic and microstructural defect mechanisms underlying radiation effects and of determining principles for the design of radiation resistant materials. A strength of this effort is the parallel and integrated experimental and theoretical approaches in each major research area. The experimental effort is active in electron microscopy, ion irradiations and ion-beam techniques, neutron irradiations, surface analysis and in other areas. The theoretical effort is active in developing the theory of radiation effects for a broad range of phenomena and in applying it to the design and interpretation of experiments and to alloy design

  6. Calculation And Design Of A New Configuration For Radiation Shielding At Neutron Beam No.3 For Fundamental And Applied Researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan; Tran Tuan Anh; Nguyen Kien Cuong; Nguyen Canh Hai; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Pham Ngoc Son; Ho Huu Thang

    2011-01-01

    The tangential horizontal channel of No. 3 of the Dalat Research Reactor has been opened and used during the 1990s. The utilizations of the thermal neutron beam at this channel were the Neutron Radiography and the Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis method (PGNAA). At present, the neutron beam used for nuclear structure data researches based on the Summing of Amplitude Coincident Pulses system (SACP). Beside, several related research equipments have been set up and operated for the research purposes. A renovation of the neutron channel, therefore, will play an important role in safe and effective utilizations of the neutron beam in fields of nuclear physic training and researches. A new configuration for radiation shielding has been simulated by MCNP code. The calculated results of dose rates for neutron and gamma at working positions are in range of dose rate limit. (author)

  7. Beam standardization of X radiation in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The ionization chamber used in dosimetric procedures in computed tomography beams (CT), is a cylindrical chamber, unsealed, with the sensitive length between 10 and 15 cm, named pencil ionization chamber. Because the doses involved in CT procedures are higher s than those in the procedures in radiology, it is very important to ensure the appropriate calibration of pencil ionization chambers and thus the accuracy of Dosimetric procedures. Recently, only the Calibration Laboratory, from Institute de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, had standards fields of conventional radiodiagnostic, but not arrived to include the energy range used in CT. In this work, will be shown the results obtained in standard field of radiodiagnostic - all qualities of radiodiagnostic of series RQR (direct beam) and RQA (attenuated beam) described in IEC 61267 norm - in an industrial X-ray equipment of the Calibration Laboratory. The recommended qualities for the calibration of TC chambers are the qualities RQA9 and RQR9. The other qualities will be used for calibration of other radiodiagnostic dosimeters and also for a larger study of the energy dependence of the pencil ionization chambers

  8. Electron beam extraction system with a ring radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auslender, V.L.; Kuksanov, N.K.; Polyakov, V.A.; Salimov, R.A.; Chertok, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    Description and results of testings of two electron beam extraction systems for shaping of a circular irradiation field are given. One of the systems contains three 20 cm long outlet windows arranged at 120 deg angle with respect to each other. Tests at the ILU-6 accelerator have shown that the given system provides 150 mm zone irradiation from three sides. Beam utilization factor when irradiating three 40 mm dia tubes amounted to 35% which provides capacity of 2.5 txMrad/h at 20 kW beam power. The other extraction system includes two C-form magnets producing nonuniform and opposing magnetic fields. This system tests at the EhLV-2 accelerator have shown that at 0.8-1.5 MeV electron energy it is possible to irradiate of 60 and 100 mm dia objects, accordingly. The system may be used together with both constant-action and pulse-action accelerators having extraction with linear scanning [ru

  9. The value of external beam radiation in pathologic node positive prostate cancer: a multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Astrid D.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Althausen, Alex F.; Heney, Niall M.; Kaufman, Donald S.; Shipley, William U.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of local/regional treatment, particularly external beam radiation alone versus radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy in patients with pathologic node positive prostate cancer on survival. The effect of delayed vs. immediate endocrine therapy on patients treated with radiation alone was also examined. Methods: Medical records of all 116 patients who received their initial treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 1996 for adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologic confirmed nodal metastasis and no distant disease were reviewed. The mean follow up was 5.5 years. Disease specific survival, time to PSA failure on endocrine therapy, and time to first intervention were evaluated. PSA failure was defined as two consecutive post-nadir rises following the first use of endocrine therapy. Intervention was defined as any surgical or radiotherapeutic procedure required for relief of symptoms related to local/regional recurrence. Survival comparisons were made between any local/regional treatment vs. none, radiation therapy alone vs. prostatectomy with radiation therapy, and immediate vs. delayed endocrine therapy. The effect of the different treatment options on survival were compared using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models to simultaneously adjust for patient and tumor characteristics (tumor stage, Gleason grade, number of positive nodes) that might influence survival. Results: The combined patient population had a 5 year disease specific survival of 74% and a 10 year disease specific survival of 48%. The comparison groups for local/regional treatment had the following adjusted outcomes. In a subgroup analysis of patients with clinical T1-T2 and clinical T3-T4 disease, local/regional treatment continued to confer a disease specific survival advantage over no local regional treatment in both subgroups (p=0.05 and p=0.02, respectively). PSA failure on endocrine therapy was

  10. A comparison of two methods for estimating the technical costs of external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayman, James A.; Lash, Kathy A.; Tao, May L.; Halman, Marc A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with external beam radiation, it is necessary to have accurate estimates of its cost. One of the most common methods for estimating technical costs has been to convert Medicare charges into costs using Medicare Cost-to-Charge Ratios (CCR). More recently, health care organizations have begun to invest in sophisticated cost-accounting systems (CAS) that are capable of providing procedure-specific cost estimates. The purpose of this study was to examine whether these competing approaches result in similar cost estimates for four typical courses of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Technical costs were estimated for the following treatment courses: 1) a palliative 'simple' course of 10 fractions using a single field without blocks; 2) a palliative 'complex' course of 10 fractions using two opposed fields with custom blocks; 3) a curative course of 30 fractions for breast cancer using tangent fields followed by an electron beam boost; and 4) a curative course of 35 fractions for prostate cancer using CT-planning and a 4-field technique. Costs were estimated using the CCR approach by multiplying the number of units of each procedure billed by its Medicare charge and CCR and then summing these costs. Procedure-specific cost estimates were obtained from a cost-accounting system, and overall costs were then estimated for the CAS approach by multiplying the number of units billed by the appropriate unit cost estimate and then summing these costs. All costs were estimated using data from 1997. The analysis was also repeated using data from another academic institution to estimate their costs using the CCR and CAS methods, as well as the appropriate relative value units (RVUs) and conversion factor from the 1997 Medicare Fee Schedule to estimate Medicare reimbursement for the four treatment courses. Results: The estimated technical costs for the CCR vs. CAS approaches for the four

  11. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  12. Radiation effects in optical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebele, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report discusses components of high performance optical devices may be exposed to high energy radiation environments during their lifetime. The effect of these adverse environments depends upon a large number of parameters associated with the radiation (nature, energy, dose, dose rate, etc.) or the system (temperature, optical performance requirements, optical wavelength, optical power, path length, etc.), as well as the intrinsic susceptibility of the optical component itself to degradation

  13. Environmental dosimetry and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Specific assessment of the potential effects on wild organisms of increased radiation exposure arising from the authorized disposal of radioactive wastes to the environment requires two interrelated sets of information. First, an estimate is required of the incremental radiation exposure; and second, dose rate-response relationships are necessary to predict the potential impact of the estimated incremental exposure. Each of these aspects will be discussed in detail. (author)

  14. Coherent spontaneous radiation from highly bunched electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Crosson, E.R.; Ricci, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    Coherent spontaneous radiation has now been observed in several FELs, and is a subject of great importance to the design of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. We report observations of coherent spontaneous radiation in both FIREFLY and the mid-infrared FEL at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. Coherent emission has been observed at wavelengths as short as 5 microns, and enhancement over incoherent levels by as much as a factor of 4x10 4 has been observed at longer wavelengths. The latter behavior was observed at 45 microns in FIREFLY with short bunches produced by off-peak acceleration and dispersive compression. We present temporal measurements of the highly bunched electron distributions responsible for the large enhancements, using both transition radiation and energy-phase techniques

  15. Radiation effects at the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D. [ed.] [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1988-06-01

    This report contains a preliminary study of the effects of the radiation levels expected at the SSC on potential detector components and a subset of materials to be used in the SSC accelerators. The report does not contain a discussion of radiation damage to electronics components that may be used at the SSC. We have investigated many of the effects of radiation on silicon detectors, on wire chambers, on scintillating materials and the associated readout, on optical fibers for data transmission and on structural or other materials to be used in detector or accelerator components. In the SSC accelerator complex, in particular the storage rings, radiation damage will not present significant problems different than those now faced by existing high energy accelerators. We find that the effects of radiation damage on SSC detector components will be significant at the design luminosity of the ssc and will limit, or determine, many of the options for different detector components. In this regard the reader should keep in mind that, in the absence of a specific detector design, it is not possible to form definitive conclusions regarding the viability of the detector components. Since the radiation levels in experiments at the SSC will depend on the geometry and composition of the apparatus, simple yes /no generalizations about the feasibility of a detector component are not possible.

  16. Analysis of beam envelope by transverse space charge effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Shin'ichi

    1997-09-01

    It is important for high current accelerators to estimate the contribution of the space charge effect to keep the beam off its beak up. The application of an envelope equation is examined in previous report in which the beam is just coasting beam (non accelerating). The analysis of space charge effect is necessary for the comparison in coming accelerator test in PNC. In order to evaluate the beam behavior in high current, the beam dynamics and beam parameters which are input to the equation for the evaluation are developed and make it ready to estimate the beam transverse dynamics by the space charge. The estimate needs to have enough accuracy for advanced code calculation. After the preparation of the analytic expression of transverse motion, the non-linear differential equation of beam dynamics is solved by a numerical method on a personal computer. The beam envelope from the equation is estimated by means of the beam emittance, current and energy. The result from the analysis shows that the transverse beam broadening is scarecely small around the beam current value of PNC design. The contribution to the beam broadening of PNC linac comes from its beam emittance. The beam broadening in 100 MeV case is almost negligible in the view of transverse space charge effect. Therefore, the electron beam is stable up to 10 A order in PNC linac design. Of course, the problem for RF supply is out of consideration here. It is important to estimate other longitudinal effect such as beam bunch effect which is lasting unevaluated. (author)

  17. Economical aspects of radiation sterilization with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.; Kaluska, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation sterilization has been introduced in Poland in the early seventies. Since then continuous progress is observed in quantity of sterilized products. The commercial irradiation facility was built in 1993 to fulfill growing demands for radiation service. The real costs of running this plant were shown. The share of the cost of investment and the cost of maintenance and spare parts in accelerator exploitation, as well as the cost of one hour accelerator exploitation against time of one year accelerator exploitation were taken into account

  18. Acoustical and optical radiation pressures and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas , Jean-Louis; Marchiano , Régis; Baresch , Diego

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and positioned micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimens...

  19. Study of the alignment of X radiation beam for calibration of chambers used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The activities developed in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radiation safety, require that the metrological parameters involving these activities have on its results a high degree of reliability, to ensure traceability. To meet the existing demand in Brazil, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation - LNMRI - is deploying a new tube X-ray beams used in the calibration of the standard rooms, which serve to quality control in hospitals, clinics and industry. (author)

  20. Study of performance of electronic dosemeters in continuous and pulsed X-radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Margarete Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Personal radiation monitoring is a