WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam neutralization

  1. Neutral beams for mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important demonstration of negative ion technology is proposed for FY92 in the MFTF-α+T, an upgrade of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This facility calls for 200-keV negative ions to form neutral beams that generate sloshing ions in the reactor end plugs. Three different beam lines are considered for this application. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  2. ITER neutral beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Beam (NB) system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has reached a high degree of integration with the tokamak and with the rest of the plant. Operational requirements and maintainability have been considered in the design. The paper considers the integration with the tokamak, discusses design improvements which appear necessary and finally notes R and D progress in key areas. (author)

  3. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (1014 particles/cm3) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  4. Merged neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwalder, Andreas [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute for Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A detailed description of a merged beam apparatus for the study of low energy molecular scattering is given. This review is intended to guide any scientist who plans to construct a similar experiment, and to provide some inspiration in describing the approach we chose to our goal. In our experiment a supersonic expansion of paramagnetic particles is merged with one of polar molecules. A magnetic and an electric multipole guide are used to bend the two beams onto the same axis. We here describe in detail how the apparatus is designed, characterised, and operated. (orig.)

  5. ATF neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is a stellarator torsatron being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate improved plasma confinement schemes. Plasmas heating will be carried out predominantly by means of neutral beam injection. This paper describes the basic parameters of the injection system. Numerical calculations were done to optimize the aiming of the injectors. The results of these calculations and their implications on the neutral power to the machine are elaborated. The effects of improving the beam optics and altering the focal length on the power transmitted to the plasma are discussed

  6. ITER Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Japanese design proposal of the ITER Neutral Beam Injection System (NBS) which is consistent with the ITER common design requirements is described. The injection system is required to deliver a neutral deuterium beam of 75MW at 1.3MeV to the reactor plasma and utilized not only for plasma heating but also for current drive and current profile control. The injection system is composed of 9 modules, each of which is designed so as to inject a 1.3MeV, 10MW neutral beam. The most important point in the design is that the injection system is based on the utilization of a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source which can produce an intense negative ion beam with high current density at a low source operating pressure. The design value of the source is based on the experimental values achieved at JAERI. The utilization of the cesium-seeded volume source is essential to the design of an efficient and compact neutral beam injection system which satisfies the ITER common design requirements. The critical components to realize this design are the 1.3MeV, 17A electrostatic accelerator and the high voltage DC acceleration power supply, whose performances must be demonstrated prior to the construction of ITER NBI system. (author)

  7. Neutral beam production using negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1978-06-14

    Techniques for producing intense negative ion beams are discussed. These beams are required for intense neutral beam development at energies greater than 150 keV. Handling, acceleration, and stripping of negative ion beams are described.

  8. Advanced neutral-beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described

  9. High power neutral beam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurred by the requirement to supply megawatts of power to heat magnetically confined plasmas to temperatures of interest for fusion research, a new class of low energy, high power accelerators termed neutral beam injectors has been developed. Industry has played an important role in building upon technology advances at the national laboratories to engineer neutral beam injectors to meet the needs of specific users. A brief retrospective of the field is presented, with emphasis upon one particular application, that of DIII-D, a large tokamak at General Atomics. In this instance, the role of industry has been especially extensive because the user/system integrator is itself an industrial concern. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  11. ORNL positive ion neutral beam program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral beam group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has constructed neutral beam generators for the ORMAK and PLT devices, is presently constructing neutral beam devices for the ISX and PDX devices, and is contemplating the construction of neutral beam systems for the advanced TNS device. These neutral beam devices stem from the pioneering work on ion sources of G. G. Kelley and O. B. Morgan. We describe the ion sources under development at this Laboratory, the beam optics exhibited by these sources, as well as some theoretical considerations, and finally the remainder of the beamline design

  12. Steady state neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learning from operational reliability of neutral beam injectors in particular and various heating schemes including RF in general on TFTR, JET, JT-60, it has become clear that neutral beam injectors may find a greater role assigned to them for maintaining the plasma in steady state devices under construction. Many technological solutions, integrated in the present day generation of injectors have given rise to capability of producing multimegawatt power at many tens of kV. They have already operated for integrated time >105 S without deterioration in the performance. However, a new generation of injectors for steady state devices have to address to some basic issues. They stem from material erosion under particle bombardment, heat transfer > 10 MW/m2, frequent regeneration of cryopanels, inertial power supplies, data acquisition and control of large volume of data. Some of these engineering issues have been addressed to in the proposed neutral beam injector for SST-1 at our institute; the remaining shall have to wait for the inputs of the database generated from the actual experience with steady state injectors. (author)

  13. Geometrically focused neutral beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A more reliable 40 kV, 65 A power supply drain at 0.4 A/cm2, neutral-beam accelerator was developed for the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). Multiple slotted aperture grids of 60% transparency are fabricated from refractory metal wires mounted to form a spherical surface. This geometrically focuses the beam by aiming individual beamlets at the center of curvature of the spherical grid (r = 3.2 m). We attain greater reliability and faster conditioning with geometrical focusing than with the previous technique of electrostatically steering beamlets to a common point. Electrostatic steering, accomplished by offsetting grid wires, is satisfactory if the offset of a beamlet is much less than the distance from the beamlet to the grids. It was found that Pierce Angle entrance grids performed better if sharper edged. A redesigned accelerator grid support structure reduced the number of ceramic-to-metal vacuum joints, and eliminated O rings between precisely aligned parts. The suppressor grid feedthrough is required to withstand a maximum voltage of 15 kV occurring during breakdown, greatly exceeding the operating voltage of 1.5 kV. Convenient fabrication and assembly techniques have been developed. Assembly of accelerators and plasma sources in a clean room appears to reduce the conditioning time. Following the successful testing of the prototype, eight 40 kV accelerators were built for TMX. Furthermore, ten 20 kV versions were built that are modifiable to 40 kV by exchanging the entrance grid

  14. Neutralization of low energy broad ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of a low energy broad ion beam space charge and current compensation and ion-beam plasma (IBP), which would be created in transport space of the beam. The beam had cylindrical symmetry. The continuous uniform and hole tube like ion beams are used in the experiments. Different channels of electron appearing have been investigated for cases of neutralization due to secondary γ-electrons from the target and by electrons from glow cathode-neutralizer with metal or dielectric target. Results of neutralizing electrons energy distributions function measurements are presented as well as dependences of electron temperature and self-consisted plasma potential vs. beam parameters, ambient gas pressure, neutralizer parameters. Role of the thermoelectrons and dependence of IBP parameters on neutralizer area, location and potential are discussed. Significant role in neutralization of spatial collisional processes has been revealed even in neutralization by thermocathode. On the base of the experimental results self-consistent theoretical model have been developed, which describes the behavior of intense ion beam passing through the neutral gas at low pressure within conductive walls. The collisionless approach is used which means absence of collisional relaxation of the beam. This theory is used to derive the plasma potential and electron temperature within the beam

  15. TFTR neutral beam injection system conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three subsystems are described in the following chapters: (1) Neutral Beam Injection Line; (2) Power Supplies; and (3) Controls. Each chapter contains two sections: (1) Functions and Design Requirements; this is a brief listing of the requirements of components of the subsystem. (2) Design Description; this section describes the design and cost estimates. The overall performance requirements of the neutral beam injection system are summarized. (MOW)

  16. Applications of neutral beam and rf technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation provides an update on the applications of neutral beams and radiofrequency (rf) power in the fusion program; highlights of the ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments now in progress, as well as the neutral beam experiments; and heating requirements of future devices and some of the available options. Some remarks on current drive are presented because this area of technology is one that is being considered for future devices

  17. Neutral beam data systems at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control system for neutral injection beam lines has been designed, implemented, and used with much success. Despite the problems with very high power levels this system is very successful in relieving the operators burdens of slow conditioning, data recording, and mode switching. The use of computer control with multiple beam lines now appears very promising

  18. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments.

  19. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented

  20. Beam profile effects on NPB [neutral particle beam] performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs

  1. ATF neutral beam injection: optimization of beam alignment and aperturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the existing Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) neutral beam injectors for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is studied. It is determined that with the practical considerations of beam aperturing, ATF vacuum vessel complexity, and realistic beam modeling, the power absorbed by the plasma will be approximately 57% of the extracted neutral beam power, which corresponds to an injected power of about 1.5 MW. By reducing the beam divergence to a 10 Gaussian distribution, the absorbed power could be increased to 93%. The power delivered to the plasma is found to be a strong function of the beam divergence but only a weak function of the beam focal length. Shinethrough can be a serious problem if very low density startups are necessary. Preliminary calculations indicate that there will be no excessive fast-ion losses. 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  2. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Lya radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations, other than beam tilt

  3. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Pace, D C

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access. PMID:26520957

  4. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  5. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  6. Development of KSTAR Neutral Beam Heating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, B. H.; Song, W. S.; Yoon, B. J. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    The prototype components of a neutral beam injection (NBI) system have been developed for the KSTAR, and a capability of the manufactured components has been tested. High power ion source, acceleration power supply, other ion source power supplies, neutralizer, bending magnet for ion beam separation, calorimeter, and cryo-sorption pump have been developed by using the domestic technologies and tested for a neutral beam injection of 8 MW per beamline with a pulse duration of 300 seconds. The developed components have been continuously upgraded to achieve the design requirements. The development technology of high power and long pulse neutral beam injection system has been proved with the achievement of 5.2 MW output for a short pulse length and 1.6 MW output for a pulse length of 300 seconds. Using these development technologies, the domestic NB technology has been stabilized under the development of high power ion source, NB beamline components, high voltage and current power supplies, NB diagnostics, NB system operation and control.

  7. Doublet III vacuum vessel neutral beam armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the Doublet III neutral beam armor is followed from the initial design of a radiation cooled metallic tile to the present actively cooled graphite design. Results of the thermal and stress analyses that dictated the present design are reviewed

  8. TFTR neutral beam injected power measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterflow calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source on the well-instrumented test stand, 99.5±3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12 degree, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations in the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water

  9. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O`Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12{degrees}). Beamline calorimeters, of a ``V``-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the ``V``, complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected.

  10. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O' Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12{degrees}). Beamline calorimeters, of a V''-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the V'', complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected.

  11. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Stevenson; B McCormack; G.D. Loesser; M. Kalish; S. Ramakrishnan; L. Grisham; J. Edwards; M. Cropper; G. Rossi; A. von Halle; M. Williams

    2002-01-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current.

  12. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P3/2/n2. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs

  13. Overview of neutral beam injector technology developments at universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of universities on the neutral beam injector developments have been overviewed. The subjects consist of NBI construction, components developments and system analyses, which are intensively studied at universities. Although neutral beam injector technologies are present day top topics, however, still a lot of efforts with flexible ideas are necessary to realize reactor relevant neutral beam injector system. (author)

  14. Progress of beam diagnosis system for EAST neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y. J., E-mail: yjxu@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, C. D.; Yu, L.; Liang, L. Z.; Zhang, W. T.; Chen, Y.; Li, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Neutral beam injection has been recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating. According to the research plan of the EAST physics experiment, two sets of neutral beam injector (NBI) were built and operational in 2014. The paper presents the development of beam diagnosis system for EAST NBI and the latest experiment results obtained on the test-stand and EAST-NBI-1 and 2. The results show that the optimal divergence angle is (0.62°, 1.57°) and the full energy particle is up to 77%. They indicate that EAST NBI work properly and all targets reach or almost reach the design targets. All these lay a solid foundation for the achievement of high quality plasma heating for EAST.

  15. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: β = 23%, q0 = 0.8, and β = 40%, q0 = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case

  16. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to 1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that meeting were asked if they were interested in rewriting and extending their contributions as a submission to Nuclear Fusion. Technology papers were accepted because of the very nature of the subject. The submissions underwent the regular double-referee peer-review process

  17. Neutral particle beam distributed data acquisition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, R.T.; Kraimer, M.R.; Novick, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    A distributed data acquisition system has been designed to support experiments at the Argonne Neutral Particle Beam Accelerator. The system uses a host VAXstation II/GPX computer acting as an experimenter's station linked via Ethernet with multiple MicroVAX IIs and rtVAXs dedicated to acquiring data and controlling hardware at remote sites. This paper describes the hardware design of the system, the applications support software on the host and target computers, and the real-time performance.

  18. Supervisory control software for MFTF neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the software structures that control the operation of MFTF Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supplies (SNBPS). These components of the Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) comprise ten distinct tasks that exist in the SCDS system environment. The codes total about 16,000 lines of commented Pascal code and occupy 240 kbytes of memory. The controls have been running since March 1981, and at this writing are being integrated to the Local Control System and to the power supply Pulse Power Module Controller

  19. Neutral Beam Power System for TPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will utilize to the maximum extent the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) equipment and facilities. This is particularly true for the TFTR Neutral Beam (NB) system. Most of the NB hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, power systems, service infrastructure, and control systems can be used as is. The major changes in the NB hardware are driven by the new operating duty cycle. The TFTR Neutral Beam was designed for operation of the Sources for 2 seconds every 150 seconds. The TPX requires operation for 1000 seconds every 4500 seconds. During the Conceptual Design Phase of TPX every component of the TFTR NB Electrical Power System was analyzed to verify whether the equipment can meet the new operational requirements with our without modifications. The Power System converts 13.8 kV prime power to controlled pulsed power required at the NB sources. The major equipment involved are circuit breakers, auto and rectifier transformers surge suppression components, power tetrodes, HV Decks, and HVDC power transmission to sources. Thermal models were developed for the power transformers to simulate the new operational requirements. Heat runs were conducted for the power tetrodes to verify capability. Other components were analyzed to verify their thermal limitations. This paper describes the details of the evaluation and redesign of the electrical power system components to meet the TPX operational requirements

  20. Neutral Beam Driven Neoclassical Transport in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlberg, W. A.; Shaing, K. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2002-11-01

    We re-examine the particle and heat flows driven by neutral beam injection in tokamak plasmas. These appear as inward pinches for co-injection and outward for counter injection. We derive the parallel friction and heat friction forces exerted on the thermal species by the energetic beam ions by extending the early analysis of Callen, et al. [1], which are then used as external forces in the moments formulation of neoclassical transport in NCLASS [2]. NCLASS is based on the multiple species treatment of Hirshman and Sigmar [3]. Of particular interest is the ion energy flux driven by the heat friction term. It scales as the beam energy, while the particle and electron heat terms scale as the thermal plasma temperature. In NSTX the high beam energy to plasma temperature ratio may lead to a net negative ion heat flux with strong co-injection. Limtations to the theory, such as the large fast ion orbit size relative to the radius of the flux surface, are discussed. Comparisons are made with earlier works by Hinton and Kim [4] and Stacey [5], who evaluated only the beam-thermal friction. [1] J.D. Callen, et al, 5th IAEA, Tokyo (1974), Vol 1, 645 [2] W.A. Houlberg, K.C. Shaing, S.P. Hirshman, M.C. Zarnstorff, Phys. Plasmas 4 (1997) 3230 [3] S.P. Hirshman, D.J. Sigmar, Nucl. Fusion 21 (1981) 1079 [4] F.L. Hinton, Y.-B. Kim, Phys. Fluids B 5 (1993) 3012 [5] W.M. Stacey, Phys. Fluids B 5 (1993) 4505

  1. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  2. Alpha-particle diagnostics with high energy neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the feasibility of alpha-particle diagnostics using a high energy neutral beam on the R-tokamak, a planned device at IPP-Nagoya, Japan, for reacting plasma experiments. In this method, injected neutral particles neutralize alpha particles so as to escape from the magnetically confined plasma through double charge exchange processes, He++ + A0 -- → He0 + A++. Requirements for a probing beam are dis cussed from viewpoints of penetration of an injected beam in the plasma and a neutralization efficiency of alpha particles in a wide velocity range. Either a Li0 beam or a He0 beam in the ground state, produced from a negative ion beam is suitable. A method to neutralize a He- beam into the ground state through an auto-detachment process is proposed. (author)

  3. Ballistic-neutralized chamber transport of intense heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor chamber are presented. The ballistic-neutralized transport scheme studied uses 4 GeV Pb+1 ion beams injected into a low-density, gas-filled reactor chamber and the beam is ballistically focused onto an ICF target before entering the chamber. Charge and current neutralization of the beam is provided by the low-density background gas. The ballistic-neutralized simulations include stripping of the beam ions as the beam traverses the chamber as well as ionization of the background plasma. In addition, a series of simulations are presented that explore the charge and current neutralization of the ion beam in an evacuated chamber. For this vacuum transport mode, neutralizing electrons are only drawn from sources near the chamber entrance

  4. Conceptual Design of Neutral Beam Injection System for EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chundong; NBI Team

    2012-06-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system with two neutral beam injections will be constructed on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in two stages for high power auxiliary plasmas heating and non-inductive current drive. Each NBI can deliver 2~4 MW beam power with 50~80 keV beam energy in 10~100 s pulse length. Each elements of the NBI system are presented in this contribution.

  5. Parasitic components from charge transfer in neutral beams for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.A.

    1978-02-01

    Charge exchange within accelerating grids in neutral beam systems produces parasitic beam components which degrade the performance of the systems. These components also change the plasma confinement properties at the target. This note discusses parasitic beams produced in three types of grid systems: (1) TFTR/MFTF sources, (2) accel-decel grids for low energy beams, and (3) the JSC negative ion system.

  6. Gas Flow Measurements of a Novel Geometry for Neutral Beam Neutralizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkle, David Ross

    The gas flow characteristics of a novel geometry (pumped neutralizer) for decreasing the flow of gas from neutral beam neutralizers were measured and compared with a conventional (passive) neutralizer. A passive neutralizer is typically a duct attached to the ion source. For the pumped neutralizer the top and bottom surfaces of the duct are replaced by a Venetian blind geometry which opens into ballast vacuum pumping volumes. With guidance from a Monte Carlo program which models gas flow at low pressure, a one-half scale model with pumped neutralizer geometry was built and compared to a passive neutralizer with comparable dimensions. With the vanes on the pumped neutralizer opened to 55 degrees, the line density of the pumped neutralizer was 1.6 times less than the passive neutralizer. The amount of gas flowing from the exit of the pumped neutralizer was from 2 to 5 times less than the amount flowing from the pumped neutralizer. Hence, the pumped neutralizer geometry appears to be a promising method of limiting the flow of gas from neutral beam gas cell neutralizers.

  7. Design of Neutral Beam-Line of EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡纯栋; 盛鹏; 许永建; 梁立振; 谢远来; 韦江龙; 谢亚红; 李军; 刘智民; 刘胜; 蒋才超

    2011-01-01

    Neutral beam injector for EAST is designed to deliver deuterium beams with a power of 2 MW to 4 MW at an energy of 50 keV to 80 keV into the plasma with a beam dimension of 12 cm× 48 cm. Considering the beam generation and transmission, a columniform beam-line of Ф 250 cm × 400 cm is designed with a neutralizer, ion dump, calorimeter, bending magnet and cryopanels. The arrangement of the internal elements for the beam-line is reported. A rectangular sleeve coupled to the ion source is employed as the neutralizer. At the downstream of the neutralizer, a dipole magnet separates the residual ions from the beam passage with a reflection radius of 42 cm for the full energy particles. The calorimeter and the ion dump serve as high heat flux components, which will work as thermal inertia targets in the first phase of operation.

  8. Recent DIII-D neutral beam calibration results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, J.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.

    1991-10-01

    Injected DIII-D neutral beam power is estimated based on three principle quantities: the fraction of ion beam that is neutralized in the neutralizer gas cell, the beamline transmission efficiency, and the fraction of beam reionized in the drift duct. System changes in the past few years have included a new gradient grid voltage operating point, ion source arc regulation, routine deuterium operations and new neutralizer gas flow controllers. Additionally, beam diagnostics have been improved and better calibrated. To properly characterize the beams the principle quantities have been re-measured. Two diagnostics are primarily used to measure the quantities. The beamline waterflow calorimetry system measures the neutralization efficiency and the beamline transmission efficiency, and the target tile thermocouples measure the reionization loss. An additional diagnostic, the target tile pyrometer, confirmed the reionization loss measurement. Descriptions and results of these measurements will be presented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Design and development of neutral beam module components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) injection system consists of twenty 20 keV start-up, and twenty-four 80 keV sustaining neutral beam source modules. The neutral beam modules are mounted in four clusters equally spaced around the waist of the vacuum vessel which contains the superconducting magnets. A module is defined here as an assembly consisting of a beam source and the interfacing components between that beam source and the vacuum chamber. Six major interfacing components are the subject of this paper. They are the magnetic shield, the neutralizer duct, the isolation valve, mounting gimbals, aiming bellows and actuators

  10. Production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded

  11. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  12. Using neutral beams as a light ion beam probe (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi, E-mail: chenxi@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Fisher, R. K. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hanson, J. M. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    By arranging the particle first banana orbits to pass near a distant detector, the light ion beam probe (LIBP) utilizes orbital deflection to probe internal fields and field fluctuations. The LIBP technique takes advantage of (1) the in situ, known source of fast ions created by beam-injected neutral particles that naturally ionize near the plasma edge and (2) various commonly available diagnostics as its detector. These born trapped particles can traverse the plasma core on their inner banana leg before returning to the plasma edge. Orbital displacements (the forces on fast ions) caused by internal instabilities or edge perturbing fields appear as modulated signal at an edge detector. Adjustments in the q-profile and plasma shape that determine the first orbit, as well as the relative position of the source and detector, enable studies under a wide variety of plasma conditions. This diagnostic technique can be used to probe the impact on fast ions of various instabilities, e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and neoclassical tearing modes, and of externally imposed 3D fields, e.g., magnetic perturbations. To date, displacements by AEs and by externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields have been measured using a fast ion loss detector. Comparisons with simulations are shown. In addition, nonlinear interactions between fast ions and independent AE waves are revealed by this technique.

  13. Drift Compression of an Intense Neutralized Ion Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longitudinal compression of a velocity-tailored, intense neutralized K+ beam at 300 keV, 25 mA has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. This measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems

  14. Comparing TARA endplugs with deuterium and hydrogen neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radial Fokker-Planck code is used to examine neutral beam injection into the endplugs of the TARA tandem mirror experiment. The radial code developed by Futch is used to study the time-dependent density profiles in a plug. The location of the neutral beam footprint with respect to the plasma axis is seen to effect importantly the radial plasma profile. We vary the beam current, energy and assumed time-dependent edge neutral pressure. The electron temperature which is fixed by the central cell energy balance is held constant. Due to its larger gyro-radius deuterium is seen to produce a broader plasma which takes longer to build up

  15. A microwave plasma cathode electron gun for ion beam neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusellier, C.; Wartski, L.; Aubert, J.; Schwebel, C.; Coste, Ph.; Chabrier, A.

    1998-02-01

    It is well known that there exist two distinct types of ion beam neutralization, viz., charge and current neutralization. We have designed and studied a versatile and compact microwave plasma (MP) cathode electron gun dedicated to charge as well as current neutralization. Unlike the conventional hot cathode neutralizer, this MP cathode allows operation of the electron gun in a reactive gaseous environment when it is eventually associated with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion gun. Charge neutralization can be easily carried out by extracting from the MP cathode through a 1 mm diameter hole, a 35 mA electron beam under a 20 V voltage; the MP cathode being fed with a 75 W microwave power at 2.45 GHz. Higher beam intensities could be obtained using a multiaperture thin plate. Electron beam intensities as high as 300 mA and energies of 2 keV needed for current neutralization, e.g., when an ion beam impinges onto a thick dielectric surface, are obtained via a two-stage arrangement including an anodic chamber associated with a set of three monoaperture plates for the electron beam extraction. Transport of 200-2000 eV electron beams is ensured using focusing optics composed of three aligned tubes 6 cm in diameter and unsymmetrically polarized.

  16. Preliminary Experimental Study of Ion Beam Extraction of EAST Neutral Beam Injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yong-Jian; HU Chun-Dong; LIU Sheng; XIE Ya-Hong; LIANG Li-Zhen; JIANG Cai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Neutral beam injection is recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating.The preliminary data of ion beam extraction is obtained on the EAST neutral beam injector test-stand.Beam extraction from the ion source of EAST-NBI is verified by measuring the beam current with a Faraday cup and by analyzing the results obtained by means of water calorimetric measurement on the temperature rises of water cooling the accelerator electrodes.

  17. Calculation of neutral beam deposition accounting for excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale neutral-beam auxillary heating of plasmas has led to new plasma operational regimes which are often dominated by fast ions injected via the absorption of an energetic beam of hydrogen neutrals. An accurate simulation of the slowing down and transport of these fast ions requires an intimate knowledge of the hydrogenic neutral deposition on each flux surface of the plasma. As a refinement to the present generation of transport codes, which base their beam deposition on ground-state reaction rates, a new set of routines, based on the excited states of hydrogen, is presented as mechanism for computing the attenuation and deposition of a beam of energetic neutrals. Additionally, the numerical formulations for the underlying atomic physics for hydrogen impacting on the constiuent plasma species is developed and compiled as a numerical database. Sample results based on this excited state model are compared with the ground-state model for simple plasma configurations

  18. Calculation of neutral beam deposition accounting for excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianakon, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Large-scale neutral-beam auxillary heating of plasmas has led to new plasma operational regimes which are often dominated by fast ions injected via the absorption of an energetic beam of hydrogen neutrals. An accurate simulation of the slowing down and transport of these fast ions requires an intimate knowledge of the hydrogenic neutral deposition on each flux surface of the plasma. As a refinement to the present generation of transport codes, which base their beam deposition on ground-state reaction rates, a new set of routines, based on the excited states of hydrogen, is presented as mechanism for computing the attenuation and deposition of a beam of energetic neutrals. Additionally, the numerical formulations for the underlying atomic physics for hydrogen impacting on the constiuent plasma species is developed and compiled as a numerical database. Sample results based on this excited state model are compared with the ground-state model for simple plasma configurations.

  19. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  20. Preliminary Results of Ion Beam Extraction Tests on EAST Neutral Beam Injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡纯栋

    2012-01-01

    The neutral beam injection (NBI) system is one of the most important auxiliary plasma heating and current driving methods for fusion device. A high power ion beam of 3 MW with 80 keV beam energy in 0.5 s beam duration and a long pulse ion beam of 4 s with 50 keV beam energy ion beam extraction were achieved on the EAST neutral beam injector on the teststand. The preliminary results show that the EAST-NBI system was developed successfully on schedule.

  1. Neutral beam species measurements using in situ Rutherford backscatter spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a new in situ method for measuring the neutral particle fractions in high power deuterium neutral beams, used to heat magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Deuterium beams, of variable energies, pulse lengths, and powers up to 47 keV, 100 msec, 1.6 MW, were Rutherford backscattered at 1350 from TiC inner neutral beam armor of the PDX, and detected using an electrostatic analyzer with microchannel plates. Complete energy scans were made every 20 msec and data were obtained simultaneously from five different positions across the beam profile. The neutral particle fractions were measured to be D0(E):D0(E/2):D0(E/3)=53:32:15. The corresponding neutral power fractions were P0(E):P0(E/2):P0(E/3)=72:21:7, and the associated ionic fractions at the output of the ion source were D1+(E):D2+(E):D3+(E)=74:20:6. The measured neutral particle fractions were relatively constant over more than 70% of the beam power distribution. A decrease in the yield of the full energy component in the outer regions of the beam was observed. Other possible experimental configurations and geometries are discussed

  2. Bootstrap current of fast ions in neutral beam injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bootstrap current of fast ions produced by the neutral beam injection is investigated in a large aspect ratio tokamak with circular cross-section under specific parameters. The bootstrap current density distribution and the total bootstrap current are figured out. In addition, the beam bootstrap current always accompanies the electron return current due to the parallel momentum transfer from fast ions. With the electron return current considered, the net current density obviously decreases due to electron return current, at the same time the peak of current moves towards the centre plasma. Numerical results show that the value of the net current depends sensitively not only on the angle of the neutral beam injection but also on the ratio of the velocity of fast ions to the critical velocity: the value of net current is small for the neutral beam parallel injection but increases multipliedly for perpendicular injection, and increases with beam energy increasing. (authors)

  3. The fast beam interlock system for JET neutral injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JET Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system poses severe interlock problems with the possibility of unsafe conditions arising on a fast timescale. In order to cope with this the high-security Fast Beam Interlock System (FBIS) has been developed. It is used to turn off the beams in a failsafe manner when a condition arises which could damage the beam line or torus on a timescale too short to be dealt with by the JET Central Interlock and Safety System (CISS). FBIS interfaces signals from many JET safety systems and processes them to act directly on the Neutral Beam power supplies. The interfaces and the fail safety operation of FBIS are described. It is presently planned to upgrade the system to include a real-time comparison of the ion beam deflection magnet currents and the beam extraction voltage and a system which will compensate for the effects of the Tokamak stray fields on the NBI beamlines

  4. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  5. Fault detection and protection system for neutral beam generators on the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam sources, their power supplies and instrumentation can be damaged from high voltage sparkdown or from overheating due to excessive currents. The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) in Berkeley has protective electronic hardware that senses a condition outside a safe operating range and generates a response to terminate such a fault condition. A description of this system is presented in this paper. 8 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  6. Fokker-Planck/Transport model for neutral beam driven tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of nonlinear Fokker-Planck models to the study of beam-driven plasmas is briefly reviewed. This evolution of models has led to a Fokker-Planck/Transport (FPT) model for neutral-beam-driven Tokamaks, which is described in detail. The FPT code has been applied to the PLT, PDX, and TFTR Tokamaks, and some representative results are presented

  7. Mechanical engineering problems in the TFTR neutral beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design of a prototype beam line for the TFTR Neutral Beam System has been developed. The basic components have been defined, cost estimates prepared, and the necessary development programs identified. Four major mechanical engineering problems, potential solutions and the required development programs are discussed

  8. Negative ion based neutral beam injector for JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Y.; Araki, M.; Hanada, M.; Inoue, T.; Kunieda, S.; Kuriyama, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Mizuno, M.; Ohara, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Watanabe, K.

    1992-10-01

    A 500 keV, 10 MW neutral beam injector is to be constructed in JT-60 Upgrade for the experiments of current drive and heating of heat density core plasmas. This is the first neutral beam injector in the world using negative ions as the primary ions. In the design, D- ion beams of 44 A, 500 keV are produced by two ion sources (22 A/each ion source) and neutralized in a long gas neutralizer. The total system efficiency is about 40%. The ion source is a cesium-seeded multicusp volume source having a three stage electrostatic accelerator. To reduce the stripping loss of D- ions in the accelerator, the ion source should be operated at a low pressure of 0.3 Pa with a current density of 13 mA/cm2. The first test of the full-size negative ion source is scheduled from middle of 1993.

  9. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron-beam heater and associated power supply have been developed for use in formation of metal vapors for neutral beam studies. The device is small with relatively low power (250 W). It is easily constructed and designed such that the target surface is normal to the direction of propagation of the neutral beam. Beams of tantalum atoms and carbon particles have been formed using the device

  10. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, J.A.; Vroom, D.A.

    1978-07-01

    An electron-beam heater and associated power supply have been developed for use in formation of metal vapors for neutral beam studies. The device is small with relatively low power (250 W). It is easily constructed and designed such that the target surface is normal to the direction of propagation of the neutral beam. Beams of tantalum atoms and carbon particles have been formed using the device.

  11. Neutral beam injection into mirror machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    Neutral injection into 2XIIB has started and sustained a hot ion plasma of n/sub h/ = 10/sup 13/ - 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ and anti E/sub i/ = 9 to 14 keV. The experiment and its interpretation are discussed.

  12. Plasma diagnostics of discharge channels for neutralized ion beam transport

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Most of the future accelerators will be high intensity machines delivering mega-watt beams for applications such as spallation neutron production, muon colliders, neutrino factories, nuclear-waste transmutation or inertial confinement fusion energy (IFE). Especially in the field of heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion, where space charge dominated multi kilo-ampere beams have to be transported over several meters through a reactor chamber to a mm-size target, some kind of beam neutral...

  13. Intense proton beam source for ITER neutral-beam spectroscopy diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense proton beam has been developed to evaluate a gas-cell neutralizer for use in an intense-neutral beam source for Tokomak Spectroscopy diagnostics. The allowed energy range of the proton stream is determined to be 50 to 70 keV from neutralization and reionization cross-sections and from the alpha particle charge exchange recombination intensity as a function of energy (baseline diagnostic). The neutralization evaluation source uses a flashover anode, magnetized, ion-diode. Neutral probes sensitive to energetic atomic and molecular hydrogen, developed to evaluate neutralizer performance, show neutral fluence from the ion-diode during the beam pulse. An array of Rogowski current probes, used to study the evolution of the current path, suggests that expansion of the anode plasma along the radial insulating magnetic field leads to impedance collapse

  14. Development of ion source for neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a few methods for further raising (secondary heating) toroidal plasma temperature above the limit of Joule heating of 1 to 2 keV. In this paper, the ion source used for neutral beam injection heating is described, which is now considered to be the most effective means as the secondary heating. It was reported that in Oak Ridge National Laboratory, neutral particle beam was injected into the torus and the plasma temperature increased as expected. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) planned the plasma heating by neutral beam injection in JFT-2 torus from the summer of 1976 and it was decided that the heating by neutral beam injection is also employed in the critical plasma test facility (JT-60) which is scheduled to start operation in 1980. For this purpose, JAERI decided to build some test stand for ion source development including ITS-1 already prepared. At present, the test stand ITS-2 for the development of two stage acceleration ion source is ordered as a part of the development program of neutral beam injection heating for JT-60. This stand will be available for the test of ion sources of up to 100 kV, 20 A, and pulse width 1 sec. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. A high energy neutral beam system for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy neutral beams provide a promising method of heating and driving current in steady-stage tokamak fusion reactors. As an example, we have made a conceptual design of a neutral beam system for current drive on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The system, based on electrostatic acceleration of Dions, can deliver up to 100 MW of 1.6 MeV Do neutrals through three ports. Radiation protection is provided by locating sensitive beamlime components 35 to 50 m from the reactor. In an application to a 3300 MW power reactor, a system delivering 120 MW of 2-2.4 MeV deuterium beams assisted by 21 MW of lower hybrid wave power drives 25 MA provides an adequate plasma power again (Q = 24) for a commercial fusion power plant. (author). 8 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  16. Instrumentation system for long-pulse MFTF neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation system for long pulse neutral beams for MFTFS consists of monitoring and protective circuitry. Global synchronization of high speed monitoring data across twenty-four neutral beams is achieved via an experiment wide fiber optic timing system. Fiber optics are also used as a means of isolating signals at elevated voltages. An excess current monitor, interrupt monitor, sparkdown detector, spot detector and gradient grid ratio detector form the primary protection for the neutral beam source. A unique hierarchical interlocking scheme allows other protective devices to be factored into the shutdown circuitry of the power supply so that the initiating cause of a shutdown can be isolated and even allows some non-critical devices to be safely ignored for a period of time

  17. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ∼ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage (∼ 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K+ ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments

  18. Amplification of critical velocity ionization by a pulsed neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical results of computer simulations on critical ionization velocity (CIV) discharges in pulsed neutral beams are presented. In a typical CIV scenario, neutral molecules as well as newly created ions are traveling across the ambient magnetic field. The ions slow down as they transfer kinetic energy to the electrons via plasma waves. For a single pulse of neutral gas, there is a finite contact time between the beam and the plasma; the contact time is governed by the length of the pulse and the velocity of neutrals. The injection of multiple pulsed neutral beam into a magnetized plasma has the advantage that succeeding pulses may extend the effective contact time of a single pulse. Using the particle-in-cell method of computer simulations, the authors show a detailed time history of the CIV process as a result of the interplay between plasma (wave-particle) interactions and collisional (ionization, charge exchange) processes. It is found that ions slowing down and lagging behind the pulses can still contribute to electron heating. Simulation results show that CIV in a multiple pulsed beam is more efficient than that in a single continuous pulse

  19. Diagnostic neutral beams for plasma studies in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, low-divergent, quasi-stationary neutral beams are widely used in magnetic fusion devices as a diagnostic tool providing unique information about plasma parameters. Essentially, a diagnostic determines the requirements for the beams, which in many cases consist in sufficiently large current density and energy of the particles so that the beam can penetrate to the plasma core. At the same time, the duration of the beams should overlap that of a plasma shot (∼10 s or longer for large machines). We have developed a number of diagnostic hydrogen beams with a maximum beam energy of 55kV, extracted ion current varying up to 6 A, and pulse duration from several milliseconds to 10 s. The beams are formed by a four electrode ion optical system which makes it possible to provide a low divergent (0.5-0.7 deg.) beam. Additionally, a beam can be focused onto a desired point by proper choice of the curvature radius of the grids. The beams can be modulated with a frequency variable up to 500 Hz. The plasma emitter in the injector is provided by a radiofrequency discharge in hydrogen (deuterium) for long duration beams and, alternatively, by an arc-discharge plasma box for the beams with a duration of up to ∼0.5 s. The arc discharge plasma box provides a higher proton fraction (∼90%) than the RF discharge version (∼60%). The parameters for the different beams developed are presented. (author)

  20. Optic diagnosis of neutral beam injection on HL-1M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑银甲; 冯震; 雷光玖; 姜韶风; 卢大伦; 罗俊林

    2002-01-01

    During the operation of a high-power neutral beam injection (NBI) system on the H L-1M tokamak, an optical diagnostic means using CCD camera was developed to characterize the NBI performance. The vacuum valve opening process and NBI period in the HL-1M experiment were displayed by a lot of photos taken with this means. Thus, the Hα emission profiles of the neutral beam (NB) and its interaction with plasma were given. Finally, the reason possible for plasma breakdown during NBI mode Ⅱ discharge was investigated. Therefore, this in-situ diagnosis can provide more information of the NBI.

  1. Control system for the text diagnostic neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam source (DNB) has been designed, built, and installed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The control system, presented in this paper, coordinates the functioning of all associated subsystems necessary for neutral beam operation. These include the modulator/regulator, the capacitor bank charging system, the arc and filament supplies, the biased snubber supply, the deflection magnet supply, the suppressor switch, and the Culham vacuum system. The control system architecture is a hierarchical, decentralized, hardwired logic system designed to meet criteria of reliability, modularity, and flexibility

  2. Bootstrap current of fast ions in neutral beam injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bootstrap current of fast ions produced by neutral beam injection (NBI) is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak with circular cross-section under specific parameters. The bootstrap current density distribution and the total bootstrap current are reported. In addition, the beam bootstrap current always accompanies the electron return current due to the parallel momentum transfer from fast ions. With the electron return current taken into consideration, the net current density obviously decreases; at the same time, the peak of the current moves towards the central plasma. Numerical results show that the value of the net current depends sensitively not only on the angle of the NBI but also on the ratio of the velocity of fast ions to the critical velocity: the value of the net current is small for neutral beam parallel injection, but increases severalfold for perpendicular injection, and increases with increasing beam energy. (paper)

  3. Personal computer applications in DIII-D neutral beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An IBM PC AT has been implemented to improve operation of the DIII-D neutral beams. The PC system provides centralization of all beam data with reasonable access for on-line shot-to-shot control and analysis. The PC hardware was configured to interface all four neutral beam host minicomputers, support multitasking, and provide storage for approximately one month's accumulation of beam data. The PC software is composed of commercial packages used for performance and statistical analysis (i.e., LOTUS 123, PC PLOT, etc.), host communications software (i.e., PCLink, KERMIT, etc.), and applications developed software utilizing fortran and basIc. The objectives of this paper are to describe the implementation of the PC system, the methods of integrating the various software packages, and the scenario for on-line control and analysis

  4. PC application in DIII-D neutral beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An IBM PC/AT has been implemented to improve operation of the DIII-D neutral beams. The PC system provides centralization of all beam data with reasonable access for online shot-to-shot control and analysis. The PC hardware was configured to interface all four neutral beam host mini-computers, support multi-tasking, and provide storage for approximately one month's accumulation of beam data. The PC software is composed of commercial packages used for performance and statistical analysis (i.e. LOTUS 123, PC PLOT, etc.) host communications software (i.e. PCLINK, KERMIT, etc.) and applications developed software utilizing FORTRAN and BASIC. The objectives of this paper are to describe the implementation of the PC system, the methods of integrating the various software packages, and the scenario for online control and analysis

  5. Power system for the text diagnostic neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam source (DNB) has been built and installed on the Texas Experimental Tokamek (TEXT). The power supplies necessary for the 100 millisecond pulsed source operation have been built and are described in this paper. The high voltage power supply utilizing capacitor banks for energy storage is described. The suppressor, arc, filament, snubber bias, and deflection magnet supplies are described. A description of the arc notcher used to modulate the beam is given

  6. National negative-ion-based neutral-beam development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.S.; Pyle, R.V. (eds.)

    1983-08-01

    The plan covers facilities required, program milestones, and decision points. It includes identification of applications, experiments, theoretical research areas, development of specific technologies and reactor development and demonstration facilities required to bring about the successful application of negative-ion-based neutral beams. Particular emphasis is placed on those activities leading to use on existing plasma confinement experiments or their upgrades.

  7. National negative-ion-based neutral-beam development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plan covers facilities required, program milestones, and decision points. It includes identification of applications, experiments, theoretical research areas, development of specific technologies and reactor development and demonstration facilities required to bring about the successful application of negative-ion-based neutral beams. Particular emphasis is placed on those activities leading to use on existing plasma confinement experiments or their upgrades

  8. Measurement of neutral beam power and beam profile distribution on DNB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injection power of a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) can be obtained with the thermocouple probe measurement system on the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). With the 49 kv, 6 A, 100 ms pulse charge of an acceleration electrode, a thermocouple probe measurement system with 13 thermocouples crossly distributed on a coppery heat target was used to measure the temperature rise of the target, and the maximum measured temperature rise was 14 degree C. And the neutral beam power of 160 kW and beam profile distribution was obtained by calculation. The total neutral beam power of 130 kW was also obtained by integral calculation with the temperature rise on the heat section board. The difference between the two means was analyzed. The experiment results shows that the method of heat section board with thermocouple probe is one of the effective ways to measure the beam power and beam profile distribution. (authors)

  9. Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Gazza, E.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Spolaore, M.; Zaniol, B. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P.; De Muri, M. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University (Italy); Croci, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H{sup -}/D{sup -} production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

  10. Measurement of Neutral Particle Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Rob Roy; Hanson, Gail

    2011-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the ISIS proton synchrotron at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to measure ionization cooling of a muon beam. During recent data-taking, it was determined that there is a significant background contamination of neutral particles populating the MICE muon beam. This contamination creates unwanted triggers in MICE, thus reducing the percentage of useful data taken during running. This paper describes the analysis done with time-of-flight detectors, used to measure and identify the source of the contamination in both positive and negative muon beams.

  11. Energy recovery in high energy neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One way to heat the plasma of thermonuclear fusion experiments, is to inject high energy (50 to 100 KeV per nucleon), neutral particles (hydrogen or deuterium). Neutral beam elaboration consists in ion production and acceleration, neutralisation by charge exchange on gas target, disposal of unneutralized ions. But, in the case of positive ion based neutral beam injection, the neutralisation efficiency is limited to 50% at 100 KeV, and decreases rapidly with energy. The energy recovery is a new method for disposing of the unneutralized ions: these are electrostatically decelerated and collected on electrodes which are polarized at low voltage, close to the ion source potential. An energy recovery system was studied and experimented with positive ion beams of 50 and 100 KeV. In the framework of a french-japanese collaboration, we measured a relative power reduction of about 20%, with 100 KeV, 1,5 MW deuterium beams. We have also studied theoretically an energy recovery system for negative ion beams, which will be utilized at high energy (1 MeV). A relative power reduction of 20% can be expected in the best conditions

  12. TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injected power measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  13. Plasma neutralization models for intense ion beam transport in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed based on the assumption of long charge bunches (lb >> rb). Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The analytical predictions for the degree of ion beam charge and current neutralization also agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The model predicts very good charge neutralization (>99%) during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration τb is much longer than the electron plasma period 2π/ωp, where ωp = (4πe2np/m)1/2 is the electron plasma frequency, and np is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. The analytical formulas derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes, and provide scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters

  14. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  15. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction. PMID:26628137

  16. Spheromak Energy Transport Studies via Neutral Beam Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Wood, R D; Jayakumar, J; Pearlstein, L D

    2008-02-11

    Results from the SSPX spheromak experiment provide strong motivation to add neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Such auxiliary heating would significantly advance the capability to study the physics of energy transport and pressure limits for the spheromak. This LDRD project develops the physics basis for using NBI to heat spheromak plasmas in SSPX. The work encompasses three activities: (1) numerical simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effect of adding beams to SSPX, (2) using the SSPX spheromak and theory/modeling to develop potential target plasmas suitable for future application of neutral beam heating, and (3) developing diagnostics to provide the measurements needed for transport calculations. These activities are reported in several publications.

  17. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane

  18. Current neutralization in ballistic transport of light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense light ion beams are being considered as drivers to ignite fusion targets in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Ballistic transport of these beams from the diode to the target is possible only if the beam current is almost completely neutralized by plasma currents. This paper summarizes related work on relativistic electron beam and heavy ion beam propagation and describes a simple simulation model (DYNAPROP) which has been modified to treat light ion beam propagation. DYNAPROP uses an envelope equation to treat beam dynamics and uses rate equations to describe plasma and conductivity generation. The model has been applied both to the high current, 30 MeV Li+3 beams for LMF as well as low current, 1.2 MeV proton beams which are currently being studied on GAMBLE B at the Naval Research Laboratory. The predicted ratio of net currents to beam current is ∼0.1--0.2 for the GAMBLE experiment and ∼0.01 for LMF. The implications of these results for LMF and the GAMBLE experiments art discussed in some detail. The simple resistive model in DYNAPROP has well-known limitations in the 1 torr regime which arise primarily from the neglect of plasma electron transport. Alternative methods for treating the plasma response are discussed

  19. Neutral beam injection system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B.H.; Lee, K.W.; Chung, K.S.; Oh, B.H.; Cho, Y.S.; Bae, Y.D.; Han, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The NBI system for KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been designed based on conventional positive ion beam technology. One beam line consists of three ion sources, three neutralizers, one bending magnet, and one drift tube. This system will deliver 8 MW deuterium beam to KSTAR plasma in normal operation to support the advanced experiments on heating, current drive and profile control. The key technical issues in this design were high power ion source(120 kV, 65 A), long pulse operation (300 seconds; world record is 30 sec), and beam rotation from vertical to horizontal direction. The suggested important R and D points on ion source and beam line components are also included. (author). 7 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Commissioning of heating neutral beams for COMPASS-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Belov, V.; Gorbovsky, A.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Mishagin, V.; Abdrashitov, A.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondakov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    Two neutral beam injectors have been developed for plasma heating on COMPASS-D tokamak (Institute of Plasma Physics, Prague). The 4-electrodes multihole ion-optical system with beam focusing was chosen to provide the low divergence 300 kW power in both deuterium and hydrogen atoms. The accelerating voltage is 40 kV at extracted ion current up to 15 A. The power supply system provides the continuous and modulated mode of the beam injection at a maximal pulse length 300 ms. The optimal arrangement of the cryopanels and the beam duct elements provides sufficiently short-length beamline which reduces the beam losses. The evolution of the impurities and molecular fraction content is studied in the process of the high voltage conditioning of the newly made ion sources. Two injectors of the same type have been successfully tested and are ready for operation at tokamak in IPP, Prague.

  1. Neutral beam injectors for the Big Dee vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four neutral beam injectors built for Doublet III will be modified to reoptimize beam transmission into the Big Dee vessel. All beamline components will be remounted 900 to their original position in the cylindrical vacuum vessel. This will permit optimum alignment with the available port opening. While these modifications are being incorporated into the disassembled injectors, it is planned that improvements and upgrading features will be added at the least possible cost. The calorimeter will be replaced by two independently driven calorimeters, thus decoupling the operation of the two ion sources. The beam path is being opened up to accommodate a long pulse (cw) source and all beam absorbing surfaces are being increased in size to withstand up to 5 s of operation with heat fluxes up to 700 W/cm2. By opening up the apertures along the beam trajectory, an increase in power transmission into the plasma of 33% is realized compared with the present Doublet III performance

  2. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2008-06-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally-applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage ({approx} 8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO{sub 3} source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios {approx} 120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high energy density physics applications.

  3. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  4. Negative-ion-based neutral beams for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To maximize the usefulness of an engineering test reactor (e.g., ITER, TIBER), it is highly desirable that it operate under steady-state conditions. The most attractive option for maintaining the circulating current needed in the center of the plasma is the injection of powerful beams of neutral deuterium atoms. The beam simultaneously heats the plasma. At the energies required, in excess of 500 keV, such beams can be made by accelerating D- ions and then removing the electron. Sources are being developed that generate the D- ions in the volume of a specially constructed plasma discharge, without the addition of cesium. These sources must operate with minimum gas flow, to avoid stripping the D- beam, and with minimum electron output. We are designing at LBL highly efficient electrostatic accelerators that combine electric strong-focusing with dc acceleration and offer the possibility of varying the beam energy at constant current while minimizing breakdown. Some form of rf acceleration may also be required. To minimize irradiation of the ion sources and accelerators, the D- beam can be transported through a maze in the neutron shielding. The D- ions can be converted to neutrals in a gas or plasma target, but advances in laser and mirror technology may make possible very efficient photodetachment systems by the time an ETR becomes operational. 9 refs., 4 figs

  5. JET neutral beam injection system, construction and component tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two neutral injection systems for JET are each determined by 40 mw beam power extracted from eight sources during 10 s pulses. Under the existing spatial restrictions, this has led to a complex beam-line system design. The applied manufacturing techniques and the approach to quality assurance are discussed. The beam sources have been operated at 80 kv, 60 a, 5 s in hydrogen. Plasma source development has increased the H+ yield to approximately 84%. Beamlet steering by aperture offset has experimentally been adjusted to the values required for the restricted tokamak entrance geometry. A beam source has also been operated at 160 kv, 37 a in deuterium. At the tokamak the 7 m high injector vacuum box has been installed incorporating a fast shutter and a cryopump. This LHE cooled pump with 40 m2 entrance area and 45% pumping efficiency has successfully been tested as well as the flexible cryoliquid transfer-lines. The bakeable valve between injector box and tokamak vacuum (1.1 m x 0.5 m gate cross-section) has been operated with leak rates <10-9 mbar1/s. The sub-system commissioning is completed by short-pulse operation of the beam sources with their final power supplies in situ at the tokamak and, in parallel to this, testing of the beam-line system in the neutral injection testbed

  6. Instrumentation architecture for ITER diagnostic neutral beam power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Neutral Beam (NB) Injection system is used for heating or diagnostics of the plasma in a Tokamak. The Diagnostics Neutral Beam (DNB) system for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) based on acceleration of negative ions; injects a neutral (H0) beam at 100 KeV with specified modulation into the plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. DNB Power Supply (DNBPS) system consists of various high voltage power supplies, high current power supplies and RF Generators. The system operates in a given operating sequence; very high electromagnetic transients are intrinsically generated during frequent short circuit at the accelerator grid (breakdowns) and sudden loss of load (Beam off). Instrumentation is to be provided to operate the DNBPS system remotely with required control and protection in synchronisation with ITER operation as directed by CODAC (COntrol Data Access and Communication); the central control system for ITER. Instrumentation functionality includes 1. Operation and control of DNBPS subsystems and associated auxiliaries 2. Protection of DNB components and power supplies using interlock system, 3. To ensure safe operation of high voltage hazardous systems 4. Acquisition of injector performance parameters and 5. To facilitate test and maintenance of individual subsystem. This paper discusses about proposed DNBPS instrumentation architecture. The design generally follows the protocols from the ITER- Plant Control Design Handbook (PCDH). (author)

  7. Study of neutral beam attenuation of 5 MW hydrogen beam in SST-1 Tokomak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral beam injector (NBI) system at IPR is capable of injecting ∼1 MW of neutral beam (H°, 30-50 keV) power to the Tokamak (SST-1) plasma for performing heating and current drive experiments. Currently, preparations are underway for integrating the NBI injector with the SST-1 Tokamak. For understanding the power transmission into the tokomak and power delivered to the NB shine-through, knowledge on the neutral beam attenuation profile for different impurity composition and in various operating scenarios of SST-1 operation is necessary. A comprehensive Charge Exchange Recombination and Beam emission analysis package is being developed under JET-IPR collaboration, for analysing the CX and Beam emissions from Tokamaks. A neutral beam attenuation package for SST-1 is being developed to suit the SST-1 NBI geometries and plasma, which is expected to have Carbon and Oxygen as the main impurity species. The main features of the package and the computed neutral beam attenuation profiles, for various operation scenarios of SST1 have been presented here

  8. Scanning system for charged and neutral particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention aims at providing a simple and reliable method and a reliable device for irradiating a confined volume of matter, preferably at great depth, with a beam of high energy charged or neutral particles. The basic feature of the invention is that the particle beam coming from a radiation source of charged particles is scanned electrically in two orthogonal directions, and that the beam scanned in one plane is deflected in space. For most practical purposes it is important that the radiation source is of small extension. Such a radiation source is realized by means of a beam optical system that includes two scanning magnets each of which admits scanning of the particle beam in one of two orthogonal planes. The beam scanned in one of the planes leaves the associated scanning magnet from an effective scanning centre. The optical system also includes a deflection magnet disposed between the scanning magnets for deflecting the path of the beam in space. By utilizing the optical properties of the deflection magnet in such a way that the deflection magnet produces an image of the effective scanning centre of the first scanning magnet which coincides with the effective scanning centre of the second scanning magnet, the beam scanned in two orthogonal planes will radiate isotropically from the scanning centre of the second scanning magnet. By using the deflection magnet a compact scanning system with a small distance between the scanning centres of the scanning magnets is obtained

  9. Assembly of neutral beam injector with SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) is capable of delivering a hydrogen beam of power 1.7 MW to the SST-1 tokomak for the purpose of heating its plasma. The Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is the core project aimed at producing high temperature plasma. The Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) is a system meant for heating the SST-1 plasma. NBI system is used for generating a beam of energetic hydrogen particles and then launches them into the SST-1. The NBI system is currently being operated for production of such a beam on a designated test stand in the NBI hall. As a next step, it is now required to transfer the entire NBI system from the test stand (in NBI hall) to the NBI-SST-1 area and then integrate with the SST-1 Tokamak. The NBI system comprises of a huge vacuum vessel with an ion source and gate valve mounted on it. The vacuum vessel contains the following major sub-systems such as neutralizer, electromagnet (magnet), magnet liner, calorimeter, Ion dump, Beam Transmission Duct, Shine-Through and cryo-condensation pumps (cryopumps). It also contains headers and distribution systems for liquid nitrogen, liquid helium and cooling water, external vacuum system, external cryogenic distribution, external cooling water distribution and snubber deck. NBI integration with SST-1 involves assembly sequence of activities, Heat Transfer Elements welding with neutraliser, ion dump, magnet liner and calorimeter, dis-mantling of existing cooling water lines, dis-assembly of snubber deck, shifting of Vacuum Vessel (VV), lifting of VV and placing VV on the Support Structure, and alignment of VV with SST-1 at pre-defined position. In this paper, we present the planning, sequence of assembly activities, VV lifting methodology. (author)

  10. Radiation shielding for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NB system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) consists of two heating and current drive (H and CD) NB injectors and a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) injector. The NB accelerates negative deuterium ions with maximum energy of 1 MeV and maximum beam current of 40 A. The ITER (H and CD) NB will be tested in the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) that will be located in Italy, near Padua. The performance test will be based on different operation phases starting with low energy hydrogen beam. In the initial testing phase for many months the machine will operate with hydrogen only and with deuteron at a reduced intensity suggesting the possibility of hosting the device in a light shielding room/area. In the paper the study performed to evaluate the minimum shielding needed in connection with the different operation phases is shown. The source terms were calculated starting from neutron source characterisation and then assessing article transport in the ITER NB structure with a mathematical model of the components geometry that was implemented into MCNP computer code. The neutron source definition was outlined considering both D-D and D-T neutron production. Shielding was assessed for hydrogen operation only and for 20, 60, 100 and 1000 kV (full energy) deuteron acceleration, accounting for the associated beam current intensity. Related results are presented and discussed in the paper. (author)

  11. 8MVA modulator/regulator for neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes very generally the modulator/regulator (Mod/Reg) being built for Transrex by Systems, Science and Software for use on the neutral beam power supplies that Transrex is building for General Atomic Company to power the neutral beam heating systems that will be used on the Doublet III fusion device. The Mod/Reg is required to provide an 80 kV, 100 A pulse for a second every 90 sec. The voltage is to be regulated to 3%, and in case of fault the pulse must be interrupted within 10 μsec. An additional requirement was that the total system have very low capacity such that the total energy stored would be less than 15 joules. This is a restriction imposed by the source designer to prevent destroying the source in case of an arc within the source

  12. Shielding calculations for the TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed: one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and walls of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m are sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/DT pulse

  13. Preliminary Measurement of Beam Power Transmission in KSTAR Neutral Beam Test-Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutral beam test-stand (NBTS) was constructed to develop 300-sec deuterium beam extraction of 120 kV/65 A as an auxiliary heating system of KSTAR. The ion source is composed of a plasma generator and a tetrode accelerator. The beamline components include an optical multi-channel analyzer (OMA) duct, a neutralizer, a bending magnet (BM), an ion dump, a calorimeter, and a cryo-sorption pump system. Beam deposition along the NBTS has been measured by water flow calorimetry (WFC) and 96 % of the extracted beam power (Vacc·Iacc) was counted for a beam of 97 kV/22.2 A. Maximum power transmission efficiency, which is the ratio of transmitted power on the calorimeter to the extracted beam power, was 0.77 with an optimum perveance of 1.1 microperv

  14. Conceptual design of the JT-60 neutral beam injection system (interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an interim report on conceptual design of the JT-60 neutral beam injection system. Requirements for the JT-60 neutral beam injector are injection of a 20 MW neutral hydrogen beam into the plasma in the vicinity of energy 75 keV as long as 10 sec, keeping thermal gas flow rate into the torus vacuum chamber below 15% the neutral beam flux. On the basis of these requirements and recent results of research and development of ion sources and beam line components, system conceptual design is now proceeding. Scale of the JT-60 neutral beam injection system is discussed, indicating also future problems. (auth.)

  15. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  16. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs

  17. Neutral beam control systems for the Tandem Mirror Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) is presently developing the technology and approaches which will be used in larger fusion systems. This paper describes some of the designs which were used in creating the control system for the TMX neutral beams. To create a system of controls that would work near these large, rapid switching current sources required a mixture of different technologies: fiberoptic data transmission, printed circuit and wirewrap techniques, etc

  18. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies

  19. Ion source development for JT-60 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design work of the JT-60 neutral beam injection system requires two ion sources in each beam line. A low divergent ion beam of 35 A at 75 keV shall be extracted for several to ten seconds through 12 cm x 27 cm extraction grids. The corresponding ion current density is about 0.27 A/cm2 with 40% transparency. To develop ion sources of these specifications, we investigate the beam optics of the two-stage acceleration system using the 100 kV test stand. The extraction grids are made of copper disk with 83 apertures over 5 cm diam. area. The total acceleration energy ranges from 50 keV to 70 keV, and the extraction and the acceleration gap distances are changed in the range of 4.5 to 8 mm. The beam divergence is plotted as a function of perveance for a set of these parameters. We find the tendency that the minimum beam divergence is improved with the decrease of field intensity ratio f, while one must allow the decrease of optimum perveance, the perveance at which the beam divergence is minimum. When f is smaller than 0.25, where the strong lens effect is expected, we obtain the smallest beam divergence (1.0 degree), but the heat loading of the plasma and the gradient grid increases significantly above a certain perveance value. Chamfering of the aperture edge in the plasma and the gradient grid improves beam optics appreciably. The heat loading of each grid is discussed in relation to the beam optics. The maximum perveance per hole obtained is 1.3 nanopervs., where the beam energy is 70 keV and the divergence is 1.4 degree

  20. Transmission of the Neutral Beam Heating Beams at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection heating has been development for the TJ-II stellarator. The beam has a port-through power between 700-1500 kW and injection energy 40 keV. The sensibility of the injection system to the changes of several parameters is analysed. Beam transmission is limited by losses processes since beam is born into the ions source until is coming into the fusion machine. For the beam transmission optimization several beam diagnostics have been developed. A carbon fiber composite (CFC) target calorimeter has been installed at TJ-II to study in situ the power density distribution of the neutral beams. The thermographic print of the beam can be recorded and analysed in a reliable way due to the highly anisotropic thermal conductivity of the target material. With the combined thermographic and calorimetric measurements it has been possible to determine the power density distribution of the beam. It has been found that a large beam halo is present, which can be explained by the extreme misalignment of the grids. This kind of halo has a deleterious effect on beam transport and must be minimized in order to improve the plasma heating capability of the beams. (Author) 155 refs

  1. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the region of the TFTR vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC-clad POCO graphite titles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm2 the armor surface temperature exceeds 12000C within 250 ms and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber-optic telescope views three areas of approx.30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 900 nm pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the twelve ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold settable in the range of 500 to 23000C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance will be presented

  2. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discuss how although the region of the TFTR vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC clad POCO graphite tiles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm2 the armor surface temperature exceeds 1200 degrees C within 250 ms and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber optic telescope views three areas of ∼30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three the ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 1-μ pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the twelve ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold settable in the range of 500-1800C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance is presented

  3. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the region of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC-clad POCO graphite tiles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm2 the armor surface temperature exceeds 1200 0C within 250 ms, and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber-optic telescope views three areas of --30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 900-nm pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the 12 ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold which can be set in the range of 500--2300 0C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance will be presented

  4. Experimental approach to high power long duration neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of ion sources and beam dumps for the development of a high power long duration neutral beam injector for JT-60 are presented. Long pulse operation of high power beams requires a high degree of reliability. To develop a reliable ion source with large extraction area, a new duoPIGatron ion source with a coaxially shaped intermediate electrode is proposed and tested. Magnetic configuration is examined numerically to obtain high current arc discharge and source plasma with small density variation. Experimental results show that primary electrons were fed widely from the cathode plasma region to the source plasma region and that dense uniform source plasma could be obtained easily. Source plasma characteristics are studied and comparison of these with other sources are also described. To develop extraction electrode of high power ion source, experimental studies were made on the cooling of the electrode. Long Pulse beams were extracted safely under the condition of high heat loading on the electrode. Finally, burnout study for the development of high power beam dumps is presented. Burnout data were obtained from subcooled forced-convective boiling of water in a copper finned tube irradiated by high power ion beams. The results yield simple burnout correlations which can be used for the prediction of burnout heat flux of the beam dump. (author)

  5. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm2 in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within ±6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F2-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl2-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than ±5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  6. The ITER neutral beam front end components integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, M., E-mail: marc.urbani@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Hemsworth, R.; Schunke, B.; Graceffa, J.; Delmas, E.; Svensson, L.; Boilson, D. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Krylov, A.; Panasenkov, A. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Agarici, G. [Fusion For Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral-B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Stafford Allen, R.; Jones, C.; Kalsey, M.; Muir, A.; Milnes, J. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Geli, F. [FGI Consulting, Le Garde d’Estienne, 4565 route du Puy Sainte Reparade, 13540 Puyricard (France); Sherlock, P. [AMEC Limited, Booths Park Chelford Road, Knutsford Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    The neutral beam (NB) system for ITER is composed of two heating neutral beam injectors (HNBs) and a diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNB). A third HNB can be installed as a future up-grade. This paper will present the design development of the components between the injectors and the tokamak; the so-called ‘front end components’: the drift duct consists of the NB bellows and the drift duct liner, the vacuum vessel pressure suppression system box (VVPSS box), the absolute valve, and the fast shutter. These components represent the key links between the ITER tokamak and the vessels of the NB injectors. The design of these components is demanding due to the different loads that these components will have to stand. The paper will describe the different design solutions which have to be implemented regarding the primary vacuum confinement, the power handling capability and the remote maintenance operations. The sizes of the components are determined by the large cross section of the neutral beam. The power handling capability is driven by the anticipated re-ionization of the neutral beam and the electromagnetic fields in this region. The drift duct bellows (with an inner diameter of 2.5 m) shall guarantee a leak tight vacuum enclosure during the vertical and radial displacements of the ITER vacuum vessel. The conductance of the VVPSS box must be maximized in the available space. The absolute valve remains a challenging development. The total leak rate through the valve must be ≤1 × 10{sup −8} Pa m{sup 3}/s when the valve is closed. Due to the radiation environment, the seals of the gate valve will be metallic. An R and D program has been launched to develop a suitable metallic seal solution with the required dimensions. The maximum allowed closing time for the fast shutter shall be less than 1 s. For all these components the leak tightness will be guaranteed by a welded lip seal and the mechanical stability by bolted structures.

  7. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  8. Performance test results of ion beam transport for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutral beam injector is built at IPR to heat the plasma of SST-1 and its upgrade. It delivers a maximum beam power of 1.7 MW for 55 kV Hydrogen beam or 80 kV Deuterium beam. At lower beam voltage, the delivered power falls to 500 kW at 30 kV Hydrogen beam which is adequate to heat SST-1 plasma ions to ∼ 1 keV. Process of acceleration of ions to the required beam voltage, conversion of ions to neutrals and removal of un-neutralized ions and the beam diagnostic systems occupy a large space. The consequence is that linear extent of the neutral beam injector is at least a few meters. Also, port access provides a very narrow duct. Even a very good injector design and fabrication practices keep beam divergence at a very low but finite value. The result is beam transport becomes an important issue. Since a wide area beam is constructed by hundreds of beam lets, it becomes essential they be focused in such a way that beam transport loss is minimized. Horizontal and vertical focal lengths are two parameters, in addition to beam divergence, which give a description of the beam transport. We have obtained these two parameters for our injector by using beam transport code; making several hundred simulation runs by varying optical parameters of the beam. The selected parameters set has been translated into the engineering features of the extractor grid set of the ion source. Aperture displacement technique is used to secure the horizontal beam focusing at 5.4 m. Combination of both aperture displacement and inclining of two grid halves to ∼ 17 mrad are secured for vertical beam focusing at 7 m from earth grid of the ion source. The gaps between the design, engineered and performance tested values usually arise due to lack of exercising control over fabrication processes or due to inaccuracies in the assumption made in the model calculations of beam optics and beam transport. This has been the case with several injectors, notably with JET injector. To overcome this

  9. The ITER neutral beam test facility : Design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame an EFDA contract, the CEA, in close collaboration with the Consorzio RFX, Padua, FZK, Karlsruhe and IPP Garching, is carrying out a design study of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) with the aim to procure in time, a dedicated test bed to optimise the performances of the first ITER neutral beam injector and to demonstrate its reliability. The main specifications that have to be considered for the study of the NBTF genetic design and general infrastructure are first an easy maintenance of components, an easy man access and also integration of the required full set of beam diagnostics. A specific inspection tool is developed that allows remote visual inspection of the source ground grid and beam line components to be performed under vacuum. Associated safety requirements are also considered (pulses in H2 and D2, X-ray and neutron production). The current design of the dedicated beam line vessel allows mixed vertical and horizontal access to the beam line components during phase 1 of the operation plan (20s short pulses). The split two halves cylindrical cryopumps, developed by FZK, will be further re-assembled in the final ITER reference cylindrical configuration for phase 2 of the operation plan: long pulses at full power. The 4.5 K cryopanels must be periodically regenerated at 90 K. Both regeneration and cool-down phases of the cryopanels are time consuming optimised. The cryosystem that supply the necessary cryogens to the cryopump is designed using existing industrial 4.5 K cold power and 80 K helium gas refrigenerators. A total power of about 50 MW will have to be removed during the two NBTF operation stages of short (20 s) and long (∼ 1 hour) pulses. for both scenarios, the cooling plant is designed for cooling down the high and low voltage components, the cryoplant and associated power supply systems. (author)

  10. Neutral beam current drive scaling in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam current drive scaling experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. These experiments were performed using up to 10 MW of 80 keV hydrogen beams. Previous current drive experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated beam driven currents up to 340 kA. In the experiments reported here we achieved beam driven currents of at least 500 kA, and have obtained operation with record values of poloidal beta (εβ/sub p/ = 1.4). The beam driven current reported here is obtained from the total plasma current by subtracting an estimate of the residual Ohmic current determined from the measured loop voltage. In this report we discuss the scaling of the current drive efficiency with plasma conditions. Using hydrogen neutral beams, we find the current drive efficiency is similar in Deuterium and Helium target plasmas. Experiments have been performed with plasma electron temperatures up to T/sub e/ = 3 keV, and densities in the range 2 /times/ 1019m/sup /minus/3/ 19m/sup /minus/3/. The current drive efficiency (nIR/P) is observed to scale linearly with the energy confinement time on DIII-D to a maximum of 0.05 /times/ 1020m/sup /minus/2/ A/W. The measured efficiency is consistent with a 0-D theoretical model. In addition to comparison with this simple model, detailed analysis of several shots using the time dependent transport code ONETWO is discussed. This analysis indicates that bootstrap current contributes approximately 10--20% of the the total current. Our estimates of this effect are somewhat uncertain due to limited measurements of the radial profile of the density and temperatures. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    OpenAIRE

    Kurimoto, Y; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S J; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Cheng, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D. A.; Franke, A. J.; C. Giganti; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Guzowski, P.; Hanson, A.

    2010-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon by a muon neutrino beam with average energy 0.8 GeV. The separation of coherent from inclusive neutral pion production has been improved by detecting recoil protons from resonant neutral pion production. We measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent neutral pion production to total charged current cross sections to be (1.16 +/- 0.24) x 10-2. The ratio of charged current cohere...

  12. Assembly process of the ITER neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graceffa, J., E-mail: joseph.graceffa@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R.; Petrov, V.; Schunke, B.; Urbani, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Pilard, V. [Fusion for Energy, C/ Josep Pla, n°2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The ITER neutral beam (NB) injectors are used for heating and diagnostics operations. There are 4 injectors in total, 3 heating neutral beam injectors (HNBs) and one diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNB). Two HNBs and the DNB will start injection into ITER during the hydrogen/helium phase of ITER operations. A third HNB is considered as an upgrade to the ITER heating systems, and the impact of the later installation and use of that injector have to be taken into account when considering the installation and assembly of the whole NB system. It is assumed that if a third HNB is to be installed, it will be installed before the nuclear phase of the ITER project. The total weight of one injector is around 1200 t and it is composed of 18 main components and 36 sets of shielding plates. The overall dimensions are length 20 m, height 10 m and width 5 m. Assembly of the first two HNBs and the DNB will start before the first plasma is produced in ITER, but as the time required to assemble one injector is estimated at around 1.5 year, the assembly will be divided into 2 steps, one prior to first plasma, and the second during the machine second assembly phase. To comply with this challenging schedule the assembly sequence has been defined to allow assembly of three first injectors in parallel. Due to the similar design between the DNB and HNBs it has been decided to use the same tools, which will be designed to accommodate the differences between the two sets of components. This reduces the global cost of the assembly and the overall assembly time for the injector system. The alignment and positioning of the injectors is a major consideration for the injector assembly as the alignment of the beamline components and the beam source are critical if good injector performance is to be achieved. The theoretical axes of the beams are defined relative to the duct liners which are installed in the NB ports. The concept adopted to achieve the required alignment accuracy is to use the

  13. Predictive Simulations of ITER Including Neutral Beam Driven Toroidal Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Federico D.; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, Glenn; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Budny, Robert V.; McCune, Douglas C.

    2008-06-16

    Predictive simulations of ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 2002] discharges are carried out for the 15 MA high confinement mode (H-mode) scenario using PTRANSP, the predictive version of the TRANSP code. The thermal and toroidal momentum transport equations are evolved using turbulent and neoclassical transport models. A predictive model is used to compute the temperature and width of the H-mode pedestal. The ITER simulations are carried out for neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas, for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas, and for plasmas heated with a mix of NBI and ICRF. It is shown that neutral beam injection drives toroidal rotation that improves the confinement and fusion power production in ITER. The scaling of fusion power with respect to the input power and to the pedestal temperature is studied. It is observed that, in simulations carried out using the momentum transport diffusivity computed using the GLF23 model [R.Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)], the fusion power increases with increasing injected beam power and central rotation frequency. It is found that the ITER target fusion power of 500 MW is produced with 20 MW of NBI power when the pedesta temperature is 3.5 keV. 2008 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.2931037

  14. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this report present the progress achieved to date on the Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project. This effort is an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique (CCFM). The overall objective of the effort is to develop and apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was established to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present the project is in the middle of its second budget period with the instrumentation on-site at TdeV. The first half of this budget period was used to complete total system tests at InterScience, Inc., dismantle and ship the hardware to TdeV, re-assemble and install the HNBP on the tokamak. Integration of the diagnostic into the TdeV facility has progressed to the point of first beam production and measurement on the plasma. At this time, the HNBP system is undergoing final de-bugging prior to re-start of machine operation in early Fall of this year

  15. Fast magnetic field penetration into an intense neutralized ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments involving propagation of neutralized ion beams across a magnetic field indicate a magnetic field penetration time determined by the Hall resistivity rather than the Spitzer or Pedersen resistivity. In magnetohydrodynamics the Hall current is negligible because electrons and ions drift together in response to an electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. For a propagating neutralized ion beam, the ion orbits are completely different from the electron orbits and the Hall current must be considered. There would be no effect unless there is a component of magnetic field normal to the surface which would usually be absent for a good conductor. It is necessary to consider electron inertia and the consequent penetration of the normal component to a depth c/ωp. In addition it is essential to consider a component of magnetic field parallel to the velocity of the beam which may be initially absent, but is generated by the Hall effect. The penetration time is determined by whistler waves rather than diffusion

  16. On neutral-beam injection counter to the plasma current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, P.; Akers, R. J.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2005-11-01

    It is well known that when neutral beams inject ions into trapped orbits in a tokamak, the transfer of momentum between the beam and the plasma occurs through the torque exerted by a radial return current. It is shown that this implies that the angular momentum transferred to the plasma can be larger than the angular momentum of the beam, if the injection is in the opposite direction to the plasma current and the beam ions suffer orbit losses. On the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [R. J. Akers, J. W. Ahn, G. Y. Antar, L. C. Appel, D. Applegate, C. Brickley et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 45, A175 (2003)], this results in up to 30% larger momentum deposition with counterinjection than with co-injection, with substantially increased plasma rotation as a result. It is also shown that heating of the plasma (most probably of the ions) can occur even when the beam ions are lost before they have had time to slow down in the plasma. This is the dominant heating mechanism in the outer 40% of the MAST plasma during counterinjection.

  17. Neutral beam injectors for the Big Dee vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four neutral beam injectors built for Doublet III will be modified to reoptimize beam transmission into the Big Dee vessel. All beamline components will be remounted 900 to their original position in the cylindrical vacuum vessel. This will permit optimum alignment with the available port opening. While these modifications are being incorporated into the disassembled injectors, it is planned that improvements and upgrading features will be added at the least possible cost. The calorimeter will be replaced by two independently driven calorimeters, thus decoupling the operation of the two ion sources. The beam path is being opened up to accommodate a long pulse (cw) source and all beam absorbing surfaces are being increased in size to withstand up to 5 s of operation with heat fluxes up to 700 W/cm2. By opening up the apertures along the beam trajectory, an increase in power transmission into the plasma of 33% is realized compared with the present Doublet III performance. In addition to improving the performance of the present system, this modification allows for the simple replacement of the present field free sources with larger cw sources to be developed and available at a later date. Ultimately, the four injectors will be capable of delivering up to 16 MW of heating into the Big Dee for up to 5-second pulses

  18. Neutral Beam Heating and Current Drive in MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, R.; Challis, C.; Appel, L.; Conway, N.; Cunningham, G.; Gryaznevich, M.; Lloyd, B.; Patel, A.; Tabasso, A.; Tournianski, M.

    2002-11-01

    Primary auxiliary heating on MAST (R 0.8m, a 0.6m) is provided by two ORNL neutral-beam injectors, oriented in the mid-plane, each with a tangency radius of 0.7m. Centrally peaked heating profiles at electron densities routinely exceeding the Greenwald limit are generated by injecting in the range 40 co-injection heated discharges and for low current (Ip 300kA), low-density (ne>0.5x1019m-3) co and counter injection heated plasmas where NBCD is being investigated.

  19. Comparison of experimental data and three-dimensional simulations of ion beam neutralization from the Neutralized Transport Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams [E. Henestroza, S. Eylon, P. Roy, S. Yu, A. Anders, F. Bieniosek, W. Greenway, B. Logan, R. MacGill, D. Shuman et al., Phys. Rev. ST-Accel. Beams 7, 083501 (2004)]. Preformed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge-induced spreading of the beam spot. Neutralized Transport Experiment physics issues are discussed and experimental data are analyzed and compared with three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data at the entrance of the neutralization region have been acquired. These data are used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with experimental measurements for K+ ion beams (∼250 keV) with dimensionless perveance of (1-7)x10-4. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is encouraging for heavy ion fusion and high energy density physics applications

  20. Producing a known neutral particle beam for the purpose of calibrating a neutral particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On Earth, gravitational confinement of a plasma is not possible, so plasmas are studied in vacuum chambers where the confinement of the plasma consists mainly of the chamber walls and magnetic fields. Here, the interaction of the plasma with the walls around it is unavoidably significant. The energetic ions and electrons of the plasma strike the walls and a number of different particles leave the surface, most of which are electrically neutral. Sometimes, plasma-surface interactions are beneficial such an in plasma processing. In other cases, the plasma-surface interaction is a hindrance such as in magnetic fusion systems. In either case, it is important to study plasma-surface interactions in order to predict and control its effect on the experimental system. In an effort to understand the composition of the particles leaving the surface, Ph.D. candidate Bruce Cain and Associate Professor David Ruzjc at the University of Illinois have designed and built a system to examine the neutral particles scattered from light ions hitting a surface with a beam energy of 10 to 900 eV. According to the design of the system, the neutral particles are ionized by a glow discharge ionizer and then enter into an energy analyzer. In order to calibrate the ionizer and the energy analyzer, a known particle beam is made by a charge exchange cell that is placed in the path of an ion beam. The design and use of the charge exchange cell is the subject of this paper, which will present the underlying theory, followed by the experimental design, and finally the procedures and the results of the experiments undertaken

  1. Thermal Transport in NCS Plasmas with Counter Neutral Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, B. W.; Casper, T. A.; Greenfield, C. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Gohil, P.; Lohr, J.; Petty, C. C.; Synakowski, E.; Austin, M. E.; McKee, G. R.; Rettig, C. L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII-D have investigated internal transport barrier (ITB) formation with neutral beams injected in the counter-current direction, assisted by early ECH during current ramp up. For counter injection the v_torBT term for radial force balance adds to the nabla p term to determine E× B flow shear. Compared to ITB plasmas with co-current injection, characteristics with counter injection at similar beam power are: (a) broader profiles of T_I, T_e, n_e, and ω_tor within a larger barrier radius, (b) reduced profile gradients in the barrier region, and (c) about a factor of 2 higher Z_eff ( ~4) from the carbon impurity. In this paper profile evolution and results of transport analysis will be compared with co-injection plasmas.

  2. Si etching with reactive neutral beams of very low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Si etching process has been investigated with reactive neutral beams (NBs) extracted using a low acceleration voltage of less than 100 V from CF4 and Ar mixed plasmas. The etched Si profile shows that the etching process is predominantly anisotropic. The reactive NB has a constant Si etching rate in the acceleration voltage range from 20 V to 80 V. It is considered that low-energy NBs can trigger Si etching because F radicals adsorb onto the Si surface and weaken Si–Si bonds. The etching rate per unit beam flux is 33 times higher than that with Ar NB. These results show that the low-energy reactive NB is useful for damage-free high speed Si etching

  3. Development of rf plasma generators for neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of low frequency (1-2 MHz) rf plasma generators for high power neutral beam applications is summarized. Immersed couplers from one to three turns were used. Acceptable plasma profiles, less than or equal to 15% max/min, were obtained in a variety of field-free magnetic bucket and magnetic filter-bucket sources, with 10 x 10 cm or 10 x 40 cm extraction areas. Hydrogen beam properties were measured with a 7 x 10 cm accelerator operated at 80 kV. Atomic fraction and power efficiency were at least as high as with arc plasmas in similar chambers. The potential advantages of an rf plasma source are: ease of operation; reliability; and extended service lifetime

  4. Neutronics calculations for the TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates, based entirely on one-dimensional transport calculations, of some of the effects of radiation on the operation and maintenance of the neutral beam injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to be built at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University are presented. Radiation effects due to 14-MeV neutrons produced by D-T reactions in the plasma and due to 2.6-MeV neutrons produced by D-D reactions in the calorimeter and in the charged-deuteron beam dump are considered. The results presented here are intended to indicate potential radiation problems rather than to be an accurate estimate of the magnitude of the actual radiation effects that will exist in the vicinity of the final injectors

  5. Tritium Monitoring in the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) is designed to operate with negative ion neutral injectors in order to provide the required beam power and efficiency. The operation of the neutral beam test bed involves the firing of a beam of deuterons into a calorimeter. The deuterons will become embedded in the calorimeter and subsequent particles can be involved in deuterium fusion reactions. There are two branches of this reaction which have approximately equal probability. These are: D + D → 3He + n D + D → 3H + p Because of this relationship, it is possible to estimate the level of tritium production accurately by measuring the neutron production. The proposed testing campaign will generate an annual tritium discharge to the atmosphere of about 246 GBq. An absolutely calibrated neutron monitor is needed for tritium accounting but difficulties arise because the neutron source is complex: it is spatially extended and varying and is anisotropic. Furthermore the material of the injector will cause significant scattering of neutrons between the source and any detector. To resolve these problems it is proposed that a set of detectors is deployed around the injector and that a neutron source be placed within the injector is used to calibrate them. Very detailed Monte-Carlo calculations have been carried out to model the neutron transport thought the NBTF. All major component of the injector have been modelled. These include the calorimeter, the residual ion dump, the neutraliser, the beam source, the HV bushing and the vacuum vessel. The spatial variation of the neutron source, based on the deuteron deposition on the calorimeter and the residual ion dump has been simulated. The effects of anisotropy and the angular dependence of the neutron energy spectrum have been included. The calculations demonstrate that such a suite of detectors can be calibrated using a 252Cf source to absolutely determine the neutron and therefore the tritium production to an

  6. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Joseph, E-mail: jkhoury@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C. [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  7. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants

  8. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C.

    2013-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  9. A Space-Charge-Neutralizing Plasma for Beam Drift Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.E.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-08-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a {approx} 10 cm long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter {approx} 5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8T field. Measured plasma density of {ge} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} meets the challenge of n{sub p}/Zn{sub b} > 1, where n{sub p} and n{sub b} are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the plasma ions.

  10. Intervention to repair a tritiated JET neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.J.; Bell, A.C.; Dines, A.J.; Hurd, F.H.; Lundquist, J.G.; Macklin, B.J.; Orchard, J.C.; Patel, B. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    At the end of May 1997, tritium neutral beams were run for the first time in the JET Octant 8 Neutral Injector Box (NIB8). On 4 June 1997 there were indications of a water leak in the NIB8. The leak was associated with operation of the Fast Shutter system positioned between the Injector and the Rotary Valve. The presence of water was detected at a very early stage by routine operating procedures using the NIB Mass Spectrometer and Penning gauge instrumentation. Operations on NIB8 were suspended whilst the pressure was still below 5.10{sup -7} mb with the Cryopumps cold. The pressure was still two orders of magnitude below the interlock trip level from the Fast Beam Interlock system which would have automatically inhibited pulsing. Some 3 cm{sup 3} of water was estimated to have leaked into the NIB. In order to effect a manned intervention with minimal impact on the JET operational programme several critical issues had to be addressed in parallel: Rate of tritium removal from NIB8 using the Exhaust Detritiation System (EDS). Health Physics procedures to be agreed and the appropriate controls established. NIB access requirements and the removal of the Octant 8 Central Support Column (CSC). The design and procurement of an access facility together with the appropriate services. (author)

  11. Condition monitoring for a neutral beam injector cryopumping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, N., E-mail: n.wright@lboro.ac.uk [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Dixon, R., E-mail: r.dixon@lboro.ac.uk [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Verhoeven, R., E-mail: roel.verhoeven@ccfe.ac.uk [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The development of a cryopumping condition monitoring scheme is presented. ► A residual generation scheme is used to detect two faults. ► Kalman filtering is used to generate the residuals. ► A filtering and voting arrangement is used to evaluate the residuals. ► A non-linear simulation model is used to verify the scheme. -- Abstract: For neutral beam injection systems, the maintenance of a vacuum inside the injector box is essential for normal operation. Cryogenic pumping systems are often used to create and maintain this vacuum. Cryogenic pumping systems have been deployed on the neutral beam heating systems supporting the Joint European Torus. With these as a target application, the development of a condition monitoring scheme is presented. The scheme uses a residual generation approach. A bank of Kalman filters is used to estimate measured process variables. A residual evaluator is used to map residual signals onto a set of faults. Two example faults are simulated to demonstrate the response of the scheme. This paper contributes to the wider fusion development programme by demonstrating how a contemporary condition monitoring technique can be applied to a fusion support system, in order to improve its availability.

  12. Neutral Beam Current Drive in Spheromak plasma and plasma stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlstein, L. D.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Hudson, B.; Hill, D. N.; Lodestro, L. L.; McLean, H. S.; Fowler, T. K.; Casper, T. A.

    2007-11-01

    A key question for the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is understanding how spheromaks can be sustained by other current drive tools such as neutral beam current drive. Another question is whether the present relationship between current and maximum spheromak magnetic field (plasma beta) is related to Alcator-like ohmic confinement limit or is a stability limit. Using the code CORSICA, the fraction of neutral beam current drive that can be achieved has been calculated for different injection angles with a fixed equilibrium. It is seen that relaxing the equilibrium with this drive simply drives the core safety factor to low values. Other equilibria where the NBI may give aligned current drive are being explored. Free-boundary equilibria calculations are underway to see what hyper-resistivity model gives the observed sustained SSPX performance and include that in the NBI calculations. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  13. Electrostatic steering and beamlet aiming in large neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, P., E-mail: pierluigi.veltri@igi.cnr.it; Chitarin, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4 - 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, viale dell' Università n. 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2015-04-08

    Neutral beam injection is the main method for plasma heating in magnetic confinement fusion devices. In high energy injector (E>100 keV/amu), neutrals are obtained with reasonable efficiency by conversion of negative ions (H- or D-) via electron detachment reactions. In the case of ITER injectors, which shall operate at 1 MeV, a total ion current of ∼ 40 A is required to satisfy the heating power demand. Gridded electrodes are therefore used in the accelerator, so that 1280 negative ion beamlets are accelerated together. A carefully designed aiming system is required to control the beamlet trajectories, and to deliver their power on a focal point located several meters away from the beam source. In nowadays injectors, the aiming is typically obtained by aperture offset technique or by grid shaping. This paper discuss an alternative concept of beamlets aiming, based on an electrostatic ”steerer” to be placed at the end of the accelerator. A feasibility study of this component is also presented, and its main advantages and drawbacks with respect to other methods are discussed.

  14. Electrostatic steering and beamlet aiming in large neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection is the main method for plasma heating in magnetic confinement fusion devices. In high energy injector (E>100 keV/amu), neutrals are obtained with reasonable efficiency by conversion of negative ions (H- or D-) via electron detachment reactions. In the case of ITER injectors, which shall operate at 1 MeV, a total ion current of ∼ 40 A is required to satisfy the heating power demand. Gridded electrodes are therefore used in the accelerator, so that 1280 negative ion beamlets are accelerated together. A carefully designed aiming system is required to control the beamlet trajectories, and to deliver their power on a focal point located several meters away from the beam source. In nowadays injectors, the aiming is typically obtained by aperture offset technique or by grid shaping. This paper discuss an alternative concept of beamlets aiming, based on an electrostatic ”steerer” to be placed at the end of the accelerator. A feasibility study of this component is also presented, and its main advantages and drawbacks with respect to other methods are discussed

  15. A New Doppler Shift Spectroscopy for Measurement of Neutral Beam Profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yue-Jiang; GAO Xiang; WAN Bao-Nian; WANG Guang-Qi; FU Jia; WU Zhen-Wei; CHANG Jia-Feng; SUN Dan-Peng; GAO Wei; HUANG Juan; ZHOU Qian

    2007-01-01

    A new diagnostic based on Doppler shift is designed to measure the power profile of a hydrogen or deuterium neutral beam on the magnetic confined fusion machines. The interference niters and multi-channel photon detector array (PDA) are the main components of this diagnosis. The multi-channel PDA measures the line integrated Doppler Ha signal emitted by the neutral beam at one section in two directions. The local intensity of neutral beam can be obtained with the tomography technique. Compared to the conventional calorimeter diagnoses, this diagnosis can provide the beam profile without blocking the injection of neutral beam.

  16. Several atomic-physics issues connected with the use of neutral beams in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energetic neutral beams are used for heating and diagnostics in present magnetic fusion experiments. They are also being considered for use in future large experiments. Atomic physics issues are important for both the production of the neutral beams and the interaction of the beams and the plasma. Interest in neutral beams based on negative hydrogen ions is growing, largely based on advances in producing high current ion sources. An extension of the negative ion approach has been the suggestion to use negative ions of Z > 1 elements, such as carbon and oxygen, to form high power neutral beams for plasma heating

  17. Theoretical analysis of some problems in the measurement of beam divergence angle for EAST neutral beam injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beam angular divergence is one of the indicators to evaluate the beam quality. Operating parameters of the beam extraction system could be adjusted to gain better beam quality following the measurement results, which will be helpful not only to study the transmission characteristics of the beam and the power distribution on the heat load components, but also to understand the real-time working condition of the ion source and beam extraction system. This study includes: (1) the theoretical analysis of beam extraction pulse duration for measurement of beam angular divergence; (2) the theoretical analysis of beam intensity distribution during beam transmission for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST) neutral beam injector. Those theoretical analyses could point the way to the measurement of beam divergence angle for EAST neutral beam injector.

  18. Scheme for Low Energy Beam Transport with a Non-Neutralized Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Prost, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-23

    A typical Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) design relies on dynamics with nearly complete beam space charge neutralization over the entire length of the LEBT. This paper argues that, for a beam with modest perveance and uniform current density distribution when generated at the source, a downstream portion of the LEBT can be un-neutralized without significant emittance growth.

  19. Fast-ion transport and neutral beam current drive in ASDEX upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, B.; Weiland, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou;

    2015-01-01

    The neutral beam current drive efficiency has been investigated in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by replacing on-axis neutral beams with tangential off-axis beams. A clear modification of the radial fast-ion profiles is observed with a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic that measures centrally peaked profil...

  20. Active steering system for the neutral beam injector for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER requires an additional power injection of 33 MW from neutral beams, which can be provided by two injectors, delivering 16.5 MW each, having an ion current of 40 A and an accelerating voltage of 1 MV. The requirement of on-axis and off-axis injection into ITER is presently accomplished by mechanical tilting of the injector source. To preserve the integrity of the beam line components, on the horizontal plane, very tight misalignment is tolerable (±3 mrad); such accuracy requires precise installation of the components. Breaking the vacuum and executing a long series of operations is required to provide proper beam alignment. It would be helpful if such alignments could be performed remotely. A study has been conducted on the possibility of steering the negative ions by suitable magnetic fields, generated by dedicated coils located at the exit of the accelerator. It results that the magnetic system can meet the requirements in terms of beam alignment. The steering system will heavily affect the trajectory of the electrons extracted from the accelerator and can be used to deflect the electrons onto suitable dump plates. The system can steer the ions and dump the electrons in a controlled way, even in case of modulation of the acceleration voltage; a flexible beam aiming system can be used to adapt the power deposition profile in ITER to the plasma characteristics; active steering can provide a suitable way to control the power deposition with respect to the possibility of exciting Alfven eigenmodes, which can reduce the performances of ITER plasmas. The present contribution reviews the preliminary design of the active steering system and provides an analysis of advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  1. Performance of the KTeV high-energy neutral kaon beam at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocean, V.

    1998-06-01

    The performance of the primary and secondary beams for the KTeV experiments E832 and E799-II is reviewed. The beam was commissioned in the summer of 1996 and initially operated for approximately one year. The report includes results on the primary beam, target station including primary beam dump and muon sweeping system, neutral beam collimation system, and alignment.

  2. Final design of the neutral beam lines for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Final design of the neutral beam lines for TFTR has been completed. A prototype has been assembled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and is undergoing testing as part of the Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). The final neutral beam line (NBL) configuration differs in several details from that previously reported upon; certain components have been added; and testing of the cryopump system has led to some design simplification. It is these developments which are reported herein

  3. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  4. Numerical study of beam propagation and plasma properties in the neutralizer and the E-RID of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-ohmic heating will be used in the experimental nuclear fusion reactor ITER to reach thermonuclear temperatures. Two heating mechanism will be implemented, i.e. microwaves resonant with ion and electron cyclotron frequencies and energetic neutral beam injection, which contributes also to the current drive. Each one of the two neutral beam injector planned for ITER will deliver 16 MW of 1 MeV D0 beam. In the injector, negative ions D− coming from a 40 A negative ion source are electrostatically accelerated to 1 MeV, and stripped of their extra electron by collision with a target gas in a structure known as the neutralizer. Residual charged particles are deflected after the neutralizer in an electrostatic ion dump (E-RID). The ionization of the deuterium buffer gas filling the neutralizer induced by the D− beam creates a rarefied plasma which is expected to efficiently screens the Coulomb repulsion of the beam. Moreover, this plasma can eventually escape from the neutralizer and move back in the accelerator, towards the accelerating grids and the negative ion source. The transport of the beam through the neutralizer and the RID and the related plasma properties were studied using a 3D electrostatic particle-in-cell code called OBI-3 (Orsay Beam Injector 3 dimensional). Particle–particle and particle–wall collisions are treated using the Monte Carlo collision approach. Simulations show that the secondary plasma effectively screens the beam space charge preventing beam transverse expansion. Plasma ions created in the neutralizer form an upstream current with a magnitude of ∼0.5% of the negative ion current. Gas breakdown leading to arc formation in the RID was not observed. Finally, results for the propagation of non-ideal beams coming from simulations of the extraction and consecutive acceleration taken from Revel et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073027 are presented. (paper)

  5. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Status of the realization of the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are required to deliver 16.5 MW of additional heating power to the plasma, accelerating negative ions up to -1 MV with a beam current of 40A lasting up to 1 hour. Since these outstanding requirements were never achieved all together so far, the realization of a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), called PRIMA, currently under construction in Padova, was launched with the aim to test the operation of the NB injector and to study the relevant physical and technological issues, in advance to the implementation in ITER. Two projects are under development: MITICA and SPIDER. MITICA is a full scale prototype of the ITER NB injector; the design is based on a similar scheme and layout, with the same power supply system and also the control and protection systems are being designed according to the ITER rules and constraints. The HV components are procured by JADA; the low voltage ones and the injector are procured by F4E. SPIDER project is an ion source with the same characteristics of the ITER one, specifically addressed to study the issues related to the RF operation; for this reason, the beam energy is limited to 100keV. It can generate both Hydrogen and Deuterium Ions; the design includes provisions to filter electrons and also to allow the use of cesium to attain the high values of current density required. SPIDER is procured by F4E and INDA. The construction of PRIMA buildings and auxiliaries, started in autumn 2008, was completed in summer 2015. SPIDER plant systems procurement is well advanced and some systems are under installation or site acceptance tests. In 2016 integrated commissioning and power supply integrated tests will be performed followed by the beginning of the first experimental phase. MITICA design was completed; many procurement contracts have been signed or will be launched in the next months. Installation activity will start in December 2015 with the installation of the first HV power supply components provided

  7. Power and particle balance during neutral beam injection in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed boundary plasma measurements on TFTR have been made during a NBI power scan in the range Ptot = 1MW--20MW in the L-mode regime. The behavior of the plasma density left-angle ne right-angle, radiated power Prad, carbon and deuterium fluxes ΓC, ΓD, and Ζeff can be summarized as, left-angle ne right-angle ∝ Ptot1/2, Prad, ΓC, ΓD ∝ Ptot, and Ζeff ∼ constant. It is shown that central fuelling by the neutral beams plays a minor role in the particle balance of the discharge. More important is the NBI role in the power balance. The TFTR data during NBI originate primarily at the graphite limiter

  8. Industrialization and production of neutral beam ion sources for MFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing LLNL designs of the 20 and 80kV deuterium fueled Neutral Beam Ion Source Modules (NBSM) have been industrialized and are being produced successfully for the MFTF. Industrialization includes value engineering, production engineering, cost reduction, fixturing, facilitation and procurement of components. Production assembly, inspection and testing is being performed in a large electronics manufacturing plant. Decades of experience in high voltage, high vacuum power tubes is being applied to the procedures and processes. Independent quality and reliability assurance criteria are being utilized. Scheduling of the various engineering, procurement and manufacturing task is performed by the use of a Critical Path Method (CPM) computer code, Innovative, computerized grid alignment methods were also designed and installed specifically for this project. New jointing and cleaning techniques were devised for the NBSMs. Traceability and cost control are also utilized

  9. Design of neutral beam injection power supplies for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Yoshikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Higa, Osamu; Kawashima, Syuichi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Ono, Youichi; Tanaka, Masanobu [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Design study on a power supply system for the ITER neutral beam injector(NBI) has been performed. Circuits of converter/inverter system and other components of the acceleration power supply whose capacity is 1 MV, 45 A have been designed in detail. Performance of the negative ion production power supplies such as an arc and an extraction power supplies was investigated using the EMTDC code. It was confirmed that ripples of 0.34%p-p for the extraction power supply and 1.7%p-p for the arc power supply are small enough. It was also confirmed that an energy input to a negative ion generator from the arc power supply at an arcing can be suppressed smaller than 8 J. The extraction power supply was designed to suppress the energy input lower than 13 J at the breakdown in the extractor. These performances satisfy the required specification of the power supply system. (author)

  10. Regulated 15-V, 7500-A, neutral-beam filament supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) designed a cost-effective, regulated 15-V, 7500-A filament supply for use with the High-Voltage Test Stand , a major ERDA developmental neutral-beam test facility. The filament supply can float to 200 kV and can provide pulse widths up to 30 s. Powered by a 24-V, 0.5-TJ battery bank, it avoids the use of expensive isolation transformers and induction voltage regulators (IVR's). Battery output is regulated by a water-cooled resistor-contactor combination in which contactors are closed in sequential format to create a staircase current waveform. A fine-tuning network tunes in-between the ''steps'' for regulation to less than 0.5 percent. The regulator is digitally controlled except for the sense amplifiers, which are optically coupled to the digital controller. All ground telemetry uses optical links to minimize effects of rfi and emi noise in the data channels

  11. Development of radio frequency induction plasma generators for neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques, operational aspects, and experimental results of a radio frequency induction plasma generator, with an internal rf power coupler, intended for intense neutral beam applications are described. One of the development sources suitable for 10 x 10-cm2 extraction optics was operated to a deuterium ion current density of 250 mA/cm2, uniform to 5%, over a circular extraction area 15 cm in diameter with a coupled rf power of 20 kW. Temporal fluctuation levels in the extracted ion current were measured to be typically 1% of the dc level. A second developmental source suitable for 10 x 40-cm2 grid sets was operated to 200 mA/cm2, uniform to +- 8% over a 10 x 40 cm2 area, with 40-kW coupled rf power

  12. Design progress for the ITER torus and neutral beam cryopumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER torus and neutral beam cryopumps are complex vacuum pumps which will be designed to the build-to-print level stage for the call for tender for manufacturing. Although being completely different in size, the pumps share the same concept of cryosorption on activated charcoal. Thus, the design procedure itself can follow the same generic workflow. The requirements on the pumps are summarized and the status of design evolution is described. Both design packages require specific R and D for experimental clarification and design validation. Two examples for this approach are given, namely the characterization of the closing forces of the torus pump inlet valve, and the measurement of hydraulic resistance coefficients of hydroformed components.

  13. Neoclassical current effects in neutral beam-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a long-standing prediction from neoclassical theory that strong contributions to the toroidal current should be driven by friction between trapped and passing particles when β/sub pol/ exceeds √R/a in a tokamak. A number of neutral beam heating experiments can now produce such parameters, and it is of interest to calculate the behavior which should occur in this regime to determine the feasibility of using such a bootstrap current as a steady-state tokamak current source. Since gross manifestations are absent in a wide range of experiments on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B), as reported earlier, the conclusion is that the neoclassical current, if present, can have a value no larger than 25% of its theoretically calculated value. Since the neoclassical particle (Ware) pinch is strongly related to the neoclassical current in the theory (Onsager reciprocity), the existence of the particle pinch is thus called into question

  14. Shielding considerations for neutral-beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study on the geometry of an FED-A Neutral Beam Injector beamline duct shield are presented. Also included is a calculation of dose rates, as a function of time, from an activated NBI. The shielding investigations consisted of varying the parameters of the geometry and transporting particles through it using the MCNP Monte-Carlo code. The dose rates were calculated by the ACDOS3 code using realistic MCNP results. A final-to-incident flux ratio of 6.5 x 10-7 can be achieved through the use of a 65.5 cm reentry duct. This is for a realistic source and pure water shielding material. The activated NBI produced a dose rate of 15.9 mrem/hr two and a half days after shutdown of the reactor

  15. Measurement of neutral current neutral pion production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Kurimoto, Y

    2009-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration has measured neutral current neutral pion production by the muon neutrino beam at a polystyrene target (C8H8). We obtained (7.7+- 0.5(stat.)+0.4-0.5 (sys.)) x 10^-2 as cross section ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section at the mean neutrino energy of 1.16 GeV. This result is consistent with the Monte Carlo prediction based on the Rein-Sehgal model

  16. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to form metal vapors for neutral beam studies, an electron-beam heater and a power supply have been designed. The source, which measures about 30 x 50 x 70 mm, consists of a filament, accelerating plate (defined by pole pieces), and a supported target. The electrons from the filament are focused by the field penetration through a 2 mm slit in the high-voltage cage. They are then accelerated to about 5 kV to a ground plate. The electrons then follow a path in the magnetic field and strike the sample to be heated on its front surface. The assembly is attached to a water-cooled base plate. The electron beam source has produced beams of Ta and C particles with densities of about 10 to the 8th power/cu cm.

  17. Schemes and Optimization of Gas Flowing into the Ion Source and the Neutralizer of the DIII-D Neutral Beam Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance comparisons of a DIII-D neutral beam ion source operated with two different schemes of supplying neutral gas to the arc chamber were performed. Superior performance was achieved when gas was puffed into both the arc chamber and the neutralizer with the gas flows optimized as compared to supplying gas through the neutralizer alone. To form a neutral beam, ions extracted from the arc chamber and accelerated are passed through a neutralizing cell of gas. Neutral gas is commonly puffed into the neutralizing cell to supplement the residual neutral gas from the arc chamber to obtain maximum neutralization efficiency. However, maximizing neutralization efficiency does not necessarily provide the maximum available neutral beam power, since high levels of neutral gas can increase beam loss through collisions and cause larger beam divergence. Excessive gas diffused from the neutralizer into the accelerator region also increases the number of energetic particles (ions and secondary electrons from the accelerator grid surfaces) deposited on the accelerator grids, increasing the possibility of overheating. We have operated an ion source with a constant optimal gas flow directly into the arc chamber while gas flow into the neutralizer was varied. Neutral beam power available for injecting into plasmas was obtained based on the measured data of beam energy, beam current, beam transmission, beam divergence, and neutralization efficiency for various neutralizer gas flow rates. We will present the results of performance comparison with the two gas puffing schemes, and show steps of obtaining the maximum available beam power and determining the optimum neutralizer gas flow rate

  18. Confinement studies of neutral beam heated discharges in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2T). Recently, the D0 neutral beam heating power has been increased to 6.3 MW. By operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ approx. = 0.8 MA) and low density anti n/sub e/ approx. = 1 x 1019m-3), high ion temperatures (9 +- keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 105 m/s) have been achieved during injection. At the opposite extreme, pellet injection into high current plasmas has been used to increase the line-average density to 8 x 1019m-3 and the central density to 1.6 x 1020m-3/ This wide range of operating conditions has enabled us to conduct scaling studies of the global energy confinement time in both ohmically and beam heated discharges as well as more detailed transport studies of the profile dependence. In ohmic discharges, the energy confinement time is observed to scale linearly with density only up to anti n/sub e/ approx. 4.5 x 1019m-3 and then to increase more gradually, achieving a maximum value of approx. 0.45 s. In beam heated discharges, the energy confinement time is observed to decrease with beam power and to increase with plasma current. With P/sub b/ = 5.6 MW, anti n/sub e/ = 4.7 x 1019m-3, I/sub p/ = 2.2 MA and B/sub T = 4.7T, the gross energy confinement time is 0.22 s and T/sub i/(0) = 4.8 keV. Despite shallow penetration of D0 beams (at the beam energy less than or equal to 80 keV with low species yield), tau/sub E/(a) values are as large as those for H0 injection, but central confinement times are substantially greater. This is a consequence of the insensitivity of the temperature and safety factor profile shapes to the heating profile. The radial variation of tau/sub E/ is even more pronounced with D0 injection into high density pellet-injected plasmas. 25 refs

  19. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, S.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.; Poggi, C.

    2011-12-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  20. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C. [ENEA, Radiation Protection Institute, IRP-FUAC, Frascati (Italy); Coniglio, A. [Medical Physics Department, S. Giovanni Calibita Hospital, Fatebenefratelli, Isola Tiberina, Roma (Italy); D' Arienzo, M. [ENEA, Ionizing Radiation Metrology National Institute, METR, Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  1. Understanding and improving the neutral beam injector conditioning problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of high voltage electrical breakdowns between the ion beam extraction grids of a high-power neutral beam injector is one of the major factors that determine the performance of an injector. The tedious procedure of 'conditioning' the electrodes in up to several thousand shots and the stressing of electrical supplies by the fast transients are two examples illustrating the need for more understanding of the actual origins of the high-voltage breakdown and the desire to reduce their frequency, thereby shortening the down-times on an injector. This report is an attempt to systematically address these questions. It starts with a survey of the relevant literature relevant to gap breakdown in the extraction optics system. Considering the various possible reasons for breakdowns, different methods for conditioning are discussed as to their potential effectiveness and with respect to the necessary effort. The proposed experimental work to improve the conditioning time will then be described. Finally the results so far obtained will be reported. (orig.)

  2. DIII-D Neutral Beam control system operator interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A centralized graphical user interface has been added to the DIII-D Neutral Beam (NB) control systems for status monitoring and remote control applications. This user interface provides for automatic data acquisition, alarm detection and supervisory control of the four NB programmable logic controllers (PLC) as well as the Mode Control PLC. These PLCs are used for interlocking, control and status of the NB vacuum pumping, gas delivery, and water cooling systems as well as beam mode status and control. The system allows for both a friendly user interface as well as a safe and convenient method of communicating with remote hardware that formerly required interns to access. In the future, to enable high level of control of PLC subsystems, complete procedures is written and executed at the touch of a screen control panel button. The system consists of an IBM compatible 486 computer running the FIX DMACS trademark for Windows trademark data acquisition and control interface software, a Texas Instruments/Siemens communication card and Phoenix Digital optical communications modules. Communication is achieved via the TIWAY (Texas Instruments protocol link utilizing both fiber optic communications and a copper local area network (LAN). Hardware and software capabilities will be reviewed. Data and alarm reporting, extended monitoring and control capabilities will also be discussed

  3. Electron-temperature requirements for neutralized inertial-confinement-fusion light-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of their large self-space-charge fields, light ion beam drivers of energy and power sufficient to achieve inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cannot be focused on a small fuel pellet unless neutralized. Even if initially neutralized with comoving electrons, these beams will not stay neutralized and focus during propagation through a vacuum chamber unless the initial thermal energy of the neutralizing electrons is sufficiently small. In this paper we discuss the effects which contribute to the effective initial temperature of the neutralizing electrons, including compressional shock heating. We also employ a simple heuristic model to construct envelope equations which govern axial as well as radial beam compression and use them to predict the largest initial electron temperature consistent with the required beam compression. This temperature for typical light ion beam systems is about ten eV - a temperature which may be possible to achieve

  4. Focused neutral beams with low chaotic divergence for plasma heating and diagnostics in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of neutral beam injectors has been developed in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for plasma heating and diagnostics in modern fusion devices. Ion optical system of these injectors is optimized to produce ion beams with low angular divergence. In order to provide beam focusing, the grids are formed to be spherical segments. Such geometrically focused neutral beams are particularly advantageous for plasma diagnostics when high spatial resolution is required. Another application of these beams is plasma heating in the machines with narrow ports through which only small size, high power density beams can be transported. (author)

  5. Maximum entropy algorithm and its implementation for the neutral beam profile measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tomography algorithm to maximize the entropy of image using Lagrangian multiplier technique and conjugate gradient method has been designed for the measurement of 2D spatial distribution of intense neutral beams of KSTAR NBI (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research Neutral Beam Injector), which is now being designed. A possbile detection system was assumed and a numerical simulation has been implemented to test the reconstruction quality of given beam profiles. This algorithm has the good apllicability for sparse projection data and thus, can be used for the neutral beam tomograpy

  6. Maximum entropy algorithm and its implementation for the neutral beam profile measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Cho, Gyu Seong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A tomography algorithm to maximize the entropy of image using Lagrangian multiplier technique and conjugate gradient method has been designed for the measurement of 2D spatial distribution of intense neutral beams of KSTAR NBI (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research Neutral Beam Injector), which is now being designed. A possible detection system was assumed and a numerical simulation has been implemented to test the reconstruction quality of given beam profiles. This algorithm has the good applicability for sparse projection data and thus, can be used for the neutral beam tomography. 8 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  7. The analysis and calculation of H0 neutral beam attenuation due to penetration into tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical processes of the neutral beam heated plasma is described. The penetration attenuation of the neutral beam in the plasma has been calculated, analysed and compared by means of two kinds of calculation methods based on different physics models. The dependence of neutral beam decay in the plasma on the beam energy, plasma parameters and impurity has been investigated. The calculation results of the beam attenuation for HL-1M typical plasma parameters also have been given. In numerical calculation taking multistep collision processes of the interaction between the beam and the plasma into account, its physics model includes excitation, collisional and radiative de-excitation, ionization, charge exchange and Lorentz field ionization of excited atoms. In the analytical calculation using the simple physics model, the ionization of the neutral beam and the charge exchange between the beam and the particles of the plasma and impurity are only taken into account. Both calculation results show that the penetration coefficient of the neutral beam entering the plasma increases with the neutral beam energy E0, and decreases with the plasma density ne, and show that comparing the analytical calculation using simple physics model with the numerical calculation taking multistep processes into account in the range of ne≤1014 cm-3 and 20≤E0 (keV/u)≤100, the effective stopping cross-section of the former is ≤20% less than that of the latter. (7 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  8. Cryogenic supplies for the TFTR neutral beam line cryopanels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryocondensing panels will be used for the Neutral Beam Lines of the TFTR to satisfy a pumping speed requirement of 2.5 x 106 l/s. The cryocondensing panels are fed by liquid helium (LHe), boiling at selectable temperatures of 4.50K or 3.80K. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) panels and chevrons thermally shield the LHe panel. The closed-loop LHe supply system and the open loop LN2 system are discussed. The helium refrigerator of minimum 1070-W capacity, together with its distribution system, and the nitrogen distribution system in the ton/hour LN2 range is presented. Problems and their solutions in connection with the LHe system, including the distribution over a distance of 500 feet of large quantities of liquid/gas mixtures with load variations over the range of about 3 : 1, and the economies of various types of distribution lines (passive, pumped, shielded, combined), are described. The system design passed the preliminary phase. Design features and auxiliary equipment to assure dispersion of large quantities of nitrogen into the atmosphere and to permit operation under degraded cryogenic helium refrigerator performance are also discussed in Design Considerations

  9. Global energy confinement scaling for neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 677 representative discharges from seven neutral-beam-heated tokamaks has been used to study the parametric scaling of global energy confinement time. Contributions to this data base were from ASDEX, DITE, D-III, ISX-B, PDX, PLT, and TFR, and were taken from results of gettered, L-mode type discharges. Assuming a power law dependence of tau/sub E/ on discharge parameters kappa, I/sub p/, B/sub t/, anti n/sub e/ P/sub tot/, a, and R/a, standard multiple linear regression techniques were used in two steps to determine the scaling. The results indicate that the discharges used in the study are well described by the scaling tau/sub E/ α kappa/sup 0.28/ B/sub T//sup -0.09/ I/sub p//sup 1.24/anti n/sub e//sup -0.26/ P/sub tot//sup -0.58/ a/sup 1.16/ (R/a)/sup 1.65/

  10. High-resolution spectral analysis of light from neutral beams and ion source plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral distributions of Balmer alpha emission from 7- and 22-cm-diam neutral hydrogen beams have been measured with a Fabry-Perot interferometer to obtain information on the beam energy, divergence, and species composition. Results of these measurements are compared with other data on the beam properties to evaluate high-resolution spectroscopy as a beam diagnostic technique. Measurements on ion source plasmas and on beam-produced background plasmas yield average neutral atom energies of approximately 0.3 and 2.5 eV, respectively

  11. Manufacture of high-speed neutral atomic and molecular beam apparatus and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our research group has been studying chemical reactivity at solid surfaces. For example, the study of O2/Si (001) reaction dynamics has been demonstrated with a hyperthermal molecular beam technique and synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. By using more reactive atomic and molecular beams with higher kinetic energy than supersonic molecular beams, it is expected that researches on surface chemical reactivity can be progressed. For this reason, we are developing a high-speed neutral atomic and molecular beam generator. This apparatus generates ion beams with a plasma ion source. The control of kinetic energy of neutral beams is performed by accelerating and decelerating the positive ion beams. Desirable ions are selected with a Wien filter: Passing through a gas cell they are neutralized by charge transfer reactions. In this report we describe characteristics of ion beams, which are generated by using oxygen as a sample gas, as well as neutral beams. When acceleration energy was 8 keV and 20 eV, total ion beam current was 52 μA, and 17 μA respectively. Characteristics of the mass separator were good, even when ion beam energy was 20 eV. Ion beam current was 5.5 μA for O+ and 11 μA for O2+, respectively (author)

  12. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  13. Analysis of fusion neutron production in EAST with neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The neutron emission rate increases rapidly with high-power deuterium beam injected into deuterium plasmas. It is necessary to calculate the neutron production in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for the radiation safety. Purpose: We aim to provide reference for developing new detection systems of fusion neutron and neutron radiation shielding design. Methods: Neutron emission rate was calculated using the typical particle model and analysis method. The relationships were analyzed among the fusion neutron production and the ion density, ion temperature, neutral beam energy and neutral beam power respectively. Results: The results demonstrated that the total fusion neutron production was 1016 n·s-1 with 80-keV, 4-MW neutral beam injection. Conclusion: Neutron intensity in EAST will increase by a factor of ten when appropriate neutral beam injection is applied. It can be referred for further performance improvement and radiation protection of EAST. (authors)

  14. Neoclassical current effects in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a long-standing prediction from neoclassical theory that strong contributions to the toroidal current should be driven by friction between trapped and passing particles when βsub(pol) exceeds root (R/a) in a tokamak. A number of neutral-beam heating experiments can now produce such parameters, and it is of interest to calculate the behaviour which should occur in this regime to determine the feasibility of using such a 'bootstrap' current as a steady-state tokamak current source. It is found that the neoclassical current should be large enough to reverse the external loop voltage for typical experimental parameters (ISX-B, in particular) in cases where the total current is fixed and to produce a detectable excess of total current above the pre-programmed (demand) value in cases where the loop voltage is regulated. Other manifestations of such a current should be either: a sharp rise in the central q-value (producing a cessation of internal m=1 and m=2 MHD activity), with an enhancement by two orders of magnitude of ion thermal conductivity (due to the formation of a hollow current density profile and a consequent drop in local values of the poloidal magnetic field in the central plasma region), or an enhanced tendency for disruption (arising from magnetic reconnection in hollow-profile equilibria). Since these gross manifestations are absent in a wide range of experiments on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B), as reported earlier, the conclusion is that the neoclassical current, if present, can have a value no larger than 25% of its theoretically calculated value. Since the neoclassical particle (Ware) pinch is strongly related to the neoclassical current in the theory (Onsager reciprocity), the existence of the particle pinch is thus called into question. (author)

  15. Ta2O5-based redox memory formed by neutral beam oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Takeo; Samukawa, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    A room temperature neutral beam oxidation process using a tantalum (Ta) metal film was used to obtain a high quality Ta oxide (Ta2O5) film. After irradiation of a Ta metal film with a neutral oxygen beam, a nanometer-thick Ta2O5 film with a film density of 7.5 g/cm3 was obtained. We also confirmed that the fabricated Cu/Ta2O5/Pt redox memory structure shows a bipolar resistive switching characteristic. This result demonstrates the great potential of neutral beam metal oxidation for the development of redox-based memory devices.

  16. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed. PMID:24593596

  17. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up - a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture - in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam. PMID:26922370

  18. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H− magnetron source provides about 100 mA H− beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H− beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H− beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H− beam from optically pumped polarized ion source

  19. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source. PMID:26932107

  20. The Beam and Detector for the NA48 Neutral Kaon CP Violation Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fanti, V; Marras, D; Musa, L; Nappi, A; Batley, J Richard; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Galik, R; Gershon, T; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Katvars, S; Lazzeroni, C; Moore, R; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; Patel, M; Slater, M; Takach, S; White, T O; Wotton; Bal, F; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Brodier-Yourstone, P; Buchholz, P; Burns, M; Ceccucci, A; Clément, M; Cuhadar-Donzelsmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels; Falaleev, V; Formenti, F; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Grafström, P; Hallgren, B; Kapusta, P; Kesseler, G; Kubischta, Werner; Iwanski, W; Lacourt, A; Laverriere, G; Linser, G; Ljuslin, C; Marchioro, A; Mast, M; Matheys, J P; Morel, M; Norton, A; Orlic, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Seidl, W; Taureg, H; Tarlé, J C; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wertelaers, P; Weterings, J; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kalinin, A; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhevnikov, Yu; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tkatchev, A; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Peach, K J; Sacco, R; Veitch, E; Walker, A; Carassiti, V; Contalbrigo, M; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Duclos, J; Ferretti, P; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Rossi, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Simani, C; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Michetti, A; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Behler, M; Blümer, H; Coward, D; Ebersberger, C; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Geib, K H; Hirstius, A; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Luitz, S; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Melzer-Pellmann, I; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Peters, A; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Staeck, J; Wanke, R; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Zeitnitz, O; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; de La Taille, C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Martin-Chassard, G; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Bordacchini, F; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lariccia, P; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Papi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Punturo, M; Talamonti, C; Tondini, F; Bertanza, L; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Francesco; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Gorini, B; Laico, F; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V; Passuello, D; Pierazzini, G M; Raffaelli, F; Sozzi, M; Tripiccione, R; Anvar, S; Bédérède, D; Bugeon, F; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Durand, D; Edard, S; Fallou, J L; Formica, A; Gosset, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Heitzmann, J; Le Provost, H; Louis, F; Mandzhavidze, I; Mazzucato, E; Migliori, A; Mur, M; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Steinkamp, O; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Maier, A; Schwarz, I; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Barberis, P L; Benotto, F; Bertolino, F; Biino, C; Brunasso, O; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Dattola, D; Goy-Lopez, S; Govi, G; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Palestini, S; Pastrone, N; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, E; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    The Beam and Detector, used for the NA48 experiment, devoted to the measurement of $Re(\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon)$, and for the NA48/1 experiment on rare K_S and neutral hyperon decays, are described.

  1. Dynamics of neutralizing electrons and the focusability of intense ion beams in HIF accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Maynard, G.; Vay, J.-L.

    2005-05-01

    In most of the proposals for HIF reactors, beams propagate ballistically through the containment chamber. To get the required final radius (˜3 mm), the charge of the beam must be neutralized to some extent. Several neutralization schemes are possible, as co-injection of negative-ion beams, inclusion of external sources of electrons, or it can be provided by electrons coming from ionization of the background gas. In this work, we study the role of the electron dynamic on the neutralization and final radius of the beam. This is done by performing fully electromagnetic PIC simulations of the beam ballistic transport using the BPIC code (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 464 (2001) 118). In agreement with previous works we found that the evolution of an isolated beam is well described as a bidimensional adiabatic compression, and the beam neutralization degree and final radius can be estimated from the initial electron transversal temperature. When a background gas is present the evolution differs significantly from an adiabatic compression. Even for low gas densities, the continuous electrons flow coming from gas ionization limits efficiently the compressional heating, thus reducing the final radius. Aspects of beam neutralization by background gas ionization are discussed.

  2. Performance study of the TFTR diagnostic neutral beam for active charge exchange measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutral beam source will be incorporated in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) charge exchange diagnostic to provide a time modulated, spatially localized enhancement of the charge exchange efflux. Two autonomous Charge Exchange Neutral Analyzer (CENA) systems are being designed for the TFTR. One system measures the plasma ion temperature along twelve vertical line-of-sight chords spaced approximately equidistantly across the torus minor diameter. The other system is dedicated primarily to measurement of ion phenomena associated with neutral beam injection heating and has a fan-like field of view along eight sight-lines in the equitorial plane. The neutral beam is steerable in order to access the viewing field of both CENA systems, though in general not simultaneously. The performance of the diagnostic neutral beam is evaluated to determine the optimal beam specifications for active charge exchange measurements. Using the optimal beam design parameters, the efficacy of the neutral doping is examined for both CENA systems over the envisioned range of the TFTR plasma density and temperature

  3. Novel neutralized-beam intense neutron source for fusion technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a neutralized-beam intense neutron source (NBINS) as a relevant application of fusion technology for the type of high-current ion sources and neutral beamlines now being developed for heating and fueling of magnetic-fusion-energy confinement systems. This near-term application would support parallel development of highly reliable steady-state higher-voltage neutral D0 and T0 beams and provide a relatively inexpensive source of fusion neutrons for materials testing at up to reactor-like wall conditions. Beam-target examples described incude a 50-A mixed D-T total (ions plus neutrals) space-charge-neutralized beam at 120 keV incident on a liquid Li drive-in target, or a 50-A T0 + T+ space-charge-neutralized beam incident on either a LiD or gas D2 target with calculated 14-MeV neutron yields of 2 x 1015/s, 7 x 1015/s, or 1.6 x 1016/s, respectively. The severe local heat loading on the target surface is expected to limit the allowed beam focus and minimum target size to greater than or equal to 25 cm2

  4. Dynamics of relativistic electron beam space charge compensation in a neutral gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilko, V.I.; Ognivenko, V.V.

    1983-06-01

    The dynamics of the space charge compensation of a relativistic electron beam with magnetized electrons as a result of ionization collisions of beam electrons and secondary ions with gas atoms has been studied theoretically. The analysis of calculation data shows that the neutral gas ionization by a relativistic electron beam leads to appearance of secondary ions which oscillate in a potential well of the electron beam space charge. It is shown that the density of ions formed is maximal in the beam center and drops to the beam periphery. As a result, the force compensation is possible only in the vicinity of a fixed coordinate which value grows with time.

  5. Space-charge neutralization experiment with a low-energy proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of space-charge neutralization of a low-energy proton beam is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. In the experiment, the transverse profile of a 500 keV proton beam delivered by a duoplasmatron source is accurately measured at the end of a 3 m long drift space. Profile measurements are performed by an imaging technique using a scintillating screen and an intensified CCD camera. Measurement results done with different beam intensities (between 0.5 and 15 mA) and various residual-gas pressures are described. They show that, at high beam current an increase of the gas pressure results in a reduction of the beam spot, which indicates an increase of the value of the neutralization coefficient. On the other hand, the behavior is the opposite at low beam current: the beam size increases with the gas pressure. An interpretation of these experimental results is proposed. (author)

  6. Enhancement of neutral beam deposition in hydrogen discharge using carbon pellet injection in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central ion temperature in the large helical device (LHD), as measured by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy, has been improved to a record 5.6 keV by combining 21 MW of neutral beam heating with the injection of a carbon pellet. The intensity of the neutral beam emission of the hydrogen Balmer line (Hα: n=3 → 2) was observed to weaken along the beam injection axis following the carbon pellet injection due to the increased beam attenuation. The beam-emission intensity was reconstructed by calculating the density distribution, and the beam-stopping coefficients, along a beam injection axis and was found to fit well to the measured beam-emission for a mixed hydrogen and carbon target plasma. The dynamics of the neutral beam deposition power and the carbon fraction were estimated from the beam-emission measurements using data from ADAS. We conclude that the beam deposition power in a carbon pellet discharge is enhanced over that of a pure hydrogen discharge. (author)

  7. The TFTR 40 MW neutral beam injection system and DT operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since December 1993, TFTR has performed DT experiments using tritium fuel provided mainly by neutral beam injection. Significant alpha particle populations and reactor-like conditions have been achieved at the plasma core, and fusion output power has risen to a record 10.7 MW using a record 40 MW NB heating. Tritium neutral beams have injected into over 480 DT plasmas and greater than 500 kCi have been processed through the neutral beam gas, cryo, and vacuum systems. Beam tritium injections, as well as tritium feedstock delivery and disposal, have now become part of routine operations. Shot reliability with tritium is about 90% and is comparable to deuterium shot reliability. This paper describes the neutral beam DT experience including the preparations, modifications, and operating techniques that led to this high level of success, as well as the critical differences in beam operations encountered during DT operations. Also, the neutral beam maintenance and repair history during DT operations, the corrective actions taken, and procedures developed for handling tritium contaminated components are discussed in the context of supporting a continuous DT program

  8. The ASDEX 100 keV neutral lithium beam diagnostic gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral lithium beam gun intended for measurement of the poloidal magnetic field and of the density gradient in the scrape-off layer of ASDEX is described, and test results over a beam energy range of 27-100 keV are presented. In the gun, lithium ions are extracted from a solid emitter (#betta#-Eurcryptite) in a Pierce-type configuration, accelerated and focused in a two-tube immersion lens, and neutralized in a charge-exchange cell using sodium. The beam can be pulsed from less than one to several seconds, depending on experimental needs. At a distance of 165 cm from the gun the neutral beam equivalent current is typically greater than 1 mA (0.16 mA) for a beam energy of 100 keV (27 keV), the beam FWHM being about 8-9 mm. It is found that to produce a particular beam with a certain ratio must be maintained between the extraction and total beam voltages, this relationship depending in turn on the emitter-extractor separation. The principal features which distinguish the ASDEX gun from that employed on W7a are the greater compactness - all the active elements, i.e. emitter, extractor, lens, deflection plates and neutralizer, are contained with 57 cm - and the vacuum vessel, which simultaneously serves as the magnetic shielding. (orig.)

  9. Electron behavior in ion beam neutralization in electric propulsion: full particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By performing full Particle-In-Cell simulations, we examined the transient response of electrons released for the charge neutralization of a local ion beam emitted from an ion engine which is one of the electric propulsion systems. In the vicinity of the engine, the mixing process of electrons in the ion beam region is not so obvious because of large difference of dynamics between electrons and ions. A heavy ion beam emitted from a spacecraft propagates away from the engine and forms a positive potential region with respect to the background. Meanwhile electrons emitted for a neutralizer located near the ion engine are electrically attracted or accelerated to the core of the ion beam. Some electrons with the energy lower than the ion beam potential are trapped in the beam region and move along with the ion beam propagation with a multi-streaming structure in the beam potential region. Since the locations of the neutralizer and the ion beam exit are different, the above-mentioned bouncing motion of electrons is also observed in the direction of the beam diameter

  10. Space Charge Neutralization of DEMO Relevant Negative Ion Beams at Low Gas Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of neutral beams to future power plant devices (DEMO) is dependent on achieving significantly improved electrical efficiency and the most promising route to achieving this is by implementing a photoneutralizer in place of the traditional gas neutralizer. A corollary of this innovation would be a significant reduction in the background gas density through which the beam is transported between the accelerator and the neutralizer. This background gas is responsible for the space charge neutralization of the beam, enabling distances of several metres to be traversed without significant beam expansion. This work investigates the sensitivity of a D- beam to reduced levels of space charge compensation for energies from 100 keV to 1.5 MeV, representative of a scaled prototype experiment, commissioning and full energy operation. A beam transport code, following the evolution of the phase space ellipse, is employed to investigate the effect of space charge on the beam optics. This shows that the higher energy beams are insensitive to large degrees of under compensation, unlike the lower energies. The probable degree of compensation at low gas density is then investigated through a simple, two component beam-plasma model that allows the potential to be negative. The degree of under-compensation is dependent on the positive plasma ion energy, one source of which is dissociation of the gas by the beam. The subsequent space charge state of the beam is shown to depend upon the relative times for equilibration of the dissociation energy and ionization by the beam ions.

  11. Plasma Neutralized Drift Compression and Final Focus of Heavy Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to small radius and the pulselength must be greatly compressed. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method

  12. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong, E-mail: xieyh@ipp.ac.cn; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-02-15

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST.

  13. Design study of a beam energy recovery system for a negative-ion-based neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam energy recovery system for future neutral beam injectors based on negative ions has been designed. Residual negative ions are recovered electrically, while residual positive ions are decelerated on a soft-landing beam dump. This design simplifies the beam energy recovery power supply system an reduces the heat flux on the beam dump. Residual ions are separated into negative and positive ions by the stray magnetic field from the Fusion Engineering Reactor (FER). The next Japanese tokamak reactor. Each ion beam is also guided to the collector electrode and the soft-landing beam dump by the stray magnetic field. In the 500-keV/20-MW injector designed for FER, the total power efficiency can be improved from 46 to 59% by recovering the negative ions

  14. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K., E-mail: k.prakrajang@gmail.com [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  15. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-01

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable. PMID:24593588

  16. Estimates of energy fluence at the focal plane in beams undergoing neutralized drift compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors estimate the energy fluence (energy per unit area) at the focal plane of a beam undergoing neutralized drift compression and neutralized solenoidal final focus, as is being carried out in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In these experiments, in order to reach high beam intensity, the beam is compressed longitudinally by ramping the beam velocity (i.e. introducing a velocity tilt) over the course of the pulse, and the beam is transversely focused in a high field solenoid just before the target. To remove the effects of space charge, the beam drifts in a plasma. The tilt introduces chromatic aberrations, with different slices of the original beam having different radii at the focal plane. The fluence can be calculated by summing the contribution from the various slices. They develop analytic formulae for the energy fluence for beams that have current profiles that are initially constant in time. They compare with envelope and particle-in-cell calculations. The expressions derived are useful for predicting how the fluence scales with accelerator and beam parameters

  17. Assessment of the plasma start-up in Wendelstein 7-X with neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma start-up by neutral beam injection was investigated for stellarators. A zero-dimensional collisional model was extended to evaluate the temporal evolution of the plasma start-up in a confining toroidal magnetic field. Inclusion of different beam energy components indicated a substantial effect due to the energy dependence of beam–gas collisions. Additional collision processes and particle equations were considered to simulate the plasma start-up in helium–hydrogen mixtures. The isotope effect between operation with hydrogen and deuterium beams was also investigated. As a major objective the conditions necessary for a plasma start-up with neutral beams in W7-X have been examined. The assessed beam configuration in W7-X was found not to allow plasma start-up by neutral beam injection alone. The model has been validated for experimental data from W7-AS and Large Helical Device. Quantitative predictions of this study show that the ratio of the beam–plasma interaction length and the plasma volume is an essential quantity for the successful plasma start-up with neutral beams. (paper)

  18. Diagnostics in Indian test facility (INTF) for ITER-diagnostic neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) will inject 5Hz modulated, 100 keV energetic neutral hydrogen atom beam of equivalent neutral beam current ∼ 20 A, having duty cycle 3S ON/20S OFF into the ITER torus to measure He ash density using CXRS diagnostics during ITER’s D–T phase. DNB is negative ion based neutral beam system and possesses many technological challenges in terms of producing high extracted and accelerated negative ion beam current (60A) with minimal divergence to ensure maximum neutral current transport over a path length of 20.7 m through different beamline components, maintaining their respective optimum functionalities. Modelling calculations have been carried out to optimise the design and dispersion of the beam line components. Besides validating these calculations, new concepts related to establishing the functionality of an 8 plasma driver based RF negative ion source, the beam line components specially residual ion dump (RID) and correspondingly the beam transport need to be tested to meet the DNB needs. This is envisaged in a test facility (INTF) to be set up in the ITER-India lab of IPR. Experimental set up of such a facility requires a judicious choice of various diagnostics to characterize the beam and functionality of individual beamline components. Appropriate diagnostics based on optical spectroscopy, electrical probe, thermal imaging, water calorimetry and thermocouples along with standard electrical voltage-current measurements will ensure safe operation of individual components and also the overall system. The conceptual designs of some of these diagnostics shall be presented. (author)

  19. Implementation of a quasi-realtime display of DIII-D neutral beam heating waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIII-D neutral beam system employs eight 80 keV ion sources mounted on four beamlines to provide plasma heating to the DIII-D tokamak. The neutral beam system is capable of injecting over 20 MW of deuterium power with flexibility in terms of timing and modulation of the individual neutral beams. To maintain DIII-D's efficient tokamak shot cycle and make informed control decisions, it is important to be able to determine which beams fired, and exactly when, by the time the tokamak shot is over. Previously this information was available in centralized form only after a several minute wait. A cost-effective alternative to the traditional eight-channel storage oscilloscope has been implemented using off the shelf PC hardware and software. The system provides a real time display of injected neutral beam accelerator voltages and tokamak plasma current, as well an a summation waveform indicative of the total injected power as a function of time. The hardware consists of a Macintosh Centris 650 PC with a Motorola 68040 microprocessor. Data acquisition is accomplished using a National Instrument's 16-channel analog to digital conversion board for the Macintosh. The color displays and functionality were developed using National Instruments' LabView environment. Because the price of PCs has been decreasing rapidly and their capabilities increasing, this system is far less expensive than an eight-channel storage oscilloscope. As a flexible combination of PC and software, the system also provides much more capability than a dedicated oscilloscope, acting as the neutral beam coordinator's logbook, recording comments and availability statistics. Data such as shot number and neutral beam parameters are obtained over the local network from other computers and added to the display. Waveforms are easily archived to disk for future recall. Details of the implementation will be discussed along with samples of the displays and a description of the system's function and capabilities

  20. Implementation of a quasi-realtime display of DIII-D neutral beam heating waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system employs eight 80 keV ion sources mounted on four beamlines to provide plasma heating to the DIII-D tokamak. The neutral beam system is capable of injecting over 20 MW of deuterium power with flexibility in terms of timing and modulation of the individual neutral beams. To maintain DIII-D`s efficient tokamak shot cycle and make informed control decisions, it is important to be able to determine which beams fired, and exactly when, by the time the tokamak shot is over. Previously this information was available in centralized form only after a several minute wait. A cost-effective alternative to the traditional eight-channel storage oscilloscope has been implemented using off the shelf PC hardware and software. The system provides a real time display of injected neutral beam accelerator voltages and tokamak plasma current, as well an a summation waveform indicative of the total injected power as a function of time. The hardware consists of a Macintosh Centris 650 PC with a Motorola 68040 microprocessor. Data acquisition is accomplished using a National Instrument`s 16-channel analog to digital conversion board for the Macintosh. The color displays and functionality were developed using National Instruments` LabView environment. Because the price of PCs has been decreasing rapidly and their capabilities increasing, this system is far less expensive than an eight-channel storage oscilloscope. As a flexible combination of PC and software, the system also provides much more capability than a dedicated oscilloscope, acting as the neutral beam coordinator`s logbook, recording comments and availability statistics. Data such as shot number and neutral beam parameters are obtained over the local network from other computers and added to the display. Waveforms are easily archived to disk for future recall. Details of the implementation will be discussed along with samples of the displays and a description of the system`s function and capabilities.

  1. Comparison between the radial density buildup in the TARA plugs using hydrogen versus deuterium neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WOLF code is used to compare the beam divergences from a TARA source using hydrogen and deuterium. Factors which influence the divergence which are investigated are the electron temperature, initial ion energy, electrode positions and ion beam current density. The beam divergence for 20 keV hydrogen is found to be only 20% smaller than for 25 keV deuterium for the same electrode positions. Since the optimal positioning of the electrodes is found to be independent of mesh spacing, a large parameter study is undertaken using little computer time. A time-dependent radial Fokker-Planck code is next used to examine the radial density buildup in a plug of the TARA tandem mirror. For both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beams, the influences of beam positioning, current and energy, edge neutral pressure and assumed electron temperature are studied

  2. Study of the synthesized plasma resulting from forced neutralization of a mercury ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an ionic beam is used (space simulation etc...) it needs a forced space charge neutralization by means of electrons injection when the perturbations resulting from the ionic space charge are not already eliminated by the well known self neutralization of the beam on the back ground gas of the tank. We have shown that it is possible to obtain the forced neutralization of a low energy (a few KeV) Hg+ ion beam, 10 cm in diameter, with a neutraliser made of a hot emissive filament located inside the beam close to the ion source. The computed solution of the plane waves dispersion equation has shown that the synthesized plasma, resulting from the neutralised beam, is damping fluctuations with any wave length when the average ions velocity is less than the neutralizing electrons thermal velocity. This last conclusion assumes that no external electromagnetic field is applied. When a longitudinal electric field is applied, by means of a polarized grid into the beam, the plasma stability range is changed. (author)

  3. Evaluation of crystal implantation technique for the measurement of neutral beam composition and energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A promising method of measuring a neutral beam's energy spectrum and impurity content is to implant beam high purity silicon crystals. The depth distribution of the beam particles into the crystal surface is then measured by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy); the penetration distance is a function of the incident particle energy. The inferred beam energy spectrum can be used to determine the percentages of atomic and molecular ions that comprise the source plasma. Moreover, other elements are analyzed by mass and compared with the total amount of implanted hydrogen in order to obtain a beam impurity content. Previous analysis of a 40 keV ORNL hydrogen beam gave a source species composition that agreed with that obtained by magnetic momentum analysis of the residual ion beam to within the accuracy of the momentum analysis. Crystals have already been irradiated by a 78 keV hydrogen beam from the LBL 30-sec ion source at their Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF); similar exposures are made with the ORNL 30 sec source at the same test stand. Use of the NBETF allows direct comparison with the spectra obtained from the LBL Doppler-shift spectrometer. Although increasing particle energy allows greater peak resolution and increased accuracy, the increasing power density makes proper exposure more difficult. An exposure technique used at ORNL to measure a 70 keV beam is also discussed

  4. Numerical Simulation of Non-Inductive Current Driven Scenario in EAST Using Neutral Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jinfang; Wang, Ji; Hu, Chundong

    2015-01-01

    For achieving the scientific mission of long pulse and high performance operation, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) applies fully superconducting magnet technology and is equiped with high power auxiliary heating system. Besides RF (Radio Frequency) wave heating, neutral beam injection (NBI) is an effective heating and current drive method in fusion research. NBCD (Neutral Beam Current Drive) as a viable non-inductive current drive source plays an important role in quasi-steady state operating scenario for tokamak. The non-inductive current driven scenario in EAST only by NBI is predicted using the TSC/NUBEAM code. At the condition of low plasma current and moderate plasma density, neutral beam injection heats the plasma effectively and NBCD plus bootstrap current accounts for a large proportion among the total plasma current for the flattop time.

  5. The design, research and development of JT-60 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JT-60 neutral beam injector (JT-60 NBI) injects neutral hydrogen beam into JT-60 with a maximum power of 20 MW/10 sec at an energy of 75 keV (70 - 100 keV), to achieve the break even plasma condition in JT-60. The performances required to JT-60 NBI were by far exceeded the those of former neutral beam injector, and there had not been technical and engineering bases to construct the JT-60 NBI. Therefore, research and development, and design on the ion sources and other NBI components have been performed for over ten years. As a result of these R and D and design, the JT-60 NBI system was constructed and was completed in 1986. The present report describes the R and D and design processes of JT-60 NBI. (author)

  6. Preliminary experiment of neutral beam injection heating in JIPP T-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection experiments are carried out in JIPP T-II, which is a hybrid device of stellarator and tokamak. Two neutral beam injectors are equipped tangentially in the direction of co- and counter-injections. Hydrogen neutral beams of 22 keV, 60 kW (co-injection) and 30 kW (counter-injection) are applied to the ohmically heated stellarator plasma and also to the tokamak plasma. The bulk ion heating efficiency for co-injection is around 1.6 eV/kW in the case of stellarator and 1.9 eV/kW in the case of tokamak, while the heating efficiencies for counter-injection are about 1.6 eV/kW in both cases. The difference between the tokamak and stellarator is considered to be caused by the enhanced orbit loss due to the helical ripples in the stellarator. (author)

  7. Measurement of Neutral Current Neutral Pion Production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of the π0 production via neutrino-nucleus neutral current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for the neutrino oscillation experiments. In this thesis, we present a study of neutral current π0 production from muon neutrinos scattering on a polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE experiment. All neutrino beam data corresponding to 0.99 × 1020 protons on target have been analyzed. We have measured the cross section ratio of the neutral current π0 production to the total charge current interaction and the π0 kinematic distribution such as momentum and direction. We obtain [7.7 ± 0.5(stat.) ± 0.5(sys.)] × 10-2 as the ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section; the mean energy of neutrinos producing detected neutral pions is 1.1 GeV. The result agrees with the Rein- Sehgal model, which is generally used for the Monte Carlo simulation by many neutrino oscillation experiments. We achieve less than 10 % uncertainty which is required for the next generation search for νµ → νe oscillation. The spectrum shape of the π0 momentum and the distribution of the π0 emitted angle agree with the prediction, which means that not only the Rein-Sehgal model but also the intra-nuclear interaction models describe our data well. We also measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent pion production to total charged current cross section to be (1.17 ± 0.23 ) × 10-2 based on the Rein and Sehgal model. The result gives the evidence for non-zero coherent pion production via neutral current interaction at the mean neutrino energy of 1.0 GeV.

  8. TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor] parameters with neutral beams at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The baseline neutral beam energy for TIBER II was chosen to be 500 keV consistent with the use of near term dc acceleration technology. Adequate penetration to the axis for core current drive in larger ETR devices requires higher beam energies. However, beam instabilities may limit the current drive efficiency at high energy to lower values than predicted classically. The characteristics of TIBER II and a device with 4.5 m major radius as functions of beam energy are presented. 11 refs

  9. Conceptual design of negative-ion-based 500 keV, 20 MW neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual design of the source plasma generator and the accelerating system is presented. Three candidate systems are then examined, each with a different neutralizing cell. The system having a very long neutralizer was judged to be the most suitable to the reactor considered. It was designed in detail. The long neutralizer (30 m) has many advantages: (1) the ion source can be located far from the reactor, permitting a narrow injection tube and tangential injection angle; (2) neutron shielding is easy because the solid angle of the beam line is very small; (3) complex components are removed from the vicinity of the reactor

  10. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab

    CERN Document Server

    Chudakov, E.; Meyer, C.; Pennington, M.; Ritman, J.; Strakovsky, I.; KL2016

    2016-01-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal. Further details about the Workshop can be found on the web page of the conference: http://www.jlab.org/conferences/kl2016/index.html .

  11. dc plasma generator development for neutral-beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectangular plasma generators are being developed with the capability of producing hydrogen ion beams of 60 to 100 A. Using single and double electron feed configurations of the duoPIGatron type, these generators have been operated at arc levels of 1200 A for pulse lengths of > 30 s. The plasma density and uniformity are sufficient for extracting approx. 60-A hydrogen ions using a 13 x 43 cm accelerator and approx. 100 A with an 18 x 48 cm accelerator

  12. Development of multi-megawatt negative ion sources and accelerators for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy and high power negative ion sources and accelerators have been developed for neutral beam (NB) injectors of future fusion machines such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a 5-stage electrostatic accelerator, negative ion beam has been successfully accelerated up to the energy of 1 MeV, which is the required energy for ITER. Powerful negative ion beams of 18.5 A, 360 keV H- and 14.3 A, 380 keV D- have been produced with a high arc efficiency of 0.11 A/kW at a low source pressure of 0.15 Pa in JT-60 negative ion sources, and neutral beams of 5.2 MW have been injected into the plasma. Continuous operation of a Cs-seeded negative ion source has also been demonstrated for 140 hours, which is equivalent to the half year operation in the ITER-NB system. (author)

  13. Efficient, radiation-hardened, 800-keV neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances and new concepts in negative ion generation, transport, acceleration, and neutrailzation make it appear likely that an efficient, radiation-hardened neutral beam injection system could be developed in time for the proposed FED-A tokamak. These new developments include the operation of steady-state H- ion sources at over 5 A per meter of source length, the concept of using strong-focussing electrostatic structures for low-gradient dc acceleration of high-current sheet beams of negative ions and the transport of these beams around corners, and the development of powerful oxygen-iodine chemical lasers which will make possible the efficient conversion of the negative ions to neutrals using a photodetachment scheme in which the ion beam passes through the laser cavity

  14. Effect of collisional quenching on the measurement of ion species ratios in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In positive ion based Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI), generally corona model is used in analyzing the Doppler shifted spectroscopy diagnostics data for estimating the ion species mix in the ion-source, ion and beam species fractions in extracted beam and power fractions injected into Tokomak. At the beam energies 10-60 keV/amu, the non-radiative processes such as collisional quenching of the excited neutrals affect these estimations when background pressure is ≥ 1 mTorr. We present here a modified corona model that takes into account the effect due to collisional quenching. We describe the application of the present model to a typical Doppler shifted spectral data obtained in SST-1-NBI injector. (author)

  15. A D- surface-conversion source for neutral beam applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a surface-conversion source, using a 10 cm diameter solid barium converter, to produce D- ion beams suitable for acceleration by the ESQ accelerator. The ion temperature was found to be ∼3% of the converter bias potential. The efficiency of converting D+ to D- is as high as 4.8% but only 25% of the D- ions survived to leave the source without being stripped by the plasma or the gas molecules. Some early results from the RF discharges are promising because of their higher power efficiency and gas efficiency

  16. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  17. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  18. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  19. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raparia, D., E-mail: raparia@bnl.gov; Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11786 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The H{sup −} magnetron source provides about 100 mA H{sup −} beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H{sup −} beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H{sup −} beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H{sup −} beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  20. Neutralization of ion beam by means of transverse injection of electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitin, A. V.; Serebrennikov, K. S.; Sionov, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam transverse injection into a region of a positive ion beam propagating between two conducting plates is considered. This problem is important for ion beam propagation in the implanter tracts and for construction of ion beam focusing elements. After the transition stage the formation of different stationary ion-beam plasma states is possible, with electrons being accelerated or decelerated while moving from the wall up to the center of the ion beam. The dependence of the final state on the parameters of the system is obtained. The regime with deceleration is characterized by negative total space charge and can be used for focusing of the ion beam. Temporary evolution of the neutralization process and realization of these stationary states is studied by means of one-dimensional particle-in-cell code simulation. The dynamics of the process in the case of absence of the stationary state and such non-stationary phenomena like sheath and virtual cathode are studied, too. This process comes to a high degree of neutralization due to the electrons being captured by the ion beam space charge potential.

  1. Neutral beam spectroscopy for equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical neutral beam spectroscopy system is being designed to provide equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment. Spatially localized measurements of the electron temperature and plasma density are possible by observing the intensity of the collisionally induced neutral beam fluorescence. In a helium beam, the population of the singlet levels are relatively independent of the plasma temperature compared to the triplet levels. Therefore, the ratio of intensities of a triplet transition (e.g., 33S→23P, λ=706.5 nm) to a singlet transition (e.g., 31P→21S, λ=501.6 nm) provides a measure of the local plasma temperature for the range 10 eVe<1.0 keV. The plasma density profile can be inferred from the attenuation of the beam fluorescence signal as the beam passes through the plasma. Additionally in a deuterium beam, the local plasma density can be directly inferred from the local radial gradient in the observed beam fluorescence signal. Plasma stability will be studied with localized magnetohydrodynamics measurements via beam emission spectroscopy, which otherwise is problematic for low-field spherical plasmas. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. Short-Pulse, Compressed Ion Beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, Peter A; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P; Grote, David; Ji, Qing; Kaganovich, I D; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynam...

  3. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  4. Optimizing 50kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam performance for active spectroscopy in MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Boguski, J.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Munaretto, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Olivia, S.

    2015-11-01

    The 50 kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam on MST provides local measurements of impurity ion emission through charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) and of core-localized magnetic field through the motional Stark effect (MSE). The beam, which was designed to provide 5A of neutral current at 50 kV to meet these needs, is currently on a test stand to accommodate diagnosis, in order to increase the reliability of beam formation, sustain a steady current of 5 amps for 20ms, and optimize the primary energy fraction. The reliability of arc formation was increased from 40% to 80% success rate with increase of cathode gas pressure from 150kPa to 200kPa, and the stability of the arc current is improved with a decrease of the insulation magnetic field. A calorimeter with 5 thermocouples is installed to measure the horizontal and vertical beam profiles as well as beam divergence. Beam energy components are quantified through Doppler-shift spectroscopy. Preliminary simulation results of the beam using the ALCBEAM code as well as a description of how changes to the beam performance can affect CHERS and MSE measurements are presented. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  5. Detailed electrical characterization of the TARA neutral beam injector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive use of modern automatic control, data acquisition and state of the art power supply technology has enabled detailed electrical characterization and optimization of the TARA ion source operating point. The TARA ion sources and power supplies are parameterized empirically and/or modeled theoretically. The sources are characterized in the basic three dimensional space: filament power, arc power, and gas pressure. Filament warm-up rate, arc voltage to current ratio, arc and filament power supply ripple, and beam current parameter subspace are also investigated. Characterization is done in terms of small and large signals, frequency response, hysteresis and linearity to enable optimal source stability in a fully regulated environment. Discharge density regulation with the filament power highly regulated has been achieved through power supply feedback on the arc current or a Langmuir probe in the discharge. Dynamic divergence correction by feedback from secondary emission detectors in the source beamline is discussed. 4 refs., 36 figs

  6. Start-up neutral-beam power supply system for MFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes some of the design features and considerations of the MFTF start-up neutral-beam power supplies. In particular, we emphasize features of the system that will ensure MFTF compatibility and achieve the required reliability/availability for the MFTF to be successful

  7. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested

  8. Neutral V production with 14.6 x A GeV/c silicon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a measurement of neutral V production with 14.6xA GeV/c Si beams on Au and Cu targets. The Λ and Ks0 yields were measured as a function of negative particle multiplicity. Effective temperatures were determined from an exponential fit to the transverse mass distributions. (orig.)

  9. Weibel and Two-Stream Instabilities for Intense Charged Particle Beam Propagation through Neutralizing Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the multi-species electromagnetic Weibel and electrostatic two-stream instabilities are investigated for an intense ion beam propagating through background plasma. Assuming that the background plasma electrons provide complete charge and current neutralization, detailed linear stability properties are calculated within the framework of a macroscopic cold-fluid model for a wide range of system parameters

  10. Direct energy conversion and neutral beam injection for catalyzed D and D-3He tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculated performance of single stage and Venetian blind direct energy converters for Catalyzed D and D-3He Tokamak reactors are discussed. Preliminary results on He pumping are outlined. The efficiency of D and T neutral beam injection is reviewed

  11. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughian, J.M.

    1977-07-01

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested.

  12. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results

  13. In situ measurement of neutral beam components using the Doppler-shifted Hα emissions in Heliotron E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density fraction of energy components (E,E/2,E/3,E/18) of the neutral beam was measured at the plasma center, using the Doppler-shifted Hα emissions, which were excited by electron and proton collisions in the plasma. This measurement will be useful in understanding the heating process by neutral beam injection. (author)

  14. Results of the SINGAP Neutral Beam Accelerator Experiment at JAEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Esch, H. P. L.; Svensson, L.; Inoue, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M.; Fubiani, G.

    2009-03-01

    IRFM (CEA Cadarache) and JAEA Naka have entered into a collaboration in order to test a SINGAP [1] accelerator at the JAEA Megavolt Test Facility (MTF) at Naka, Japan. Whereas at the CEA testbed the acceleration current was limited to 0.1 A, at JAEA 0.5 A is available. This allows the acceleration of 15 H- beamlets in SINGAP to be tested and a direct comparison between SINGAP and MAMuG [2] to be made. High-voltage conditioning in the SINGAP configuration has been quite slow, with 581 kV in vacuum achieved after 140 hours of conditioning. With 0.1 Pa of H2 gas present in the accelerator 787 kV could be achieved. The conditioning curve for MAMuG is 200 kV higher. SINGAP beam optics appears in agreement with calculation results. A beamlet divergence better than 5 mrad was obtained. SINGAP accelerates electrons to a higher energy than MAMuG. Measurements of the power intercepted on one of the electron dumps have been compared with EAMCC code [3] calculations. Based on the experiments described here, electron production by a SINGAP accelerator scaled up to ITER size was estimated to be too high for comfort

  15. Design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline is also equpped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities

  16. Characterization of 1 MW, 40 keV, 1 s neutral beam for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam with geometrical focusing for plasma heating in moderate-size plasma devices has been developed in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. When operated with hydrogen, the neutral beam power is 1 MW, pulse duration is 1 s, beam energy is 40 keV, and angular divergence is 1.2 deg. Initial ion beam is extracted and accelerated by triode multiapertures ion-optical system. To produce 1 MW neutral beam, about 40 A proton current is extracted with nominal current density of 320 mA/cm2. Ion-optical system has 200 mm diameter grids with 44% transparency. The grids have inertia cooling and heat is removed between the pulses by water flowing in channels placed on periphery of the grids. A plasma emitter for ion extraction is produced by rf-plasma box. Ion species mix of rf plasma source amounts to 70%, 20%, and 10% of H+, H2+, and H3+ ions, respectively, by current. Heavy impurities contribute less than 0.3%.

  17. Neutral beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for measurement of density fluctuations on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-channel diagnostic for measuring low amplitude, long wavelength (kperpendicularρi α fluorescence of a neutral heating beam due to collisional excitation from the plasma and impurity ions. Both radial and poloidal correlation lengths as short as 2--3 cm can be determined, with the spatial resolution limited primarily by the width and geometry of the three neutral beam sources. Optical fibers transmit the light from a 20-cm diameter vacuum window, re-entrant mirror, and lens assembly to sixteen interference filter/photomultiplier combinations located outside the radiation area. Initially, the fibers comprise a fixed 55-channel radial array and readily movable 10-channel vertical arrays which can be positioned at 27 radial locations. The filters are designed to accept the Doppler-shifted Hα emission from primary energy component of the neutral beam, and reject background lines and unshifted edge Hα. The measurable fluctuation amplitude (at sign S/N = 1) is limited to 0.5% over a 100 kHz bandwidth by the photon noise associated with the DC level of the beam emission. The contribution of impurities to the total beam fluorescence will be determined directly by measuring impurity density fluctuations using charge exchange recombination emission from the n = 8 - 7 CVI line at 5292 angstrom. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Amplification of relativistic electron beam current propagating in ambient neutral gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is experimentally observed that the net current is more than the primary beam current when the relativistic electron beam (REB) is propagated in ambient neutral gases (H2, He, air) at subtorr pressures (0.1-0.3 torr). Chambers attempted to explain the current amplification via the two-stream instability under the assumption of an ultrarelativistic, one-dimensional cold beam, limiting its applicability to specific situations. The authors have derived the current gain (G) expression in general for a scattered REB propagating in a neutral gas by taking into account a quasi-hydrodynamic expression for the beam energy loss. Moreover, the beam-to-plasma density ratio nb/nrho as a function of time is obtained for a given beam pulse by solving the electron energy and continuity equations numerically. It is found that at a given nb/nrho the current gain increases with increasing the beam energy, increases being rapid for the small average scattering angles. A finite average scattering angle is seen to reduce the current amplification

  19. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; de Ruette, N; Stützel, J; Savin, D W; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of $\\sim$7.4\\% for H$^-$ at a beam energy of 10\\,keV and $\\sim$3.7\\% for C$^-$ at 28\\,keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975\\,nm and 808\\,nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2\\,kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  20. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Bruhns, H; de Ruette, N; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; Savin, D W; Stützel, J; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ∼7.4% for H(-) at a beam energy of 10 keV and ∼3.7% for C(-) at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table. PMID:26628128

  1. Slow down of a globally neutral relativistic $e^-e^+$ beam shearing the vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, E P; Silveirinha, M G; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    The microphysics of relativistic collisionless sheared flows is investigated in a configuration consisting of a globally neutral, relativistic $e^-e^+$ beam streaming through a hollow plasma/dielectric channel. We show through multidimensional PIC simulations that this scenario excites the Mushroom instability (MI), a transverse shear instability on the electron-scale, when there is no overlap (no contact) between the $e^-e^+$ beam and the walls of the hollow plasma channel. The onset of the MI leads to the conversion of the beam's kinetic energy into magnetic (and electric) field energy, effectively slowing down a globally neutral body in the absence of contact. The collisionless shear physics explored in this configuration may operate in astrophysical environments, particularly in highly relativistic and supersonic settings where macroscopic shear processes are stable.

  2. Overview of the negative ion based neutral beam injectors for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B., E-mail: email@none.edu; Boilson, D.; Chareyre, J.; Choi, C.-H.; Decamps, H.; El-Ouazzani, A.; Geli, F.; Graceffa, J.; Hemsworth, R.; Kushwah, M.; Roux, K.; Shah, D.; Singh, M.; Svensson, L.; Urbani, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2016-02-15

    The ITER baseline foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beams (HNB’s) based on 1 MeV 40 A D{sup −} negative ion accelerators, each capable of delivering 16.7 MW of deuterium atoms to the DT plasma, with an optional 3rd HNB injector foreseen as a possible upgrade. In addition, a dedicated diagnostic neutral beam will be injecting ≈22 A of H{sup 0} at 100 keV as the probe beam for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The integration of the injectors into the ITER plant is nearly finished necessitating only refinements. A large number of components have passed the final design stage, manufacturing has started, and the essential test beds—for the prototype route chosen—will soon be ready to start.

  3. Data acquisition and control system for steady state neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the control system overview, hardware, software and network for Data acquisition and Control system for steady state neutral beam injector (NBIDACS) to be used for heating of plasma in steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1). The task for NBIDACS is not only to safely deliver 1.7 MW of neutral beams at 55 keV H deg. a period of 1000 s with 16.7% duty cycle but also to acquire the data related to house keeping of the system and its auxiliaries and diagnostics which determine the quality and parameters of the beam. Major issues concerning the design of the system stem from operation duty cycle of 1000 s ON/5000 s OFF. This calls for use of intelligent techniques not only for managing a large amount (100 MB) of data per shot but also to obtain failsafe, reliable control system and to archive the recorded data

  4. Design of an ion temperature diagnostic that is based on scattering of a neutral helium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small angle neutral beam scattering will be used on the STOR-M Tokamak to obtain space and time resolved measurements of the ion temperature. The scattered spectrum, centered just below the high beam energy, has a width that is directly related to the plasma ion temperature. Therefore localized measurements are relatively unaffected by attenuation of the particle flux, detection of background neutrals and poorly known temperature and density profiles. It is expected that a 20-30 keV helium beam of 35-65 A/m/sup 2/ current density together with a large area chevron channel plate detector and automatic data handling will allow direct determination of ion temperatures at an accuracy of l0%, a temporal resolution of 40 μs and a spatial resolution of better than l cm

  5. The design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permits the dissipation of 2 kW/cm2 anywhere on the panel surface. The cooling water requirements of the actively cooled dump system are provided by the closed loop Primary High Pressure Cooling Water System. To minimize the operating costs of continuously running this high power system, a variable speed hydraulic drive is used for the main pump. During beam pulses, the pump rotates at high speed, then cycles to low speed upon completion of the beam shot. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline also has an inertially cooled duct calorimeter assembly. This assembly is a moveable hinged matrix of copper plates that can be used as a beam stop up to pulse lengths of 50 ms. The beamline is also equipped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities

  6. Design of Main Control Console Software in EAST Neutral Beam Injector's Control System for the First Beam Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Yun; Hu, Chun-Dong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuan-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Cui, Qing-Long

    2013-10-01

    Neutral beam injector is one of the main plasma heating and plasma current driving methods for experimental advanced superconducting tokomaks (EAST). In order to realize visual operation of EAST neutral beam injector's control system (NBICS), main control console (MCC) is developed to work as the human-machine interface between the NBICS and physical operator. It can meet the requirements of visual control of NBICS by providing a user graphic interface. With the specific algorithms, the setup of power supply sequence is relatively independent and simple. Displaying the real-time feedback of the subsystems provides a reference for operators to monitor the status of the system. The MCC software runs on a Windows system and uses C++ language code while using client/server (C/S) mode, multithreading and cyclic redundancy check technology. The experimental results have proved that MCC provides a stability and reliability operation of NBICS and works as an effective man-machine interface at the same time.

  7. Study of the fast neutral atom beam injection on TFR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During neutral beam injection experiments on TFR, the increase of the plasma temperature appears to be weak and is saturating at high power. This observation leads to question the classical scheme of power coupling to the thermal plasma and to check experimentally its successive steps. First of all, the neutral beam transmission and capture in the plasma, measured by calorimetric methods, are in agreement with the classical calculations. Next the confinement and thermalization of the fast ions is reviewed by means of three different measurements: charge exchange analysis of fast neutrals leaving the plasma (an auxiliary modulated neutral beam gives a spatially resolved measurement); neutron flux analysis during injection of deuterium ions into a deuterium plasma; measurement of the fast ions trapped in the toroidal magnetic field ripples. These experiments show that a non-classical mechanism transports the most energetic ions towards the plasma periphery. This phenomenon then limits the overall power that can be effectively absorbed in the plasma centre and contributes to deteriorate the energy confinement. Finally the respective role of thermal and non-thermal populations in the power balance is addressed

  8. Characterisation of neutral hydrogen beam by means of active balmer-a-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral particle beams are used in thermal nuclear experiments for plasma heating and current drive, and as a diagnostic tool for active spectroscopy. Within the frame of this thesis eight viewing lines for Hα-spectroscopy have been installed at the end of the injector to observe the fully established neutral beam. The viewing lines are all parallel to the horizontal plane and include small angles with the beam axis, in order to make use of the Doppler effect which separates the signals from the three energy components from each other and from the Hα-emission of the thermal particles. A multi-Gaussian fit code has been applied to give the amplitudes, positions and widths of the Gauss shaped signals. From this data, the beam composition and, including the physics processes in the acceleration and neutralisation sections, the ion species fractions in the source have been calculated. Furthermore, the vertical density profile and an estimation of the absolute particle density distribution based on an absolute calibration resulted. From the line positions the exact acceleration voltage has been obtained. The line widths allow an estimate of the horizontal divergence. During this work, two ion sources, the 'Pagoda' and the 'Sourcette', have been investigated to obtain the ion species ratio and beam profile. The comparison of the spectroscopic with the calorimetric results gives a useful insight into the beam steering geometry. (author)

  9. Characterisation of neutral hydrogen beam by means of active balmer-a-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, C

    1999-01-01

    Neutral particle beams are used in thermal nuclear experiments for plasma heating and current drive, and as a diagnostic tool for active spectroscopy. Within the frame of this thesis eight viewing lines for H{sub {alpha}}-spectroscopy have been installed at the end of the injector to observe the fully established neutral beam. The viewing lines are all parallel to the horizontal plane and include small angles with the beam axis, in order to make use of the Doppler effect which separates the signals from the three energy components from each other and from the H{sub {alpha}}-emission of the thermal particles. A multi-Gaussian fit code has been applied to give the amplitudes, positions and widths of the Gauss shaped signals. From this data, the beam composition and, including the physics processes in the acceleration and neutralisation sections, the ion species fractions in the source have been calculated. Furthermore, the vertical density profile and an estimation of the absolute particle density distribution based on an absolute calibration resulted. From the line positions the exact acceleration voltage has been obtained. The line widths allow an estimate of the horizontal divergence. During this work, two ion sources, the 'Pagoda' and the 'Sourcette', have been investigated to obtain the ion species ratio and beam profile. The comparison of the spectroscopic with the calorimetric results gives a useful insight into the beam steering geometry. (author)

  10. Ion transport studies on the PLT tokamak during neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial transport of ions during co- and counter-neutral beam heating in the PLT tokamak has been studied, using molybdenum and scandium ions as tracer elements. The time evolution of the radial profiles of several ionization stages of both elements, injected by laser blowoff during the neutral beam heating, were measured under three significantly different beam-plasma combinations. No noticeable differences in the radial profiles attributable to the beam direction were observed. However, a given injected amount resulted in considerably larger interior concentrations of the tracer element in the counter-beam heating cases, suggesting larger penetration of the plasma periphery. Computer simulation with the MIST code suggests a net inward drift of the order 103 cm/sec superposed to a diffusion coefficient of the order 104 cm2/sec for both scandium and molybdenum ions. Injection of larger amounts of the tracer element, sufficient to cause measurable central electron temperature changes, resulted in dramatic changes in ion-state distributions, making some appear peaked in the center while others disappeared. This effect could be produced with both co- and counter-beam heating, but with lesser amounts in the latter case. It is interpreted as rearrangement of the ionization balance, rather than any preferential accumulation of the injected element

  11. Lower hybrid wave heating into neutral beam heated plasma in the JT-60 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injection of high-power lower hybrid waves (LHW) of up to 6.0 MW into neutral-beam-20 MW-heated plasmas with the medium electron density regime (n-bare ≤ 3.5 x 1019 m-3) increases the plasma energy content at the same incremental energy confinement time as in the case of neutral beam heating alone. In addition to thermal electron and ion heating, LHW accelerates beam ions to energies considerably higher than the beam injection energy. In contrast to LH injection into OH plasmas in the same density regime, where substantial high-energy electron production is observed, the case of combined heating shows much less high-energy electrons. The heating efficiency of LHW in the combined heating case tends to decrease as the electron density is increased. Ray-tracing analysis suggests that the accessibility condition prevents effective heating in a high-density plasma. Estimation of wave damping, which is taking account of the beam component of the ion velocity distribution function, indicates that waves are absorbed by beam ions before they are absorbed by electrons. (author)

  12. Effect of radial electric field and ripple on edge neutral beam ion distribution in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynönen, V.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Suttrop, W.; Stäbler, A.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2008-03-01

    The neutral beam injected fast ion distribution at the ASDEX Upgrade edge region is studied focusing on the difference between co- and counter-injected neutral beams. The slowing-down distribution of beam ions is simulated using the orbit-following Monte Carlo code ASCOT. The edge fast ion density and its gradient are higher for counter-injection than for co-injection. Also the distribution in the velocity space is different: for co-injection, there exists a population of untrapped particles which for counter-injection is found only when the effect of a non-constant, experimentally obtained quiescent H-mode radial electric field is included in the simulation. Toroidal ripple removes ions having small particle pitch, thereby reducing the density and density gradient, whereas the radial electric field has the opposite effect. Including simultaneously the effects of both ripple and the radial electric field restores the distribution close to the ideal case where both of them are neglected. The radial electric field is found to squeeze the orbit of a counter-injected neutral beam ion but to widen the orbit of a co-injected ion, and to cause transitions in the orbit topologies which are reflected in the fast ion distribution.

  13. Preliminary considerations concerning neutral plasma beam propagation across a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plan to address physical questions of interest for exoatmospheric military applications of intense neutralized plasma beams is described. After a brief review of earlier work relevant to this matter and a detailed explanation of why such work cannot answer questions of present interest, a plan employing interactive application of several numerical and analytic techniques to treat relevant phenomena occurring on the various rather disparate time and length scales involved is suggested. The first part of the study would determine the macroscopic features of beam propagation through calculations effected with a magnetohydrodynamical numerical code. Classical transport coefficients would be employed in this initial phase. Using information thus gained concerning gross charge and current distributions, particle-in-cell simulations would be initialized to study those microscopic, phase-space-dependent phenomena which can alter the phenomonological transport coefficients appearing in the fluid description. Insight thereby gained concerning anomaous, collectively induced transport effects would then be applied to yield a refined, accurate description of the macroscopic aspects of neutral plasma beam propagation. Personnel and computational resources available at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. Results of a very preliminary particle-in-cell simulation of a neutral plasma beam propagating across a magnetic field are presented

  14. An Indian test facility to characterise diagnostic neutral beam for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) line shall be used to diagnose the He ash content in the D-T phase of the ITER machine using the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS). Implementation of a successful DNB at ITER requires several challenges related to the production, neutralization and transport of the neutral beam over path lengths of 20.665 m, to be overcome. The delivery is aided if the above effects are tested prior to onsite commissioning. As DNB is a procurement package for INDIA, an ITER approved Indian test facility, INTF, is under construction at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India and is envisaged to be operational in 2015. The timeline for this facility is synchronized with the RADI, ELISE (IPP, Garching), SPIDER (RFX, Padova) in a manner that best utilization of configurational inputs available from them are incorporated in the design. This paper describes the facility in detail and discusses the experiments planned to optimise the beam transmission and testing of the beam line components using various diagnostics.

  15. An Indian test facility to characterise diagnostic neutral beam for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.J., E-mail: mahendrajit@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat 380025 (India); Bandyopadhyay, M.; Rotti, C.; Singh, N.P.; Shah, Sejal [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat 380025 (India); Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujrat 382428 (India); Lakdawala, H. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat 380025 (India); Waghela, Harshad [Shirkrishna Industries, Boisar, Mumbai (India); Ahmed, I.; Roopesh, G.; Baruah, U.K.; Chakraborty, A.K. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat 380025 (India)

    2011-10-15

    The diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) line shall be used to diagnose the He ash content in the D-T phase of the ITER machine using the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS). Implementation of a successful DNB at ITER requires several challenges related to the production, neutralization and transport of the neutral beam over path lengths of 20.665 m, to be overcome. The delivery is aided if the above effects are tested prior to onsite commissioning. As DNB is a procurement package for INDIA, an ITER approved Indian test facility, INTF, is under construction at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India and is envisaged to be operational in 2015. The timeline for this facility is synchronized with the RADI, ELISE (IPP, Garching), SPIDER (RFX, Padova) in a manner that best utilization of configurational inputs available from them are incorporated in the design. This paper describes the facility in detail and discusses the experiments planned to optimise the beam transmission and testing of the beam line components using various diagnostics.

  16. Positive ion portion of the LBL/LLL Neutral Beam Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positive ion portion of the Neutral Beam Development Program at the Lawrence Berkeley (LBL) and Livermore (LLL) Laboratories has two purposes: (a) to carry out general research and development in a timely way to assure that users' needs can be met in principle, and (b) to carry out specific development for users. To meet the first requirement, we have programs to develop sources capable of producing beams with high (85%) atomic fractions, long pulse lengths (10 sec to DC), and at beam energies up to 150 keV. We are also pursuing the development of on-line computer diagnostics and controls, the sophisticated high-power electronics required by neutral beam systems, and energy recovery. To meet the second requirement, we are developing prototype source modules to meet the requirements of the TMX and MFTF experiments at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the TFTR experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the Doublet III experiment at General Atomic Co. The Lawrence Laboratories are also constructing and will demonstrate at LBL a complete prototype neutral injection system for TFTR, and are designing a similar system for Doublet III

  17. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  18. Temperature Measurement and Water Flow Calorimetry for the Neutral Beam Test Stand Operation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature measurements during the beam line operation of the neutral beam test stand(NB-TS) is very important for the estimation of the absorbed energy by the beam line components such calorimeter and also for the temperature monitoring of the various components, and have been accomplished by the utilization of many of the thermocouples(TCs) installed onto the NB-TS and the data acquisition system(DAQ) based on the National Instruments' (NI) SCXI system. Preliminary estimations of the absorbed energy by the calorimeter during the beam extraction have been made. Greater efforts for the noise reduction in the TC signal acquisition has been made with partial success. We present the status of the temperature measurement and water flow calorimetry(WFC) related to the NB-TS operations

  19. Oxide degradation effects in dry patterning of resist using neutral oxygen beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel processing methods are being studied to address the highly selective and directional etch requirements of the ULSI manufacturing era; neutral molecular and atomic beams are two promising candidates. In this study, the potential of 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams for dry development of photoresist is demonstrated for application in patterning of CMOS devices. The patterning of photoresist directly on polysilicon gate layers enables the use of a self-contained dry processing strategy, with oxygen beams for resist etching and chlorine beams for polysilicon etching. Exposure to such reactive low-energy species and to the UV radiation from the line-of-sight, high-density plasma source can, however, after MOSFET gate oxide quality, impacting device performance and reliability. We have studied this processing related device integrity issue by subjecting polysilicon gas MOS structures to exposure treatments similar to those used in resist patterning using low energy oxygen beams. Electrical C-V characterization shows a significant increase in the oxide trapped charge and interface state density upon low energy exposure. I-V and dielectric breakdown characterization show increased low-field leakage characteristics for the same exposure. High-field electron injection studies reveal that the 0.25-V to 0.5-V negative flatband shifts can be partially annealed by the carrier injection. This could be due to positive charge annihilation or electron trapping, or some combination of both. Physical and analysis of patterned resist layers and electrical characterization data of MOS structures exposed to different neutral beam processing environments and following thermal annealing treatments is presented

  20. Development of Temperature Measurements and Calorimetry for the Neutral Beam Test Stand Operation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation of the Neutral Beam Test Stand(NB-TS) at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) now reaches to 80 kV-20A for about 10 seconds. Experiments with this kind of enormous power and energy necessarily entail many temperature measurements at various locations of the system, and most of the beam line components require to be monitored of their temperatures. We have been implementing temperature measurement utilizing K-Type and T-Type thermocouples(TCs) and a Pt-100 resistance temperature detector for the instrumentation and control and for establishing calorimetry during the operation of the NB-TS facility

  1. Extreme ultraviolet diagnosis of a neutral-beam-heated mirror machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extreme ultraviolet emissions from the LLL 2XIIB fusion research experiment have been studied. (2XIIB was a magnetic-mirror-plasma-confinement device; beams of high-energy (20 keV) neutral deuterium created a high-density, high-temperature plasma.) A normal-incidence concave-grating monochromator, equipped with a windowless photomultiplier tube, was used to measure emissions in the spectral region from 400 Angstrom to 1600 A. Emissions of oxygen, titanium, carbon, nitrogen, and deuterium were identified; the oxygen brightnesses at times exceeded 1018 ph-s-1-cm-2-sr-1. A survey of the emission characteristics found the oxygen concentration was 3%, the other impurities had concentrations near 0.4%. The radiated power loss was about 5% of the deposited neutral beam power

  2. Relative and absolute level populations in beam-foil-excited neutral helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J.

    1975-01-01

    Relative and absolute populations of 19 levels in beam-foil-excited neutral helium at 0.275 MeV have been measured. The singlet angular-momentum sequences show dependences on principal quantum number consistent with n to the -3rd power, but the triplet sequences do not. Singlet and triplet angular-momentum sequences show similar dependences on level excitation energy. Excitation functions for six representative levels were measured in the range from 0.160 to 0.500 MeV. The absolute level populations increase with energy, whereas the neutral fraction of the beam decreases with energy. Further, the P angular-momentum levels are found to be overpopulated with respect to the S and D levels. The overpopulation decreases with increasing principal quantum number.

  3. Protection and fault detection for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, D.B.; Baker, W.R.; Berkner, K.H.; Ehlers, K.W.; Honey, V.J.; Lietzke, A.F.; Milnes, K.A.; Owren, H.M.

    1979-11-01

    Testing of TFTR neutral beam (NB) sources has begun at the LBL Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). Operation at 120 kV, 65 A, 0.5 sec should be achieved soon. Because NB sources spark down frequently during conditioning, the main accelerating (accel) power supply must be interrupted within a few microseconds to avoid degrading the voltage holding capability, or even the damaging, of the NB source. A variety of improper magnitudes and/or ratios of voltages, currents, and times can occur and must be recognized as fault conditions in order to initiate a prompt interruption of the accel power supply. This paper discusses in detail the key signals which must be monitored and the manner in which they are processed in fault detector circuitry for safe operation of LBL NB sources. The paper also reviews the more standard interlocks and protective features recommended for these sources.

  4. Power transmission characteristics of a two-stage multiaperture neutral beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, M. M.; Tsai, C. C.; Schechter, D. E.; Ryan, P. M.; Barber, G. C.; Davis, R. C.; Gardner, W. L.; Kim, J.; Haselton, H. H.; Ponte, N. S.

    1980-09-01

    A neutral beam source which employs a two-stage accelerating scheme is presented. It is shown that the two-stage accelerating scheme offers significantly higher power transmission efficiency when compared with single-stage schemes: efficiencies as high as 80% can be realized. The grid loading in the two-stage accelerator with straight circular apertures is much higher than that of the single-stage accelerator. However, by appropriate choice of the size and the shape of the aperture, this problem can be minimized and even higher transmission efficiencies could be attained. The effect of increasing the accel column length on the source performance is also discussed. The results can be useful in the design of high power, high energy neutral beam sources for plasma heating applications in fusion devices.

  5. Neutral Molecular ZnX (X = O, OH, N) Compounds In A Molecular Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannavo, D.; Knopp, G.; Radi, P.; Beaud, P.; Tulej, M.; Bodek, P.; Gerber, T.; Wokaun, A.

    2005-03-01

    Neutral ZnO and ZnOH molecules could be produced in a molecular beam by expansion of laser ablated zinc together with H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O seeded in a rare gas (Ar, Ne, He). The abundance of ZnOH produced in our experiments exceeds the one of ZnO and ZnN by orders of magnitude if H{sub 2}O is present in the sys-tem. Small quantities of (ZnO)2H and Zn{sub 2}(OH)3 compounds could also be observed. To our knowledge this is the first evidence for the occurrence of neutral ZnO and ZnOH molecules in a molecular beam. (author)

  6. 24-MW neutral-beam injector of 400-keV H0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The negative and positive ion systems have both common goals and common problems. In fact, we have identified five items that must be developed before any large, neutral-beam injector, operating continuously or almost so, can be engineered. The five items are: (1) a continuous or almost continuous ion source, with 1A designating a source of positive ions and 1B a direct extraction source of negatives, (2) a recirculating metal-vapor cell, (3) a computer code with which to calculate beam trajectories in three dimensions, (4) a resistive coating to bleed stray charges from the surface of high-voltage vacuum insulators, and (5) an arc suppression technique for large systems. These items are discussed and it is shown how their development is prerequisite to the design of a 24-MW, 400-keV neutral hydrogen injector such as might be required for a fusion power reactor

  7. Confinement scaling studies of radiofrequency and neutral beam heated currentless heliotron E plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric scaling studies of radiofrequency and neutral beam heated currentless Heliotron E plasmas have been performed. The parametric local electron transport analyses show that the electron energy transport in electron cyclotron heating (ECH) plasmas is nearly of the same magnitude as the neoclassically predicted transport inside the 2/3 radius, while neutral beam injection (NBI) plasmas and plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are dominated by anomalous electron transport in the entire region. Scaling studies on the global energy confinement time reveal that ECH, NBI and ICRF plasmas obey approximately identical scalings that are characterized by continuous power degradation and favourable positive density dependence. The global energy confinement time is thought to be affected by the anomalous transport in the peripheral plasma regions in the same way for ECH, NBI and ICRF plasmas although the core plasma properties - such as local electron transport - seem to be different for the individual plasmas. (author). 39 refs, 11 figs

  8. Some estimates of mirror plasma startup by neutral beam heating of pellet and gas cloud targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot plasma buildup by neutral beam injection into an initially cold solid or gaseous target is found to be conceivable in large mirror machine experiments such as 2XIIB or MFTF. A simple analysis shows that existing neutral beam intensities are sufficient to ablate suitable targets to form a gas or vapor cloud. An approximate rate equation model is used to follow the subsequent processes of ionization, heating, and hot plasma formation. Solutions of these rate equations are obtained by means of the ''GEAR'' techniques for solving ''stiff'' systems of differential equations. These solutions are in rough agreement with the 2XIIB stream plasma buildup experiment. They also predict that buildup on a suitable nitrogen-like target will occur in the MFTF geometry. In 2XIIB the solutions are marginal; buildup may be possible, but is not certain

  9. Relative and absolute level populations in beam-foil--excited neutral helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative and absolute populations of 19 levels in beam-foil--excited neutral helium at 0.275 MeV have been measured. The singlet angular-momentum sequences show dependences on principal quantum number consistent with n-3, but the triplet sequences do not. Singlet and triplet angular-momentum sequences show similar dependences on level excitation energy. Excitation functions for six representative levels were measured in the range 0.160 to 0.500 MeV. The absolute level populations increase with energy, whereas the neutral fraction of the beam decreases with energy. Further, the P angular-momentum levels are found to be overpopulated with respect to the S and D levels. The overpopulation decreases with increasing principal quantum number

  10. Protection and fault detection for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of TFTR neutral beam (NB) sources has begun at the LBL Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). Operation at 120 kV, 65 A, 0.5 sec should be achieved soon. Because NB sources spark down frequently during conditioning, the main accelerating (accel) power supply must be interrupted within a few microseconds to avoid degrading the voltage holding capability, or even the damaging, of the NB source. A variety of improper magnitudes and/or ratios of voltages, currents, and times can occur and must be recognized as fault conditions in order to initiate a prompt interruption of the accel power supply. This paper discusses in detail the key signals which must be monitored and the manner in which they are processed in fault detector circuitry for safe operation of LBL NB sources. The paper also reviews the more standard interlocks and protective features recommended for these sources

  11. Upgrade of the diagnostic neutral beam injector for the TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNBI) [CRPP report LRP 710/01, CRPP-EPFL, 2001; EPS Conf. Contr. Fusion Plasma Phys., 25A (2001) 365] has been installed on tokamak a configuration variable (TCV) [Plasma Phys. Control Fusion, 36 (1994) B277; Plasma Phys. Control Fusion, 43 (2001) A161; Plasma Phys. Control Fusion, to be published] for the purpose of providing local measurements of plasma ion temperature, velocity and impurity density by Charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) [EPS Conf. Contr. Fusion Plasma Phys., 25A (2001) 365]. The system recently underwent a technical upgrade, which allowed to increase the full neutral beam current density by a factor of two (from 0.5 to 1 A at 52 keV injection energy) and to extend the operational range of the diagnostic. This was achieved by means of a new, larger ion source, with an increased extraction area and corresponding enhancements of the power supplies

  12. Shielding calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed, one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and wall of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m is sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/D-T pulse

  13. Mechanical properties considerations for use of epoxy insulators and bonded joints in neutral beam ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Doublet III (D-III) neutral beam injectors, cast, rigid-epoxy insulators are joined to the AISI 304 stainless steel corona rings with semi-rigid epoxy adhesive. Selected mechanical properties of these materials were measured between 110C and 650C, well below the material temperature limits, to identify the trends and to confirm adequate mechanical strength for the insulators. Significant creep deformation was measured at 220C. Empirical relationships were developed to predict long term strain over a range of stress and temperature of design interest. Delayed failure was observed in bonded specimens at stress levels well below the ultimate strength. In order to protect the D-III neutral beam ion source epoxy from elevated temperature effects, a chill was installed in the cooling water circuit. Outgassing measurements of the insulator epoxy were made and found to be low and primarily H2O

  14. Neutron and gamma-ray streaming calculations for the engineering test facility neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional radiation transport methods have been used to estimate the effects of neutron and gamma-ray streaming on the performance of the Engineering Test Facility neutral beam injectors. The calculations take into account the spatial, angular, and spectral distributions of the radiation entering the injector duct. The instantaneous nuclear heating rate averaged over the length of the cryopumping panel in the injector is 7.5 X 10-3 MW/m3, which implies a total heat load of 2.2 X 10-4 MW. The instantaneous dose rate to the ion gun insulators was estimated to be 3200 rad/s. The radial dependence of the instantaneous dose equivalent rate in the neutral beam injector duct shield was also calculated

  15. Neutron and gamma ray streaming calculations for the ETF neutral beam injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, R. A.; Santoro, R. T.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Barnes, J. M.

    1981-02-01

    Two dimensional radiation transport methods were used to estimate the effects of neutron and gamma ray streaming on the performance of the engineering test facility neutral beam injectors. The calculations take into account the spatial, angular, and spectral distributions of the radiation entering the injector duct. The instantaneous nuclear heating rate averaged over the length of the cryopumping panel in the injector is 7.5 x 10(+3) MW/m(3) which implies a total heat load of 2.2 x 10(+4) MW. The instantaneous dose rate to the ion gun insulators was estimated to be 3200 rad/s. The radial dependence of the instantaneous dose equivalent rate in the neutral beam injector duct shield was also calculated.

  16. Neutron and gamma ray streaming calculations for the ETF neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional radiation transport methods have been used to estimate the effects of neutron and gamma ray streaming on the performance of the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) neutral beam injectors. The calculations take into account the spatial, angular, and spectral distributions of the radiation entering the injector duct. The instantaneous nuclear heating rate averaged over the length of the cryopumping panel in the injector is 7.5 x 10-3 MW/m3 which implies a total heat load of 2.2 x 10-4 MW. The instantaneous dose rate to the ion gun insulators was estimated to be 3200 rad/s. The radial dependence of the instantaneous dose equivalent rate in the neutral beam injector duct shield was also calculated

  17. Density peaking in the JFT-2M tokamak plasma with counter neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant particle pinch and reduction of the effective thermal diffusivity are observed after switching the neutral beam direction from co- to counter- injection in the JFT-2M tokamak. A time delay in the occurrence of density peaking to that of plasma rotation is found. This shows that the particle pinch is related to the profile of the electric field as determined by the plasma rotation profile. The measured particle flux shows qualitative agreement with the theoretically-predicted inward pinch. (author)

  18. Confinement of Neutral Beam Ions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The loss of neutral-beam ions to the wall has been measured in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by means of thermocouples, an infrared (IR) camera, and a Faraday cup probe. The losses tend to exhibit the expected dependences on plasma current, tangency radius of the injector, and plasma outer gap. However, the thermocouples and the Faraday cups indicate substantially different levels of loss and this difference has yet to be understood

  19. Spectroscopic study of impurities in neutral beam heated and ohmically heated JT-60 discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impurities in JT-60 were studied by visible and VUV spectroscopy over two periods of operation. The two periods wree distinguished by the use of different first wall materials: from April 1985 to March 1987, TiC coated molybdenum was used as limiter material; from June to October 1987, graphite was used. Quantitative spectroscopic measurements of Zeff, impurity concentrations and radiated power losses were made for ohmically heated and neutral beam heated discharges with limiter and divertor configurations. In the first phase with metallic first wall material, oxygen, carbon and titanium were identified as the main plasma impurities. In neutral beam heated, diverted discharges, Zeff was 1.6 at n-bare=4x1019m-3. The concentrations of oxygen, carbon and titanium were 1%, 0.1% and 0.006% of ne, respectively. In the second phase with graphite material, the metallic impurities were reduced, and the contribution of metallic impurities to the radiated power loss was less than 1%. However, Zeff increased up to 3 in neutral beam heated discharges. In limited plasmas, the concentrations of oxygen and carbon were 1% and 5%, respectively, at n-bare=4x1019m-3, in diverted plasmas, these concentrations were 2% and 0.4% at the same n-bare. The radiated power loss from the main plasma was 20-40% of the input power in neutral beam heated, limited discharges, and 7-25% in diverted discharges. The contributions of oxygen and carbon to the radiated power in limited discharges were comparable, and in diverted discharges the contribution of oxygen was dominant. (author). 29 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Exploring a small sawtooth regime in Joint European Torus plasmas with counterinjected neutral beams

    OpenAIRE

    Nave, M. F. F.; Koslowski, H. R.; Coda, J. W.; Graves, J; Buttery, R; Challis, C; Giroud, C.; Stamp, M.; de Vries, P.

    2006-01-01

    During a recent reversed toroidal field (B-T) campaign at the Joint European Torus (JET), experiments were performed to investigate the effect on sawteeth of neutral beam injection (NBI)-driven toroidal plasma rotation counter to the direction of the toroidal plasma current and B-T. A power scan at constant density has permitted analytical continuation, into the reversed B-T domain, of previous experiments with forward field and hence corotation. Earlier JET results were confirmed, indicating...

  1. Estimation of neutral-beam-induced field reversal in MFTF by an approximate scaling law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1980-04-28

    Scaling rules are derived for field-reversed plasmas whose dimensions are common multiples of the ion gyroradius in the vacuum field. These rules are then applied to the tandem MFTF configuration, and it is shown that field reversal appears to be possible for neutral beam currents of the order of 150 amperes, provided that the electron temperature is at least 500 eV.

  2. Microwave plasma source for neutral-beam injection systems. Quarterly technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall program is described and the technical and programmatic reasons for the decision to pursue both the RFI and ECH sources into the current hydrogen test stage is discussed. We consider the general characteristics of plasma sources in the parameter regime of interest for neutral beam applications. The operatonal characteristics, advantages and potential problems of RFI and ECH sources are discussed. In these latter two sections we rely heavily on experience derived from developing RFI and ECH ion engine sources for NASA

  3. Design of Control Server Application Software for Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the remote control of a neutral beam injection (NBI) system, a software NBIcsw is developed to work on the control server. It can meet the requirements of data transmission and operation-control between the NBI measurement and control layer (MCL) and the remote monitoring layer (RML). The NBIcsw runs on a Linux system, developed with client/server (C/S) mode and multithreading technology. It is shown through application that the software is with good efficiency.

  4. Radiation losses in PLT during neutral beam and ICRF heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and charge exchange losses in the PLT tokamak are compared for discharges with ohmic heating only (OH), and with additional heating by neutral beams (NB) or RF in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). Spectroscopic, bolometric and soft x-ray diagnostics were used. The effects of discharge cleaning, vacuum wall gettering, and rate of gas inlet on radiation losses from OH plasmas and the correlation between radiation from plasma core and edge temperatures are discussed

  5. The Supervisory Control System for the HL-2A Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supervisory control and protection system of the neutral beam injector (NBI) in the HL-2A tokamak is presented. The system is used for a safe coordination of all the main NBI subsystems. Because the system is based on computer networks with its transmission medium of optical fiber, its advantages in high operational stability, reliability, security and flexible functional expandability are clearly shown during the NBI commissioning and heating experiment in HL-2A.

  6. Development of negative ion beam accelerators for high power neutral beam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 500 keV negative ion source for JT-60U and a 1 MeV ion source for ITER are being developed at JAERI. Beam acceleration test of the JT-60U negative ion source, that is designed to produce a 500 keV, 22 A D- beam for 10 S, has started. The ion source consists of a cesium seeded volume negative ion generator and a three-stage multi-aperture accelerator. Up to now, D- ion beam of 410 keV, 6.1 A, 0.2 s, 2.5MW was accelerated. This is the world record of deuterium negative ion beam current and negative ion beam power. On the other hand, to demonstrate negative ion acceleration up to an energy of 1 MeV for ITER, the authors constructed a five-stage electrostatic accelerator and a 1MV/1A test facility called MeV Test Facility (MTF). The accelerator was conditioned up to a high voltage of 760 kV without beam. The H- ion beam was successfully accelerated up to the energy of 700 keV with a drain current of 230 mA for 1 s

  7. Specific features of measuring the isotopic composition of hydrogen ions in ITER plasma by using neutral particle diagnostics under neutral beam injection conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasyev, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Goncharov, P. R., E-mail: p.goncharov@spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Mironov, M. I.; Nesenevich, V. G., E-mail: vnesenevich@npd.ioffe.ru; Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, S. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Sergeev, V. Yu. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Results of numerical simulation of signals from neutral particle analyzers under injection of the heating and diagnostic neutral beams in different operating modes of the ITER tokamak are presented. The distribution functions of fast ions in plasma are simulated, and the corresponding neutral particle fluxes escaping from the plasma along the line of sight of the analyzers are calculated. It is shown that the injection of heating deuterium (D{sup 0}) beams results in the appearance of an intense background signal hampering measurements of the ratio between the densities of deuterium and tritium fuel ions in plasma in the thermal energy range. The injection of a diagnostic hydrogen (H{sup 0}) beam does not affect measurements owing to the high mass resolution of the analyzers.

  8. Neutral beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for measurement of density fluctuations on the TFTR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, S.F. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Fonck, R.J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-06-01

    A multi-channel diagnostic for measuring low amplitude, long wavelength (k{sub {perpendicular}{rho}i} < 0.5) density fluctuations along the outer half of the plasma has been installed on TFTR. It is based on observing fluctuations in the H{sub {alpha}} fluorescence of a neutral heating beam due to collisional excitation from the plasma and impurity ions. Both radial and poloidal correlation lengths as short as 2--3 cm can be determined, with the spatial resolution limited primarily by the width and geometry of the three neutral beam sources. Optical fibers transmit the light from a 20-cm diameter vacuum window, re-entrant mirror, and lens assembly to sixteen interference filter/photomultiplier combinations located outside the radiation area. Initially, the fibers comprise a fixed 55-channel radial array and readily movable 10-channel vertical arrays which can be positioned at 27 radial locations. The filters are designed to accept the Doppler-shifted H{sub {alpha}} emission from primary energy component of the neutral beam, and reject background lines and unshifted edge H{sub {alpha}}. The measurable fluctuation amplitude ( S/N = 1) is limited to 0.5% over a 100 kHz bandwidth by the photon noise associated with the DC level of the beam emission. The contribution of impurities to the total beam fluorescence will be determined directly by measuring impurity density fluctuations using charge exchange recombination emission from the n = 8 {minus} 7 CVI line at 5292 {angstrom}. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Burnout experiment in subcooled forced-convection boiling of water for beam dumps of a high power neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies were made on burnout heat flux in highly subcooled forced-convection boiling of water for the design of beam dumps of a high power neutral beam injector for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60. These dumps are composed of many circular tubes with two longitudinal fins. The tube was irradiated with nonuniformly distributed hydrogen ion beams of 120 to 200 kW for as long as 10 s. The coolant water was circulated at flow velocities of 3 to 7.5 m/s at exit pressures of 0.4 to 0.9 MPa. The burnout and film-boiling data were obtained at local heat fluxes of 8 to 15 MW/m2. These values were as high as 2.5 times larger than those for the circumferentially uniform heat flux case with the same parameters. These data showed insensitivity to local subcooling as well as to pressure, and simple burnout correlations were derived. From these results, the beam dumps have been designed to receive energetic beam fluxes of as high as 5 MW/m2 with a margin of a factor of 2 for burnout

  10. Development of 120 keV 10 MW neutral beam teststand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report of design and construction of 120 keV, 10 MW Neutral Beam Test Stand (10 MW NBTS) which has been prepared for the development of NB Injector on R-project in the 1981 to 1982 fiscal year. The Test Stand is designed to simulate NBI on the project and the aim is test for the performance of many components and the over all performance of beam line. A design of the beam line (which is composed of a neutralizer cell, a 180 deg deflection magnet, calorimeter, and ion dump, etc.), 1/4 size ion source, power supply system, and sequence and control are described, and the test results are also given briefly. Main features of the NBTS are as follows: (1) A powerful ion source of 120 keV, 75 A for 1 sec, (2) Gate Turn Off (G.T.O.) accel power supply system of 120 kV, 10 MW, in which all the components are fabricated by the solid-state elements, (3) highspeed open-type cryocondensation pump for the vacuum system. Test results of each component are compared with the design value of them. Overall test including the beam extraction of up to 120 keV, ∼ 20 A for 1 sec is satisfactorily completed by applying 1/4 size model ion source. (author)

  11. Magnetic Field Considerations for the Design and Location of a Diagnostic Neutral Beam Injector for the TJ-II Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam injection system is being developed for the TJ-II stellarator. The principal goal is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to provide spatial resolution along the plasma minor radius in Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy and Neutral Particle Analysis diagnostics, while also opening up new opportunities for physics studies. After summarizing the compact diagnostic neutral beam injector system selected as well as the TJ-II vacuum vessel and coil geometry, we address the sensitivity of TJ-II magnetic configurations to the ferromagnetic materials that shield the ion source and neutralizer tubing of the neutral beam injection system using a popular approach in which the field is approximated via magnetic dipole moments, finally, the scientific and design trade-offs made to minimize the impact are discussed. (Author) 24 refs

  12. Computer study of an energy recovery system for the Tore-Supra neutral beam injection lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prototype of an Energy Recovery System (ERS) has been designed for the Tore-Supra neutral beam injection lines (100 kV, 40 A deuterium beams). Our study, based on computer calculations using a 2-D charged particle trajectory program, consisted mainly in the optimisation of the components of the ERS, but it has been extended in order to draw general conclusions on some problems that might be encountered and to derive scaling laws for the suppression voltage determination. In our system, the power saving can be as large as 1 MW per injection line, i.e. about 25 % of the total power that would be spent without energy recovery. The recovery on higher energy beams has also been investigated; the power gain would be even larger in this case

  13. Numerical simulation for the accelerator of the KSTAR neutral beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments with a prototype long-pulse, high-current ion source being developed for the neutral beam injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research have shown that the accelerator grid assembly needs a further upgrade to achieve the final goal of 120keV/65A for the deuterium ion beam. The accelerator upgrade concept was determined theoretically by simulations using the IGUN code. The simulation study was focused on finding parameter sets that raise the optimum perveance as large as possible and reduce the beam divergence as low as possible. From the simulation results, it was concluded that it is possible to achieve this goal by sliming the plasma grid (G1), shortening the second gap (G2-G3), and adjusting the G2 voltage ratio.

  14. Mixed-DT neutral-beam injection: An alternative heating method for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors propose an alternative method for the heating, and perhaps also refueling, of tokamak fusion devices. The alternative method replaces the deuterium neutral-beam injectors (NBIs) such as those now used, for example, on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) device. Instead they make use of a mixed (deuterium-tritium) NBI (MNBI) and thereby vastly reduce the cost and complexity of the fuel-recovery cycle. Another like consequence is the reduction of the total amount of tritium in the on-site inventory. The authors suspect that the alternative plant design would have a positive effect on safety, although they have not done an accident analysis based on the mixed-beam injectors. They have, however, studied the requirements of the new fuel cycle and have looked at the question of optimizing some of the parameters associated with a mixed-beam injector. 3 refs

  15. Sensibility Studies for the Neutral Beam Injection System in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensibility of the Neutral Beam Injection system of TJ-II to the changes of several parameters is analysed. Transmission, absorption and power loads at the intercepting structures are evaluated. The adopted values for the ion source distance, focal length and divergence are confirmed as optimal, showing a small sensitivity to changes, except for the divergence. The operational margins for beam misalignments has been found to be small but feasible, confirming also the reference directions as optimal. Finally four possible alternatives, intended to reduce the power loads at the beam entering structures, are analysed. All of them have been discarded since lead to the appearance of new risk zones, with unacceptable load levels, and reduce the transmitted power. (Author) 13 refs

  16. Design and fabrication of a large rectangular magnetic cusp plasma source for high intensity neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and fabrication techniques for a large, rectangular magnetic bucket plasma source are described. This source is compatible with the accelerator structures for the TFTR and DIII neutral-beam systems

  17. In situ spatial-profile monitoring of beam flux of neutral free radicals produced by photo-deionization of negative ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-current difference measurement by light intensity modulation (ICD) is introduced as a convenient method to characterize a purified beam of momentum-controlled neutral free radicals produced by photo-deionization of a negative ion beam for the purpose of surface-reaction-selective device processing. The ICD setup developed in this study to estimate the number flux of the photo-deionized neutral particles exhibited the high precision, sensitivity, and spatial resolution.

  18. Balmer-series emission cross-sections for the interaction between hydrogen neutral beams and molecular hydrogen: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study of Balmer emission cross-sections in the interaction between hydrogen neutral beams and molecular hydrogen is presented. The relative importance of different processes leading to excited neutrals is reviewed. The effect of external perturbations on the excited levels of a neutral atom is taken into account. Finally an 'effective cross section' for the production of Doppler shifted and unshifted Hsub(α) emission line is proposed

  19. Attainment of high confinement in neutral beam heated divertor discharges in the PDX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PDX divertor configuration has recently been converted from an open to a closed geometry to inhibit the return of neutral gas from the divertor region to the main chamber. Since then, operation in a regime with high energy confinement in neutral beam heated discharges (ASDEX H-mode) has been routine over a wide range of operating conditions. These H-mode discharges are characterized by a sudden drop in divertor density and H/sub α/ emission and a spontaneous rise in main chamber plasma density during neutral beam injection. The confinement time is found to scale nearly linearly with plasma current, but it can be degraded due to either the presence of edge instabilities or heavy gas puffing. Detailed Thomson scattering temperature profiles show high values of Te near the plasma edge (approx. 450 eV) with sharp radial gradients (approx. 400 eV/cm) near the separatrix. Density profiles are broad and also exhibit steep gradients close to the separatrix

  20. Evaluation of tritium diffusion through the Neutral Beam Injector calorimeter panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) to be realized in Padoa will test the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI), one of the Heating and Current Drive Systems foreseen for ITER. The NBI is based on the acceleration of hydrogen or deuterium negative ions up to 1 MeV. This work has been aimed at assessing the tritium release from the NBTF in order to provide data for the safety analysis. In particular, the diffusion of the tritium through the neutral beam target material (the CuCrZr alloy calorimeter panels) has been assessed by using literature data of the diffusion coefficient. The tritium generated inside the calorimeter panels moves into both the vacuum and water side: the tritium diffusion flux has been evaluated during the beam-on (200 deg. C) and the beam-off (20 deg. C) phases of the NBTF experiments consisting of an interim campaign and a final test. The penetration depth of the tritium through the 2 mm thick CuCrZr alloy material has been also evaluated by using a Monte-Carlo code. As main result, the assessed diffusion flux of tritium during both the beam-on and the beam-off phases are modest. In fact, at the end of the interim campaign (100 days), about the 96% of the all generated tritium (626.5 MBq) exits the calorimeter while the residual tritium inventory (25 MBq) leaves the copper alloy with a diffusion time of about 1 month. At the end of the final test (14 days) about the 99% of the total generated tritium (1.023 x 104 MBq) leaves the copper alloy and the remaining tritium inventory (152.2 MBq) is released by about 32 days. In both the interim campaign and the final test, more than the 99% of the total tritium is transferred into the vacuum side of the calorimeter panel while negligible tritium amounts enter the cooling water system thus showing a very low impact on the environment.

  1. Evaluation of tritium diffusion through the Neutral Beam Injector calorimeter panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgognoni, Fabio [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione Tecnologie e Presidio Nucleare, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (RM) I-00044 (Italy)], E-mail: fabio.borgognoni@frascati.enea.it; Moriani, Andrea [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione Tecnologie e Presidio Nucleare, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (RM) I-00044 (Italy); Sandri, Sandro [ENEA, Dipartimento Biotecnologie, Agroindustria e Protezione della Salute Istituto di Radioprotezione - C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (RM) I-00044 (Italy); Tosti, Silvano [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione Tecnologie e Presidio Nucleare, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (RM) I-00044 (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    The Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) to be realized in Padoa will test the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI), one of the Heating and Current Drive Systems foreseen for ITER. The NBI is based on the acceleration of hydrogen or deuterium negative ions up to 1 MeV. This work has been aimed at assessing the tritium release from the NBTF in order to provide data for the safety analysis. In particular, the diffusion of the tritium through the neutral beam target material (the CuCrZr alloy calorimeter panels) has been assessed by using literature data of the diffusion coefficient. The tritium generated inside the calorimeter panels moves into both the vacuum and water side: the tritium diffusion flux has been evaluated during the beam-on (200 deg. C) and the beam-off (20 deg. C) phases of the NBTF experiments consisting of an interim campaign and a final test. The penetration depth of the tritium through the 2 mm thick CuCrZr alloy material has been also evaluated by using a Monte-Carlo code. As main result, the assessed diffusion flux of tritium during both the beam-on and the beam-off phases are modest. In fact, at the end of the interim campaign (100 days), about the 96% of the all generated tritium (626.5 MBq) exits the calorimeter while the residual tritium inventory (25 MBq) leaves the copper alloy with a diffusion time of about 1 month. At the end of the final test (14 days) about the 99% of the total generated tritium (1.023 x 10{sup 4} MBq) leaves the copper alloy and the remaining tritium inventory (152.2 MBq) is released by about 32 days. In both the interim campaign and the final test, more than the 99% of the total tritium is transferred into the vacuum side of the calorimeter panel while negligible tritium amounts enter the cooling water system thus showing a very low impact on the environ0010me.

  2. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/μm and the emission field at 1 mA/cm2 decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/μm. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters

  3. Neutral beam injector oxygen impurity measurements and concentration reduction via gettering processes. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, R.J.; Hsu, W.L.; Kerr, R.G.; Mills, B.E.; Poulsen, P.; Hibbs, S.

    1984-12-01

    We have measured the reduction of oxygen impurity levels by means of gettering within the arc chambers of the TMX-U neutral-beam injectors using the TMX-U neutral-beam test stand. Our analysis incorporated silicon surface-probe measurements and optical Doppler-shift measurements of the hydrogen alpha spectra of deuterium atoms with energies appropriate for D/sub 2/O parentage. Without gettering, the Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of an exposed silicon sample showed a large oxygen peak below the surface peak with a concentration equivalence of approximately 2% for an accelerated beam. After gettering, with either titanium or chromium getters, optical monochromator data indicated a reduction in the oxygen concentration of at least a factor of 10 whereas Auger spectroscopy data showed at least a factor-of-eight reduction. Other metallic impurities remained below the level of detection even after gettering. Additional effects observed during this study include a change in the accelerated deuterium species concentrations, loss of gettering activity, loss of arc operation, and a change in arc performance due to arc chamber gas absorption during operation.

  4. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  5. Polarization of the sigma minus hyperon produced by a polarized neutral particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spin transfer technique has been tried in an attempt to produce a beam of polarized hyperons. The method makes use of a two-stage targeting scheme where unpolarized protons from Fermilab's Tevatron incident on target number one (Cu) at production angles of ±2.0 mrad would produce a beam of particles containing polarized Λs and Ξs as well as neutrons and Ks. This secondary beam would then be swept magnetically to retain only neutral particles and brought to bear on target number two (Cu) at 0.0 mrad, producing a tertiary beam of hyperons. The polarization of some 1.3 millions reconstructed Σ- → nπ- events in this tertiary beam (the Σ- having been produced in the inclusive reaction neutrals + Cu → Σ- + X) has been measured at average Σ- momenta 320 GeV/c (1.14 millions events) and 410 GeV/c (135,000 events) and found to be |P| = 3.9 ± 3.2 ± 1.8% and |P| = 13.9 ± 8.1 ± 2.0% respectively, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. These polarizations are small and consistent with zero, and preclude a meaningful measurement of the Σ- magnetic moment by the spin precession method. The sign of the polarizations at the target is ambiguous, giving rise to two possible different solutions for the magnetic moment-one of two possible different solutions for the magnetic moment-one of which distinctly disagrees with the world average value for the moment. However, this solution fits the data slightly better than the other. This inconsistency would not exist if the polarization is, in fact, zero

  6. Polarization of the Sigma Minus Hyperon Produced by a Polarized Neutral Particle Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An Nhatton

    A spin transfer technique has been tried in an attempt to produce a beam of polarized hyperons. The method makes use of a two-stage targeting scheme where unpolarized protons from Fermilab's Tevatron incident on target number one (Cu) at production angles of +/-2.0 mrad would produce a beam of particles containing polarized Lambdas and Xis as well as neutrons and Ks. This secondary beam would then be swept magnetically to retain only neutral particles and brought to bear on target number two (Cu) at 0.0 mrad, producing a tertiary beam of hyperons. The polarization of some 1.3 millions reconstructed Sigma^{-} to npi^{-} events in this tertiary beam (the Sigma^{ -} having been produced in the inclusive reaction neutrals + Cu to Sigma^{ -} + X) has been measured at average Sigma^{-} momenta 320 GeV/c (1.14 millions events) and 410 GeV/c (135,000 events) and found to be |P| = 3.9 +/- 3.2 +/- 1.8% and |P| = 13.9 +/- 8.1 +/- 2.0% respectively, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. These polarizations are small and consistent with zero, and preclude a meaningful measurement of the Sigma^{-} magnetic moment by the spin precession method. The sign of the polarizations at the target is ambiguous, giving rise to two possible different solutions for the magnetic moment--one of which distinctly disagrees with the world average value for the moment. However, this solution fits the data slightly better than the other. This inconsistency would not exist if the polarization is, in fact, zero.

  7. Feasibility Study on a Neutral Beam Diagnostic Injector for TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.

    2003-07-01

    A diagnostic neutral beam system is proposed for the TJ-II stellarator. The main goal of installing such a system in TJ-II is to increase the signal to noise ratio and provide spatial resolution in diagnostic systems based on Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy and Neutral Particle Analysis, while also opening up new opportunities for physics studies in this magnetically confined plasma device. After outlining the unique characteristics of the TJ-II and reviewing available diagnostic injector systems, the compact system selected for TJ-II is presented together with estimates of the resulting increased signal levels Finally other important aspects are discussed, in particular its location and orientation, as well as possible solutions to avoid perturbing the TJ-II magnetic configurations in the heliac device. (Author) 31 refs.

  8. Feasibility Study on a Neutral Beam Diagnostic Injector for TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam system is proposed for the TJ-II stellarator. The main goal of installing such a system in TJ-II is to increase the signal to noise ratio and provide spatial resolution in diagnostic systems based on Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy and Neutral Particle Analysis, while also opening up new opportunities for physics studies in this magnetically confined plasma device. After outlining the unique characteristics of the TJ-II and reviewing available diagnostic injector systems, the compact system selected for TJ-II is presented together with estimates of the resulting increased signal levels Finally other important aspects are discussed, in particular its location and orientation, as well as possible solutions to avoid perturbing the TJ-II magnetic configurations in the heliac device. (Author) 31 refs

  9. Neutron and gamma-ray streaming calculations for the ETF neutral-beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium plasma of the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) fusion reactor will be heated and ignited by the injection of neutral deuterium. Since the deuterons must be injected through straight ducts into the plasma, the neutron and secondary gamma radiation produced as a result of the D-T reactions will stream directly into the neutral beam injectors and lead to adverse effects in vital components. The radiation leaking through the injection ports will be comprised of approx. 14 MeV neutrons (from the D-T reactions) plus a low-energy neutron and secondary gamma ray distribution that results from the interactions of the energetic neutrons with the plasma liner and the primary shielding about the torus. In this paper two-dimensional radiation transport calculations carried out to estimate the effects on the injector components of radiation streaming through the injection duct will be described and the results of these calculations will be presented and discussed

  10. Neutron and gamma-ray streaming calculations for the ETF neutral-beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The tritium plasma of the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) fusion reactor will be heated and ignited by the injection of neutral deuterium. Since the deuterons must be injected through straight ducts into the plasma, the neutron and secondary gamma radiation produced as a result of the D-T reactions will stream directly into the neutral beam injectors and lead to adverse effects in vital components. The radiation leaking through the injection ports will be comprised of approx. 14 MeV neutrons (from the D-T reactions) plus a low-energy neutron and secondary gamma ray distribution that results from the interactions of the energetic neutrons with the plasma liner and the primary shielding about the torus. In this paper two-dimensional radiation transport calculations carried out to estimate the effects on the injector components of radiation streaming through the injection duct will be described and the results of these calculations will be presented and discussed.

  11. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to ∼1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is ∼18 deg. C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  12. Neutral beam system for the C-2-Upgrade Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, Sergey; Smirnov, Artem; Clary, Ryan; Dunaevsky, Alexandr; Isakov, Ivan; Magee, Richard; Matvienko, Vasily; van Drie, Alan; Deichuli, Petr; Ivanov, Alexandr; Pirogov, Konstantin; Sorokin, Aleksey; Stupishin, Nickolay; Vakhrushev, Roman; TAE Team; Budker Team

    2015-11-01

    In the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment, tangential neutral beam injection (NBI), coupled with electrically-biased plasma guns at the plasma ends and advanced surface conditioning, led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable, hot FRCs with a significant fast-ion population, total plasma temperature of ~ 1 keV and record lifetimes were achieved. To further improve the FRC sustainment and provide a better coupling with beams, the C-2 device has been upgraded with a new NBI system, which can deliver up to a total of 10 MW of hydrogen beam power (15 keV, 8 ms pulse), by far the largest ever used in compact toroid plasma experiments. The NBI system consists of six positive-ion based injectors featuring flexible, modular design. This presentation will provide an overview of the C-2U NBI system, including: 1) NBI test facility, beam characterization, and acceptance tests, 2) integration with the machine and operating experience, 3) improvements in plasma performance with increased beam power.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of heat transfer elements for SST-1 neutral beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5 MW Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) is designed and commissioned to deliver a heating power of 1.7 MW to the SST-1 tokomak. To sustain the high heat flux in these injection experiments, heat transfer elements (IPR-HTE) were successfully developed and fabricated. These HTEs are actively cooled elements which rely on internal fins and boiling heat transfer to maximise the heat transfer capability. In this work the performance of HTE is analysed using analytical models and a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Validation of these CFD models are accomplished by comparing these with the available experimental results obtained on similar neutral beam systems. For an initial assessment on performance of HTE, a 2-D thermal analysis using transient thermal module of ANSYS software was performed in which the heat transfer coefficient (h) was calculated for the single phase flow for establishing the procedure and preliminary study. For improving the accuracy in these results, a 3-D single phase flow CFD analysis using CFX module of ANSYS software was carried out for detailed study flow characteristics. These results were then compared with the published experimental results of hypervapotron of JET neutral beams which has similar geometry of IPR-HTE. The computational results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental result for heat flux values up to 5 MW/m2 beyond which they deviated from experimental results (32% of deviation) indicating the onset of two phase flow. Hence, a two phase flow analysis was further attempted with Eulerian approach and RPI boiling model in CFX module of ANSYS. With the inclusion of the two phase models and user defined functions, the results agreed well with the experimental results (<15 % deviation). This analysis significantly improved the understanding of the flow characteristics such as velocity streamlines, eddies formulation, temperature distribution and their effect on performance of IPR-HTE at

  14. Solid state generator for powerful radio frequency ion sources in neutral beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio frequency ion sources used in neutral beam injection systems (NBI) of fusion machines are currently supplied by self-excited RF generators. These generators have both a low power efficiency and a limited frequency stability, therefore transistorized amplifiers are being considered for the power supply of the next generation of RF sources. A 75 kW generator, originally designed for broadcasting, has been tested with a negative ion source. High operational reliability and a very good matching to the plasma load has been demonstrated. These results make this generator type a very promising candidate for future NBI systems

  15. Computer based diagnostic and control system for a 120 keV neutral beam test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer based system provides data acquisition, analysis, display, archival, and control functions for the 120 KEV test stand IIIa at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The system supports calorimeter arrays and spectrometer diagnostics, controls all power supplies and provides 7 modes of control ranging from manual control with computer monitor to full auto conditioning with an auto sweep capability for parameter variation studies. This paper describes the software structure, I/O techniques, control algorithms, hardware configuration, and system performance. Conclusions based on system performance provide useful insight for design of neutral beam control systems for use on large plasma devices

  16. Applying Remote Handling Attributes to the ITER Neutral Beam Cell Monorail Crane

    CERN Document Server

    Crofts, O; Raimbach, J; Tesini, A; Choi, C-H; Damiani, C; Van Uffelen, M

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance requirements for the equipment in the ITER Neutral Beam Cell requires components to be lifted and transported within the cell by remote means. To meet this requirement, the provision of an overhead crane with remote handling capabilities has been initiated. The layout of the cell has driven the design to consist of a monorail crane that travels on a branched monorail track attached to the cell ceiling. This paper describes the principle design constraints and how the remote handling attributes were applied to the concept design of the monorail crane, concentrating on areas where novel design solutions have been required and on the remote recovery requirements and solutions.

  17. Solid state generator for powerful radio frequency ion sources in neutral beam injection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, W.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Franzen, P.

    2015-02-15

    Radio frequency ion sources used in neutral beam injection systems (NBI) of fusion machines are currently supplied by self-excited RF generators. These generators have both a low power efficiency and a limited frequency stability, therefore transistorized amplifiers are being considered for the power supply of the next generation of RF sources. A 75 kW generator, originally designed for broadcasting, has been tested with a negative ion source. High operational reliability and a very good matching to the plasma load has been demonstrated. These results make this generator type a very promising candidate for future NBI systems.

  18. Applying remote handling attributes to the ITER neutral beam cell monorail crane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maintenance requirements for the equipment in the ITER neutral beam cell require components to be lifted and transported within the cell by remote means. To meet this requirement, the provision of an overhead crane with remote handling capabilities has been initiated. The layout of the cell has driven the design to consist of a monorail crane that travels on a branched monorail track attached to the cell ceiling. This paper describes the principle design constraints and how the remote handling attributes were applied to the concept design of the monorail crane, concentrating on areas where novel design solutions have been required and on the remote recovery requirements and solutions

  19. Formation of Balmer Lines in Impulsively Heated Flare Atmosphere by Neutral Beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varady, M.; Kašparová, Jana; Moravec, Z.; Karlický, Marian; Heinzel, Petr

    San Francisco: Astronomical Society otf the Pacific, 2012 - (Sekii, T.), s. 341-344. (ASP Conference Series. 454). ISBN 9781583817902. [Hinode Science Meetin /3./. Tokyo (JP), 01.12.2009-04.12.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/1680; GA ČR GA205/07/1100; GA ČR GP205/06/P135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar atmoshpere * neutral beams Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  20. Field reversed configuration confinement enhancement through edge biasing and neutral beam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszewski, M; Smirnov, A; Thompson, M C; Korepanov, S; Akhmetov, T; Ivanov, A; Voskoboynikov, R; Schmitz, L; Barnes, D; Binderbauer, M W; Brown, R; Bui, D Q; Clary, R; Conroy, K D; Deng, B H; Dettrick, S A; Douglass, J D; Garate, E; Glass, F J; Gota, H; Guo, H Y; Gupta, D; Gupta, S; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Longman, A; Hollins, M; Li, X L; Luo, Y; Mendoza, R; Mok, Y; Necas, A; Primavera, S; Ruskov, E; Schroeder, J H; Sevier, L; Sibley, A; Song, Y; Sun, X; Trask, E; Van Drie, A D; Walters, J K; Wyman, M D

    2012-06-22

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) with high confinement are obtained in the C-2 device by combining plasma gun edge biasing and neutral beam injection. The plasma gun creates an inward radial electric field that counters the usual FRC spin-up. The n = 2 rotational instability is stabilized without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. The FRCs are nearly axisymmetric, which enables fast ion confinement. The plasma gun also produces E × B shear in the FRC edge layer, which may explain the observed improved particle transport. The FRC confinement times are improved by factors 2 to 4, and the plasma lifetimes are extended from 1 to up to 4 ms. PMID:23004613

  1. Design of Experimental Data Publishing Software for Neutral Beam Injector on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Hu, Chundong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wu, Deyun

    2015-02-01

    Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) is one of the most effective means for plasma heating. Experimental Data Publishing Software (EDPS) is developed to publish experimental data to get the NBI system under remote monitoring. In this paper, the architecture and implementation of EDPS including the design of the communication module and web page display module are presented. EDPS is developed based on the Browser/Server (B/S) model, and works under the Linux operating system. Using the data source and communication mechanism of the NBI Control System (NBICS), EDPS publishes experimental data on the Internet.

  2. Design of Experimental Data Publishing Software for Neutral Beam Injector on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) is one of the most effective means for plasma heating. Experimental Data Publishing Software (EDPS) is developed to publish experimental data to get the NBI system under remote monitoring. In this paper, the architecture and implementation of EDPS including the design of the communication module and web page display module are presented. EDPS is developed based on the Browser/Server (B/S) model, and works under the Linux operating system. Using the data source and communication mechanism of the NBI Control System (NBICS), EDPS publishes experimental data on the Internet. (fusion engineering)

  3. High frequency cascaded resonant transformer rectifier power supply for neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection for fusion requires DC megavolt power sources at several amperes. The conventional methods of using series or shunt fed multipliers cannot provide the current while the 60 Hz coupled transformer method is difficult to modularize because of size and stores excessive amounts of energy. A technique which borrows from several technologies has been investigated and shows promise for a satisfactory solution. This technique uses resonant multistage high frequency (100 kHz) series coupled ferrite transformer with rectifiers to produce megavolts at several amperes of current. Modularity, high efficiency and low energy storage are desirable features of this power source

  4. Pascal software structures achieve definite control of the 24 MFTF sustaining neutral-beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise control of large, complex systems is not assured unless there is known to be no unintended interactions in the control system. The software controlling the sustaining neutral-beam power supplies of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility accomplishes this feat. The software structures comprise some 16,000 lines of commented Pascal code, distributed amoung 10 different tasks. Each task may control any of the 24 power supplies. All the tasks are strictly event-driven, and are not subject to any system mode. Since there is no global information in the software, we know that all the power supplies are controlled independently

  5. Estimated nuclear effects in the neutral beam injectors of a large fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are given for the nuclear heat loads on the cryopanels, radiation damage (energy deposition rate) in ion gun insulators, and dose equivalent rates from induced activity in the components for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) neutral beam injectors. The estimates have been obtained by scaling similar results, obtained by careful neutronics analysis for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The approximate nature of the scaling procedure introduces considerable uncertainty in the results, but they are, hopefully, correct to within an order of magnitude and may be substantially more accurate

  6. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R.S. [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  7. Low damage etching method of low-k material with a neutral beam for interlayer dielectric of semiconductor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reduce the cross-talk between nanoscale devices, low-k materials such as methyl silsesquioxane (MSQ), which is damaged easily during plasma etching, are introduced as an intermetallic dielectric material in addition to the use of copper as the conducting material for the reduction of parasitic resistance and capacitance. In this study, beam techniques such as neutral/ion beams were used in the etching of MSQ and the effect of these beam techniques on the reduction of the degradation of the MSQ were investigated. When MSQ was etched using the same CF4 etch gas at the similar etch rate as that used for conventional MSQ etching using inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), the neutral/ion beam etching showed lower F contents and lower penetration depth of F, indicating decreased degradation by fluorination of MSQ during etching using the beam techniques. Especially, the neutral beam etching technique showed the lowest F contamination and the lower penetration depth of F among the etch methods. When the dielectric constant was measured after the etching of the same depth, the MSQ etched with the neutral beam showed the lowest change of the dielectric constant, while that etched using the ICP showed the highest change of dielectric constant. The lower degradation, that is, the lower chemical modification of MSQ material with the beam technique is believed to be related to the decreased concentration of radical species in the processing chamber reacting with the MSQ surface, while the lowest degradation using the neutral beam is believed to be due to the lower reaction rate of the reactive neutral compared to reactive ions

  8. Low damage etching method of low-k material with a neutral beam for interlayer dielectric of semiconductor device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seung Hyun [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Kyu [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746, South Korea and Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ho [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Woo [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Geun Young, E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746, South Korea and SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    To reduce the cross-talk between nanoscale devices, low-k materials such as methyl silsesquioxane (MSQ), which is damaged easily during plasma etching, are introduced as an intermetallic dielectric material in addition to the use of copper as the conducting material for the reduction of parasitic resistance and capacitance. In this study, beam techniques such as neutral/ion beams were used in the etching of MSQ and the effect of these beam techniques on the reduction of the degradation of the MSQ were investigated. When MSQ was etched using the same CF{sub 4} etch gas at the similar etch rate as that used for conventional MSQ etching using inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), the neutral/ion beam etching showed lower F contents and lower penetration depth of F, indicating decreased degradation by fluorination of MSQ during etching using the beam techniques. Especially, the neutral beam etching technique showed the lowest F contamination and the lower penetration depth of F among the etch methods. When the dielectric constant was measured after the etching of the same depth, the MSQ etched with the neutral beam showed the lowest change of the dielectric constant, while that etched using the ICP showed the highest change of dielectric constant. The lower degradation, that is, the lower chemical modification of MSQ material with the beam technique is believed to be related to the decreased concentration of radical species in the processing chamber reacting with the MSQ surface, while the lowest degradation using the neutral beam is believed to be due to the lower reaction rate of the reactive neutral compared to reactive ions.

  9. Cavity Ringdown Technique for negative-hydrogen-ion measurement in ion source for neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cavity Ringdown Technique (CRD) is applied for negative hydrogen ion (H−) density measurement in H− source for the neutral beam injector. The CRD is one of the laser absorption techniques. Nd:YAG pulse laser was utilized for negative-hydrogen-ion photodetachment. The H− density related to extracted H− beam was successfully observed by a fixed position CRD. A two-dimensional movable CRD has been developed to measure the H− density profile. Measured profiles were consistent with expected profiles from the H− production area in pure hydrogen and cesium seeded plasmas. By applying absorption saturation in the optical cavity, negative hydrogen ion temperature was evaluated and was confirmed as being a similar value measured with other diagnostics

  10. Power transmission characteristics of a two-stage multiaperture neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam power transmission and grid loading characteristics of a two-stage neutral beam source are presented. The dependence of power deposition on the target, the grids, and the gas cell was studied over a wide range of extraction perveance values with the accel-to-extraction gap field ratio as the other parameter. The results show that the power transmission improves remarkably with increasing field ratio. For sufficiently large field ratios (approx. =2.5), more than 80% of the input IV power was collected on a target located 4 m downstream and subtending 2 0 half angle to the source. The sum of the grid loading is approximately double that of single-stage accelerators; the plasma grid loading is the highest, followed by ground grid, accel grid, and extraction grid in that order

  11. Selective in-plane nitrogen doping of graphene by an energy-controlled neutral beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takeru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene promises to improve current electronic devices, sensors, and energy-based devices. To this end, the bonding states between carbon and nitrogen atoms can be manipulated to tailor the properties of the doped graphene. For example, graphitic nitrogen is known to promote desired catalytic activities in graphene fuel-cell systems, resulting from a four-electron reaction. However, established nitrogen-doping methods lack selectivity in dopant chemical identity and in dopant location; both are key factors in graphene property design because the properties depend on the chemical identity and location of the dopant. Here, we utilize a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) technique-with exquisite beam energy control-to dope graphene with nitrogen. Using x-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopy, we show that the energy of the nitrogen NB not only determines the chemistry of the nitrogen dopant introduced to graphene, but it also dictates the doping locations within graphene layers. PMID:26559390

  12. Measurement of KL0 flux at the J-PARC neutral-kaon beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the KL0 flux measurements performed at the J-PARC neutral-kaon beam line. This beam line was constructed for an experiment aiming to observe the CP-violating rare decay KL0→π0νν¯. The primary proton energy was 30 GeV and the KL0 production angle was 16°. Prior to the physics run, the KL0 flux and spectrum were measured by counting KL0→π+π-π0 decays with a simple setup, which was composed of an electromagnetic calorimeter and a hodoscope system. Results from these measurements are presented and compared with various hadron-interaction simulations.

  13. Birth: A Neutral Beam Deposition Code for Non-Circular Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new neutral beam deposition code has been developed which is capable of calculating fast ion deposition profiles including the orbit correction. The code incorporates any injection geometry and a non-circular cross-section plasma with a variable elongation and an outward shift of the magnetic flux surface. Typical CPU time on a KL DEC-10 computer is 10--20 s and 5--10 s with and without the orbit correction, respectively. This is shorter by an order of magnitude than that of other codes, e.g., Monte Carlo beam deposition codes. The power deposition profile calculated by this code is in good agreement with that calculated by the Monte Carlo code which was developed to calculate the complete behaviors of the fast ions in circular plasmas

  14. Status of PRIMA, the test facility for ITER neutral beam injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonato, P.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Zaccaria, P.; ITER International Team

    2013-02-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1MV a 40A beam of negative deuterons, delivering to the plasma about 17MW up to one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was decided to build a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. The Japan and the India Domestic Agencies participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as KIT-Karlsruhe, IPP-Garching, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. In the paper the main requirements are discussed and the design of the main components and systems are described.

  15. Calorimeter design-aspects for neutral beam injection on W7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, D., E-mail: holtum@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Froeschle, M.; Heinemann, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Liebe, T. [Fa. Xenos GmbH, Jugendstr. 2, D-81667 Muenchen (Germany); Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Rong, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Schubert, W. [Fa. Xenos GmbH, Jugendstr. 2, D-81667 Muenchen (Germany); Staebler, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) is one of the heating systems for Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). The beam power of the NBI is measured calorimetrically. Using the knowledge gained from ASDEX-Upgrade operation, the complete calorimeter was re-designed. The design-aspects and the necessary improvements for operation on W7-X are described in this paper. The main aspects improved concern: (i) the adapted slope of the winding drum at the lift, (ii) the adjustable acceleration/deceleration ramp and integrated position sensors, (iii) the improvements of panels in the body, (iv) the accessibility for mounting panels, (v) the water-distribution, and (vi) the centering of the body on the support to fix and reproduce the measuring position. The manufacturing is in progress, installation will start in 2011 and the commissioning is scheduled for the end of 2014.

  16. Calorimeter design-aspects for neutral beam injection on W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) is one of the heating systems for Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). The beam power of the NBI is measured calorimetrically. Using the knowledge gained from ASDEX-Upgrade operation, the complete calorimeter was re-designed. The design-aspects and the necessary improvements for operation on W7-X are described in this paper. The main aspects improved concern: (i) the adapted slope of the winding drum at the lift, (ii) the adjustable acceleration/deceleration ramp and integrated position sensors, (iii) the improvements of panels in the body, (iv) the accessibility for mounting panels, (v) the water-distribution, and (vi) the centering of the body on the support to fix and reproduce the measuring position. The manufacturing is in progress, installation will start in 2011 and the commissioning is scheduled for the end of 2014.

  17. Neutral beam injection heating on field-reversed configuration plasma decompressed through axial translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power deposition of neutral beam injection (NBI) on translated field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma has been investigated. A certain level of electron heating effect was observed in the slowly decaying phase of the decompressed FRC, leading to a hollow electron temperature profile. Numerical calculation of beam trajectories has shown that about 50% of the injected NB power is absorbed by the plasma electron inside the separatrix with a hollow deposition profile similar to the observed electron temperature profile. The estimated absorbed NB power of 120 kW will be enough to bring the change in electron temperature, since the electron conduction and radiation loss was estimated to be ∼100 kW

  18. High current H- ion sources for the large helical device neutral beam injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Osakabe, M.; Asano, E.; Kawamoto, T.; Akiyama, R.

    1998-02-01

    Two large helical device-neutral beam injector (LHD-NBI) ion sources were fabricated and tested in the test stand for producing a beam of 180 keV×40 A with H- ions. They are Cesiated multicusp ion sources with a rectangular discharge chamber and a single stage multihole accelerator. These are scaled up from the 16 A H- ion sources in the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). A plasma source with a high aspect ratio was operated stably with an arc power up to ˜300 kW for 10 s, after balancing of the electron emission from the filaments was made. A satisfactorily dense and uniform plasma without mode flip was produced. Electrons accompanied by H- ions were reduced by an extraction grid with the electron trap, instead of straight holes. The electron beam component caused by the stripping of electrons from H- ions was detected with an array of calorimeters at the bottom of the connecting duct. At the first stage of the test, one of the five segment grids of the accelerator was installed. An H- ion current of 5.5 A with a current density of 27.5 mA/cm2 for 0.6 s was obtained with an arc power of 135 kW with Cs introduction. A high arc power efficiency for H- ions was observed. The intense cusp field is considered to be the important factor to improve this. The beam divergence angle at 10.4 m downstream was ˜10 mrad. Since these results satisfied our design, a full segment accelerator was tested in the next stage. Beam conditioning for five segment grids is underway. So far, an H- current of 21.0 A has been obtained at 106 keV for 0.6 s. As a result, we had good prospects for achieving the full specification of LHD-NBI ion sources, especially for achieving higher current and focused beam as well as for long pulse. The neutral beam injection experiment for the LHD is scheduled to start in the middle of 1998.

  19. Fast control and data acquisition in the neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, A., E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • The paper describes the fast control and data acquisition in the ITER neutral beam test facility. • The usage of real time control in ion beam generation and extraction is proposed. • Real time management of breakdowns is described. • The implementation of event-driven data acquisition is reported. - Abstract: Fast control and data acquisition are required in the ion source test bed of the ITER neutral beam test facility, referred to as SPIDER. Fast control will drive the operation of the power supply systems with particular reference to special asynchronous events, such as the breakdowns. These are short-circuits among grids or between grids and vessel that can occur repeatedly during beam operation. They are normal events and, as such, they will be managed by the fast control system. Cycle time associated to such fast control is down to hundreds of microseconds. Fast data acquisition is required when breakdowns occur. Event-driven data acquisition is triggered in real time by fast control at the occurrence of each breakdown. Pre- and post-event samples are acquired, allowing capturing information on transient phenomena in a whole time-window centered on the event. Sampling rate of event-driven data acquisition is up to 5 MS/s. Fast data acquisition may also be independent of breakdowns as in the case of the cavity ring-down spectroscopy where data chunks are acquired at 100 MS/s in bursts of 1.5 ms every 100 ms and are processed in real time to produce derived measurements. The paper after the description of the SPIDER fast control and data acquisition application will report the system design based on commercially available hardware and the MARTe and MDSplus software frameworks. The results obtained by running a full prototype of the fast control and data acquisition system are also reported and discussed. They demonstrate that all SPIDER fast control and data acquisition requirements can be met in the prototype solution.

  20. Fast control and data acquisition in the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The paper describes the fast control and data acquisition in the ITER neutral beam test facility. • The usage of real time control in ion beam generation and extraction is proposed. • Real time management of breakdowns is described. • The implementation of event-driven data acquisition is reported. - Abstract: Fast control and data acquisition are required in the ion source test bed of the ITER neutral beam test facility, referred to as SPIDER. Fast control will drive the operation of the power supply systems with particular reference to special asynchronous events, such as the breakdowns. These are short-circuits among grids or between grids and vessel that can occur repeatedly during beam operation. They are normal events and, as such, they will be managed by the fast control system. Cycle time associated to such fast control is down to hundreds of microseconds. Fast data acquisition is required when breakdowns occur. Event-driven data acquisition is triggered in real time by fast control at the occurrence of each breakdown. Pre- and post-event samples are acquired, allowing capturing information on transient phenomena in a whole time-window centered on the event. Sampling rate of event-driven data acquisition is up to 5 MS/s. Fast data acquisition may also be independent of breakdowns as in the case of the cavity ring-down spectroscopy where data chunks are acquired at 100 MS/s in bursts of 1.5 ms every 100 ms and are processed in real time to produce derived measurements. The paper after the description of the SPIDER fast control and data acquisition application will report the system design based on commercially available hardware and the MARTe and MDSplus software frameworks. The results obtained by running a full prototype of the fast control and data acquisition system are also reported and discussed. They demonstrate that all SPIDER fast control and data acquisition requirements can be met in the prototype solution

  1. Conceptual design of a 500 keV, 20 MW negative-ion-based neutral beam injector for FER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A negative-ion-based neutral beam injector is designed conceptually for Fusion Engineering Reactor (FER). The injector is characterized by a long, slender beamline, which is 0.3 - 0.4 m wide, 40 m long, supplying 500 keV, 20 MW neutral beams into the tokamak. Beam divergence is 0.3 degree and such a low divergence is considered to be attainable by using a volume D- ion source because the divergence of 0.8 - 0.9 degree was obtained in our recent experimental results in spite of the low beam energy of 25 keV. Tangential beam injection is possible in this design because of high beam energy and a narrow drift duct. Maintenance of the injector will be easy since beamline components installed near the tokamak are small and simple, and complicated beamline components such as the ion source are situated far from the tokamak. (author)

  2. Transmission of the Neutral Beam Heating Beams at TJ-II; Transmision del Haz de Neutros de Calentamiento en TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes Lopez, C.

    2007-09-27

    Neutral beam injection heating has been development for the TJ-II stellarator. The beam has a port-through power between 700-1500 kW and injection energy 40 keV. The sensibility of the injection system to the changes of several parameters is analysed. Beam transmission is limited by losses processes since beam is born into the ions source until is coming into the fusion machine. For the beam transmission optimization several beam diagnostics have been developed. A carbon fiber composite (CFC) target calorimeter has been installed at TJ-II to study in situ the power density distribution of the neutral beams. The thermographic print of the beam can be recorded and analysed in a reliable way due to the highly anisotropic thermal conductivity of the target material. With the combined thermographic and calorimetric measurements it has been possible to determine the power density distribution of the beam. It has been found that a large beam halo is present, which can be explained by the extreme misalignment of the grids. This kind of halo has a deleterious effect on beam transport and must be minimized in order to improve the plasma heating capability of the beams. (Author) 155 refs.

  3. Comparison of Heating Efficiency Between Co and Counter Neutral Beam injection in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Katsunori; Kaneko, Osamu; Osakabe, Masaki; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Oka, Yoshihide; Murakami, Sadayoshi; Narihara, Kazumichi; Asano, Eiji E.; Kawamoto, Toshikazu; LHD Experiment Groups Team

    2001-10-01

    In the Large Helical Device, tangential neutral beam injection (NBI) is adopted in order to avoid that the fast ions are directly trapped in helical ripples. Then effective heating is realized by negative ion based high energy tangential NBI systems in Large Helical Device, two beam lines ware arranged counter -injection and the other one was arranged co-injection. However, it is predicted that the absorption efficiency of a NBI heating is also influenced by troidal drift motion of injected beam particle in weak magnetic field (Bt < 1T) operations such as high beta experiment. And also plasmas must be build up by using tangential NBI heating alone from the magnetic field strength Bt 0.5T to 1.5T, since heating by electron cyclotron heating can not be performed. So, the efficiency of co and counter NBI heating is an important issue for generating high beta plasma. According to experiment results, either of co and counter NBI was able to heat plasma efficiently in Bt=0.75T. Enhancement factors of energy confinement time without considering direct drift loss is almost the same in these plasmas. However, there is a difference in build up time of plasma by co and counter. There are no big difference in an electron temperature profile of co and counter heating as low as Bt=0.75 although the beam absorption profile may be different between co and counter injection.

  4. Theoretical study of the electrostatic lens aberrations of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrations due to the electrostatic lenses of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector and the space charge effect are theoretically investigated. A multi-stage extractor/accelerator is modeled and the aberration coefficients are numerically calculated using the eikonal method, which is conventionally used in electron optics. The aberrations are compared with the radii of a beam core with good beam divergence and a beam halo with poor beam divergence. H- beamlet profile measurements give the 1/e radii of the beam core and beam halo of 5.8 mm (beam divergence angel: 6 mrad) and 11.5 mm (beam divergence angel: 12 mrad), respectively. When the beam divergence angle of the beam core is 5 mrad and the beam energy is 406 keV, the aberrations due to the electrostatic lenses are less than a few millimeters, thus are less than the radii of the beam core and beam halo. The geometrical aberrations due to te space charge effect (negative ion current density: 10 mA/cm2), however, are estimated to be much larger than the radius of the beam halo. Although the aperture radii of the grids are not taken into account in this estimation, the results indicate that the space charge effect is an important factor in the aberration or beam halo in a negative ion accelerator. (author)

  5. Relative and absolute level populations of beam-foil excited neutral helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative and absolute populations of excited levels in neutral helium have been measured. An experimental system was built and calibrated with a tungsten ribbon standard lamp. Helium was accelerated to 0.275 MeV by a Van de Graaff generator and passed through a carbon foil. Transitions in the spectral region between lambda 2829 A and lambda 5875 A were observed and the relative and absolute level populations per emergent neutral atom were calculated for the upper levels of the transitions. Beam geometry, polarization, cascading, and normalization were taken into account. The populations showed a dependence roughly proportional to the inverse cube of the principal quantum number, with no preferential populations of the ground state. Level populations with the same principal quantum number but different orbital angular momentum and spin were not proportional to the statistical weights of the levels. However, they showed a tendency to approach statistical behavior with increasing principal quantum number. The triplet and singlet spin level populations also differ from purely statistical population ratios. Further, these ratios exhibit a slight dependence on incident particle energy in the range 0.160 to 0.500 MeV. A measurement of excitation functions for the levels 4s 1S, 4s 3S, 3p1P, 3p3P, 4d1D, 4d3D in this same energy range shows that the number of these levels per emergent atom is increasing, although the total number of neutral atoms is decreasing

  6. Heavy ion beam-ionosphere interactions: Charging and neutralizing the payload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The argon release controlled studies (ARCS 1-3) rocket flights carried ion generators to altitudes of 400-500 km in the nighttime auroral ionosphere. Three distinct electrical charging and neutralization processes were seen on the payloads during gun operation: steady or dc vehicle charging, brief charging at gun turn-on, and extended oscillatory sequences. Many of the unexpected consequences of gun firings are attributed to these payload charging and neutralization processes. Electrical charging is regulated by the rate at which low-energy electrons escape from the generator, which in turn is dependent on magnetic field geometry. Each ion generator produced a dipolar magnetic field which merged with the Earth's field near the rocket. The resulting local magnetic field guided electrons back to the rocket for certain gun orientations, thereby inhibiting neutralization. Transient charging was attributed to the formation of an electron cloud around at least some vehicles, while dc charging altered the rocket's surroundings until the electron escape rate balanced the ion beam flux. The authors concluded that during oscillatory events the entire environment of a payload could alternate between hot electron and cold electron configurations at very high rates, possibly exceeding 10 kHz. These changes in the plasma environment did not produce substantial electric field perturbations at the dc or ac high impedance electric field sensors, so were not seen in data from typical wave detectors. However, changes in plasma density and temperature produced dramatic effects on low impedance electric current sensors such as Langmuir probes

  7. Fast neutral lithium beam probing of the edge region of the spherical tokamak ETE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The close relationship between the behavior of the edge plasma characteristics and the global confinement in discharges in tokamaks has been extensively explored in recent years. A 15 keV lithium beam with 80% neutralization efficiency, using a high ion current density emitter and a modified Pierce gun design for extraction of ions, was developed for edge studies on the spherical tokamak ETE--(major radius R=0.30 m, aspect ration A=1.5, designed plasma current of 200 kA with a torodial magnetic field up to 0.4 T). Already in the calibration phase this diagnostics confirmed to be an efficient experimental tool, allowing accurate measurements of the fast varying pressure of the discharges in ETE. The measurement of the temporal evolution of the density of the plasma edge with fast neutral lithium beam is in accordance with data from Langmuir probe for the region near the limiter and the one made by the Thomson scattering for the inner region

  8. Formation and sustainment of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by spheromak merging and neutral beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews a compact toroid reactor concept that addresses critical issues for forming, stabilizing and sustaining a field reversed configuration (FRC) with the use of plasma merging, plasma shaping, conducting shells, neutral beam injection (NBI). In this concept, an FRC plasma is generated by the merging of counter-helicity spheromaks produced by inductive discharges and sustained by the use of neutral beam injection (NBI). Plasma shaping, conducting shells, and the NBI would provide stabilization to global MHD modes. Although a specific FRC reactor design is outside the scope of the present paper, an example of a promising FRC reactor program is summarized based on the previously developed SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasmas by Induction, Reconnection and Injection Techniques) concept in order to connect this concept to the recently achieved the High Performance FRC plasmas obtained by Tri Alpha Energy [Binderbauer et al, Phys. Plasmas 22,056110, (2015)]. This paper includes a brief summary of the previous concept paper by M. Yamada et al, Plasma Fusion Res. 2, 004 (2007) and the recent experimental results from MRX.

  9. Etching characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and poly crystalline silicon by hydrogen hyperthermal neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogen hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) generated by an inclined slot-excited antenna electron cyclotron resonance plasma source has been used to etch hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. In this work, we present selective etching of a-Si:H with respect to poly-Si by hydrogen plasma and hydrogen HNB under various substrate temperatures, gas pressures, and bias voltages of the neutralizer. We have observed that the etch rate of a-Si:H is considerably higher than that of poly-Si. The etch rate is largely dependent upon the substrate temperature. In this experiment, the optimal substrate temperature for improving the etch rate is approximately at 150 °C. The root mean square surface roughness of the etched material reaches a maximum at 150 °C and decreases rapidly. The etch rate of poly-Si is not sensitive to changes in the experimental condition, such as the substrate temperatures and gas pressures. However, as the hydrogen HNB energy is increased, the etch rate of poly-Si also increases gradually. The hydrogen HNB energy contributes in improving the etch rate of a-Si:H and poly-Si films. - Highlights: • The highest etch rate is shown to be at the substrate temperature of 150 °C. • We investigated the effects of hydrogen hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) energy. • Increasing HNB energy shows an increase in the etch rate of the poly-Si and a-Si:H

  10. Etching characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and poly crystalline silicon by hydrogen hyperthermal neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seung Pyo; Kim, Jongsik; Park, Jong-Bae; Oh, Kyoung Suk; Kim, Young-Woo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kim, Dae Chul, E-mail: dchcharm@nfri.re.kr

    2015-03-31

    A hydrogen hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) generated by an inclined slot-excited antenna electron cyclotron resonance plasma source has been used to etch hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. In this work, we present selective etching of a-Si:H with respect to poly-Si by hydrogen plasma and hydrogen HNB under various substrate temperatures, gas pressures, and bias voltages of the neutralizer. We have observed that the etch rate of a-Si:H is considerably higher than that of poly-Si. The etch rate is largely dependent upon the substrate temperature. In this experiment, the optimal substrate temperature for improving the etch rate is approximately at 150 °C. The root mean square surface roughness of the etched material reaches a maximum at 150 °C and decreases rapidly. The etch rate of poly-Si is not sensitive to changes in the experimental condition, such as the substrate temperatures and gas pressures. However, as the hydrogen HNB energy is increased, the etch rate of poly-Si also increases gradually. The hydrogen HNB energy contributes in improving the etch rate of a-Si:H and poly-Si films. - Highlights: • The highest etch rate is shown to be at the substrate temperature of 150 °C. • We investigated the effects of hydrogen hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) energy. • Increasing HNB energy shows an increase in the etch rate of the poly-Si and a-Si:H.

  11. Production and detection of neutral molecular beams : from single amino acids to biomolecular complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents a laser desorption source for neutral organic molecules and clusters as well as the first exploration of a superconducting single photon detector for the detection of massive neutral particles. Whereas the source can produce beams of biomolecules for various gas-phase applications, the detector can be used to overcome the current post- ionization detection mass limit of neutral molecules. The aim of our work is to produce and detect neutral molecular gas-phase beams, ranging from small amino acids overlarge polypeptides to massive complexes. The purpose of creating these beams is to use them for quantum optics experiments, like near field matter wave interference and its applications in metrology. Standard effusive sources usually lack the ability to cool the evaporated organic molecules fast enough to prevent fragmentation. In contrast to that, the presented laser desorption source cools the initially evaporated molecules by embedding them into a supersonic seed gas beam. The mixing of the seed gas and the desorbed molecules is implemented both in free expansion as well as inside a closed mixing channel. The desorbed neutral molecules are detected by photo-ionization using UV (266 nm) and FUV (157 nm) light followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For the amino acid tryptophan (204amu) and for the antibiotic polypeptide gramicidin (1884amu) the ion yields for both photo-ionization wavelengths are examined and the ionization cross sections for the UV wavelength are measured. In case of tryptophan the ionization yield is comparable for both wavelengths, whereas gramicidin is detected fifteen times more efficiently under VUV ionization than for UV ionization at equal intensity. Desorption of heavier molecules than gramicidin never resulted in a detectable ion yield, which confirms the known inefficiency for the post-ionization of isolated large organic molecules [1-3]. The desorption source is also used for the formation of large neutral

  12. Benchmarking of neutral beam current drive codes as a basis for the integrated modelling for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection is a robust method for heating and current drive because it does not depend on any resonance conditions or coupling conditions at the edge. High-energy neutral beam current drive (NBCD) was experimentally validated for central current drive in JT-60U, giving a further confidence in ITER predictions. Recent progress in diagnostics, equilibrium solvers and analysis techniques enable rather detailed comparisons with NBCD codes. However, different codes give somewhat different results. Thus, we need to clarify physics implementations in NBCD codes, such as the beam model, ionization process, fast ion diffusion in the velocity space, orbit effects and electron shielding. Also from an integrated modelling viewpoint, an NBCD code benchmark is needed to establish a more solid basis for ITER operations. A benchmark of the Fokker-Planck code ACCOME has been performed against the orbit following Monte-Carlo code OFMC. Although calculated profiles agree rather well, the OFMC profile is slightly wider than the ACCOME one. The difference in the total fast ion current is ∼ 15%. We have examined fast ion diffusion in the 2D velocity space and observed difference in the diffusion in the pitch angle space. We have also examined orbit effects using a point source of the fast ions. Comparison of OFMC runs with and without the drift term in the orbit equation shows the finite banana width effect is not negligible. We have started a new NBCD code benchmark in the frame of the ITPA Steady-State Operation Topical Group with Fokker-Planck codes and orbit following Monte-Carlo codes such as OFMC, ACCOME, SPOT, NEMO, ASTRA, TRANSP/NUBEAM, ONETWO/NUBEAM, DRIFT and TOPICS. (author)

  13. Parametric scaling studies of the energy confinement time for neutral beam heated Heliotron E plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic analysis of the global energy confinement time for neutral beam heated Heliotron E plasmas has been performed with a 1-D, time independent transport analysis code, PROCTR-Mod. From a regression analysis of a representative sample selection of the presented data sets, the global energy confinement time, τEG(ms), is found to scale as τEG=13n-bareαPheatβBγ, where α=0.53±0.10, β=-0.71±0.09, and γ=0.35±0.14; the error bar indicates the 95% confidence region deduced from the limited data points; n-bare(1014cm-3) is the line average electron density; Pheat(MW) is the neutral beam heating power; and B(T) is the vacuum magnetic field at the magnetic axis. The data analysis shows that the favourable density dependence partially offsets the unfavourable power dependence and that anomalous electron transport loss becomes dominant in the overall energy balance as the beam power and the plasma density are increased. An alternative scaling law is also presented, which is to fit τEG(ms) by an 'offset linear' law, τEG=ζB2+ηe>/Pheat, where ζ=1.1±0.33 and η=15.0±1.9; e>(1014cm-3) is the volume average electron density. The latter scaling is found to provide a better fit to the presented data sets, in spite of its simple form. The parametric scaling of the local electron thermal diffusivity, χe, is also discussed on the basis of the kinetic analysis. (author). 40 refs, 21 figs, 2 tabs

  14. High-beta experiments with neutral-beam injection on PDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of high-beta plasmas produced in PDX with near-perpendicular neutral-beam injection are reported. Systematic power scans have been performed over a wide range of toroidal fields (νsub(T)q.7 T< Bsub(T)<2.2 T) and plasma currents (200 kA< Isub(p)<500 kA). At high toroidal fields, the change in total stored energy due to beam injection increases linearly with input power and also increases with plasma current. At lower toroidal fields and low injection power levels, the stored energy also increases with power and plasma current. However, at high power and low toroidal fields, a saturation in heating is observed. This result suggests the onset of a νsub(T) limit for circular cross-section tokamaks with near-perpendicular injection. Scaling experiments indicate that this νsub(T) limit increases with rising 1/q. Values of νsub(T)approx.=3% at qsub(PSI)=1.8 have been achieved. At high values of νsub(T)q, short bursts of MHD activity are observed, synchronized with sharply increased fluxes of perpendicular charge-exchange neutrals and rapid decreases in the rate of beam-driven neutron production. When strong bursts occur, there is a significant depletion of the fast-ion population. Estimates of the fast-ion loss indicate that it could explain the observed decrease in heating, although an additional reduction in thermal-plasma confinement cannot be ruled out. Numerical studies using measured pressure profiles predict that the equilibria obtained become unstable to the ideal n=1 internal mode, at about the same value of 0 where the new fluctuations are observed. (author)

  15. A spectroscopic study of impurity behavior in neutral-beam and ohmically heated TFTR discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative spectroscopic measurements of Z/sub eff/, impurity densities, and radiated power losses have been made for ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated TFTR discharges at a plasma current of 2.2 MA and toroidal field of 4.7 T. Variations in these quantities with line-average plasma density (anti n/sub e/) and beam power up to 5.6 MW are presented for discharges on a graphite movable limiter. A detailed discussion of the use of an impurity transport model to infer absolute impurity densities and radiative losses from line intensity and visible continuum measurements is given. These discharges were dominated by low-Z impurities with carbon having a considerably higher density than oxygen, except in high-anti n/sub e/ ohmic discharges, where the densities of carbon and oxygen were comparable. Metallic impurity concentrations and radiative losses were small, resulting in hollow radiated power profiles and fractions of the input power radiated being 30 to 50% for ohmic heating and 30% or less with beam heating. Spectroscopic estimates of the radiated power were in good agreement with bolometrically measured values. Due to an increase in the carbon density, Z/sub eff/ rose from 2.0 to 2.8 as the beam power increased from 0 to 5.6 MW, pointing to a potentially serious dilution of the neutron-producing plasma ions as the beam power increased. Both the low-Z and metallic impurity concentrations were approximately constant with minor radius, indicating no central impurity accumulation in these discharges

  16. Development of a 400 keV multi-stage electrostatic accelerator for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-stage electrostatic accelerator has been tested up to 400 keV. The structure of the accelerator is the same as that of the 500 keV accelerator for the JT-60U negative-ion-based neutral beam injection (N-NBI) system. It was confirmed that the heat loads were mainly due to secondary particles generated by the stripping of H- ions in the accelerator, and suppressed effectively by reducing the operational gas pressure. The heat loads at the source pressure of 0.3 Pa, which is the design pressure of the JT-60U ion source, were evaluated to be 3.4 % (the first acceleration grid), 4.3 % (the second acceleration grid) and 2.4 % (the grounded grid) of the input electric power. A H- beam of 0.18 A has been accelerated successfully up to 400 keV for 1 s from 9 apertures. The accelerated H- current density was 13 mA/cm2, the same current density of the JT-60U source. Higher H- beam current of 0.5 A was also obtained at 350 keV from 49 apertures. (orig.)

  17. Toroidal plasma rotation in the PLT tokamak with neutral-beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroidal plasma rotation in the Princeton Large Torus, PLT, has been measured for various plasma and neutral beam injection conditions. Measurements of the plasma rotational velocities were made from Doppler shifts of appropriate spectral lines and include data from both hydrogen and deuterium beams and co- and counter-injection at several electron densities. Without injection, a small but consistent toroidal rotation exists in a direction opposite to the plasma current (counter-direction) in the plasma center but parallel to the current (co-direction) in the plasma periphery. Using these measured velocities and the plasma density and temperature gradients, radial electron fields can be determined from theory, giving E/sub r / approx. = 40 V/cm near the plasma center and E/sub r/ approx. = 10 V/cm near the plasma edge. Insertion of a local, 2.5 percent magnetic well produced no observable effect on the beam driven rotation. Modeling of the time evolution and radial distribution of the rotation allows one to deduce an effective viscosity of the order of (1 to 5) x 104 cm2/sec

  18. Physics design of the injector source for ITER neutral beam injector (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, V; Agostinetti, P; Aprile, D; Cavenago, M; Chitarin, G; Fonnesu, N; Marconato, N; Pilan, N; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Veltri, P

    2014-02-01

    Two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are foreseen to provide a substantial fraction of the heating power necessary to ignite thermonuclear fusion reactions in ITER. The development of the NBI system at unprecedented parameters (40 A of negative ion current accelerated up to 1 MV) requires the realization of a full scale prototype, to be tested and optimized at the Test Facility under construction in Padova (Italy). The beam source is the key component of the system and the design of the multi-grid accelerator is the goal of a multi-national collaborative effort. In particular, beam steering is a challenging aspect, being a tradeoff between requirements of the optics and real grids with finite thickness and thermo-mechanical constraints due to the cooling needs and the presence of permanent magnets. In the paper, a review of the accelerator physics and an overview of the whole R&D physics program aimed to the development of the injector source are presented. PMID:24593568

  19. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value

  20. Experimental measurements of bifurcations, chaos and three cycle behaviour on a neutralized electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment involving the natural oscillations on an electron beam propagating parallel to a magnetic field in a low pressure gas is described. Increasing the beam current, Isub(b), increases the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation until period doubling occurs. With a further small increase many more period doublings occur in rapid succession until the spectrum of the oscillations is essentially flat out to the original frequency fsub(o) above which it rapidly decreases. This state remains as Isub(b) is increased until, suddenly, a perfectly coherent three cycle oscillation appears with a periodicity three times that of fsub(o); with a small further increase of Isub(b), the three cycle becomes a six cycle and then the chaotic regime returns. The frequency fsub(o) agrees well with the ion plasma frequency of the neutralized electron beam and is probably driven by some form of shear instability. The behaviour of the system is remarkably well modelled by a simple, one-dimensional quadratic difference equation

  1. Measurement of the beam asymmetry in neutral pion photoproduction from the proton near Threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A precise measurement of neutral pion photoproduction with a linearly polarized, tagged, photon beam and almost 4π detector in the threshold region (and higher) was performed at the Mainz Microtron. The Glasgow-Mainz tagged photon facility alon with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detector system and a cryogenic liquid hydrogen target were used to obtain the total and differential cross sections simultaneously with the photon-beam asymmetry. This allowed for a precise determination of the S-wave amplitude, all three P-wave amplitudes and, for the first time, their energy dependence. The unitary cusp in the S-wave amplitude arising from charged pion re-scattering was also examined, leading to the extraction of the cusp function for the real part of the electric dipole amplitude. Results for the photon-beam asymmetry differ from the only previous measurement, which was done with the TAPS detector alone (PRL 87 232501). These data provide the most stringent test to date of the predictions of Chiral Perturbation Theory and its energy region of convergence.

  2. Design and test of-80 kV snubber core assemblies for MFTF sustaining-neutral-beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core snubbers, located near the neutral beam source ends of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS) source cables, protect the neutral beam source extractor grid wires from overheating and sputtering during internal sparkdowns. The snubbers work by producing an induced counter-emf which limits the fault current and by absorbing the capacitive energy stored on the 80 kV source cables and power supplies. A computer program STACAL was used in snubber magnetic design to choose appropriate tape wound cores to provide 400 Ω resistance and 25 J energy absorption. The cores are mounted horizontally in a dielectric structure. The central source cable bundle passes through the snubber and terminates on three copper buses. Multilam receptacles on the buses connect to the source module jumper cables. Corona rings and shields limit electric field stresses to allow close clearances between snubbers

  3. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.; Foster, C.A.; Haselton, H.H.; Hayes, P.H.; Menon, M.M.; Moeller, J.A.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle ..cap alpha.. to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin ..cap alpha.. (for the present design, ..cap alpha.. =13/sup 0/ and 21/sup 0/). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics.

  4. Multi-Seconds Diagnostic Neutral Beam Injector Based on Arc-Discharge with LaB6 Hollow Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic neutral beam injector based on arc-discharge plasma source with LaB6 hollow cathode is described.The ion source of the diagnostic injector provides a proton beam with a current up to 2.5A, the particle energy up to 50 keV, the beam divergence is ∼0.5 deg. The beam species at the 2 A ion current are: H+-83%, H2+-5%, H3+-12%. The injector was tested at pulse duration up to 2 seconds

  5. Ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the nearly perpendicular neutral beam injection in the Wendelstein VII-A stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the high power neutral beam injection is investigated for the conditions of the W VII-A stellarator by means of linear stability analysis. On the basis of only collisional (classical) slowing down, beam ion distribution functions are calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulation. In this report, various cases are considered: Transient beam ion distributions (i) immediately after switch on the neutral beam injection and (ii) after half of an average slowing down time; stationary beam ion distributions (iii) for confinement properties strongly improved by radial electric fields, transport and fast orbit losses are neglected for these situations, and (iv) for worse confinement properties for which the average beam ion confinement time is of the order of the average slowing down time. Furthermore, the distribution functions of the ions originating from the neutral beam injection are estimated for the early phase of the discharges with low temperatures and for the later phase with maximum ion temperatures. (orig.)

  6. Design of the precast, post-tensioned concrete shielding structure for the TFTR neutral beam test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the TFTR facility, the Neutral Beam Test Cell is a room separated from the TFTR Cell by a 4-foot-thick concrete wall and devoted to testing the neutral beam injector. The function of the shielding structure is to protect personnel from radiation casued by pulsing the injector. The distance from the TFTR device to the injector is large enough to permit use of magnetic materials in the shielding structure, and the neutron flux levels are small enough so that ordinary concrete of moderate thickness may be employed. Radiation considerations are not discussed in this paper, which is devoted to a description of the structural design of the shield

  7. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  8. Internal Transport Barrier in Edge Plasma of Small Size Divertor Tokamak Using Neutral Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekheit, A. H.

    2013-08-01

    We model the internal transport barrier "ITB" in edge plasma of small size divertor tokamak with B2SOLPS0.5.2D fluid transport code. The simulation results demonstrated the following: (1) we control the internal transport barrier by altering the edge particle transport through changes the edge toroidal rotation which agree with the result of Burrell et al. (Edge Pedestal control in quiescent H-mode discharges in DIII-D using co-plus counter-neutral beam injection, Nucl Fusion, 49, 085024 (9pp) in 2009). (2) The radial electric field has neoclassical nature near separatrix with discharge by co-injection NBI. (3) The toroidal plasma viscosity has strong influence on the toroidal velocity.

  9. New source of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S., E-mail: sargis@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Prasad, R. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany); Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7-1NN (United Kingdom); Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, CEA, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, 33405 Talence (France)

    2016-02-15

    The scenario of “electron-capture and -loss” was recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with MeV kinetic energies. However, it does not explain why the formation of negative ions in a liquid spray is much more efficient than with an isolated atom. The role of atomic excited states in the charge-exchange processes is considered, and it is shown that it cannot account for the observed phenomena. The processes are more complex than the single electron-capture and -loss approach. It is suggested that the shell effects in the electronic structure of the projectile ion and/or target atoms may influence the capture/loss probabilities.

  10. Prompt Loss of Energetic Ions during Early Neutral Beam Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early neutral-beam injection is used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to heat the electrons and slow current penetration which keeps q(0) elevated to avoid deleterious MHD activity and at the same time reduces Ohmic flux consumption, all of which aids long-pulse operation. However, the low plasma current (Ip ∼ 0.5 MA) and electron density (ne ∼ 1 x 1013 cm-3) attending early injection lead to elevated orbit and shine through losses. The inherent orbit losses are aggravated by large excursions in the outer gap width during current ramp-up. An investigation of this behavior using various energetic particle diagnostics on NSTX and TRANSP code analysis is presented

  11. Commercialization of a high energy neutral beam ion source. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-21

    This final report summarizes the effort and presents the results of a Phase II fabrication effort to build an industrial prototype of the LBL developed high energy neutral beam source. The effort was primarily concentrated on incorporating hard vacuum dielectric seals and a ceramic high voltage accelerator insulator. Several other design changes were incorporated for cost, reliability or life improvements to include: (1) accelerator grid locating dowel pins to aid final alignment, (2) plasma source to accelerator captive fasteners to aid filament replacement during source maintenance, (3) molybdenum cooling tubes on all accelerator grids, (4) additional fasteners in the plasma generator to facilitate hard seals, (5) modified suppressor grid rails and holders to simplify final grid alignment, (6) adjusting screws on exit grid rail holders to simplify final grid alignment, (7) addition of adjusting screws to the grid end pieces to simplify alignment, and (8) addition of accelerator hat shims to allow two different grid positioning locations.

  12. Review of energy confinement and local transport scaling results in neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, tokamak neutral beam injection experiments have evolved from the brute force study of the effects of global discharge characteristics (I/sub p/, anti n/sub e/, P/sub heat/, etc.) on energy confinement to the appreciation that there are effects more subtle, yet controllable, that may influence confinement dramatically. While this evolution from first to second generation experiments is derived from an empirical understanding of low and high energy confinement modes and how to achieve them operationally, the underlying physics is still unknown. Several theories with different physical bases appear to describe the global scaling of the low confinement mode discharges quite well. On the other hand, little agreement has been found between theoretical and experimentally deduced values of local transport coefficients. While it is known operationally how to achieve any one of several types of high confinement mode discharges, here too, the underlying physics of the transport associated with these modes is poorly understood

  13. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goumiri, I. R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Rowley, C. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Boyer, M. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Andre, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kolemen, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Taira, K. [Florida State Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Tallahassee, FL USA.

    2016-02-19

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  14. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Kolemen, E.; Taira, K.

    2016-03-01

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  15. Development of hard-seal gate valve and fast shutter for JT-60 neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 600 mm hard-seal valve and a fast shutter for the JT-60 Neutral Beam Injector were developed. The 600 mm hard-seal gate valve was fabricated and tested for 500 cycles at various temperatures of up to 2500C. In consequence, requirements of the endurance and vacuum tightness were satisfied. Major components of the fast shutter, i.e., swing action bellows and a high-speed pneumatic cylinder, were tested for 30,000 cycles, and their reliability was confirmed. Then the fast shutter was fabricated and tested. The test result indicated that the fast shutter fully satisfied the requirements of the molecular gas flow conductance and opening/closing speed. (author)

  16. Armor plate protection for the Doublet III vacuum vessel for neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of vacuum vessel armor plate for neutral beam systems presents a number of challenges to the engineer. Heat fluxes of several hundred watts/cm2 must be handled on a routine basis during normal plasma operations, and a factor of ten increase in these fluxes can occur during plasma disruptions. At the present time, a graphite tile system appears to be the best candidate for such a situation. Heat fluxes in excess of 4 kW/cm2 can be routinely sustained and the material sputtered or evaporated from the surface has a low atomic number. The system proposed for Doublet III will provide valuable data for the designers of future fusion reactors and will also provide proof-of-principle demonstrations for such machines as TFTR and JET

  17. Design of pulsed heat load removal system for JT-60 neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrictions imposed on the heat removal system for JT-60 Neutral Beam Injectors are very severe. Since it handles a large amount of pulsed heat load, the system tends to be very large, if it is designed based on a conventional method. Such a design would be unreasonable, if we consider about construction fee as well as space allowed for it. In the present report, we have taken into account the transient state of pulsed heat load and have tried to design the heat load removal system suffering pulsed heat load to be very compact. As a result of the design, it turned out that the system can be made in a scale which is less than 1/10 of the conventional design. This design is also applied to heat load removal system for the prototype-NBI for JT-60. (author)

  18. TJ-II neutral beam injectors control and data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Control and Data Acquisition System for the Neutral Beam Injectors of TJ-II are described in this paper. The DAQ and Control architecture is based on a distributed system including VME-OS9 real-time computers and personal computers (PCs) with Linux and Windows NT. One OS9-VME local computer located near each injector performs the timing, local signal processing, signal interlock, and operation of the injector mechanical and electrical components. A main OS9-VME interfaces and controls some peripheral systems, such as the high voltage power supplies, water cooling, safety and protection systems. Control is performed from the OS9-VME machines, in which the software elements are basically C/C++ programs performing real time processing and a web server enabling access to the HTML pages acting as user graphic interface

  19. Ion internal transport barrier in neutral beam heated plasmas on HL-2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D. L.; Wei, Y. L.; Liu, L.; Dong, J. Q.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Sun, A. P.; Cao, J. Y.; Shi, Z. B.; Wang, Z. X.; Xiao, Y.; Yuan, B. S.; Du, H. R.; He, X. X.; Chen, W. J.; Ma, Q.; Itoh, S.-I.; Zhao, K. J.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J.; Ji, X. Q.; Zhong, W. L.; Li, Y. G.; Gao, J. M.; Deng, W.; Liu, Yi; Xu, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; HL-2A Team

    2016-05-01

    Ion internal transport barriers (iITBs) are first observed in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas at the HL-2A tokamak. The position of the barrier foot, in the stationary state, coincides with the q  =  1 surface within its uncertainty of measurement. iITBs can develop more easily at the beginning of NBI heating. Also, iITBs are unstable for the sawtooth plasma. Simulations reveal that the thermal diffusivity of ions (χ i) inside the barrier can be as low as the neoclassical level. It is observed that the flow shear in the stationary iITB state reaches the level required for suppressing the ion temperature gradient mode instability, which indicates the important role of flow shear in sustaining the iITB.

  20. HVPTF-The high voltage laboratory for the ITER Neutral Beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzi, A., E-mail: antonio.delorenzi@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Pilan, N.; Lotto, L.; Fincato, M. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Pesavento, G.; Gobbo, R. [DIE, Universita di Padova, Via Gradenigo 6A, I-35100 Padova (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    In the MITICA research program for the construction of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector prototype, a Laboratory for the investigation on high voltage holding in vacuum has been set up. This Laboratory - HVPTF: High Voltage Padova Test Facility - is presently capable of experiments up to 300 kV dc, and planned for the upgrade to 800 kV. The specific mission for this ancillary lab is the support to the electrostatic design and construction of the MITICA accelerator and the development and testing of HV components to be installed inside the MITICA accelerator during its operation. The paper describes the structure of the lab, characterized by a high degree of automation and reports the results of the commissioning at 300 kV and the first results of voltage holding between test electrodes.

  1. Confinement scaling studies of rf- and neutral-beam heated currentless heliotron E plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametrical scaling studies of rf- and neutral-beam-heated currentless Heliotron E plasmas have been performed. Parametrical local electron transport analyses show that the electron energy transport of the ECH plasmas has nearly the same values as the neoclassically predicted ones inside the 2/3 radius, while the NBI and the ICRF plasmas are dominated by the anomalous electron transport in the whole region. Scaling studies on global energy confinement time reveal that the ECH, NBI and ICRF plasmas obey nearly the same scaling that is characterized as continuous power degradation and favorable positive density dependence. The global energy confinement time is thought to be influenced by the anomalous transport in the peripheral plasma region in common with the ECH, NBI and ICRF plasmas, although the core plasma properties such as the local electron transport seem to be different between these plasmas. (author)

  2. Progress in control and data acquisition for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, Adriano, E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy); Manduchi, Gabriele; Taliercio, Cesare; Soppelsa, Anton [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy); Paolucci, Francesco; Sartori, Filippo [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Barbato, Paolo; Capobianco, Roberto; Breda, Mauro; Molon, Federico; Moressa, Modesto; Polato, Sandro; Simionato, Paola; Zampiva, Enrico [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► An ion source experiment, referred to as SPIDER, is under construction in the ITER neutral beam test facility. ► The progress in designing and testing the SPIDER control and data acquisition system is reported. ► An original approach is proposed in using ITER CODAC and non-ITER CODAC technology. -- Abstract: SPIDER, the ion source test bed in the ITER neutral beam test facility, is under construction and its operation is expected to start in 2014. Control and data acquisition for SPIDER are undergoing final design. SPIDER CODAS, as the control and data acquisition system is referred to, is requested to manage 25 plant units, to acquire 1000 analogue signals with sampling rates ranging from a few S/s to 10 MS/s, to acquire images with up to 100 frames per second, to operate with long pulses lasting up to 1 h, and to sustain 200 MB/s data throughput into the data archive with an annual data storage amount of up to 50 TB. SPIDER CODAS software architecture integrates three open-source software frameworks each addressing specific system requirements. Slow control exploits the synergy among EPICS and Siemens S7 programmable controllers. Data handling is by MDSplus a data-centric framework that is geared towards the collection and organization of scientific data. Diagnostics based on imaging drive the design of data throughput and archive size. Fast control is implemented by using MARTe, a data-driven, object-oriented, real-time environment. The paper will describe in detail the progress of the system hardware and software architecture and will show how the software frameworks interact to provide the functions requested by SPIDER CODAS. The paper will focus on how the performance requirements can be met with the described SPIDER CODAS architecture, describing the progress achieved by carrying out prototyping activities.

  3. High power neutral beam operation at 120 keV with a single stage extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 37 A, 120 keV, 0.1 s pulse length, perveance matched hydrogen beam has been obtained reliably by using a three electrode extraction system with shaped circular apertures illuminated by a rectangular periplasmatron ion source of 12 x 38 cm2 full extraction area. The length of the ''accel'' gap was 2 cm and the extracted ion current density, at 120 keV, J+ = 200 mA/cm2. The injector was operated with a neutralizing gas cell of nl approximately = 7.1015 mol/cm2 gas target thickness. Divergence angles as low as 0.65deg in hydrogen and 0.4deg in argon have been measured. The grid power loadings, normalized to the H.V drain power and to the ion source filling pressure (mTorr) were: 0.1% for the plasma grid, 0.02% for the negative grid and 0.07% for the neutralizer grid. The results show that such a 3-grid system is suitable for high energy injectors required for the JET device and that it can be advantageously utilized instead of a 4-grid system on account of its greater simplicity. (author)

  4. ? modification by means of counter-neutral beam injection in a low-? plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Burrell, K. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Hinton, F. L.; Sager, G. T.; Staebler, G. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.

    1996-08-01

    The idea of controlling the radial electric field 0741-3335/38/8/059/img3 by means of a radial current resulting from ion orbit loss caused by counter neutral beam injection has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. A large fraction (0741-3335/38/8/059/img4%) of the 75 keV deuterium ions counter-injected into a low-0741-3335/38/8/059/img5 plasma (0741-3335/38/8/059/img6 MA) suffers prompt orbit loss, which forces an inward ion current to maintain charge neutrality. Monte Carlo guiding-centre orbit calculations predict a radial current of 80 A at the last closed flux surface. In these discharges, 0741-3335/38/8/059/img7 is negative everywhere, owing to the counter-going toroidal rotation, and exhibits a double-bump shape, in contrast to the usual positive parabolic shape for the co-injection case. The measured carbon impurity ion toroidal rotation profile shows a pedestal over the outer region where fast ions are lost, possibly due to the effect of 0741-3335/38/8/059/img8 torque. The momentum diffusion process tends to slow down and to spatially spread the 0741-3335/38/8/059/img8 torque effect. The L - H transition did not occur more quickly in these discharges than in similar co-injected discharges.

  5. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun, E-mail: Kychen@ipp.cas.cn, E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Hu, Liqun, E-mail: Kychen@ipp.cas.cn, E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhu, Yubao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  6. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well

  7. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  8. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  9. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at ∼1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of ∼50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  10. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)3He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3He(d,p)4He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  11. Conceptual design of a compact absolute valve for the ITER neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Chris [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: chris.m.jones@jet.uk; Waldon, Chris; Martin, David; Watson, Mike [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sonderegger, Kurt; Lenherr, Bruno [VAT Vakuumventile AG, CH-9469 Haag (Switzerland); Andrews, Ian; Mansbridge, Simon [VAT Vacuum Products Ltd., Edmund House, Rugby Road, Leamington Spa, Warwickshire CV32 6EL (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The reference design for the ITER neutral beam injectors incorporated a fast shutter to limit tritium migration to the injector vacuum enclosures. In 2005, a need for an 'absolute' isolation valve was identified to facilitate injector maintenance procedures and protect the system from an in-vessel ingress of coolant event (ICE). An outline concept for an all-metal seal valve was developed during 2006, in close cooperation with the Swiss valve manufacturer VAT. During the following year, it became apparent that the length of beamline available for the valve was significantly less than originally envisaged, resulting in a radical revision of the design concept. A casing length of 760 mm has been achieved by means of major changes to the casing structure, plate dimensions, pendulum mechanism and seal actuators. A concept for a seal protection system has been developed to prevent beam line contamination reaching the valve components and to protect the valve plate from surface heating by plasma radiation. The new design concept has been extensively validated by analysis, including a whole-system FE model of the valve.

  12. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  13. Neutron diagnostic that measures Z/sub eff/ in a neutral-beam-heated Tokomak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of pitch-angle scattering in a beam-driven Tokomak is proportional to Z/sub eff/ when neutral deuterium is injected parallel or antiparallel to the toroidal field B/sub T/. The energy spectrum of neutrons produced by D--D or D--T reactions is sensitive to the angular distribution of reacting energetic deuterons so that a measurement of the spectrum may be used to infer Z/sub eff/. Energy spectra of neutrons emitted parallel to B/sub T/ during simultaneous co- and counter-injection were calculated for the case of 120-keV beams by using a PPPL code. The results were then convoluted with spectrometer lineshapes determined experimentally for a system used to measure neutron spectra during a 1.0-s source pulse. Results indicate that Z/sub eff/ in the range of 1 to 4 may be determined with uncertainties of +- 0.25 for D--D plasma and +- 0.5 for D--T plasma, provided the ion temperature T/sub i/ is well known. However, the spectrometer energy resolution is not adequate to determine T/sub i/ directly from a neutron--spectrum measurement. In the absence of accurate T/sub i/ data, the uncertainty in Z/sub eff/ is approximately +- 1. In either case, impurity identification is not established by this type of measurement

  14. Neutron diagnostic that measures Z/sub eff/ in a neutral-beam-heated Tokomak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, D.R.

    1979-04-30

    The rate of pitch-angle scattering in a beam-driven Tokomak is proportional to Z/sub eff/ when neutral deuterium is injected parallel or antiparallel to the toroidal field B/sub T/. The energy spectrum of neutrons produced by D--D or D--T reactions is sensitive to the angular distribution of reacting energetic deuterons so that a measurement of the spectrum may be used to infer Z/sub eff/. Energy spectra of neutrons emitted parallel to B/sub T/ during simultaneous co- and counter-injection were calculated for the case of 120-keV beams by using a PPPL code. The results were then convoluted with spectrometer lineshapes determined experimentally for a system used to measure neutron spectra during a 1.0-s source pulse. Results indicate that Z/sub eff/ in the range of 1 to 4 may be determined with uncertainties of +- 0.25 for D--D plasma and +- 0.5 for D--T plasma, provided the ion temperature T/sub i/ is well known. However, the spectrometer energy resolution is not adequate to determine T/sub i/ directly from a neutron--spectrum measurement. In the absence of accurate T/sub i/ data, the uncertainty in Z/sub eff/ is approximately +- 1. In either case, impurity identification is not established by this type of measurement.

  15. Experimental study of the bridged and classical structures of the ethyl radical and cation by neutralized ion-beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The states of ethyl radicals formed in electron capture reactions of a fast beam of C2H5+ with a series of metal target atoms (K, Na, Ca, Mg, and Zn) have been investigated by neutral beam scattering techniques. Reactions of C2H5+ with Mg or Zn atoms lead to formation of ground state radicals and an excited state about 0.5 eV above the dissociation limit of C2H4+H. Analysis of branching ratios for these processes over a range of Mg atom densities shows that the ion beam is a mixture of two isomers in the ratio of about 7.3/1.0 for beams generated either by electron impact or chemical ionization methods. From neutral-precursor ion relationships we propose that the major and minor components of the ion beam are the bridged and classical C2H5+ structures, respectively. Analysis of neutral beam profiles in experiments with Na or K targets indicate the formation of a dissociative state of the classical radical lying about 4.2 eV above the ground state. An upper limit of 2.2 eV to the barrier to 1, 2 hydrogen migration in the classical radical is provided by the energy of the lowest state of the bridged radical observed

  16. Hyperthermal molecular beam scattering: K--O2 ion/neutral product angular, energy, and branching ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions of K+ ions and K atoms from collisions of a beam of hyperthermal K atoms with a cross beam of thermal O2 molecules were determined in the range from 18 to 38 eV (lab). A pronounced rainbow was observed in the ion-pair channel at a reduced angle of 240 eV deg. A smaller rainbow was also found in the neutral channel at 220 eV deg. Energy loss distributions for both product species were also determined at 28 eV (lab) by time-of-flight measurements. Both K+ ions and K atoms from K+O2 were detected concurrently. A pseudorandom pulsing method was used to increase the duty cycle. The TOF spectra indicated overlapping energy-loss distributions corresponding to ground and excited state formation for both the neutral and ion products. Excited state to ground state branching ratios for both the neutral and ion products were determined as a function of reduced angle. The neutral branching ratio shows a pronounced peak at approx.180 eV deg., while the ion ratio increases rapidly above 200 eV deg. From these ratios the differential cross sections were calculated for neutral K in which either K or O2 is electronically excited. These cross sections are similar to the differential cross sections of K+ ions. The neutral to ion branching ratios, also determined, exhibit a broad minimum in the vicinity of the rainbow angle. Differential cross sections for neutral and ion scattering were integrated to give the total neutral/ion branching ratio of approx.4. A preliminary analysis of the experimental differential cross sections has been performed via an atom--atom model. Although the model has substantial and expected deficiencies, the analysis strongly indicates that the quartet surfaces emanating from the neutral ground electronic asymptote must be substantially more repulsive than the corresponding doublet surface

  17. Electric and magnetic field measurements inside a high-velocity neutral beam undergoing ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vector electric field measurements have been made inside two ionizing, high-velocity streams of barium atoms in the Earth's ionosphere. A variety of electrical phenomena were observed across the frequency spectrum and are presented in this paper, which emphasizes the experimental results. A most startling result is that a very large quasi-dc electric field was detected antiparallel to the beam velocity. This by itself is not unreasonable since newly ionized barium ions with their large gyroradii are expected to create such a field. But since the beam had roughly a 45 degree angle with the magnetic field, Bo, the authors find a very large (approx-gt 500 mV/m) component of E parallel to Bo. The fluctuating electric fields were also quite large, in fact, of the same order of magnitude as the quasi-dc pulse. The wave energy was found to maximize at frequencies below the barium lower hybrid frequency and included strong signatures of the oxygen cyclotron frequency. Measurements made on a subpayload separated across Bo by several hundred meters and along Bo by several kilometers do not show the large pulse, although a variety of wave emissions were seen. In addition, very large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations were detected in both bursts. Although they have no clear explanation, they appear to be real phenomenon and worthy of future study. Finally, they note that even though the critical ionization velocity effect did not go into a discharge mode in this experiment, remarkable electromagnetic effects were seen in the neutral beam-plasma interaction

  18. SIPHORE: Conceptual Study of a High Efficiency Neutral Beam Injector Based on Photo-detachment for Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative high efficiency neutral beam injector concept for future fusion reactors is under investigation (simulation and R and D) between several laboratories in France, the goal being to perform a feasibility study for the neutralization of intense high energy (1 MeV) negative ion (NI) beams by photo-detachment.The objective of the proposed project is to put together the expertise of three leading groups in negative ion quantum physics, high power stabilized lasers and neutral beam injectors to perform studies of a new injector concept called SIPHORE (SIngle gap PHOto-neutralizer energy REcovery injector), based on the photo-detachment of negative ions and energy recovery of unneutralised ions; the main feature of SIPHORE being the relevance for the future Fusion reactors (DEMO), where high injector efficiency (up to 70-80%), technological simplicity and cost reduction are key issues to be addressed.The paper presents the on-going developments and simulations around this project, such as, a new concept of ion source which would fit with this injector topology and which could solve the remaining uniformity issue of the large size ion source, and, finally, the presentation of the R and D program in the laboratories (LAC, ARTEMIS) around the photo-neutralization for Siphore.

  19. Long-pulse neutral beam power supply system for LBL 20 kV, 10 A sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honey, V.J.; Baker, W.R.; Fitzgerald, M.L.

    1976-05-01

    A description is given of the power supplies and control system for the LBL 20 kV, 10 A, 10 sec long-pulse neutral beam source test facility, now in operation. Such sources are used in a number of existing and planned fusion power experiments.

  20. Design and implementation of a user-friendly interface for DIII-D neutral beam automated operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operational interface to the DIII-D neutral beam system, in use for the past 10 years, consisted of several interactive devices that the operator used to sequence neutral beam conditioning and plasma heating shots. Each of four independent MODCOMP Classic control computers (for four DIII-D beamlines) included a touch screen, rotary knobs, an interactive dual port terminal, and a keyboard to selectively address each of five display screens. Most of the hardware had become obsolete and repair was becoming increasingly expensive. It was clear that the hardware could be replaced with current equipment, while improving the ergonomics of control. Combined with an ongoing effort to increase the degree of automated operation and its reliability, a single microcomputer-based interface for each of the four neutral beam MODCOMP Classic control computers was developed, effectively replacing some twenty pieces of hardware. Macintosh II microcomputers were selected, with 1 megabyte of RAM and ''off-the-shelf'' input/output (I/O) consisting of a mouse, serial ports, and two monochrome high-resolution video monitors. The software is written in PASCAL and adopts standard Macintosh ''window'' techniques. From the Macintosh interface to the MODCOMP Classic, the operator can control the power supply setpoints, adjust ion source timing and synchronization, call up waveform displays on the Grinnell color display system, view the sequencing of procedures to ready a neutral beam shot, and add operator comments to an automated shot logging system. 3 refs., 2 figs

  1. Initial measurements of the beam ion profile in NSTX with the Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) array on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) utilizes silicon diodes coupled to fast digitizers to measure the energy distribution of charge exchange fast neutral particles (35∼100 keV) at four fixed tangency radii (60, 90, 100, and 120 cm) to obtain the corresponding beam ion profile. Noise reduction techniques required to operate in the tokamak environment and post-shot pulse height analysis (PHA) methods are described. The results have been compared with those on the scanning E//B type Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) and good agreement was achieved. The redistribution and loss of beam ions during MHD activity including sawteeth events and internal reconnection events have been observed. (author)

  2. Measurement of longitudinal phase space in an accelerated H- beam using a laser-induced neutralization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced neutralization of H- ions is a process that can be used to measure the longitudinal phase space of accelerated H- beams. The laser-induced neutralization diagnostic approach (LINDA) measures the longitudinal emittance of an H- beam by photoneutralizing different phase slices of beam microbunches and analyzing the energy distribution of the neutral slices. A LINDA system utilizing a pulsed laser and time-of-flight analysis has successfully measured longitudinal emittance of the 5 MeV H- beam exiting the drift-tube linac of the Los Alamos Accelerator Test Stand. Design considerations associated with the LINDA laser-based emittance measuring system are given. The present LINDA system is described and its limitations are discussed. Experimental results are given from an application of the LINDA system to the measurement of longitudinal emittance growth in a drift space and following insertion into the beamline of beam transport elements comprising a single-arm funnel. A new system is proposed which uses a mode-locked laser and spectrometer to improve resolution and shorten measurement time. (orig.)

  3. Neutral beam heating for jet, construction and test of a quasi-stationary plasma heating system at the 10 MW level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection is one of the two heating methods for JET. During the first stage of operation hydrogen beams will be injected at 80 keV with a beam pulse length of 10 s. The total beam power into the Torus is 18 MW with 10 MW in the full energy beam component. The power will be provided from 16 beam sources with an extracted ion beam current of 60 A each, arranged in two systems of 8 sources. For the second stage of operation the system will be modified to 160 keV deuterium beams, with 30 A extracted beam current per source. (orig.)

  4. Design considerations for a negative ion source for dc operation of high-power, multi-megaelectron-volt neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dc negative hydrogen and/or deuterium ion source is needed to prouce high-power, high-energy neutral beams for alpha diagnostics and current drive applicatiosn in fusion devices. The favorable beam particle energy for such applications extends to 1.5 MeV/amu. Continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have been proposed to accelerate negative ions effeciently to this energy range. In this paper, the desired beam properties for ion beams injected into cw RFQ accelerators are summariezed. A number of candidate ion sources being developed at Culham, JAERI, LBL, and ORNL may prove useful for these applications. The properties of the Volume Ionization with Transverse Extraction (VITEX) ion sources being developed at ORNL are presented. Scaling such a dc ion source to produce ampere beams is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Effect of a neutral N2 cloud on the electrical charging of an electron beam-emitting rocket in the ionosphere - Echo IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, G. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of 114 moles of neutral N2 and a 40-kV, 80 mA electron beam was studied during the Echo IV rocket flight. Neutralizing return currents to the rocket body preferentially followed a route back through the region where the electron beam interacted with the cloud. Photometric observations of a complex luminous discharge accompanying beam injection are reported. Observations of 3914-A emission produced by the beam indicated a maximum neutral N2 number density of nearly 10 to the 15th power per cu cm. An oscillatory discharge with a frequency somewhat lower than the N2 (+) ion gyrofrequency was noted at one point.

  6. Powerloads on the front end components and the duct of the heating and diagnostic neutral beam lines at ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M. J.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Geli, F.; Graceffa, J.; Urbani, M.; Schunke, B.; Chareyre, J. [ITER Organisation, 13607 St. Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Dlougach, E.; Krylov, A. [RRC Kurchatov institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-08

    The heating and current drive beam lines (HNB) at ITER are expected to deliver ∼16.7 MW power per beam line for H beams at 870 keV and D beams at 1 MeV during the H-He and the DD/DT phases of ITER operation respectively. On the other hand the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) line shall deliver ∼2 MW power for H beams at 100 keV during both the phases. The path lengths over which the beams from the HNB and DNB beam lines need to be transported are 25.6 m and 20.7 m respectively. The transport of the beams over these path lengths results in beam losses, mainly by the direct interception of the beam with the beam line components and reionisation. The lost power is deposited on the surfaces of the various components of the beam line. In order to ensure the survival of these components over the operational life time of ITER, it is important to determine to the best possible extent the operational power loads and power densities on the various surfaces which are impacted by the beam in one way or the other during its transport. The main factors contributing to these are the divergence of the beamlets and the halo fraction in the beam, the beam aiming, the horizontal and vertical misalignment of the beam, and the gas profile along the beam path, which determines the re-ionisation loss, and the re-ionisation cross sections. The estimations have been made using a combination of the modified version of the Monte Carlo Gas Flow code (MCGF) and the BTR code. The MCGF is used to determine the gas profile in the beam line and takes into account the active gas feed into the ion source and neutraliser, the HNB-DNB cross over, the gas entering the beamline from the ITER machine, the additional gas atoms generated in the beam line due to impacting ions and the pumping speed of the cryopumps. The BTR code has been used to obtain the power loads and the power densities on the various surfaces of the front end components and the duct modules for different scenarios of ITER

  7. Assessment and modification of an ion source grid design in KSTAR neutral beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Jin, Hyung Gon; Guen Choi, Bo; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho

    2014-02-01

    A new 2 MW NB (Neutral Beam) ion source for supplying 3.5 MW NB heating for the KSTAR campaign was developed in 2012 and its grid was made from OFHC (Oxygen Free High Conductivity) copper with rectangular cooling channels. However, the plastic deformation such as a bulging in the plasma grid of the ion source was found during the overhaul period after the 2012 campaign. A thermal-hydraulic and a thermo-mechanical analysis using the conventional code, ANSYS, were carried out and the thermal fatigue life assessment was evaluated. It was found that the thermal fatigue life of the OFHC copper grid was about 335 cycles in case of 0.165 MW/m2 heat flux and it gave too short fatigue life to be used as a KSTAR NB ion source grid. To overcome the limited fatigue life of the current design, the following methods were proposed in the present study: (1) changing the OHFC copper to CuCrZr, copper-alloy or (2) adopting a new design with a pure Mo metal grid and CuCrZr tubes. It is confirmed that the proposed methods meet the requirements by performing the same assessment.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of neutral beam injection into the TJ-II helical-axis stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral beam injection (NBI) efficiency for the TJ-II helical-axis stellarator was studied by Monte Carlo simulations for the case of tangential injection. For benchmark purposes, two different NBI codes are applied which take into account the peculiar geometries of the NBI, vacuum vessel, and helical-indented magnetic surfaces in TJ-II. The results obtained for various plasma parameters are discussed, emphasis being placed on comparing the co- and counter-heating efficiencies and considering loss mechanisms. The results from the two codes are in good agreement if differences in the magnetic field configurations used are borne in mind. The Monte Carlo code, which treats the guiding center part in magnetic coordinates, was used to investigate the influence of an assumed radial electric field on the heating efficiency. An interesting type of resonance which enhances fast orbit losses has been found for ωpol/ωtor ∼ 2 (with ωpol and ωtor being the poloidal and toroidal frequencies of the fast ions, respectively). This critical ratio can be reached during slowing-down owing to the vector E x vector B-drift. (orig.)

  9. High-power ICRF and ICRF plus neutral-beam heating on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PLT ICRF experiments with RF powers up to approx.=3 MW have demonstrated efficient plasma heating in both the minority fundamental and the second harmonic ion-cyclotron regimes. In the minority 3He regime, ion temperatures of approx.=3 keV have been produced along with approx.=1 kW of D-3He fusion power and substantial electron heating. In the second harmonic H regime, an equivalent averaged ion energy of approx.=4 keV has been achieved. Combined ICRF plus neutral-beam heating experiments with auxiliary powers totalling up to 4.5 MW have provided insight into auxiliary heating performance at stored plasma energy levels up to approx.=100 kJ. Values of #betta#sub(phi) in the range of 1.5-2% have been attained for Bsub(phi) approx.=17 kG. Energetic discharges with n-barsub(e) up to approx.6x1013 cm-3 at Bsub(phi) approx.=28 kG have also been investigated. Preliminary confinement studies suggest that energetic ion losses may contribute to a direct loss of the input RF power in the H minority heating regime but are insignificant in the 3He minority case. The energy confinement time for the H minority regime is reduced somewhat from the Ohmic value. (author)

  10. Systems approach for condition management design: JET neutral beam system-A fusion case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maturation of any new technology can be coarsely divided into three stages of a development lifecycle: (1) fundamental research, (2) experimental rig development and testing through to (3) commercialization. With the enhancement of machines like JET, the building of ITER and the initiation of DEMO design activities, the fusion community is moving from stages 1 and 2 towards stage 3. One of the consequences of this transition will be a shift in emphasis from scientific achievement to maximizing machine reliability and availability. The fusion community should therefore be preparing itself for this shift by examining all methods and tools utilized in established engineering sectors that might help to improve these fundamental performance parameters. To this end, the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) has proactively engaged with UK industry to examine whether the development of condition management (CM) systems could help improve such performance parameters. This paper describes an initial CM design case study on the JET neutral beam system. The primary output of this study was the development of a CM design methodology that captures existing experience in fault detection, and classification as well as new methods for fault diagnosis. A summary of the methods used and the potential benefits of data fusion are presented here.

  11. Development of Distributed Control System for Neutral Beam Injector on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Peng; Hu, Chundong; Cui, Qinglong; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Yulian; Yu, Shan; Gao, Yangyang

    2015-07-01

    A distributed control system of Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST-NBI) is briefly presented in this paper. The control system is developed in accordance with the experimental operational characteristics of the EAST-NBI. The NBI control system (NBICS), which is based on the computer network technologies and classified according to the control levels, consists of three levels: a remote monitoring layer, a server control layer, and a field control layer. The 3-layer architecture is capable of extending the system functions and upgrading devices. The timing system provides the reference clock of the synchronization and interlock for the EAST-NBI system. An interlock system ensures the safety of the experiment operators and field devices. Both of the ion sources of the beamline are designed to operate independently. This lays an important foundation for developing a control system for the second beamline on EAST. Experimental results demonstrate that the NBICS meets functional requirements of the EAST-NBI control, and makes experimental operations visual and automatic. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB101001)

  12. ProVac3D and application to the neutral beam injection system of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed ProVac3D (3D density Profiles in Vacuum systems), a Monte Carlo simulation code, to calculate gas dynamics and the density profiles in a complex vacuum system characterized by distributed gas sources and pumps. The Neutral Beam Injection System of ITER is a good example of such a system, for which Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe is responsible to design the state-of-the-art cryogenic pump. By using ProVac3D, we can intensively study volumes of interest inside NBI and get the information about the pumping speed in order to provide the required density profile along the beamline. The advantage of ProVac3D is that it is flexible with modular structures and very fast to achieve precise statistics by large simulation numbers even with a current desktop computer. To extend ProVac3D beyond the free molecular regime, the collision of the probe molecule with the gas background has been included. We are going to present some preliminary results as well.

  13. The capacitor banks for the text diagnostic neutral beam and electron cyclotron heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) has been operational since November of 1980. Since that time, many experimental systems have been added to the machine. Currently, two major experiments are being added to compliment the diagnostics already online. These systems, the Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) and the Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments are described in separate papers. A set of five modular, bipolar capacitor banks are used to power both the DNB and the ECH. The total capacitance of the banks is 92μF. The stored energy is about 500kJ at+or-100kV. The banks are built as five identical, interchangeable modules. One module is adequate to run the DNB. Up to four banks are used to power the ECH. The banks are portable so that they can be moved to the open end of the laboratory for maintenance. This gives much better access for repair work and allows the experiments to continue to run with the remaining banks. Due to budgetary constraints, these banks were constructed in the most economical manner possible consistent with worker safety and long term reliability. The capacitors themselves are on loan from Los Alamos National Labs. They are rated at 1.85μF at 60kV. Our application requires that they be used in a series/parallel configuration with a peak voltage of 50kV each. This paper describes the electrical, mechanical and control design considerations required to achieve a working set of banks

  14. Influence of Off-axis Neutral Beam Injection on Resistive Wall Mode Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is an essential issue for future magnetic fusion reactors (e.g., ITER) aiming at long-duration steady discharges over the no-wall beta limit. The RWM has been extensively investigated during recent years, both theoretically and experimentally. However, so far the physical mechanism of the passive control of the RWM has not been investigated fully, particularly the mechanism for the interaction between the RWM and energetic particles (EPs). Recent experiments in DIII-D indicate that the increase of the off-axis neutral beam injection (NBI) power can lead to the enhancement of RWM stability, which is opposite to expectation from consideration of the trapped particles fraction reduced by off-axis NBI. In this work, we apply our previous theory model to investigate the deposition effect of trapped EPs from off-axis NBI on the RWM instability. The results show that the spatial deposition effect of trapped EPs indeed significantly affects the RWM stability, and, compared with the on-axis case, off-axis deposition of EPs can contribute more stabilization to the RWM. (author)

  15. Surface modification of molten W exposed to high heat flux helium neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High heat flux tests with central heat flux of 10.5 MW/m2 using helium neutral beams have been carried out on rolled tungsten. The energy of helium particles is 33 keV and the particle flux is 2 × 1021 m−2 s−1. An 80 × 65 × 3 mm3 rolled tungsten plate is firstly exposed to a 4.6 s pulse resulting in partially molten surfaces. Thereafter the tungsten plate is irradiated by several helium pulses with fluences of 1.2–2.5 × 1022/m2 and peak temperatures from 1450 to 2590 °C. The experiments show that: (1) helium-induced surface modification of the resolidified tungsten surface is very different from that of the non-molten surface; (2) the surface morphology of molten surface is closely related to the orientation of the resolidified grain; (3) the evolution of surface modifications, for both of the molten and non-molten tungsten surfaces, indicates a strong dependence on the surface temperature and local helium fluence

  16. SYSTEM DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RECENT DIII-D NEUTRAL BEAM COMPUTER UPGRADE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK-B135 This operating year marks an upgrade to the computer system charged with control and data acquisition for neutral beam injection system's heating at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, funded by the US Department of Energy and operated by General Atomics (GA). This upgrade represents the third and latest major revision to a system which has been in service over twenty years. The first control and data acquisition computers were four 16 bit mini computers running a proprietary operating system. Each of the four controlled two ion source over dedicated CAMAC highway. In a 1995 upgrade, the system evolved to be two 32 bit Motorola mini-computers running a version of UNIX. Each computer controlled four ion sources with two CAMAC highways per CPU. This latest upgrade builds on this same logical organization, but makes significant advances in cost, maintainability, and the degree to which the system is open to future modification. The new control and data acquisition system is formed of two 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 based PC's, running the LINUX operating system. Each PC drives two CAMAC serial highways using a combination of Kinetic Systems PCI standard CAMAC Hardware Drivers and a low-level software driver written in-house expressly for this device. This paper discusses the overall system design and implementation detail, describing actual operating experience for the initial six months of operation

  17. SYSTEM DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RECENT DIII-D NEUTRAL BEAM COMPUTER UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHILLIPS,J.C; PENAFLOR,B.G; PHAM,N.Q; PIGLOWSKI,D.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 This operating year marks an upgrade to the computer system charged with control and data acquisition for neutral beam injection system's heating at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, funded by the US Department of Energy and operated by General Atomics (GA). This upgrade represents the third and latest major revision to a system which has been in service over twenty years. The first control and data acquisition computers were four 16 bit mini computers running a proprietary operating system. Each of the four controlled two ion source over dedicated CAMAC highway. In a 1995 upgrade, the system evolved to be two 32 bit Motorola mini-computers running a version of UNIX. Each computer controlled four ion sources with two CAMAC highways per CPU. This latest upgrade builds on this same logical organization, but makes significant advances in cost, maintainability, and the degree to which the system is open to future modification. The new control and data acquisition system is formed of two 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 based PC's, running the LINUX operating system. Each PC drives two CAMAC serial highways using a combination of Kinetic Systems PCI standard CAMAC Hardware Drivers and a low-level software driver written in-house expressly for this device. This paper discusses the overall system design and implementation detail, describing actual operating experience for the initial six months of operation.

  18. Neutralization efficiency of H- beams based on measurements of one- and two-electron removal from H- in H- + Arq+ (q≤8) collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing the Giessen ion-ion crossed-beams facility, absolute cross sections have been measured for single- and double-electron removal from H- in energetic collisions with Arq+ (q ≤ 8) ions. The data is compared to CTMC calculations and is discussed with respect to conversion efficiencies of H- into H0 beams in plasma neutralizers proposed for efficient neutral beam heating of next generation fusion plasmas. (orig.)

  19. Sensitive in situ method to measure the rate of neutral free radical production by photodeionization of negative ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelectron-current measurement by low-frequency electromodulation probe (PMMP) is proposed as a sensitive method to determine the rate Gr of neutral free radical production by the photodeionization of negative ion beams (PDINIB). The PMMP method was employed to evaluate the production rate in a trial surface-processing apparatus developed in the author's laboratory utilizing a steady-flux refined beam of neutral free radicals produced by the PDINIB procedure. A 63Cu- negative ion beam of kinetic energy Ei varied up to 15 keV was irradiated with a 514.5 nm visible light beam from a 25 W cw Ar+ ion laser. The detection limit of the production rate by the measurement setup was 6x109/s under the conditions that Ei=15 keV, the negative ion beam current Ii=4 μA, and the laser power P=6 W. Based on the results of these basic experiments, furthermore, the photodeionization efficiency defined by eGr/Ii where e is the elementary electric charge was estimated to be 27±6% under the conditions that Ei=15 keV, Ii=40 μA, and P=18 W

  20. Time- and spatial-behaviours of metal impurity during neutral-beam injection on the JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed time- and spatial-behaviours of emissions from iron impurities with the different ionic charge were obtained in the JFT-2 deutrium discharges with co- or counter-injections. In co-injection, the iron impurity is driven out from the central region of the plasma, and in counter-injection, they appear to accumulate and the plasma is not disrupted. These enhanced diffusion of the iron impurity can well be explained by the neutral-beam induced effect (direct beam-impurity interaction and toroidal rotation of the plasma), predicted by the neoclassical theory. (author)

  1. Al and Ge simultaneous oxidation using neutral beam post-oxidation for formation of gate stack structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain a high-quality Germanium (Ge) metal–oxide–semiconductor structure, a Ge gate stacked structure was fabricated using neutral beam post-oxidation. After deposition of a 1-nm-thick Al metal film on a Ge substrate, simultaneous oxidation of Al and Ge was carried out at 300 °C, and a Ge oxide film with 29% GeO2 content was obtained by controlling the acceleration bias power of the neutral oxygen beam. In addition, the fabricated AlOx/GeOx/Ge structure achieved a low interface state density of less than 1 × 1011 cm−2 eV−1 near the midgap

  2. Al and Ge simultaneous oxidation using neutral beam post-oxidation for formation of gate stack structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Takeo, E-mail: t-ohno@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Nakayama, Daiki [Institute of Fluid Science (IFS), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Samukawa, Seiji, E-mail: samukawa@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Institute of Fluid Science (IFS), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    To obtain a high-quality Germanium (Ge) metal–oxide–semiconductor structure, a Ge gate stacked structure was fabricated using neutral beam post-oxidation. After deposition of a 1-nm-thick Al metal film on a Ge substrate, simultaneous oxidation of Al and Ge was carried out at 300 °C, and a Ge oxide film with 29% GeO{sub 2} content was obtained by controlling the acceleration bias power of the neutral oxygen beam. In addition, the fabricated AlO{sub x}/GeO{sub x}/Ge structure achieved a low interface state density of less than 1 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2 }eV{sup −1} near the midgap.

  3. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumiri, Imene; Rowley, Clarence; Sabbagh, Steven; Gates, David; Gerhardt, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    A model-based system to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device is developed to maintain plasma stability for long pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed to control plasma rotation by using momentum from injected neutral beams and viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields as actuators. Based on the data driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed to theoretically sustain the toroidal momentum of the plasma in a stable fashion and to achieve desired plasma rotation profiles. On going work includes extending this method to NSTX Upgrade which has more complete radial coverage of the neutral beams momentum sources which enable simultaneous control of plasma stored energy (Beta control).

  4. Arc and filament heater current control system for 5 MW ion source of neutral beam injector for SST1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents control system used in managing power system deployed on 1.7 MW neutral beam injector at 80 kV. Power system consists of 24 arc discharge current power supplies (120 V, 80 A, DC), 8 filament heater power supplies (200V, 10 A, 400 Hz, AC) and one highly regulated high voltage power supply (80 kV, 60ADC)

  5. Tandem mirror experiment-upgrade neutral beam test stand: a powerful tool for development and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During construction of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we assembled a test stand to develop electronics for the neutral beam system. In the first six months of test stand use we operated a few neutral beam injector modules and directed considerable effort toward improving the electronic system. As system development progressed, our focus turned toward improving the injector modules themselves. The test stand has proved to be the largest single contributor to the successful operation of neutral beams on TMX-U, primarily because it provides quality assurance andd development capability in conjunction with the scheduled activities of the main experiment. This support falls into five major categories: (1) electronics development, (2) operator training, (3) injector module testing and characterization, (4) injector module improvements, and (5) physics improvements (through areas affected by injector operation). Normal day-to-day operation of the test stand comes under the third category, testing and characterization, and comprises our final quality assurance activity for newly assembled or repaired modules before they are installed on TMX-U

  6. Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade neutral beam test stand: A powerful tool for development and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During construction of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), a test stand was assembled to develop electronics for the neutral beam system. In the first six months of test stand use the authors operated a few neutral beam injector modules and directed considerable effort toward improving the electronic system. As system development progressed, the focus turned toward improving the injector modules themselves. The test stand has proved to be the largest single contributor to the successful operation of neutral beams on TMX-U, primarily because it provides quality assurance and development capability in conjunction with the scheduled activities of the main experiment. This support falls into five major categories: (1) electronics development, (2) operator training, (3) injector module testing and characterization, (4) injector module improvements, and (5) physics improvements (through areas affected by injector operation). Normal day-to-day operation of the test stand comes under the third category, testing and characterization, and comprises the final quality assurance activity for newly assembled or repaired modules before they are installed on TMX-U. They have also used the test stand to perform a series of physics experiments, including: reducing gas flow through valve and arc chamber characterization, reducing impurities by titanium gettering, and reducing streaming gas using apertures and collisional gas dynamics

  7. The Cryoplant for the Iter Neutral Beam Test Facility to BE Built at Rfx in Padova, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengo, R.; Fellin, F.; Sonato, P.

    2010-04-01

    The Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), planned to be constructed in Padua (Italy), will constitute the prototype of the two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI), which will be installed in the ITER plant (Cadarache-France). The NBTF is composed of a 1 MV accelerator that can produce a 40 A deuteron pulsed neutral beam particles. The necessary vacuum needed in the accelerator is achieved by two large cryopumps, designed by FZK-Karlsruhe, with radiation shields cooled between 65 K and 90 K and with cryopanels cooled by 4 bar supercritical helium (ScHe) between 4.5 K and 6.5 K. A new cryoplant facility will be installed with two large helium refrigerators: a Shield Refrigerator (SR), whose cooling capacity is up to 30 kW between 65 K and 90 K, and a helium Main Refrigerator (MR), whose equivalent cooling capacity is up to 800 W at 4.5 K. The cooling of the cryopanels is obtained with two (ScHe) 30 g/s pumps (one redundant), working in a closed cycle around 4 bar producing a pressure head of 100 mbar. Two heat exchangers are immersed in a buffer dewar connected to the MR. The MR and SR different operation modes are described in the paper, as well as the new cryoplant installation.

  8. Neutral-beam-injection fueling for a small, D-3He burning, field-reversed-configuration reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttolph, Michael; Stotler, Daren; Cohen, Samuel

    2013-10-01

    Rocket propulsion powered by the D-3He fusion reaction in a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) has been proposed for a variety of solar-system missions. Two key unique features of this concept are a relatively small, 25-cm-radius, plasma core and a relatively thick (10 cm), dense (1e14 cm3), and cool (100 eV electron temperature) scrape-off layer (SOL). The SOL contains the heated propellant - likely hydrogen, deuterium or helium - and also fusion reaction products at a lower density (ca. 1e12 cm-3). A critical design question is the refueling of the fusion reactants. A moderate energy neutral-beam method is considered. It must be able to penetrate the SOL without significant losses but must be stopped in the core. DEGAS 2, a Monte-Carlo code designed to model neutral transport, was implemented to simulate beam-plasma interactions including ionization and charge exchange of the neutral beam's helium-3 and deuterium atoms by impact in the SOL and core plasma with thermal plasma constituents and fusion reaction products. Operational methods to alleviate the effects deleterious reactions such as deuterium charge-exchange in the SOL are described.

  9. High energy, high current neutral beam injector operation with single stage and two-stage multi-aperture extraction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam development for JET injectors at FAR laboratory has led to the study of properties of a single stage (triode) and a two-stage (tetrode) multi-aperture extraction system at ion beam powers exceeding the megawatt level and up to 80 keV beam energy. The results of the experimental measurements and of a numerical study of the beam optical qualities and grid power loadings of these systems are presented. Grid power loading levels of less than 1% of the high-voltage drain power were measured in both the triode and the tetrode accelerators. This would allow long pulse operation (10 s with water-cooling) as required for JET. The beam divergence angle (α approx.= 0.70) and the transmission characteristics were almost identical. At the same energy, higher current densities, at optimum perveance, were obtained with the triode at a lower electric field stress on the high-voltage gap. The triode offers the additional advantage of being simpler from the mechanical and electrical points of view. Operation of the injection line with an electrostatic beam dump associated with a grounded source is also demonstrated for a 25 A ion beam up to 60 keV. (orig.)

  10. High energy, high current neutral beam injector operation with single stage and two-stage multi-aperture extraction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherer, R.; Desmons, M.; Fumelli, M.; Raimbault, P.; Valckx, F. P. G.

    1982-12-01

    Neutral beam development for JET injections at FAR laboratory has led to the study of properties of a single stage (triode) and a two-stage (tetrode) multi-aperture extraction system at ion beam powers exceeding the megawatt level and up to 80 keV beam energy. The results of the experimental measurements and of a numerical study of the beam optical qualities and grid power loadings of these systems are presented. Grid power loading levels of less than 1% of the high-voltage drain power were measured in both the triode and the tetrode accelerators. This would allow long pulse operation (10 s with water-cooling) as required for JET. The beam divergence angle (α ≅ 0.7°) and the transmission characteristics were almostidentical. At the same energy, higher current densities, at optimum perveance, were obtained with the triode at a lower electric field stress on the high-voltage gap. The triode offers the additional advantage of being simpler from the mechanical and electrical points of view. Operation of the injection line with an electrostatic beam dump associated with a grounded source is also demonstrated for a 25 ion beam up to 60 keV.

  11. Extraction of 10 sec/75 keV/70 A ion beams at prototype neutral beam injector unit for JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype neutral beam injector for JT-60 was constructed to test and demonstrate a single beam line performance before fabrication of fourteen injector units for JT-60. The system has been operated over 4 months without serious troubles. Ion beams of 10 sec/75 keV/70 A were extracted repeatedly and most of design values were achieved. Accelerator grids were stable during 10 sec pulse, and other components of the system were confirmed to be sufficiently reliable. The system was also operated with a magnetic field which simulated a stray field from JT-60 tokamak. With the stray field applied, no choking effect in a drift tube like PLT or Culham effects were observed at all. (author)

  12. Grating spectrometer system for beam emission spectroscopy diagnostics using high-energy negative-ion-based neutral beam injection on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system was developed for density gradient and fluctuation diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to cover the large Doppler shift of the Hα beam emission because of the high-energy negative-ion-based neutral beam atom (acceleration voltage Vacc=90-170 kV) and the large motional Stark splitting due to the large vxB field (magnetic field B=3.0 T), a grating spectrometer was used instead of a conventional interference filter system. The reciprocal linear dispersion is about 2 nm/mm, which is sufficient to cover the motional Stark effect spectra using an optical fiber with a diameter of 1 mm.

  13. Progress of the Hard-wired Instrumentation and Control Works for the Neutral Beam Test Stand at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress of the hard-wired instrumentation and control works for the neutral beam test stand(NB-TS) has been existed for the past one year period. Details of the installed arc detector circuit are explained. LN2 level and temperature control during the cryosorption pumping operation are explained with an emphasis on its control circuit. With an expectation of more accurate and sensitive measurement of temperatures than the thermocouple utilization during the calorimeter operation, PT-100 resistance temperature detector(RTD) utilization is initiated and the results are described. During the ion beam experiment, physical measurements are made with some delayed time than the beam extraction, and thus a delayed trigger pulse generator was fabricated and installed to the system. Underlying principles of the electronic circuits for the interlock implementation and optical signal transmission are introduced. These are basically the application of operational amplifier circuits. A cautious aspect of the SMPS(switch mode power supply) utilization is also give

  14. Review of neutral beam heating on JET for physics experiments and the production of high fusion performance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JET neutral beam injection system has proved to be both effective and reliable as a plasma heating device. The ion heating and plasma fuelling characteristics of the system are ideally suited to the production of high fusion performance plasmas while the flexibility in the choice of beam species (H, D, T, 3He or 4He) and the ability to inject into almost any JET plasma configuration allows a wide variety of related physics experiments to be carried out. The capability to inject (for the first time) tritium beams was essential to the successful execution of the first tritium experiments in which 1.7MW of power from D-T fusion reactions was generated. ((orig.))

  15. Vacuum Insulation and Achievement of 980 keV, 185 A/m2 H− Ion Beam Acceleration at JAEA for the ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum insulation of −1 MV is a common issue for the HV bushing and the accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI). The HV bushing as an insulating feedthrough has a five-stage structure and each stage consists of double-layered insulators. To sustain −1 MV in vacuum, reduction of electric field at several triple points existing around the double-layered insulators is a critical issue. To reduce electric field simultaneously at these points, three types of stress ring have been developed. In a voltage holding test of a full-scale mockup equipped with these stress rings, 120% of rated voltage was sustained and the voltage holding capability required in ITER was verified. In the MeV accelerator, whose target is the acceleration of a H− ion beam of 1 MeV, 200 A/m2, the gap between the grid support was extended to suppress breakdowns triggered by electric field concentration at the edge and corner of the grid support. This modification improved the voltage holding capability in vacuum, and the MeV accelerator succeeded in sustaining −1 MV stably. Furthermore, it appeared that the H− ions beam was deflected and a part of the beam was intercepted at the acceleration grid. This causes high heat load on the grids and breakdowns during beam acceleration. To suppress the direct interception, a new grid was designed with proper aperture displacement based on a three dimensional beam trajectory analysis. As a result, 980 keV, 185 A/m2 H− ion beam acceleration has been demonstrated, which is close to the ITER requirement. (fusion engineering)

  16. Study on the characters of high voltage charging power supply system for diagnostics neutral beam on HT-7 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high voltage power supply system has been developed for the diagnostic neutral beam on the HT-7 experimental Tokamak, and the over-voltage phenomenon of storage capacitor was founded in the experiment. In order to analyse and resolve this problem, the structure and principle of high voltage power supply is described and the primary high voltage charging power supply system is introduced in detail. The phenomenon of over-voltage on the capacitors is also studied with circuit model, and the conclusion is obtained that the leakage inductance is the mA in reason which causes the over-voltage on the capacitors. (authors)

  17. MHD Instabilities and Their Effects on Plasma Confinement in Large Helical Device Plasmas with Intense Neutral Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Toi; K. Narihara; K. Tanaka; T. Tokuzawa; H. Yamada; Q. Yang; LHD experimental group; S. Ohdachi; S. Yamamoto; S. Sakakibara; K. Y. Watanabe; N. Nakajima; X. Ding; J. Li; S. Morita

    2004-01-01

    MHD stability of the Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas produced with intense neutral beam injection is experimentally studied. When the steep pressure gradient near the edge is produced through L-H transition or linear density ramp experiment, interchange-like MHD modes whose rational surface is located very close to the last closed flux surface are strongly excited in a certain discharge condition and affect the plasma transport appreciably. In NBI-heated energetic ion loss, but also trigger the formation of internal and edge transport barriers.

  18. Ion beam studies of surfaces by multiphoton resonance ionization of sputtered neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization of neutral atoms sputtered from ion bombarded solids by multiphoton resonance ionization has been recently demonstrated. The ionization efficiency is several orders of magnitude greater than other post-ionization methods. This approach should find applications in the characterization of the chemistry and structure of solid surfaces and in the trace analysis of a wide variety of materials. (author)

  19. Coupling of Neutral-Beam-Driven Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes to Kinetic Alfvén Waves in NSTX Tokamak and Energy Channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, E V; Gorelenkov, N N; Fredrickson, E D; Tritz, K; Crocker, N A

    2015-07-01

    An energy-channeling mechanism is proposed to explain flattening of the electron temperature profiles at a high beam power in the beam-heated National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Results of self-consistent simulations of neutral-beam-driven compressional Alfvén eigenmodes (CAEs) in NSTX are presented that demonstrate strong coupling of CAEs to kinetic Alfvén waves at the Alfvén resonance location. It is suggested that CAEs can channel energy from the beam ions to the location of the resonant mode conversion at the edge of the beam density profile, modifying the energy deposition profile. PMID:26182100

  20. The effects of neutral beam injection on momentum transport and rotation resulting from reconnection events in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, T.; Nornberg, M. D.; Anderson, J. K.; den Hartog, D. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, John; Eilerman, Scott; Craig, Darren

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection events are characterized by rapid transport that flattens both the plasma current and parallel flow profiles in a RFP. The tangential neutral beam on the MST is a source of momentum injection into the MST that has also been observed to suppress the core-most mode of the plasma. Ensembles of multiple sawtooth events with and without the NBI were performed over a variety of plasma conditions to observe any effects of the NBI on sawtooth crashes. Observations of both mode rotation and impurity emission Doppler shifts show an increase in toroidal rotation associated with the neutral beam. The suppression of the core-most mode was verified for a broader variety of plasmas then before. The mode data also shows that for some plasma parameters the NBI brings a mode into resonance that is not resonant without the NBI. This is the first evidence of the NBI's effect on the plasma current profile. In addition, Co-injection greatly reduces the mode locking, while counter-injection has been shown to slightly increase mode locking.

  1. Development of an amorphous surge blocker for a high voltage acceleration power supply of the neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An amorphous surge blocker for a high voltage acceleration power supply for the neutral beam injectors has been developed. Since the saturation magnetic flux density of the amorphous core is higher than that of the ferrite core, the surge blocker made of amorphous cores can be reduced in size appreciably compared to the conventional ferrite surge blocker. A 350 kV, 0.05 volt-second amorphous surge blocker was designed, fabricated and tested. The amorphous core was made by winding an amorphous tape with a film for the layer insulation and was heat-treated to recover the magnetic characteristics. The core is molded by epoxy resin and installed in a FRP insulator tube filled with SF6 gas for the insulation. The volt-second measured was higher than the designed value and the electrical breakdown along the cores and between layers was not observed. This test result shows that the amorphous surge blocker is applicable for a dc acceleration power supply for high energy neutral beam injectors. (author)

  2. Resistive wall mode stabilization by slow plasma rotation in DIII-D tokamak discharges with balanced neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] show that the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be stabilized by smaller values of plasma rotation than previously reported. Stable discharges have been observed with beta up to 1.4 times the no-wall kink stability limit and ion rotation velocity (measured from CVI emission) less than 0.3% of the Alfven speed at all integer rational surfaces, in contrast with previous DIII-D experiments that indicated critical values of 0.7%-2.5% of the local Alfven speed. Preliminary stability calculations for these discharges, using ideal magnetohydrodynamics with a drift-kinetic dissipation model, are consistent with the new experimental results. A key feature of these experiments is that slow plasma rotation was achieved by reducing the neutral beam torque. Earlier experiments with strong neutral beam torque used ''magnetic braking'' by applied magnetic perturbations to slow the rotation, and resonant effects of these perturbations may have led to a larger effective rotation threshold. In addition, the edge rotation profile may have a critical role in determining the RWM stability of these low-torque plasmas

  3. Work function measurements during plasma exposition at conditions relevant in negative ion sources for the ITER neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutser, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wimmer, C. [Lst. f. Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lst. f. Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Cesium seeded sources for surface generated negative hydrogen ions are major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. The stability and delivered current density depend highly on the work function during vacuum and plasma phases of the ion source. One of the most important quantities that affect the source performance is the work function. A modified photocurrent method was developed to measure the temporal behavior of the work function during and after cesium evaporation. The investigation of cesium exposed Mo and MoLa samples under ITER negative hydrogen ion based neutral beam injection relevant surface and plasma conditions showed the influence of impurities which result in a fast degradation when the plasma exposure or the cesium flux onto the sample is stopped. A minimum work function close to that of bulk cesium was obtained under the influence of the plasma exposition, while a significantly higher work function was observed under ITER-like vacuum conditions.

  4. Impurity transport during neutral beam injection in the ISX-B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ohmically heated ISX-B discharges, both the intrinsic iron impurity ions and small amounts of argon introduced as a test gas accumulate at the center of the plasma. But during certain beam-heated discharges, it appears that this accumulation does not take place. These results may reflect the conclusion of Stacey and Sigmar that momentum transferred from the beams to the plasma can inhibit inward impurity transport

  5. Modelling of fast ion redistribution due to sawteeth in neutral beam heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximate semi-analytical approach is presented which uses line-of-sight measurements of D-D fusion neutrons from beam heated Tokamak plasmas to infer the behaviour of the fast ion population at sawtooth collapses. Application to recent results on JET indicates that a large fraction of the central fast beam ions are expelled outside the q=1 surface. The approach provides a computationally fast and convenient alternative to presently used inversion techniques. (au)

  6. Neutral beam heating and current drive system and its role in ITER-FEAT operation scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NB H and CD system, providing 33 MW in deuterium beams at 1 MeV from two injectors, in addition to 40 MW RF power, contributes to heating a plasma to sub-ignition through the L-H mode transition followed by finite-Q driven-burn (Q≥10), and achievement of a hybrid operation with an extended-duration (∼1000 s) or steady-state operation with Q≤5. To achieve such operations, the NB provides non-inductive current drive by injecting the beams tangentially into the plasma with the capability of on- and off-axis current drive. The present engineering design is under the constraints of the beam envelope, vacuum confinement, neutron shielding, tolerances, and clearances required with the toroidal field coils. The on- and off-axis current drive is to be achieved by tilting the beam axis vertically. Each beam axis of the NB injectors can be tilted independently, providing flexibility in the control of heating and the driven current profile. (author)

  7. Effect of a neutral N2 cloud on the electrical charging of an electron beam-emitting rocket in the ionosphere: Echo IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Echo IV electron beam rocket flight, 114 moles of neutral N2 was injected for the attitude stabilization system. The interaction of the 40- kV 80-mA beam with this relatively dense cloud was studied as a 'gas plume' to enhance the flow of neutralizing return current to the rocket body. It was found found that the currents preferentially followed a route back through the region where the beam interacted with the N2. A complex luminous discharge was observed photometrically to accompany beam injection. This discharge was strongly roll modulated as the rotating beam swept through the injected gas near the rocket. The neutral N2 number density was measured by observing 3914-A emission produced by the beam impact, and reached nearly 1015 cm-3 at times. During a 1-s 40-kV 80-mA beam injection pulse the discharge became oscillatory and 'flickered' with a frequency near 22 Hz, somewhat lower than the N2+ ion gyrofrequency. The injected N2 on one occasion apparently acted as a fluorescent screen, and a photometric pulse was observed from a conjugate hemisphere beam echo. Ionospheric positive ions have been used to measure E x B drifts by their flow pattern at rocket altitudes, but it was found that the N2 cloud interacted by collision to isotropize and thermalize the flow patterns, so electric fields could not be studied by this technique

  8. Demonstration of 500 keV Beam Acceleration on JT-60 Negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hydrogen negative ion beams of 490 keV, 3 A and 510 keV, 1 A have been successfully produced in the JT-60 negative ion source with three acceleration stages. This is the first acceleration of the H-ions up to 500 keV at high-current of > 1 A. These successful productions of the high-energy beams at high current have been achieved by overcoming the most critical issue, i.e., a poor voltage holding of the large negative ion sources with the grids of ∼ 2 m2 for JT-60SA and ITER. To improve voltage holding capability, the breakdown voltages for the large grids was examined for the first time. It was found that a vacuum insulation distance for the large grids was 6 - 7 times longer than that for the small-area grid (0.02 m2). From this result, the gap lengths between the grids were tuned in the JT-60 negative ion source. The modification of the ion source also realized a significant stabilization of voltage holding and a short conditioning time. These results suggest a practical use of the large negative ion sources in JT-60 SA and ITER. (author)

  9. Development of an ion source for long-pulse (30-s) neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Moeller, J.A.; Ponte, N.S.; Ryan, P.M.; Schecter, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a long-pulse positive ion source that has been designed to provide high brightness deuterium beams (divergence approx. = 0.25/sup 0/ rms, current density approx. = 0.15 A cm/sup -2/) of 40 to 45 A, at a beam energy of 80 keV, for pulse lengths up to 30 s. The design and construction of the ion source components are described with particular emphasis placed on the long-pulse cathode assembly and ion accelerator.

  10. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab (KL2016) Mini-Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Amaryan, Moskov [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Chudakov, Eugene A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Meyer, Curtis A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pennington, Michael R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ritman, James L. [Forschungszentrum Juelich Institut fuer Kernphysik

    2016-05-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal.

  11. Study of non-inductive current drive using high energy neutral beam injection on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The negative ion based neutral beam (N-NB) current drive was experimentally studied. The N-NB driven current density was determined over a wide range of electron temperatures by using the motional Stark effect spectroscopy. Theoretical prediction of the NB current drive increasing with beam energy and electron temperature was validated. A record value of NB current drive efficiency 1.55 x 1019 Am-2W-1 was achieved simultaneously with high confinement and high beta at at a plasma current of 1.5 MA under a fully non-inductively current driven condition. The experimental validation of NB current drive theory for MHD quiescent plasmas gives greater confidence in predicting the NB current drive in future reactors. However, it was also found that MHD instabilities caused a degradation of NB current drive. A beam-driven instability expelled N-NB fast ions carrying non-inductive current from the central region. The lost N-NB driven current was estimated to be 7% of the total N-NB driven current. For the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), comparisons of the measured neutron yield and fast ion pressure profile with transport code calculations revealed that the loss of fast ions increases with the NTM activity and that fast ions at higher energies suffer larger transport than at lower energies. (author)

  12. Progress of the Hard-wired Instrumentation and Control Works for the Neutral Beam Test Stand at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Sok

    2005-12-15

    Progress of the hard-wired instrumentation and control works for the neutral beam test stand(NB-TS) has been existed for the past one year period. Details of the installed arc detector circuit are explained. LN{sub 2} level and temperature control during the cryosorption pumping operation are explained with an emphasis on its control circuit. With an expectation of more accurate and sensitive measurement of temperatures than the thermocouple utilization during the calorimeter operation, PT-100 resistance temperature detector(RTD) utilization is initiated and the results are described. During the ion beam experiment, physical measurements are made with some delayed time than the beam extraction, and thus a delayed trigger pulse generator was fabricated and installed to the system. Underlying principles of the electronic circuits for the interlock implementation and optical signal transmission are introduced. These are basically the application of operational amplifier circuits. A cautious aspect of the SMPS(switch mode power supply) utilization is also give.

  13. Modeling of plasma heating with neutral beam injection in T-11 machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computations of energy balance are presented for a tokamak with hot atom beam injection. Atom ionization, trapping of generated ions and energy transfer to plasma are examined. Energy loss in charge exchange is considered. Relationships are presented between the temperature and the injection power, the plasma density and other parameters. Possibilities are discussed for obtaining a collisionless ion regime

  14. European contributions to the beam source design and R and D of the ITER neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports on the progress made by the European Home Team in strong interaction with the ITER JCT and JAERI regarding several key aspects of the beam source for the ITER injectors: integration of the SINGAP accelerator into the ITER injector design. This is a substantially simpler concept than the MAMuG accelerator of the ITER NBI 'reference design', which has potential for significant cost savings, and which avoids some of the weaknesses of the reference design such as the need for intermediate high voltage potentials from the HV power supply and pressurised gas insulation; high energy negative ion acceleration using a SINGAP accelerator; long pulse (i.e. >1000 s) negative ion source operation in deuterium; RF source development, which could reduce the scheduled maintenance of the ITER injectors (as it uses no filaments), and simplify the transmission line and the auxiliary power supplies for the ion source. (author)

  15. Feasibility study of an optical resonator for applications in neutral-beam injection systems for the next generation of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of a larger project called SIPHORE (Single gap Photo-neutralizer energy Recovery injector), which aims to enhance the overall efficiency of one of the mechanisms through which the plasma is heated, in a nuclear fusion reactor, i.e. the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system. An important component of a NBI system is the neutralizer of high energetic ion beams. SIPHORE proposes to substitute the gas cell neutralizer, used in the current NBI systems, with a photo-neutralizer exploiting the photo-detachment process within Fabry Perot cavities. This mechanism should allow a relevant NBI global efficiency of η≥ 60%, significantly higher than the one currently possible (η≤25% for ITER). The present work concerns the feasibility study of an optical cavity with suitable properties for applications in NBI systems. Within this context, the issue of the determination of an appropriated optical cavity design has been firstly considered and the theoretical and experimental analysis of a particular optical resonator has been carried on. The problems associated with the high levels of intracavity optical power (∼3 MW) required for an adequate photo-neutralization rate have then been faced. In this respect, we addressed both the problem of the thermal effects on the cavity mirrors due to their absorption of intra-cavity optical power (∼1 W) and the one associated to the necessity of a high powerful input laser beam (∼1 kW) to feed the optical resonator. (author)

  16. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Prasad, R. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany); Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); ELI–Beamlines, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Science, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Andreev, A. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Vavilov State Optical Institute, 119034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Nickles, P. V. [WCU Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, University of Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS, 33405 Talence (France); Ter-Avetisyan, S. [ELI–Beamlines, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Science, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source.

  17. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source

  18. Analyses of high power negative ion accelerators for ITER neutral beam injector (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Dairaku, M; Grisham, L R; Hanada, M; Mizuno, T; Tobari, H; Umeda, N; Watanabe, K; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    In JAEA, research and developments to realize high power accelerator (1 MeV, 40 AD(-) ion beams for 3600 s) for ITER have been carried out experimentally and numerically utilizing a five stage MAMuG (Multiaperture, Multigrid) accelerator. In this paper, the extension of the gap length, which is required to improve the voltage holding capability, is examined in two dimensional beam optics analyses and also from view point of stripping loss of ions. In order to suppress excess power loadings due to the direct interception of negative ions, which is issued in long pulse tests, the beamlet deflection is analyzed in three dimensional multibeamlet analyses. The necessary modifications shown above are applied to the MAMuG accelerator for coming long pulse tests in JAEA and ITER. PMID:20192419

  19. Analyses of high power negative ion accelerators for ITER neutral beam injector (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Dairaku, M.; Grisham, L. R.; Hanada, M.; Mizuno, T.; Tobari, H.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    2010-02-01

    In JAEA, research and developments to realize high power accelerator (1 MeV, 40 AD- ion beams for 3600 s) for ITER have been carried out experimentally and numerically utilizing a five stage MAMuG (Multiaperture, Multigrid) accelerator. In this paper, the extension of the gap length, which is required to improve the voltage holding capability, is examined in two dimensional beam optics analyses and also from view point of stripping loss of ions. In order to suppress excess power loadings due to the direct interception of negative ions, which is issued in long pulse tests, the beamlet deflection is analyzed in three dimensional multibeamlet analyses. The necessary modifications shown above are applied to the MAMuG accelerator for coming long pulse tests in JAEA and ITER.

  20. Analyses of high power negative ion accelerators for ITER neutral beam injector (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Dairaku, M.; Hanada, M.; Mizuno, T.; Tobari, H.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Inoue, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 801-1, Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Grisham, L. R. [Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In JAEA, research and developments to realize high power accelerator (1 MeV, 40 AD{sup -} ion beams for 3600 s) for ITER have been carried out experimentally and numerically utilizing a five stage MAMuG (Multiaperture, Multigrid) accelerator. In this paper, the extension of the gap length, which is required to improve the voltage holding capability, is examined in two dimensional beam optics analyses and also from view point of stripping loss of ions. In order to suppress excess power loadings due to the direct interception of negative ions, which is issued in long pulse tests, the beamlet deflection is analyzed in three dimensional multibeamlet analyses. The necessary modifications shown above are applied to the MAMuG accelerator for coming long pulse tests in JAEA and ITER.

  1. Analyses of high power negative ion accelerators for ITER neutral beam injector (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In JAEA, research and developments to realize high power accelerator (1 MeV, 40 AD- ion beams for 3600 s) for ITER have been carried out experimentally and numerically utilizing a five stage MAMuG (Multiaperture, Multigrid) accelerator. In this paper, the extension of the gap length, which is required to improve the voltage holding capability, is examined in two dimensional beam optics analyses and also from view point of stripping loss of ions. In order to suppress excess power loadings due to the direct interception of negative ions, which is issued in long pulse tests, the beamlet deflection is analyzed in three dimensional multibeamlet analyses. The necessary modifications shown above are applied to the MAMuG accelerator for coming long pulse tests in JAEA and ITER.

  2. The production of neutral vector mesons by bremsstrahlung in electron-positron colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the bremsstrahlung production of the rho meson in the reaction e+e- → e+e-rho (→ e+e- π+π-). This reaction gives a C = -1 background which complicates the study of C = +1 two-photon processes at the new colliding-beam facilities. The cross section for the reaction rises from approximately 0.3 nb to 0.7 nb as the beam energy increases from 2 GeV to 15 GeV. From a study of the distributions of the final leptons and pions, one finds a suitable choice of cuts which will reduce the event rate down to a small fraction of R. It is not possible to attribute the three-prong events seen at DELCO and PLUTO to this particular production mechanism. (Auth.)

  3. The MK III actively cooled duct liner for the JET neutral beam line: Thermo-mechanical performance and lifetime estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the analyses performed to investigate and validate the proposed design for the updated JET MKIII duct side liner, which will replace the present inertial cooled one in the frame of the EP2 neutral beam enhancement project. The thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical performance of a duct liner's generic module, under various loading scenarios has been assessed. Due to difference in scale between a generic liner module length and the relevant load bearing section thickness (∼1.2 m against 4 mm) two different scale FE models have been assessed, the first ones to evaluate the overall reactions and displacements and the others to calculate concentrated stresses in the most loaded sections. Conformity to ITER design criteria has been verified for both monotonic and cyclic loads. The effects of fatigue have been considered and an operational life of 8.5 years is predicted for the liner

  4. Field ionization of helium in a supersonic beam: Kinetic energy of neutral atoms and probability of their field ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High detection efficiency combined with spatial resolution on a nm-scale makes the field ionization process a promising candidate for spatially resolved neutral particles detection. The effective cross-sectional area σeff can serve as a measure for the effectiveness of such a field ion detector. In the present contribution, we combine quantum-mechanical calculations of the field-modified electron density distribution near the tungsten tip surface and of the resulting local field distributions, performed using the functional integration method, with a classical treatment of the atom trajectories approaching the tip in order to calculate the σeff values for ionization of free He atoms over an apex of a tungsten field emitter tip. The calculated values are compared with experimental data for supersonic He atomic beams at two different temperatures 95 and 298 K.

  5. Design and fabrication of an ion accelerator for TFTR-type neutral beam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the prototype 120-keV, 65-A, 0.5-sec ion accelerator for TFTR-type beam systems is described. Details of the manufacture of the constituent parts are given along with descriptions of the major components of the accelerator. Included are the molybdenum grid structures, molybdenum shields, stainless steel hats and the epoxy insulator. Specific manufacturing problems are discussed along with the results of tests to determine the voltage holding capabilities of the assembly

  6. Design and fabrication of an ion accelerator for TFTR-type neutral beam systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, J.A.; Duffy, T.J.; Haughian, J.M.; Biagi, L.A.; Yee, D.P.

    1977-10-01

    The design of the prototype 120-keV, 65-A, 0.5-sec ion accelerator for TFTR-type beam systems is described. Details of the manufacture of the constituent parts are given along with descriptions of the major components of the accelerator. Included are the molybdenum grid structures, molybdenum shields, stainless steel hats and the epoxy insulator. Specific manufacturing problems are discussed along with the results of tests to determine the voltage holding capabilities of the assembly.

  7. Fuel ion ratio measurements in reactor relevant neutral beam heated fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C; Eriksson, J; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Skiba, M; Weiszflog, M

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method to derive n(t)/n(d) using the ratio of the thermonuclear neutron emission to the beam-target neutron emission. We apply it to neutron spectroscopy data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer taken during the deuterium tritium experiment at JET. n(t)/n(d)-values obtained using neutron spectroscopy are in qualitative agreement with those from other diagnostics measuring the isotopic composition of the exhaust in the divertor. PMID:23130799

  8. Independent individual addressing of multiple neutral atom qubits with a MEMS beam steering system

    OpenAIRE

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Zhang, Xianli L.; Isenhower, Larry; Gill, Alex T.; Lu, Felix P.; Saffman, Mark; Kim, Jungsang

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a scalable approach to addressing multiple atomic qubits for use in quantum information processing. Individually trapped 87Rb atoms in a linear array are selectively manipulated with a single laser guided by a MEMS beam steering system. Single qubit oscillations are shown on multiple sites at frequencies of ~3.5 MHz with negligible crosstalk to neighboring sites. Switching times between the central atom and its closest neighbor were measured to be 6-7 us while moving between th...

  9. Plasma heating simulation in the T-11 device on the neutral atom beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the energy balance in the tokamak with injection of hot atom beams are carried out. Considered are atom ionization and capture of the produced ones as well as the transmission of energy to plasma. Energy losses on recharging are taken into account. Given are temperature dependencies on injection power, plasma density and other parameters. A possibility to obtain collisionless regime by ions is described

  10. Review of the neutral-beam current requirements for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques used to evaluate the beam-current requirements for MFTF are similar to those in previous studies but incorporate some improvements. In particular, we have enlarged the radial code BUILDUP to allow for a smaller radial grid and to improve the numerical accuracy; we have also improved the model of the atomic physics processes and the particle-equilibrium calculations. Also, a model of plasma containment that conserves energy as well as particles but does not include any effect of the expected drift-cyclotron loss-cone (DCLC) turbulence has been incorporated into the previous studies. We show that the DCLC turbulence increases the average ion energy and decreases the particle confinement time. Because these effects cancel to first order, the beam-current requirements are independent of the turbulence. We find that 24 of the present LBL source modules would sustain a plasma with an average beta of 0.46. This figure is within 10% of the MFTF goal and is within our calculational accuracies. We further show that the beam-current requirements for the large-diameter plasma are consistent with those of experiments to study the buildup of a field-reversed plasma

  11. Fusion reactivity, confinement, and stability of neutral-beam heated plasmas in TFTR and other tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis that the heating beam fueling profile shape connects the edge condition and improved core confinement and fusion reactivity is extensively studied on TFTR and applied to other tokamaks. The derived absolute scalings based on beam fueling profile shape for the stored energy and neutron yield can be applied to the deuterium discharges at different major radii in TFTR. These include Supershot, High poloidal beta, L-mode, and discharges with a reversed shear (RS) magnetic configuration. These scalings are also applied to deuterium-tritium discharges. The role of plasma parameters, such as plasma current, Isdo2(p), edge safety factor, qsdo5(a), and toroidal field, Bsdo2(T), in the performance and stability of the discharges is explicitly studied. Based on practical and externally controllable plasma parameters, the limitation and optimization of fusion power production of the present TFTR is investigated and a path for a discharge condition with fusion power gain, Q > 1 is suggested based on this study. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks

  12. Design status and procurement activities of the High Voltage Deck 1 and Bushing for the ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► ITER Neutral Beam Injector includes several non-standard components. ► The design status of the −1 MVdc HVD1 and Bushing is described. ► The paper reports also on the integrated layout of the two components. ► Preliminary electrostatic and thermal analyses are presented. ► Procurement activities are outlined. -- Abstract: The ITER Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) power supply system includes several non-standard components, whose ratings go beyond the present industrial practice. Two of these items, to be procured by Fusion for Energy, are: 1.A −1 MVdc air-insulated Faraday cage, called High Voltage Deck 1 (HVD1), hosting the Ion Source and Extractor Power Supplies (ISEPS) and the associated diagnostics. 2.A −1 MVdc feedthrough, called HVD1-TL Bushing, aimed at connecting the HVD1 to the gas (SF6) insulated Transmission Line (TL), containing inside its High Voltage (HV) conductor all ISEPS power and control cables coming from the HVD1 to be connected to the NBI Ion Source services. The paper deals with the status of the design of the HVD1 and HVD1-TL Bushing, focusing on insulation, mechanical and thermal issues as well as on their integration with the other components of the power supply system. In particular, the insulation issue of the integrated system has been addressed by means of an electrostatic Finite Element (FE) analysis whilst a FE thermal simulation has been carried out to assess the impact of the dissipation of the proposed design of the inner conductors (ISEPS conductors) not actively cooled. Finally, the paper describes the status of procurement strategy and execution

  13. Modeling of the negative ions extraction from a hydrogen plasma source. Application to ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a high performance negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in the construction of a Neutral Beam Injector of the future fusion reactor ITER. NI source should deliver 40 A of H- or of D-. To address this problem in a realistic way, a 3D particles-in-cell electrostatic collisional code was developed. Binary collisions between the particles are introduced using Monte-Carlo collision scheme. This code called ONIX was used to investigate the plasma properties and the transport of the charged particles close to a typical extraction aperture. Results obtained from this code are presented in this thesis. They include negative ions and electrons 3D trajectories. The ion and electron current density profiles are shown for different local magnetic field configurations. Results of production, destruction, and transport of H- in the extraction region are also presented. The production of H- is investigated via 3 atomic processes: 1) electron dissociative attachment to the vibrationally excited molecules H2(v) in the volume, 2) interaction of the positive ions H+ and H2+ with the aperture wall and 3) collisions of the neutral gas H, H2 with aperture wall. The influence of each process on the total extracted NI current is discussed. The extraction efficiency of H- from the volume is compared to the one of H- coming from the wall. Moreover, a parametric study of the H- surface production is presented. Results show the role of sheath behavior in the vicinity of the aperture developing a double layer structure responsible of the NI extraction limitations. The 2 following issues are also analysed. First the influence of the external extracted potential value on the formation of negative sheath and secondly the strength of the magnetic filter on the total extracted NI and co-extracted electron current. The suppression of the electron beam by the negative ion produced at the plasma grid wall is also discussed. Results are in good agreement with available

  14. Mechanical quality factor enhancement in a silicon micromechanical resonator by low-damage process using neutral beam etching technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication and evaluation of silicon micromechanical resonators using neutral beam etching (NBE) technology is presented. An etching technique based on a low energy neutral beam of Cl2/F2/O2 is introduced for making nano-trench patterns on 5 µm-thick silicon. The NBE technology has been investigated to form a highly-anisotropic etching shape. A 5 μm-deep trench pattern having smooth side walls with a gap width of 230 nm is achieved by using NBE. Additionally, a fabrication method for silicon resonators using NBE technology is proposed. The resonant frequency of the fabricated devices with a length of 500 μm, width of 440 μm and thickness of 5 μm is 9.66 MHz, and the average quality factor (Q) value is around 78 000. The devices fabricated by both deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and NBE are evaluated and compared. The devices fabricated by NBE show that the motional resistances are reduced by almost 11 times from 645 kΩ to 59 kΩ and their output signals (insertion loss) are increased by approximately 15 dB in comparison with those fabricated by DRIE. Especially, devices fabricated by NBE provide the higher Q factors (average Q factor value of around 78 000) than those (average Q factor value of around 61 000) fabricated by DRIE in the same resonator parameters and measurement conditions. (paper)

  15. Development of high performance negative ion sources and accelerators for MeV class neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of an accelerator at low pressure is an essential requirement to reduce the stripping loss of negative ions, which, in turn, results in high efficiency of the neutral beam systems. For this purpose, a vacuum insulated beam source (VIBS) has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, which reduces the gas pressure in the accelerator by enhanced gas conductance through the accelerator. The VIBS achieves a high voltage insulation of 1 MV by immersing the whole structure of the accelerator in vacuum with a long (∼ 1.8 m) insulation distance. Results of the voltage holding test using a long vacuum gap of 1.8 m indicate that a transition from vacuum discharge to gas discharge occurs at around 0.2 Pa m in the long vacuum gap. So far, the VIBS succeeded in accelerating a 20 mA (H-) beam up to 970 keV for 1 s. It has been demonstrated that the high voltage holding capability of the 1 MV bushing surrounding the VIBS accelerator could be drastically improved by installing new large stress rings that reduces the electric field concentration at the triple junction. After implementing this change, the VIBS sustained 1 MV stably for more than 1200 s. Acceleration of ampere class H- beams at high current density is to be started soon to demonstrate ITER relevant beam optics. The operation of a negative ion source at low pressure is also essential to reduce the stripping loss. However, it was not very easy to attain high current density H- ions at low pressure, since the destruction cross-section of the negative ion becomes large if the electron temperature is >1 eV in low pressure discharge. Using a strong magnetic filter to lower the electron temperature, and introducing higher arc discharge power to compensate for the reduction of plasma density through the filter, an H- ion beam of 310 A m-2 was extracted at a very low pressure of 0.1 Pa. This satisfies the ITER requirement of current density at one-third of the ITER design pressure (0.3 Pa

  16. Energetics of fragmentation of CH5, H3O, and NH4 from neutralized ion-beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragmentation energies for radicals of the type RH2 (RH=CH4, NH3, and H2O) produced by electron capture interactions of 5 keV RH2+ ion with Na or K atoms are reported. The experimental technique involves measurement of spatial beam profiles resulting from dissociation of neutral radicals following their formation in a near resonant electron transfer process. Cross sections for RH2+--Na capture reactions are typically 1x10-14 cm2. Fragmentation energies from measurements with Na target atoms are -2.65 +- 0.14, -0.22 +- 0.03, and -1.12 +- 0.07 eV for CH5, NH4, and H3O, respectively. From our results with Na and K targets and published values for proton affinities, the vertical electron affinities of CH5+ and H3O+ are calculated to be 5.3 +- 0.2 eV and 5.1 +- 0.3 eV, respectively. Beam profiles for ND4 show this species to be metastable with a lifetime of about 1 μs. From this we estimate a potential barrier to dissociation in NH4(ND4) between 0.36 and 0.48 eV, indicating this species should be stable at low temperatures. Comparison of these experimental results with theoretical calculations indicates areas of disagreement

  17. Estimation of Charge Exchange Recombination Emission Based on Diagnostic Neutral Beam on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-Mei; WAN Bao-Nian; WU Zhen-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) attenuation and charge exchange recombination emission are estimated on EAST tokamak. Approximately 40% of the beam with the energy of 50 keV can reach the plasma centre (r = 0) for the typical parameters of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) plasma. Emissivities of CVI (n = 8 → 7, 529.0nm) and OVⅢ (n = 10 → 9, 607.0 nm) visible charge exchange recombination emissions based on the DNB are estimated. The emissivities of the visible bremsstrahlung emission near this wavelength are also calculated for comparison. The results show that the charge exchange recombination emission is about two orders of magnitude greater than the bremsstrahlung emission. It is theoretically indicated that the ratio of signal of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy to the noise from background bremsstrahlung emission,S/N, is large enough in the EAST tokamak with the typical designed parameters. The present results are helpful for experiment design of charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy based on the DNB in the EAST tokamak.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Boiling Inside High-Heat-Flux Component with Swirl Tube in Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to realize steady-state operation of the neutral beam injection (NBI) system with high beam energy, an accurate thermal analysis and a prediction about working conditions of heat-removal structures inside high-heat-flux (HHF) components in the system are key issues. In this paper, taking the HHF ion dump with swirl tubes in NBI system as an example, an accurate thermal dynamic simulation method based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the finite volume method is presented to predict performance of the HHF component. In this simulation method, the Eulerian multiphase method together with some empirical corrections about the inter-phase transfer model and the wall heat flux partitioning model are considered to describe the subcooled boiling. The reliability of the proposed method is validated by an experimental example with subcooled boiling inside swirl tube. The proposed method provides an important tool for the refined thermal and flow dynamic analysis of HHF components, and can be extended to study the thermal design of other complex HHF engineering structures in a straightforward way. The simulation results also verify that the swirl tube is a promising heat removing structure for the HHF components of the NBI system. (fusion engineering)

  19. Impurity Dynamics under Neutral Beam Injection at TJ-II (simulation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the simulations of plasma transport under NBI for TJ-II, previously performed, are extended. Since than a considerable number of important modifications have been introduced in the model: change of magnetic configuration, use of experimental initial profiles, expansion of the Data base from NBI calculations and, mainly, a detailed handling of impurities with inclusion of sputtering effects. Moreover there is now a particular emphasis on the analysis of the conditions for discharge collapse and on the possible effects of single beam injection. This analysis of impurity behaviour with sputtering shows that in the expected usual cases there is no radioactive collapse and that if the recycling coefficients remain lower the unity it is always possible to find a strategy for external gas puffing leading to a stationary state, with densities below the limit and efficient NBI absorption (>50%). The radioactive collapse can appear either at high densities (central value higher than 1.4x10''20 m''3), excessive influx of impurities (i. e. with sputtering rates higher than twice the expected values) o for insufficient injected beam power (less than 45 kW). The present study analyses only the 1004464 configuration of TJ-II, but future works will start a systematic scan of configuration using this same model. (Author) 12 Refs

  20. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface