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Sample records for beam loss detector

  1. Test of Different Beam Loss Detectors at the GSI Heavy Ion Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P

    2001-01-01

    For the sensitive process of slow extraction from a synchrotron a reliable control of the beam losses is needed. We have tested several types of particle detectors mounted at the extraction path of the SIS: A BF-tube for pure neutron detection, a liquid and a plastic scintillator detecting neutrons, gammas and charged particles and an Argon filled ionization chamber mainly sensitive to charged particles. While the count rate is quite different, the time evolution of all detector signals during the spill are similar, but the plastic scintillator has the highest dynamic range. This type is going to be used for beam alignment.

  2. Beam loss studies on silicon strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The large beam energy of the LHC demands for a save beam abort system. Nevertheless, failures cannot be excluded with last assurance and are predicted to occur once per year. As the CMS experiment is placed in the neighboured LHC octant, it is affected by such events. The effect of an unsynchronized beam abort on the silicon strip modules of the CMS tracking detector has been investigated in this thesis by performing one accelerator and two lab experiments. The dynamical behaviour of operational parameters of modules and components has been recorded during simulated beam loss events to be able to disentangle the reasons of possible damages. The first study with high intensive proton bunches at the CERN PS ensured the robustness of the module design against beam losses. A further lab experiment with pulsed IR LEDs clarified the physical and electrical processes during such events. The silicon strip sensors on a module are protected against beam losses by a part of the module design that originally has not been...

  3. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  4. Modeling the response of a fast ion loss detector using orbit tracing techniques in a neutral beam prompt-loss study on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, D. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fisher, R. K.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Garcia-Munoz, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Darrow, D. S.; Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A numerical model describing the expected measurements of neutral beam prompt-losses by a newly commissioned fast ion loss detector (FILD) in DIII-D is presented. This model incorporates the well understood neutral beam deposition profiles from all eight DIII-D beamlines to construct a prompt-loss source distribution. The full range of detectable ion orbit phase space available to the FILD is used to calculate ion trajectories that overlap with neutral beam injection footprints. Weight functions are applied to account for the level of overlap between these detectable orbits and the spatial and velocity (pitch) properties of ionized beam neutrals. An experimental comparison is performed by firing each neutral beam individually in the presence of a ramping plasma current. Fast ion losses determined from the model are in agreement with measured losses.

  5. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  6. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M.R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, E., E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Egorov, N. [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-05-11

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage. - Highlights: • Silicon and diamond detectors are proposed for beam loss monitoring at LHC. • The first in situ radiation test of Si and diamond detectors at 1.9 K is described. • Both diamond and silicon detectors survived after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation at 1.9 K. • The rate of Si detectors degradation depends on bias polarity and is larger at V{sub forw}. • Sensitivity of Si detectors irradiated to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} is independent on resistivity.

  7. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M A

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  8. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Drozhdin, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occured at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  9. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  10. LHC beam loss pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Marsili, A; Puzo, P

    2011-01-01

    One of the systems protecting CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the Beam Loss Monitoring system (BLM). More than 3600 monitors are installed around the ring. The beam losses are permanently integrated over 12 different time intervals (from 40 microseconds to 84 seconds). When any loss exceeds the thresholds defined for the integration window, the beam is removed from the machine. Understanding the origin of a beam loss is crucial for machine operation, as it can help to avoid a repetition of the same scenario. The signals read from given monitors can be considered as entries of a vector. This article presents how a loss map of unknown cause can be decomposed using vector based analysis derived from well-known loss scenarios. The algorithms achieving this decomposition are described, as well as the accuracy of the results.

  11. Diamond Detectors as Beam Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Dobos, D; Pernegger, H; Griesmayer, E

    2010-01-01

    CVD diamond particle detectors are already in use in the CERN experiments ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE and at various particle accelerator laboratories in USA and Japan. This is a proven technology with high radiation tolerance and very fast signal read-out. It can be used for measuring single-particles as well as for high-intensity particle cascades, for timing measurements on the nanosecond scale and for beam protection systems. The radiation tolerance is specified with 10 MGy.

  12. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: detector considerations, general topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Colliding Beams Experiment Department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy Doubler/Saver and Main Ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the Main Ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part two is on detector considerations and general topics. 22 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  13. Beam loss monitors comparison at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Gilardoni, S S; Effinger, E; Gil-Flores, J; Wienands, U

    2011-01-01

    CERN is planning the renovation and upgrade of the beam loss detection system for the Proton Synchrotron (PS). Improved performance in speed–to be able to monitor beam loss on a bunch-by-bunch basis–and in longterm stability–to reduce or avoid the need for periodic calibration–are aimed for. To select the most suitable technology, different detectors were benchmarked in the machine with respect to the same beam loss. The characteristics of the different detectors, the results of the measurement campaign and their suitability as future monitors for the PS are presented.

  14. Monitoring system experiments on beam loss at SSRF injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Xia, XiaoBin; Xu, XunJiang; Liu, Xin; Xu, JiaQiang; Wang, GuangHong; Zeng, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Experiments on beam loss by using beam loss monitoring (BLM) system were carried out at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) injector. This system used highly sensitive and current-integrated Si-photodiode detectors and an Ethernet data acquisition (DAQ) system. The experimental results demonstrate that the Si-photodiode detectors are a useful tool that provides dynamic information on beam loss and investigates problems of machine operation. It also shows that the Si-photodiode BLM system is suitable for pulse-radiation of high-energy accelerators.

  15. Monitoring system experiments on beam loss at SSRF injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Experiments on beam loss by using beam loss monitoring (BLM) system were carried out at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) injector. This system used highly sensitive and current-integrated Si-photodiode detectors and an Ethernet data acquisition (DAQ) system. The experimental results demonstrate that the Si-photodiode detectors are a useful tool that provides dynamic information on beam loss and investigates problems of machine operation. It also shows that the Si-photodiode BLM system is suitable for pulse-radiation of high-energy accelerators.

  16. Beam Loss Patterns at the LHC Collimators Measurements & Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, Till Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detects particle losses of circulating beams and initiates an emergency extraction of the beam in case that the BLM thresholds are exceeded. This protection is required as energy deposition in the accelerator equipment due to secondary shower particles can reach critical levels; causing damage to the beam-line components and quenches of superconducting magnets. Robust and movable beam line elements, so-called collimators, are the aperture limitations of the LHC. Consequently, they are exposed to the excess of lost beam particles and their showers. Proton loss patterns at LHC collimators have to be determined to interpret the signal of the BLM detectors and to set adequate BLM thresholds for the protection of collimators and other equipment in case of unacceptably increased loss rates. The first part of this work investigates the agreement of BLM detector measurements with simulations for an LHC-like collimation setup. The setup consists ...

  17. Performance and perspectives of the diamond based Beam Condition Monitor for beam loss monitoring at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080862

    2015-01-01

    At CMS, a beam loss monitoring system is operated to protect the silicon detectors from high particle rates, arising from intense beam loss events. As detectors, poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are placed around the beam pipe at several locations inside CMS. In case of extremely high detector currents, the LHC beams are automatically extracted from the LHC rings.Diamond is the detector material of choice due to its radiation hardness. Predictions of the detector lifetime were made based on FLUKA monte-carlo simulations and irradiation test results from the RD42 collaboration, which attested no significant radiation damage over several years.During the LHC operational Run1 (2010 â?? 2013), the detector efficiencies were monitored. A signal decrease of about 50 times stronger than expectations was observed in the in-situ radiation environment. Electric field deformations due to charge carriers, trapped in radiation induced lattice defects, are responsible for this signal decrease. This so-called polarizat...

  18. Detection of Equipment Faults Before Beam Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, J

    2016-01-01

    High-power hadron accelerators have strict limits on fractional beam loss. In principle, once a high-quality beam is set up in an acceptable state, beam loss should remain steady. However, in practice, there are many trips in operational machines, owing to excessive beam loss. This paper deals with monitoring equipment health to identify precursor signals that indicate an issue with equipment that will lead to unacceptable beam loss. To this end, a variety of equipment and beam signal measurements are described. In particular, several operational examples from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) of deteriorating equipment functionality leading to beam loss are reported.

  19. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  20. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  1. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria [Brandenburgische Technische Univ. Cottbus (Germany); DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Baer, Tobias [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Castro Carballo, Elena Maria [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Lohmann, Wolfgang [Brandenburgische Technische Univ. Cottbus (Germany); DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Schmidt, Ruediger [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    The LHC has an operational stored energy of 130MJ per beam. Only a small percentage of beam losses in the LHC equipment can damage material or lead to magnet quenches. Therefore, it is important to monitor different types of beam losses, e.g. scattering on residual gas particles, UFOs, collisions and injection losses. A detailed understanding of beam loss mechanisms is necessary to reduce them and ensure save operation. Two different beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC tunnel: ionization chambers and diamond sensors. Ionization chambers trigger a beam dump if beam losses exceed a certain threshold. They have a time resolution of 40um (half LHC turn) which is not sufficient to resolve bunch-by-bunch beam losses. Diamond sensors have a nanosecond time resolution and can therefore detect bunch-by-bunch beam losses. This time resolution allows an analysis of various types of beam losses and an understanding of the mechanisms. For the first time beam loss intensities were measured bunch-by-bunch caused by different origins of losses. Beam loss measurements using diamond sensors will be presented. The results are compared to simulations and good qualitative agreement was found. The potential of diamond sensors for LHC and experiment applications are discussed.

  2. Preservation of beam loss induced quenches, beam lifetime and beam loss measurements with the HERAp beam-loss-monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenburg, Kay

    1994-06-01

    The beam-loss-monitors (BLMs) in the HERA-proton-ring (HERAp) must fulfill the following requirements: They have to measure losses sensitive and fast enough to prevent the superconducting magnets from beam loss induced quenching; the dynamic range of the monitors must exceed several decades in order to measure losses during beam lifetimes of hundreds of hours as well as the much stronger losses that may quench superconducting magnets; they have to be insensitive to the synchrotron radiation of the adjacent electron-ring (HERAe); and their radiation hardness must allow a monitor-lifetime of a few years of HERA operation. These requirements are well satisfied by the HERAp-BLM-System.

  3. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  4. Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors: Simulation of Signal Formation & Irradiation Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091318; Stamoulis, G; Vavougios, D

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system of the Large Hadron Collider is responsible for the pro- tection of the machine from damage and for the prevention of a magnet quench. Near the interaction points of the LHC, in the triplet magnets area, the BLMs are sensitive to the collision debris, limiting their ability to distinguish beam loss signal from signal caused due to the collision products. Placing silicon & diamond detectors inside the cold mass of the mag- nets, in liquid helium temperatures, would provide significant improvement to the precision of the measurement of the energy deposition in the superconducting coil of the magnet. To further study the signal formation and the shape of the transient current pulses of the aforementioned detectors in cryogenic temperatures, a simulation application has been developed. The application provides a fast way of determining the electric field components inside the detectors bulk and then introduces an initial charge distribution based on the properties of the radiat...

  5. Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the damage potential of electron beam and tests of beam loss detector based on quartz Cherenkov radiator read out by a silicon photomultiplier on CLIC Test Facility 3(CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Gazis, E

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at the development of an electron/positron linear collider with a centre of mass energy in the multi-TeV energy range. Each Linac will have a length of 21 km, which means that very high accelerating gradients (>100 MV/m) are required. To achieve the high accelerating gradients, a novel two-beam acceleration scheme, in which RF power is transferred from a high-current, low-energy drive beam to the low-current, high energy main accelerating beam is designed. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system will be designed for CLIC to meet the requirements of the accelerator complex. Its main role as part of the machine protection scheme will be to detect potentially dangerous beam instabilities and prevent subsequent injection into the main beam or drive beam decelerators. The first part of this work describes the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the damage potential of high energy electron beams impacting a copper target. The second...

  6. Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B

    2016-01-01

    One of the main functions of the LHC beam loss measurement system is the protection of equipment against damage caused by impacting particles creating secondary showers and their energy dissipation in the matter. Reliability requirements are scaled according to the acceptable consequences and the frequency of particle impact events on equipment. Increasing reliability often leads to more complex systems. The downside of complexity is a reduction of availability; therefore, an optimum has to be found for these conflicting requirements. A detailed review of selected concepts and solutions for the LHC system will be given to show approaches used in various parts of the system from the sensors, signal processing, and software implementations to the requirements for operation and documentation.

  7. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria

    2013-04-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus(ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments to study the questions: ''What is mass?'', ''What is the universe made of?'' and ''Why is there no antimatter?''. The four experiments take data of the collision products and try to answer the fundamental questions of physics. The two larger detectors, CMS and ATLAS, are looking for the Higgs boson to study the electroweak symmetry breaking. Both detectors were built with contrasting concepts to exclude potential error sources and to rea rm the results. The smaller experiment LHCb studies the matter-antimatter asymmetry with a focus of the beauty quark. Another smaller experiment is ALICE that studies the conditions right after the Big Bang by colliding heavy ions. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150 km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due to deviations of the beam parameters. Several systems called beam loss monitors (BLMs) can measure beam losses. This thesis concentrates on two of them, ionization chambers and diamond detectors. Over 3600 ionization chambers are installed in

  8. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Stifter, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to suppress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. Here, I present the detector...

  9. Beam Loss and Beam Shape at the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    In this master thesis the beam loss and the beam shape at the LHC collimators was measured, analysed, presented and discussed. Beginning with a short introduction of the LHC, the experiments, the supercon- ducting magnet system, the basics on linear beam dynamics and a describtion of the LHC collimation system are given. This is followed by the presentation of the performance of the LHC collimation sys- tem during 2011. A method to convert the Beam Loss Monitor signal in Gy/s to a proton beam loss rate will be introduced. Also the beam lifetime during the proton physics runs in 2011 will be presented and discussed. Finally, the shape of the LHC beams is analysed by using data obtained by scraping the beam at the LHC primary collimators.

  10. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Stifter, Kelly Marie

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to supress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will descri...

  11. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to suppress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will describ...

  12. Beam Loss Monitors at the ESRF

    CERN Document Server

    Joly, B; Naylor, G A

    2000-01-01

    The European Synchrotron radiation facility is a third generation x-ray source providing x-rays on a continuous basis. As a facility available to external users, the monitoring of radiation caused by the loss of high-energy stored beam is of great concern. A network of beam loss monitors has been installed inside the storage ring tunnel so as to detect and localize the slow loss of electrons during a beam decay. This diagnostic tool allows optimization of beam parameters and physical aperture limits as well as giving useful information on the machine to allow the lifetime to be optimized and defects localized.

  13. Overview of LHC Beam Loss Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Fadakis, E; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Kruk, G; Kurfuerst, C; Marsili, A; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Priebe, A; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M; Zamantzas, C; Grishin, V; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring system provides measurements with an update rate of 1 Hz and high time resolution data by event triggering. These informations are used for the initiation of beam aborts, fixed displays and the off line analysis. The analysis of fast and localized loss events resulted in the determination of its rate, duration, peak amplitudes, its scaling with intensity, number of bunches and beam energy. The calibration of the secondary shower beam loss signal in respect to the needed beam energy deposition to quench the magnet coil is addressed at 450GeV and 3.5T eV . The adjustment of collimators is checked my measuring the loss pattern and its variation in the collimation regions of the LHC. Loss pattern changes during a fill allow the observation of non typical fill parameters.

  14. Test of the LHC DIAMOND Beam Loss Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition(CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-­radiation environment. Four detectors were configured with fast, radiation-­hard pre-amplifiers with a bandwidth of 2GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, particle losses were resolved with a 2ns rise time, a pulse width of 10ns and a time resolution of 615ps. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2us. Measurements during the LHC start-­up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the LHC RF freq...

  15. Injection Beam Loss and Beam Quality Checks for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, Verena; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Bracco, Chiara; Drosdal, Lene; Holzer, Eva; Khasbulatov, Denis; Magnin, Nicolas; Meddahi, Malika; Nordt, Annika; Sapinski, Mariusz; Vogt, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the injection into the LHC is monitored by a dedicated software system which acquires and analyses the pulse waveforms from the injection kickers, and measures key beam parameters and compares them with the nominal ones. The beam losses at injection are monitored on many critical devices in the injection regions, together with the longitudinal filling pattern and maximum trajectory offset on the first 100 turns. The paper describes the injection quality check system and the results from LHC beam commissioning, in particular the beam losses measured during injection at the various aperture limits. The results are extrapolated to full intensity and the consequences are discussed

  16. Monte Carlo Simulations of Beam Losses in the Test Beam Line of CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Nebot Del Busto, E; Branger, E; Holzer, E B; Doebert, S; Lillestol, R L; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    The Test Beam Line (TBL) of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) aims to validate the drive beam deceleration concept of CLIC, in which the RF power requested to boost particles to multi-TeV energies is obtained via deceleration of a high current and low energy drive beam (DB). Despite a TBL beam energy (150-80 MeV) significantly lower than the minimum nominal energy of the CLIC DB (250 MeV), the pulse time structure of the TBL provides the opportunity to measure beam losses with CLIC-like DB timing conditions. In this contribution, a simulation study on the detection of beam losses along the TBL for the commissioning of the recently installed beam loss monitoring system is presented. The most likely loss locations during stable beam conditions are studied by considering the beam envelope defined by the FODO lattice as well as the emittance growth due to the deceleration process. Moreover, the optimization of potential detector locations is discussed. Several factors are considered, namely: the distance to the bea...

  17. A Fast CVD Diamond Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-radiation environment. The detectors were configured with a fast, radiation-hard pre-amplifier with a bandwidth of 2 GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250 m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, single MIPs were resolved with a 2 ns rise time, a pulse width of 10 ns and a time resolution of less than 1 ns. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1 ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2 μs. Measurements during the LHC start-up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the 400...

  18. 金刚石探测器用于C-ADS注入器Ⅱ束损探测的模拟研究%Simulation of the Diamond Detector for the C-ADS Injector II Beam Loss Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左伟; 付鑫; 苏有武; 庞成果; 李武元; 徐俊奎; 李宗强; 毛旺; 严维伟; 徐翀

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese Accelerator Driven Subcritical System (C-ADS) injector II consists of super-conduction accelerating section which is half wave resonator (HWR), the designed beam intensity is 10 mA. To avoid the damage to the resonator due to proton beam loss, special Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system is essential. BLM system could provide alarm signal when high energy deposition occurs which may cause the resonator quenching. Radiation field of 10 MeV proton lost at different point of the HWR are simulated with MCNPX, BLM could be set at proper positions based on the simulation. Considering the structure of HWR and the BLM detector selecting influence factor, radiation energy deposition in the diamond detector are simulated with MCNPX when the proton incidence angle change from 1°∼5°, Possible beam loss point can be deduced from the relationship of energy deposition in detectors at different locations. The results indicate that energy spectra of secondary particles are independent with incidence angle;the number of secondary particles may be influenced slightly.%加速器驱动次临界系统C-ADS注入器Ⅱ采用强流超导质子直线加速器,设计流强达到10 mA。强流质子束产生的束流损失有可能损伤超导腔,需要专用的束流损失监测系统进行监测,束流损失探测器(BLM)需要在高能量沉积导致超导腔失超之前提供警报。通过MCNPX模拟计算10 MeV质子在半波谐振腔(HWR)不同位置损失产生的辐射场,比较选取超导腔管道进出口处4个位置为推荐束损探测器放置的位置,结合HWR腔结构和束损探测器选择的影响因素,计算了次级辐射在金刚石探测器中的能量沉积以及1°∼5°不同质子入射角度对探测的影响。结果表明,根据不同位置处探测器的能量沉积关系可以推断出束损点;不同入射角度不会影响生成粒子的能量分布,只轻微影响生成粒子的数目。

  19. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitoring for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Sapinski, M

    A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system was installed on the outside surface of the LHC magnet cryostats to protect the accelerator equipment from beam losses. The protection is achieved by extracting the beam from the ring in case thresholds imposed on measured radiation levels are exceeded. Close to the interaction regions of the LHC, the present BLM system is sensitive to particle showers generated in the interaction region of the two beams. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and possible quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The particle showers measured by the present BLM configuration are partly shielded by the cryostat and the iron yoke of the magnets. The system can hence be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the protected element, i. e. the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass of the magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. T...

  20. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors for the Superconducting Magnets of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, MR; Sapinski, M; Kurfuerst, C; Griesmayer, E; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E

    2014-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor detectors close to the interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider are currently located outside the cryostat, far from the superconducting coils of the magnets. In addition to their sensitivity to lost beam particles, they also detect particles coming from the experimental collisions, which do not contribute significantly to the heat deposition in the superconducting coils. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and dangerous quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The system can be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass in a superfluid helium environment, at 1.9 K. The dose then measured by such Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors would more precisely correspond to the real dose deposited in the coil. The candidates under investigation for such detectors are based on p+-n-n+ si...

  1. RF Cavity Induced Sensitivity Limitations on Beam Loss Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastriotou, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Sousa, F. S. Domingues; Effinger, E.; Holzer, E. B.; Quirante, J. L. Navarro; del Busto, E. N.; Tecker, F.; Viganò, W.; Welsch, C. P.; Woolley, B. J.

    Due to the secondary showers generated when a particle hits the vacuum chamber, beam losses at an accelerator may be detected via radiation detectors located near the beam line. Several sources of background can limit the sensitivity and reduce the dynamic range of a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM). This document concentrates on potential sources of background generated near high gradient RF cavities due to dark current and voltage breakdowns. An optical fibre has been installed at an experiment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3), where a dedicated study of the performance of a loaded and unloaded CLIC accelerating structure is undergoing. An analysis of the collected data and a benchmarking simulation are presented to estimate BLM sensitivity limitations. Moreover, the feasibility for the use of BLMs optimised for the diagnostics of RF cavities is discussed.

  2. Beam losses in heavy ion drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafin, E R; Hofmann, I; Spiller, P J

    2002-01-01

    While beam loss issues have hardly been considered in detail for heavy ion fusion scenarios, recent heavy ion machine developments in different labs (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC)) have shown the great importance of beam current limitations due to ion losses. Two aspects of beam losses in heavy ion accelerators are theoretically considered: (1) secondary neutron production due to lost ions, and (2) vacuum pressure instability due to charge exchange losses. Calculations are compared and found to be in good agreement with measured data. The application to a Heavy-Ion Driven Inertial Fusion (HIDIF) scenario is discussed. 12 Refs.

  3. Ionization Chambers for the LHC Beam Loss Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E; Kain, V

    2003-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be used to prevent and protect superconducting magnets against coil quenches and coil damages. Ionisation chambers will be mounted outside the cryostat to measure the secondary shower particles caused by lost beam particles. Since the stored particle beam intensity is eight orders of magnitude larger than the lowest quench level and the losses should be detected with a relative error of two, the design and the location of the detectors have to be optimised. For that purpose a two-fold simulation was carried out. The longitudinal loss locations of the tertiary halo is investigated by tracking the halo through several magnet elements. These loss distributions are combined with simulations of the particle fluence outside the cryostat, which is induced by lost protons at the vacuum pipe. The base-line ionisation chamber has been tested at the PS Booster in order to determine the detector response at the high end of the dynamic range.

  4. Heating of Microchannel Plates Detector Positioned Inside the LHC Beam Pipe by the Electromagnetic Fields of Relativistic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dubenskiy, V P; CERN. Geneva; Tsimbal, F A

    1995-01-01

    Here we present the results of our estimates of upper limits for heating induced by the relativistic beams of charged particles at the future LHC in the MCP detector placed inside the beam pipe. The energy losses are small for the uppermost intensities of the beams to be expected: less than 0.0033 Wt for the conductive cromium MCP cladding and not greater than 0.02 Wt for the dialectric MCP body (for the whole MCP disk of 100 sq.cm area). The special measurements of the dispersion law e(w) of the MCP dialectric material have been performed in order to get the reference data to the analytical calculations. The approaches outlined here could be applied to any detector positioned in the vicinity of the beams. The possible problems of the beam induced electrical signal in the detector circuits are touched also.

  5. Beam Loss Detection at Radiation Source ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, P; Schurig, R; Langenhagen, H

    2003-01-01

    The Rossendorf superconducting Electron Linac of high Brilliance and low Emittance (ELBE) delivers an 40 MeV, 1 mA cw-beam for different applications such as bremsstrahlung production, electron channelling, free-electron lasers or secondary particle beam generation. In this energy region in case of collisions of the electron beam with the pipe nearly all beam power will be deposited into the pipe material. Therefore a reliable beam loss monitoring is essential for machine protection at ELBE. Different systems basing on photo multipliers, compton diodes and long ionization chambers were studied. The pros and cons of the different systems will be discussed. Ionization chambers based on air-isolated RF cables installed some cm away parallel to the beam line turned out to be the optimal solution. The beam shut-off threshold was adjusted to 1 μC integral charge loss during a 100 ms time interval. Due to the favourable geometry the monitor sensitivity varies less than ±50% along the beam line (di...

  6. Identification of LHC beam loss mechanism : a deterministic treatment of loss patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Marsili, Aurélien

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest machine ever built, with a total circumference of 26.7 km; and it is the most powerful accelerator ever, both in beam energy and beam intensity. The main magnets are superconducting, keeping the particles into two counter circulating beams, which collide in four interaction points. CERN and the LHC will be described in chap. 1. The superconducting magnets of the LHC have to be protected against particle losses. Depending on the number of lost particles, the coils of the magnets will become normal conducting and/or will be damaged. To avoid these events a beam loss monitoring (BLM) system was installed to measure the particle loss rates. If the predefined safe thresholds of loss rates are exceeded, the beams are directed out of the accelerator ring towards the beam dump. The detectors of the BLM system are mainly ionization chambers located outside of the cryostats. In total, about 3500 ionisation chambers are installed. Further challenges include the high dyna...

  7. Measurement of Beam Loss at the Australian Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, EB; Kastriotou, M; Boland, MJ; Jackson, PD; Rasool, RP; Schmidt, J; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented requirements that new machines are setting on their diagnostic systems is leading to the development of new generation of devices with large dynamic range, sensitivity and time resolution. Beam loss detection is particularly challenging due to the large extension of new facilities that need to be covered with localized detector. Candidates to mitigate this problem consist of systems in which the sensitive part of the radiation detectors can be extended over long distance of beam lines. In this document we study the feasibility of a BLM system based on optical fiber as an active detector for an electron storage ring. The Australian Synchrotron (AS) comprises a 216m ring that stores electrons up to 3GeV. The Accelerator has recently claimed the world record ultra low transverse emittance (below pm rad) and its surroundings are rich in synchrotron radiation. Therefore, the AS provides beam conditions very similar to those expected in the CLIC/ILC damping rings. A qualitative benchmark of beam l...

  8. Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls

    CERN Document Server

    Dotson, Danny W

    2005-01-01

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic "burn through." Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an "off the shelf" Programmable Logic Controller located in a single controll box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage "Brick" at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  9. Update on beam loss monitoring at CTF3 for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, L J; Effinger, E; Holzer, E B; del Busto, E N; Mallows, S; Branger, E

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system for the compact linear collider (CLIC) study is to work within the machine protection system. Due to the size of the CLIC facility, a BLM that covers large distances along the beam line is highly desirable, in particular for the CLIC drive beam decelerators, which would alternatively require some ~40,000 localised monitors. Therefore, an optical fibre BLM system is currently under investigation which can cover large sections of beam line at a time. A multimode fibre has been installed along the Test Beam Line at the CLIC test facility (CTF3) where the detection principle is based on the production of Cherenkov photons within the fibre resulting from beam loss and their subsequent transport along the fibre where they are then detected at the fibre ends using silicon photomultipliers. Several additional monitors including ACEMs, PEP-II and diamond detectors have also been installed. In this contribution the first results from the BLMs are presented, comp...

  10. The LHC beam loss monitoring system's data acquisition card

    CERN Document Server

    Effinger, E; Emery, J; Ferioli, G; Gauglio, G; Zamantzas, C

    2007-01-01

    The beam loss monitoring (BLM) system [1] of the LHC is one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. It must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenches and the machine components from damages, caused by beam losses. Ionization chambers and secondary emission based beam loss detectors are used on several locations around the ring. The sensors are producing a signal current, which is related to the losses. This current will be measured by a tunnel electronic, which acquires, digitizes and transmits the data via an optical link to the surface electronic. The so called threshold comparator (TC) [2] collects, analyzes and compares the data with threshold table. It also gives a dump signal through the combiner card to the beam inter lock system (BIC). The usage of the system, for protection and tuning of the LHC and the scale of the LHC, imposed exceptional specification of the dynamic range and radiation tolerance. The input current dynamic range should allow measurements between 10pA a...

  11. Test of a Diamond Detector Using Unbunched Beam Halo Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Pernegger, H; Dobos, D; Frais-Kolbl, H; Griesmayer, E

    2010-01-01

    A pCVD diamond detector has been evaluated as a beam loss monitor for future applications in the LHC accelerator. The test monitor was mounted in the SPS BA5 downstream of a LHC collimator during the LHC beam set-up. CVD diamond particle detectors are already in use in the CERN experiments ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and Alice. This is a proven technology with high radiation tolerance and very fast signal read-out. It can be used for single-particle detection, as well as for measuring particle cascades, for timing measurements on the nanosecond scale and for beam protection systems. Despite the read-out being made through 250 m of CK50 cable, the tests have shown a very good signal-to-noise ratio of 6.8, an excellent double-pulse resolution of less than 5 ns and a high dynamic range of 1:350 MIP particles. The efficiency of particle detection is practically 100% for charged particles.

  12. Beam Loss Diagnostics Based on Pressure Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Weinrich, U

    2003-01-01

    The GSI is operating a heavy ion synchrotron, which is currently undergoing an upgrade towards higher beam intensities. It was discovered that beam losses induce a significant pressure increase in the vacuum system. In order to detect the time constants of the pressure increase and decrease, fast total pressure measurements were put into operation. With the recently installed partial pressure diagnostics it is also possible to follow up which types of molecules are released. The presentation will focus on the different techniques applied as well as on some measurement results. The potential and difficulties of this diagnostic tool will also be discussed.

  13. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  14. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  15. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  16. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  17. Design and Construction of the First Prototype of Liquid Scintillator Detector for Fast Beam Loss Monitor(FBLM) System%快响应束流损失监控(FBLM)系统液闪探测器初样的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晨霞; 陈昌; 田建民; 赵中亮; 徐美杭; 李公平; 陈元柏; 徐韬光; 赵海泉

    2011-01-01

    给出快响应束流损失监控(Fast Beam Lost Monitor,FBLM)系统的液体闪烁体探测器初样的研制.在高频四极加速器(Radio Frequency Quadrupole,RFQ)实验装置上的测试表明,液闪探测器能给出宽度为500 μs 束流宏脉冲结构,能逐个显示出宏脉冲内490 ns的束流切束脉冲.液闪输出信号脉冲较490 ns束流切束脉冲延迟约70 ns.液闪型FBLM输出的信号幅度大于塑闪型.液闪探测器初样的成功研制,为其性能进一步改进提高,打下了良好的基础.%Design and constmction of the first prototype of liquid scintillator detector for fast beam loss monitor ( FBLM ) system are given. A beam chopping device can remove a 490 ns section of beam at approximately 1 MHz repetition rate within a 500 μs macro beam pulse - width. The liquid scintillator displays the measured beam - pulse structure after the beam chopper. Through RFQ special beam structure, the response time of FBLM is measured. The response time of FBLM is about nano second. The signal amplitude from liquid scintillator is larger than plastic scintillator. All of these give us good experiences for the futher improvement of liquid seintillator detector design and construction. According to the measurement data. liquid seintillator is suggested as the detector of FBLM system.

  18. Beam Collimation and Machine-Detector Interface at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Nikolai V; Kostin, Mikhail A

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, spray from the dumps and extraction lines, beam-gas and beam halo interactions with collimators and other components in the ILC beam delivery system create fluxes of muons and other secondaries which can exceed the tolerable levels at a detector by a few orders of magnitude. It is shown that with a multi-stage collimation system, magnetized iron spoilers which fill the tunnel and a set of masks in the detector, one can hopefully meet the design goals. Results of modeling with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss and energy deposition effects are presented in this paper. We concentrate on collimation system and mask design and optimization, short- and long-term survivability of the critical components (spoilers, absorbers, magnets, separators, dumps), dynamic heat loads and radiation levels in magnets and other components, machine-related backgrounds and damage in collider detectors, and environmental aspects (prompt dose, ground-water and air activation).

  19. The LUPIN detector supporting least intrusive beam monitoring technique through neutron detection

    CERN Document Server

    Manessi, G P; Welsch, C; Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M

    2013-01-01

    The Long interval, Ultra-wide dynamic Pile-up free Neutron rem counter (LUPIN) is a novel detector initially developed for radiation protection purposes, specifically conceived for applications in pulsed neutron fields. The detector has a measurement capability varying over many orders of neutron burst intensity, from a single neutron up to thousands of interactions for each burst, without showing any saturation effect. Whilst LUPIN has been developed for applications in the radiation protection fields, its unique properties make it also well suited to support other beam instrumentation. In this contribution, the design of LUPIN is presented in detail and results from measurements carried out in different facilities summarize its main characteristics. Its potential use as beam loss monitor (BLM) and complementary detector for non-invasive beam monitoring purposes (e.g. to complement a monitor based on proton beam “halo” detection) in medical accelerators is then examined. In the context of its application...

  20. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF THE BEAM LOSS MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SNS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITKOVER,R.; GASSNER,D.

    2002-05-06

    The SNS to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide a high average intensity 1 GeV beam to produce spallation neutrons. Loss of a even small percentage of this intense beam would result in high radiation. The Beam Loss Monitor (ELM) system must detect such small, long term losses yet be capable of measuring infrequent short high losses. The large dynamic range presents special problems for the system design. Ion chambers will be used as the detectors. A detector originally designed for the FNAL Tevatron, was considered but concerns about ion collection times and low collection efficiency at high loss rates favor a new design. The requirements and design concepts of the proposed approach will be presented. Discussion of the design and testing of the ion chambers and the analog j-Point end electronics will be presented. The overall system design will be described.

  1. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  2. Cherenkov Detector for Beam Quality Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Stella

    2015-01-01

    A new detector to measure the machine induced background at larger radiihas been developed and installed in the CMS experiment at LHC. Itconsists of 40 modules, each comprising a quartz bar read out by aphotomultiplier. Since Cerenkov radiation is emitted in a forward conearound the charged particle trajectory, these detectors can distinguishthe directions of the machine induced background.The back-end consists of a microTCA readout with excellent time resolution.The performance of the detector modules measured in several test-beamcampaigns will be reported. The installation in CMS will be described, andfirst results about operating the detector during data taking will begiven.

  3. A prototype readout system for the Diamond Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Effinger, E; Baer, T; Schmidt, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Griesmayer, E

    2013-01-01

    Diamond Beam Loss Monitors are used at the LHC for the measurement of fast beam losses. In this note, specimen LHC loss measurements with the prototype readout system “ROSY” from CIVIDEC are presented. The readout system is FPGA-based for on-line, real-time, and dead-time-free data processing, including a Linuxbased server for the interconnection to a GUI. The loss analysis makes full use of the fast signal response of the diamond detectors with 1 ns time resolution and 6.7 ns double pulse resolution. Two examples are presented: applications of the Time Loss Histogram with 1.6 ns binning and 1.2 ns time jitter for loss measurements that are synchronized with the LHC revolution period and a beam-loss-based tune measurement for all circulating bunches in parallel.

  4. A Prototype Readout System for the Diamond Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Effinger, E; Baer, T; Schmidt, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Griesmayer, E; Kavrigin, P; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    Diamond Beam Loss Monitors are used at the LHC for the measurement of fast beam losses. In this note, specimen LHC loss measurements with the prototype readout system “ROSY” from CIVIDEC are presented. The readout system is FPGA-based for on-line, real-time, and dead-time-free data processing, including a Linux-based server for the interconnection to a GUI. The loss analysis makes full use of the fast signal response of the diamond detectors with 1 ns time resolution and 6.7 ns double pulse resolution. Two examples are presented: applications of the Time Loss Histogram with 1.6 ns binning and 1.2 ns time jitter for loss measurements that are synchronized with the LHC revolution period and a beam-loss-based tune measurement for all circulating bunches in parallel.

  5. Single Gain Radiation Tolerant LHC Beam Loss Acquisition Card

    CERN Document Server

    Effinger, E; Emery, J; Ferioli, G; Zamantzas, C

    2008-01-01

    The beam loss monitoring system is one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. It must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenches and the machine components from damages, caused by beam losses. Ionization chambers and secondary emission based detectors are used at several locations around the ring. The sensors are producing a signal current, which is related to the losses. This current will be measured by a tunnel card, which acquires, digitizes and transmits the data via an optical link to the surface electronic. The usage of the system, for protection and tuning of the LHC and the scale of the LHC, imposed exceptional specifications of the dynamic range and radiation tolerance. The input dynamic allows measurements between 10pA and 1mA and its protected to high pulse of 1.5kV and its corresponding current. To cover this range, a current to frequency converter in combination with an ADC is used. The integrator output voltage is measured with an ADC to improve the resolution. The ...

  6. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  7. Prompt loss of beam ions in KSTAR plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Yoon, S. W.; Park, B. H.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Ko, W.-H.

    2016-10-01

    For a toroidal plasma facility to realize fusion energy, researching the transport of fast ions is important not only due to its close relation to the heating and current drive efficiencies but also to determine the heat load on the plasma-facing components. We present a theoretical analysis and orbit simulation for the origin of lost fast-ions during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. We adopted a two-dimensional phase diagram of the toroidal momentum and magnetic moment and describe detectable momentums at the fast-ion loss detector (FILD) position as a quadratic line. This simple method was used to model birth ions deposited by NBI and drawn as points in the momentum phase space. A Lorentz orbit code was used to calculate the fast-ion orbits and present the prompt loss characteristics of the KSTAR NBI. The scrape-off layer deposition of fast ions produces a significant prompt loss, and the model and experimental results closely agreed on the pitch-angle range of the NBI prompt loss. Our approach can provide wall load information from the fast ion loss.

  8. Prompt loss of beam ions in KSTAR plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Young Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For a toroidal plasma facility to realize fusion energy, researching the transport of fast ions is important not only due to its close relation to the heating and current drive efficiencies but also to determine the heat load on the plasma-facing components. We present a theoretical analysis and orbit simulation for the origin of lost fast-ions during neutral beam injection (NBI heating in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR device. We adopted a two-dimensional phase diagram of the toroidal momentum and magnetic moment and describe detectable momentums at the fast-ion loss detector (FILD position as a quadratic line. This simple method was used to model birth ions deposited by NBI and drawn as points in the momentum phase space. A Lorentz orbit code was used to calculate the fast-ion orbits and present the prompt loss characteristics of the KSTAR NBI. The scrape-off layer deposition of fast ions produces a significant prompt loss, and the model and experimental results closely agreed on the pitch-angle range of the NBI prompt loss. Our approach can provide wall load information from the fast ion loss.

  9. The in-beam tracking detectors for R3B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschalis, Stefanos; Johansen, Jacob; Scheit, Heiko [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet, D 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Heil, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Aumann, Thomas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet, D 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Krivshich, Anatoly [PNPI St. Petersburg, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Collaboration: R3B-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The R3B experiment is part of the NUSTAR pillar at FAIR. One of the great strengths of the R3B experiment is the kinematically complete measurement of reactions with exotic ions with energies of up to 1 AGeV. Key components of the R3B experiment are the neutron detector NeuLAND, the γ and charge-particle calorimeter CALIFA, the Si Tracker and the in-beam tracking detectors. A cornerstone instrument of the setup is the new dipole magnet (GLAD) which bends and momentum analyses the high-rigidity beams. A precise tracking of the charged particles through the magnetic field is crucial to resolve the masses of heavy ions and measure the momentum of the fragments with high resolution. In this contribution we present the technical design details of the in-beam tracking detectors that will be used in the R3B experiment together with recent results obtained from in-beam prototype testing. In particular, we discuss Si detectors, detectors based on plastic-scintillator fibers and paddles, straw-tube gas detectors and the overall performance of the system.

  10. The LHC beam loss monitoring system's real-time data analysis card

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Ferioli, G; Guaglio, G; Leitner, R; Zamantzas, C

    2005-01-01

    The BLM (Beam Loss Monitoring) system has to prevent the superconducting magnets from being quenched and protect the machine components against damages making it one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. The complete system consists of 3600 detectors, placed at various locations around the ring, tunnel electronics, which are responsible for acquiring, digitizing, and transmitting the data, and surface electronics, which receive the data via 2km optical data links, process, analyze, store, and issue warning and abort triggers. At those surface units, named BLMTCs, the backbone on each of them is an FPGA (field programmable gate array) which treats the loss signals collected from 16 detectors. It takes into account the beam energy and keeps 192 running sums giving loss durations of up to the last 84 seconds before it compares them with thresholds uniquely programmable for each detector. In this paper, the BLMTC's design is explored giving emphasis to the strategies followed in combining t...

  11. Secondary Electron Emission Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a vital part of the active protection of the LHC accelerators' elements. It should provide the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. The LHC BLM system will use ionization chambers as standard detectors but in the areas where very high dose rates are expected, the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) chambers will be employed because of their high linearity, low sensitivity and fast response. The SEM needs a high vacuum for proper operation and has to be functional for up to 20 years, therefore all the components were designed according to the UHV requirements and a getter pump was included. The SEM electrodes are made of Ti because of its Secondary Emission Yield (SEY) stability. The sensitivity of the SEM was modeled in Geant4 via the Photo-Absorption Ionization module together with custom parameterization of the very low energy secondary electron production. ...

  12. Beam Loss Studies for the CERN PS Booster Using FLUKA

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovic, S; Mikulec, B; Sapinski, M

    2013-01-01

    In view of future upgrade plans, the beam loss monitor (BLM) coverage of the four PS Booster (PSB) rings was reviewed. FLUKA studies at Linac4 injection and PSB extraction energies were performed to simulate the loss patterns. The results of these studies, presented in this paper, have led to the proposal to double the number of beam loss monitors in the PSB.

  13. Beam Loss Control for the Fermilab Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bruce C

    2013-01-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Losses were at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  14. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  15. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    Ahigh resolution(σ< 2 μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. EUDET was a coordinated detector R&D programme for the future International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 μm or 10 μmand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  16. Comparison of flat-panel detector and image-intensifier detector for cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Rika; Konno, Yasutaka; Ueda, Ken; Ikeda, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated a flat-panel detector (FPD) (scintillator screen and a-Si photo-sensor array) for use in a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) detector and compared it with an image-intensifier detector (IID). The FPD cone-beam CT system has a higher spatial resolution than the IID system. At equal pixel sizes, the standard deviation of noise intensity of the FPD system is equal to that of the IID system. However, the circuit noise of the FPD must be reduced, especially at low doses. Our evaluations show that the FPD system has a strong potential for use as a cone-beam CT detector because of high-spatial resolution.

  17. The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J C; Ayad, R; Azfar, F; Dambasuren, E; Efimov, A; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Anderson, S; Smith, A; Kubota, Y; Lipeles, E; Coan, T E; Staeck, J; Fadeev, V; Volobuev, I P

    1999-01-01

    We are constructing a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) for the CLEO III upgrade for precision charged hadron identification. The RICH uses plane and sawtooth LiF crystals as radiators, MWPCs as photon detectors with TEA as the photo-sensitive material, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results of a beam test of the first two out of total 30 sectors are presented.

  18. Study on beam loss system of BEPCII%BEPCII束损系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何俊; 赵晓岩; 汪林; 杜垚垚; 赵颖; 随艳峰; 岳军会; 曹建社

    2015-01-01

    为更好掌握储存环中的束流状态,在北京正负电子对撞机二期工程的储存环上建立了以二极管为探测器的束流损失探测系统。用蒙特卡罗软件对损失束流产生簇射电子的分布情况进行了模拟,为安装束损探测器位置提供了依据。搭建了包括探头、数据获取系统、数据传输系统在内的束损系统。对束损过程进行了详细的分析与描述。对北京正负电子对撞机多年的束损数据进行了整理分析,对其在丢束诊断、束流寿命研究等多个方面应用情况进行了总结。数据显示建立的束损系统工作状态稳定,是优化机器参数、改善束流寿命、分析丢束过程的有力工具。%Background: A beam loss system that uses the PIN diode as the detector has been set up on Beijing Electron–Positron Collider II (BEPCII) storage after 8-a routine operation. Further study and analysis should been carried out based on the historical data.Purpose: This study aims to learn the beam loss process in depth and further optimize the parameters of the accelerator.Methods: Based on the machine size and beam parameter of BEPCII, the Monte Carlo simulation of the cluster electrons in the storage ring was performed to provide reference for installation position of the beam loss system. Then different methods, including adding all the beam loss monitor (BLM) counts, adding the inner detector, adding the outer detector, have been used for data analysis of the beam life time, beam loss distribution, beam envelope and dispersion,etc., under both the collider mode and synchrotron mode.Results: The results show that the BLM system is useful to study the beam life time and diagnose the beam loss processes. The beam loss system for BEPCII works stablely. The detector counts are much smaller than the dynamic range of the detector.Conclusion: Over the eight years, the response of the beam loss system does not change a lot, which implies that the

  19. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-12

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  20. Micro-strip metal detector for the beam profile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugatch, V.; Borysova, M.; Mykhailenko, A.; Fedorovitch, O.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Perevertaylo, V.; Franz, H.; Wittenburg, K.; Schmelling, M.; Bauer, C.

    2007-10-01

    The Micro-strip Metal Detector (MMD) design and production technology, readout electronics as well as areas of applications are described. The MMD was designed for beam profile monitoring of charged particle and synchrotron radiation beams. Using photolithography and plasma-chemistry etching technologies we succeeded in creating detectors with a metal strip's thickness of less than 2 μm and without any other materials in the working area. The principle of operation is based on the Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). The results obtained with the MMD at the monochromatic synchrotron radiation beam at HASYLAB (DESY) are also presented. The current version of the MMD allows measuring a beam profile and position with an accuracy of 20 μm.

  1. Micro-strip metal detector for the beam profile monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugatch, V.; Borysova, M. [Kyiv Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Mykhailenko, A. [Kyiv Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine)], E-mail: mykhailenko@kinr.kiev.ua; Fedorovitch, O.; Pylypchenko, Y. [Kyiv Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Perevertaylo, V. [Institute of Micro Devices, Kyiv (Ukraine); Franz, H.; Wittenburg, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Schmelling, M.; Bauer, C. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-10-21

    The Micro-strip Metal Detector (MMD) design and production technology, readout electronics as well as areas of applications are described. The MMD was designed for beam profile monitoring of charged particle and synchrotron radiation beams. Using photolithography and plasma-chemistry etching technologies we succeeded in creating detectors with a metal strip's thickness of less than 2{mu}m and without any other materials in the working area. The principle of operation is based on the Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). The results obtained with the MMD at the monochromatic synchrotron radiation beam at HASYLAB (DESY) are also presented. The current version of the MMD allows measuring a beam profile and position with an accuracy of 20{mu}m.

  2. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Seryi, Andrei; Sramek, Christopher K

    2005-01-01

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ‘banana effect'). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  3. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

    of the depth dose curves. Solid state detectors, such as diamond detectors, radiochromic films, TLDs and the amino acid alanine are used due to there good spatial resolution. If used in particle beams their response often exhibits a dependence on particle energy and type, so the acquired signal is not always...... at energies below 20 MeV/u. We implemented this model in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. At the GSI heavy ion facility in Darmstadt, Germany, alanine has been irradiated with carbon ions at energies between 88 an 400 MeV/u, which is the energy range used for therapy. The irradiation and the detector response have...

  4. Silicon detectors for the n-TOF neutron beams monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, L; Barbagallo, M; Colonna, N; Damone, L; Pappalardo, A; Piscopo, M; Finocchiaro, P

    2015-01-01

    During 2014 the second experimental area EAR2 was completed at the n-TOF neutron beam facility at CERN. As the neutrons are produced via spallation, by means of a high-intensity 20 GeV pulsed proton beam impinging on a thick target, the resulting neutron beam covers an enormous energy range, from thermal to several GeV. In this paper we describe two beam diagnostic devices, designed and built at INFN-LNS, both exploiting silicon detectors coupled with neutron converter foils containing 6Li. The first one is based on four silicon pads and allows to monitor the neutron beam flux as a function of the neutron energy. The second one, based on position sensitive silicon detectors, is intended for the reconstruction of the beam profile, again as a function of the neutron energy. Several electronic setups have been explored in order to overcome the issues related to the gamma flash, namely a huge pulse present at the start of each neutron bunch which may blind the detectors for some time. The two devices have been ch...

  5. Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, André; Lohse, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

  6. Position Sensitive Detector Used to Detect Beam Profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Non-destructive diagnostic methods are very important for beam adjustments and monitors,especially when the beam intensity is less than 10~8 pps during the heavy-ion treatment of cancer.Now the diagnostic devices of HIFRL can’t satisfy the requests,so we decide to construct a detecting system of the residual-gas beam profile~([1,2]).The system uses the Position Sensitive Detector(PSD)~([3,4])based on microchannel plate(MCP)to

  7. Beam test of CSES silicon strip detector module

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Da-Li; Wang, Huan-Yu; Li, Xin-Qiao; Xu, Yan-Bing; An, heng-Hua; Yu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Hui; Shi, Feng; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    The silicon-strip tracker of China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite (CSES) consists of two double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSD). It provides the tracking information of incident particles. The low-noise analog ASIC VA140 was used for signal readout of DSSD. A beam test of the DSSD module was performed in the Beijing test beam Facility of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) using proton beam of 400~800MeV/c. Results on pedestal analysis, RMSE noise, gain correction and reconstruction of incident position of DSSD module are presented.

  8. Apertures in the LHC Beam Dump System and Beam Losses During Beam Abort

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, T; Gyr, M; Koschik, A; Uythoven, J; Weiler, T

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system (LBDS) is used to dispose accelerated protons and ions in a wide energy range from 450 GeV up to 7 TeV. An abort gap of $3 \\mu$s is foreseen to avoid sweeping particles through the LHC ring aperture. This paper gives a brief overview of the critical apertures in the extraction region and the two beam dump lines. MAD-X tracking studies have been made to investigate the impact of particles swept through the aperture due to extraction kicker failures or the presence of particles within the abort gap. The issue of failures during beam abort is a major concern for machine protection as well as a critical factor for safe operation of the experiments and their detectors.

  9. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions....... Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine......-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasi mono energetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties...

  10. Cavity loss factors for non-ultrarelativistic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    Cavity loss factors can be easily computed for ultrarelativistic beams using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for non-ultrarelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. The authors calculate the loss factors of a non-relativistic bunch and compare results with the relativistic case.

  11. Cavity Loss Factors For Non-Ultrarelativistic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    1998-01-01

    Cavity loss factors can be easily computed for ultrarelativistic beams using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for non-ultrarelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. We calculate the loss factors of a non-ultrarelativistic bunch and compare results with the relativistic case.

  12. Conceptual design of the ITER fast-ion loss detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Kocan, M.; Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Bertalot, L.; Bonnet, Y.; Casal, N.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Giacomin, T.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Gunn, J. P.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Kiptily, V.; Pinches, S. D.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Reichle, R.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J. F.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Snicker, A.; Vayakis, G.; Veshchev, E.; Vorpahl, Ch.; Walsh, M.; Walton, R.

    2016-11-01

    A conceptual design of a reciprocating fast-ion loss detector for ITER has been developed and is presented here. Fast-ion orbit simulations in a 3D magnetic equilibrium and up-to-date first wall have been carried out to revise the measurement requirements for the lost alpha monitor in ITER. In agreement with recent observations, the simulations presented here suggest that a pitch-angle resolution of ˜5° might be necessary to identify the loss mechanisms. Synthetic measurements including realistic lost alpha-particle as well as neutron and gamma fluxes predict scintillator signal-to-noise levels measurable with standard light acquisition systems with the detector aperture at ˜11 cm outside of the diagnostic first wall. At measurement position, heat load on detector head is comparable to that in present devices.

  13. System Architecture for measuring and monitoring Beam Losses in the Injector Complex at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Dehning, B; Jackson, S; Kwiatkowski, M; Vigano, W

    2012-01-01

    The strategy for beam setup and machine protection of the accelerators at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is mainly based on its Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) systems. For their upgrade to higher beam energies and intensities, a new BLM system is under development with the aim of providing faster measurement updates with higher dynamic range and the ability to accept more types of detectors as input compared to its predecessors. In this paper, the architecture of the complete system is explored giving an insight to the design choices made to provide a highly reconfigurable system that is able to fulfil the different requirements of each accelerator using reprogrammable devices.

  14. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  15. LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System Verification Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Zamantzas, C; Jackson, S

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Mon­i­tor­ing (BLM) sys­tem is one of the most com­plex in­stru­men­ta­tion sys­tems de­ployed in the LHC. In ad­di­tion to protecting the col­lid­er, the sys­tem also needs to pro­vide a means of di­ag­nos­ing ma­chine faults and de­liv­er a feed­back of loss­es to the control room as well as to sev­er­al sys­tems for their setup and analysis. It has to trans­mit and pro­cess sig­nals from al­most 4’000 mon­i­tors, and has near­ly 3 mil­lion con­fig­urable pa­ram­e­ters. The system was de­signed with re­li­a­bil­i­ty and avail­abil­i­ty in mind. The spec­i­fied op­er­a­tion and the fail-safe­ty stan­dards must be guar­an­teed for the sys­tem to per­form its func­tion in pre­vent­ing su­per­con­duc­tive mag­net de­struc­tion caused by par­ti­cle flux. Main­tain­ing the ex­pect­ed re­li­a­bil­i­ty re­quires ex­ten­sive test­ing and ver­i­fi­ca­tion. In this paper we re­port our most re­cent ad­di­t...

  16. Beam loss studies at the ANKA storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertle, Edmund; Smale, Nigel; Goetsch, Tobias; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Wegh, Frans; Worms, Kai [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The real time study and the post mortem analysis of beam loss are powerful tools for the optimization of a storage ring's performance. It allows, for example, a fast identification of failing hardware components or can be used to improve the beam lifetime by a reduction of the losses. This needs a sophisticated beam loss monitor system with appropriate spatial and temporal resolution. This presentation gives an overview of the loss monitor system under study at the ANKA synchrotron radiation facility of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

  17. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  18. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  19. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-15

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  20. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azangwe, Godfrey, E-mail: g.azangwe@iaea.org; Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna; Meghzifene, Ahmed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Lechner, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Andersen, Claus E.; Beierholm, Anders R.; Helt-Hansen, Jakob [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukumura, Akifumi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Gouldstone, Clare; Sharpe, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Medical Physics Department, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} to 4.2 × 4.2 cm{sup 2} and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm{sup 3} to 0.3 cm{sup 3}). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm{sup 3} air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: The results demonstrate

  1. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    -doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm3 to 0.3 cm3). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios.......148 for the 0.14 cm3 air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm3 ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors......, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm3. Conclusions: The results demonstrate how important it is for the appropriate corrections to be applied to give consistent and accurate measurements for a range of detectors in small beam geometry. The results further demonstrate...

  2. SLIM5 beam test results for thin striplet detector and fast readout beam telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.vitale@ts.infn.i [Universita degli Studi di Trieste and INFN-Trieste (Italy); Bruschi, M.; Di Sipio, R.; Fabbri, L.; Giacobbe, B.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Pellegrini, G.; Sbarra, C.; Semprini, N.; Spighi, R.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A. [Universita degli Studi di Bologna and INFN-Bologna (Italy); Avanzini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Calderini, G.; Ceccanti, M. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa and INFN-Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    In September 2008 the SLIM5 collaboration submitted a low material budget silicon demonstrator to test with 12 GeV/c protons, at the PS-T9 test-beam at CERN. Two different detectors were placed as DUTs inside a high-resolution and fast-readout beam telescope. The first DUT was a high resistivity double sided silicon detector, with short strips ('striplets') and with reduced thickness, at 45{sup 0} angle to the detector's edge, readout by the data-driven FSSR2 chip. The other one was a 4k-Pixel Matrix of Deep N Well MAPS, developed in a 130 nm CMOS Technology, providing digital sparsified readout. In the following, I present the striplets and also the beam telescope characteristics, with some details about the frontend readout (based on the FSSR2 chip) and some preliminary results of the data-analysis.

  3. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.bouchard@npl.co.uk; Duane, Simon [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kamio, Yuji [Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Palmans, Hugo [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Medical Physics, EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt A-2700 (Austria); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  4. Recommended Locations of Beam Loss Monitors for the ATLAS Roman Pots

    CERN Document Server

    Hall-Wilton, R J; Talanov, V

    2007-01-01

    This note suggests suitable locations to position beam loss monitors to observe losses on the ATLAS Roman Pot station located close to 240m from IP1. This monitoring is envisaged to help to avoid quenches of the super- conducting magnets downstream of the roman pots and to avert damage to either the LHC machine elements or the roman pot detectors. The results presented in this note indicate the locations where the BLMs should be installed. The recommended locations are determined using previous simulation results on BLM response to losses; therefore these results should be considered in conjunction with the previous results. A more detailed note on the topic will follow later.

  5. Recommended locations of beam-loss monitors for the ATLAS Roman pots

    CERN Document Server

    Hall-Wilton, R J; Talanov, V

    2007-01-01

    This note suggests suitable locations to position beam loss monitors to observe losses on the ATLAS Roman Pot station located close to 240m from IP1. This monitoring is envisaged to help to avoid quenches of the super- conducting magnets downstream of the roman pots and to avert damage to either the LHC machine elements or the roman pot detectors. The results presented in this note indicate the locations where the BLMs should be installed. The recommended locations are determined using previous simulation results on BLM response to losses; therefore these results should be considered in conjunction with the previous results. A more detailed note on the topic will follow later.

  6. Pixel diamond detectors for excimer laser beam diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, M.; Allegrini, P.; Conte, G.; Salvatori, S.

    2011-05-01

    Laser beam profiling technology in the UV spectrum of light is evolving with the increase of excimer lasers and lamps applications, that span from lithography for VLSI circuits to eye surgery. The development of a beam-profiler, able to capture the excimer laser single pulse and process the acquired pixel current signals in the time period between each pulse, is mandatory for such applications. 1D and 2D array detectors have been realized on polycrystalline CVD diamond specimens. The fast diamond photoresponse, in the ns time regime, suggests the suitability of such devices for fine tuning feedback of high-power pulsed-laser cavities, whereas solar-blindness guarantees high performance in UV beam diagnostics, also under high intensity background illumination. Offering unique properties in terms of thermal conductivity and visible-light transparency, diamond represents one of the most suitable candidate for the detection of high-power UV laser emission. The relatively high resistivity of diamond in the dark has allowed the fabrication of photoconductive vertical pixel-detectors. A semitransparent light-receiving back-side contact has been used for detector biasing. Each pixel signal has been conditioned by a multi-channel read-out electronics made up of a high-sensitive integrator and a Σ-Δ A/D converter. The 500 μs conversion time has allowed a data acquisition rate up to 2 kSPS (Sample Per Second).

  7. Beam Loss Estimates and Control for the BNL Neutrino Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Wu-Tsung; Raparia, Deepak; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wei, Jie; Yung Lee, Yong; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    BNL plans to upgrade the AGS proton beam from the current 0.14 MW to higher than 1.0 MW for a very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. This increase in beam power is mainly due to the faster repetition rate of the AGS by a new 1.5 GeV superconductiong linac as injector, replacing the existing booster. The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations for achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realising the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H-

  8. CCD based beam loss monitor for ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, A.; Mustafin, E.; Ensinger, W.

    2014-04-01

    Beam loss monitoring is an important aspect of proper accelerator functioning. There is a variety of existing solutions, but each has its own disadvantages, e.g. unsuitable dynamic range or time resolution, high cost, or short lifetime. Therefore, new options are looked for. This paper shows a method of application of a charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera as a beam loss monitor (BLM) for ion beam accelerators. The system was tested with a 500 MeV/u N+7 ion beam interacting with an aluminum target. The algorithms of camera signal processing with LabView based code and beam loss measurement are explained. Limits of applicability of this monitor system are discussed.

  9. FLUKA simulations for the optimization of the Beam Loss Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, M; Ferrari, A; Magistris, M; Santana-Leitner, M; Vlachoudis, V; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2006-01-01

    The collimation system in the beam cleaning insertion IR7 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to clean the primary halo and the secondary radiation of a beam with unprecedented energy and intensity. Accidental beam losses can therefore entail severe consequences to the hardware of the machine. Thus, protection mechanisms, e.g. beam abort, must be instantaneously triggered by a set of Beam Loss Monitors (BLM's). The readings in the BLM's couple the losses from various collimators, thus rendering the identification of any faulty unit rather complex. In the present study the detailed geometry of IR7 is upgraded with the insertion of the BLM's, and the Monte Carlo FLUKA transport code is used to estimate the individual contribution of every collimator to the showers detected in each BLM.

  10. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  11. Dependence of bunch energy loss in cavities on beam velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1999-03-01

    Beam energy loss in a cavity can be easily computed for a relativistic bunch using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for nonrelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. We calculate the cavity loss factors for a bunch in frequency domain as a function of its velocity and compare results with the relativistic case.

  12. \\title{MARS15 Simulation Studies in the CMS Detector of Some LHC Beam Accident Scenarios}

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Striganov, S.I; Singh, Amandeep

    2009-01-01

    \\begin{abstract} The CMS tracker, made of silicon strips and pixels and silicon-based electronics, is vulnerable to effects of radiation exposure during the LHC operation. Of much concern is the potential for damage from a high instantaneous dose to the pixel detectors and electronics located only a few centimeters from the beam in the event of a fast accidental beam loss. One of the worst case scenarios for such a beam loss is an unintended firing of an abort kicker module, referred to as the kicker pre-fire. MARS15 simulation studies of radiation loads in CMS for the kicker pre-fire scenario are described in this paper. It is found that, in a kicker pre-fire accident, in a time span of about 100 ns, the innermost pixel layer may see a radiation dose of about 0.02 Gy \\-- equivalent to a fluence of $\\sim 6\\times 10^{7}$ MIPs/$cm^2$. No discernible damage to the pixel detectors or the electronics were seen at these levels of fluence in recent beam tests. We note that the dose is about 1000 times smaller t...

  13. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  14. Parasitic mode losses versus signal sensitivity in beam position monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denard, J. C.; Bane, K. L.; Bijleveld, J.; Hutton, A. M.; Pellegrin, J. I.; Rivkin, L.; Wang, P.; Weaver, J. N.

    1985-04-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) for a storage or damping ring may be subject to heating problems due to the parasitic mode (PM) losses, beam interception and synchrotron radiation interception. In addition, high PM losses can cause beam instabilities under some conditions. Recessing and/or masking the BPM may increase the PM losses in the process of solving the latter two problems. Three complementary methods for estimating the PM losses and for improving the design of a stripline directional coupler type of BPM: bench measurements, computer modeling (TBCI), and an equivalent circuit representation are presented. These methods lead to a decrease in PM losses without significant reduction in output signal for the north Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring BPMs.

  15. Perspectives of the Pixel Detector Timepix for Needs of Ion Beam Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišíková, M.; Hartmann, B.; Jäkel, O.; Granja, C.; Jakubek, J.

    2012-08-01

    Radiation therapy with ion beams is a highly precise kind of cancer treatment. In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the increase of ionization density at the end of their path, the Bragg-peak, are exploited. Ions heavier than protons offer in addition increased biological effectiveness and decreased scattering. In this contribution we discuss the potential of a quantum counting and position sensitive semiconductor detector Timepix for its applications in ion beam therapy measurements. It provides high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (pixel pitch 55 μm). The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). An integrated USB-based readout interface together with the Pixelman software enable registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. The experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), which is a modern ion beam therapy facility. Patient treatments are performed with proton and carbon ions, which are accelerated by a synchrotron. For dose delivery to the patient an active technique is used: narrow pencil-like beams are scanned over the target volume. The possibility to use the detector for two different applications was investigated: ion spectroscopy and beam delivery monitoring by measurement of secondary charged particles around the patient. During carbon ion therapy, a variety of ion species is created by nuclear fragmentation processes of the primary beam. Since they differ in their biological effectiveness, it is of large interest to measure the ion spectra created under different conditions and to visualize their spatial distribution. The possibility of measurements of ion energy loss in silicon makes Timepix a promising detector for ion-spectroscopic studies in patient-like phantoms. Unpredictable changes in the patient can alter the range of the ion beam in the body

  16. Energy-loss measurement with the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, D.

    2007-05-15

    The measurement of the specific energy loss due to ionisation, dE/dx, in a drift chamber is a very important tool for particle identification in final states of reactions between high energetic particles. Such identification requires a well understood dE/dx measurement including a precise knowledge of its uncertainties. Exploiting for the first time the full set of ZEUS data from the HERA operation between 1996 and 2005 twelve detector-related influences affecting the dE/dx measurement of the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector have been identified, separately studied and parameterised. A sophisticated iterative procedure has been developed to correct for these twelve effects, which takes into account the correlations between them. A universal parameterisation of the detector-specific Bethe-Bloch curve valid for all particle species has been extracted. In addition, the various contributions to the measurement uncertainty have been disentangled and determined. This yields the best achievable prediction for the single-track dE/dx resolution. For both the analysis of the measured data and the simulation of detector performance, the detailed understanding of the measurement and resolution of dE/dx gained in this work provides a tool with optimum power for particle identification in a physics studies. (orig.)

  17. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimognari, P. J.; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  18. Test beam results of a large area strip detector made on high resistivity Czochralski silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuominen, E.; Banzuzi, K.; Czellar, S.; Heikkinen, A.; Haerkoenen, J.; Johansson, P.; Karimaeki, V.; Luukka, P.; Mehtaelae, P.; Niku, J.; Nummela, S.; Nysten, J.; Simpura, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Ungaro, D.; Vaarala, T.; Wendland, L.; Voutilainen, M.; Zibellini, A

    2003-09-01

    We have tested the detection performance of a strip detector processed on silicon wafer grown by magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) method. This is the first time a full size Czochralski detector has been tested in a beam, although the advantages of CZ silicon have been known before. Prior to test beam measurements, the electrical characteristics of the Czochralski silicon detectors were found to be appropriate for particle detection. Using the Helsinki Silicon Beam telescope at CERN H2 test beam, the performance of the Czochralski silicon detector was shown to be comparable with the existing silicon strip detectors.

  19. Beam loss detection system in the arcs of the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauzo, A.; Bovet, C.

    2000-11-01

    Over the whole circumference of the LHC, Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) will be needed for a continuous surveillance of fast and slow beam losses. In this paper, the location of the BLMs set outside the magnet cryostats in the arcs is proposed. In order to know the number of protons lost on the beam screen, the sensitivity of each BLM has been computed using the program GEANT 3.21, which generates the shower inside the cryostat. The material and the magnetic fields have been described thoroughly in 3-D and the simulation results show the best locations for 6 BLMs needed around each quadrupole. The number of minimum ionizing particles received for each lost proton serves to define local thresholds to dump the beam when the losses are menacing to quench a magnet.

  20. Beam Loss Detection System in the Arcs of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Arauzo-Garcia, A

    2000-01-01

    Over the whole circumference of the LHC, Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) will be needed for a continuous surveillance of fast and slow beam losses. In this paper, the location of the BLMs set outside the magnet cryostats in the arcs is proposed. In order to know the number of protons lost on the beam screen, the sensitivity of each BLM has been computed using the program GEANT 3.21, which generates the shower inside the cryostat. The material and the magnetic fields have been described thoroughly in 3-D and the simulation results show the best locations for 6 BLMs needed around each quadrupole. The number of minimum ionizing particles received for each lost proton serves to define local thresholds to dump the beam when the losses are menacing to quench a magnet

  1. Thermoelastic dissipation in inhomogeneous media: loss measurements and displacement noise in coated test masses for interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fejer, M M; Cagnoli, G; Crooks, D R M; Gretarsson, A M; Harry, G M; Hough, J; Penn, S D; Sneddon, P H; Vyatchanin, S P

    2004-01-01

    The displacement noise in the test mass mirrors of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is proportional to their elastic dissipation at the observation frequencies. In this paper, we analyze one fundamental source of dissipation in thin coatings, thermoelastic damping associated with the dissimilar thermal and elastic properties of the film and the substrate. We obtain expressions for the thermoelastic dissipation factor necessary to interpret resonant loss measurements, and for the spectral density of displacement noise imposed on a Gaussian beam reflected from the face of a coated mass. The predicted size of these effects is large enough to affect the interpretation of loss measurements, and to influence design choices in advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  2. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  3. Beam loss control in the LINAC4 design

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, J; Crandall, K

    2010-01-01

    The Linac4 DTL reference design has been modified to reduce the power consumption in tank 1 by modifying the accelerating field and phase law. In addition we have adopted an FFDD focusing lattice throughout to minimize expected losses resulting from alignment errors. We have observed, however, that this design suffers from decreasing transverse acceptance and a sensitivity to misalignments that causes any expected beam loss to occcur at the high energy end of the DTL. In this note we investigate two solutions to increase the acceptance, decrease its sensitivity to misalignments and eliminate the potential for a beam-loss “bottleneck” at 50 MeV.

  4. Simulations of Neutral Beam Ion Ripple Loss on EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李吉波; 丁斯晔; 吴斌; 胡纯栋

    2012-01-01

    Predictions on the ripple loss of neutral beam fast ions on EAST are investigated with a guiding center code, including both ripple and collisional effects. A 6% to 16% loss of neutral beam ions is predicted for typical EAST experiments, and a synergistic enhancement of fast ion loss is found for toroidal field (TF) ripples with collisions. The lost ions are strongly localized and will cause a maximum heat load of - 0.05 MW/m^2 on the first wall.

  5. Beam Loss Calibration Studies for High Energy Proton Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton collider with injection energy of 450 GeV and collision energy of 7 TeV. Superconducting magnets keep the particles circulating in two counter rotating beams, which cross each other at the Interaction Points (IP). Those complex magnets have been designed to contain both beams in one yoke within a cryostat. An unprecedented amount of energy will be stored in the circulating beams and in the magnet system. The LHC outperforms other existing accelerators in its maximum beam energy by a factor of 7 and in its beam intensity by a factor of 23. Even a loss of a small fraction of the beam particles may cause the transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state of the coil or cause physical damage to machine components. The unique combination of these extreme beam parameters and the highly advanced superconducting technology has the consequence that the LHC needs a more efficient beam cleaning and beam loss measurement system than previous accelerators....

  6. Beam studies for the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) -- reducing beam loss at the Fermilab Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Seiya, K; Johnson, D E; Kapin, V V; Pellico, W A; Tan, C Y; Tesarek, R J

    2015-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster is being upgraded under the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) to be capable of providing a proton flux of $2.25^{17}$ protons per hour. The intensity per cycle will remain at the present operational $4.3^{12}$ protons per pulse, however the Booster beam cycle rate is going to be increased from 7.5 Hz to 15 Hz. One of the biggest challenges is to maintain the present beam loss power while the doubling the beam flux. Under PIP, there has been a large effort in beam studies and simulations to better understand the mechanisms of the beam loss. The goal is to reduce it by half by correcting and controlling the beam dynamics and by improving operational systems through hardware upgrades. This paper is going to present the recent beam study results and status of the Booster operations.

  7. Pulsed beam dosimetry using fiber-coupled radioluminescence detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to review and discuss the potential application of fiber-coupled radioluminescence detectors for dosimetry in pulsed MV photon beams. Two types of materials were used: carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) and organic plastic scintillators. Special consideration...... was given to the discrimination between radioluminescence signals from the phosphors and unwanted light induced in the optical fiber cables during irradiation (Cerenkov and fluorescence). New instrumentation for dose-per-pulse measurements with organic plastic scintillators was developed....

  8. Intermediate γ beta beams with a cluster of detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, D.; Mena, O.; Orme, C.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pascoli, S.

    2008-05-01

    The acceleration of radionuclides in a beta beam provides an alternative experimental design to superbeam and neutrino factory long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Only single baseline beta beam scenarios have been considered thus far although a storage ring could source at least two baselines. The multitude of possible detector sites in Europe potentially allows for numerous baselines for future long baseline experiments sourced at CERN. Here, we will consider an example taking the CERN-Canfranc and CERN-Boulby baselines. We present results that indicate good sensitivity to the mass hierarchy for values of sin2 2θ13 as small as 10-3 and CP-violation discovery for sin2 2θ13 down to 10-4. These results are achieved with a single helicity since the second baseline provides the synergies usually associated with an anti-neutrino run.

  9. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  10. Status of the OPAL microvertex detector and new radiation monitoring and beam dump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Sijbrand de

    1998-11-01

    The status of the OPAL Phase III microvertex detector is discussed briefly. This is followed by a more detailed description of the OPAL microvertex detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system. This system measures AC currents induced by radiation on each passing of the beams in silicon diodes mounted close to the microvertex detector front-end electronics. Examples are shown for incidents leading to a beam dump trigger. The integrated radiation dose is also discussed.

  11. Loss management in the beta-beam decay ring

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the beta-beams is to produce pure electron neutrino and anti-neutrino highly energetic beams, coming from β-decay of the 18Ne10+ and 6He2+, both at γ = 100, directed towards experimental halls situated in the Fréjus tunnel [1], [2]. The high intensity ion beams are stored in a ring, until the ions decay. Consequently, all the injected particles will be lost anywhere around the ring generating a high level of irradiation. In order to keep a constant neutrino flux, the losses due to the decay of the radioactive ions are compensated with regular injections. The new ion beam is then merged with the stored beam with a specific RF program [3]. We have to consider two sources of losses: – The β-decay products: their magnetic rigidity being different from the reference one, they are bent differently and lost. – The losses during the injection merging process. The first one needs a particular ring design in order to insert appropriate beam stoppers at the right place. The second one needs a specific...

  12. 2014 Joint International Accelerator School: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Document Server

    JAS - Joint US-CERN-Japan-Russia Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    Many particle accelerators operate with very high beam power and very high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, the beam power in high intensity accelerators will further increase. The protection of the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of the energy is essential. This was the motivation for organizing a first school on beam losses and accelerator protection (in general referred to as machine protection). During the school the methods and technologies to identify, mitigate, monitor and manage the technical risks associated with the operation of accelerators with high-power beams or subsystems with large stored energy were presented. At the completion of the school the participants should have been able to understand the physical phenomena that can damage machine subsystems or interrupt operations and to analyze an accelerator facility to produce a register of technical risks and the corresponding risk mitigation and management strategie...

  13. SPS transverse beam scraping and LHC injection losses

    CERN Document Server

    Drosdal, L; Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Cornelis, K; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Veyrunes, E

    2012-01-01

    Machine protection sets strict requirements for the quality of the injected beam, in particular in the transverse plane. Losses at aperture restrictions and protection elements have to be kept at a minimum. Particles in the beam tails are lost at the tight transfer line collimators and can trigger the LHC beam abort system. These particles have to be removed by scrapers in the vertical and horizontal plane in the SPS. Scraping has become vital for high intensity LHC operation. This paper shows the dependence of injection quality on the SPS scraping and discusses an improved scraper setting up strategy for better reproducibility with the current scraper system.

  14. One Atomic Beam as a Detector of Classical Harmonic Vibrations with Micro Amplitudes and Low Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simplest detector of harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies, i.e. the detector consisting of one atomic beam. Here the atomic beam is induced by a plane harmonic wave and has a classical collective harmonic vibrations, which vibrant directions are perpendicular to the wave vectors of atomic beam. Compared with the detector consisting of atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the new detector has two advantages: (1) it is suitable for the detection of the harmonic vibrations induced either by a longitudinal plane harmonic wave or by a transverse plane harmonic wave; (2) the quantum noise fluctuation of the atomic beam is exactly zero.

  15. Full-beam performances of a PET detector with synchrotron therapeutic proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Pennazio, F.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cerello, P. G.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferrero, V.; Fiorina, E.; Giraudo, G.; Morrocchi, M.; Peroni, C.; Pirrone, G.; Sportelli, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2016-12-01

    Treatment quality assessment is a crucial feature for both present and next-generation ion therapy facilities. Several approaches are being explored, based on prompt radiation emission or on PET signals by {β+} -decaying isotopes generated by beam interactions with the body. In-beam PET monitoring at synchrotron-based ion therapy facilities has already been performed, either based on inter-spill data only, to avoid the influence of the prompt radiation, or including both in-spill and inter-spill data. However, the PET images either suffer of poor statistics (inter-spill) or are more influenced by the background induced by prompt radiation (in-spill). Both those problems are expected to worsen for accelerators with improved duty cycle where the inter-spill interval is reduced to shorten the treatment time. With the aim of assessing the detector performance and developing techniques for background reduction, a test of an in-beam PET detector prototype was performed at the CNAO synchrotron-based ion therapy facility in full-beam acquisition modality. Data taken with proton beams impinging on PMMA phantoms showed the system acquisition capability and the resulting activity distribution, separately reconstructed for the in-spill and the inter-spill data. The coincidence time resolution for in-spill and inter-spill data shows a good agreement, with a slight deterioration during the spill. The data selection technique allows the identification and rejection of most of the background originated during the beam delivery. The activity range difference between two different proton beam energies (68 and 72 MeV) was measured and found to be in sub-millimeter agreement with the expected result. However, a slightly longer (2 mm) absolute profile length is obtained for in-spill data when compared to inter-spill data.

  16. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    A high resolution (σ∼2μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. The telescope consists of six monolithic active pixel sensor planes (Mimosa26) with a pixel pitch of 18.4 \\mu m and thinned down to 50 \\mu m. The excellent resolution, readout rate and DAQ integration capabilities made the telescope a primary test beam tool for many groups including several CERN based experiments. Within the European detector infrastructure project AIDA the test beam telescope is being further extended in terms of cooling and powering infrastructure, read-out speed, area of acceptance, and precision. In order to provide a system optimized for the different requirements by the user community a combination of various state-of-the-art pixel technologies is foreseen. Furthermore, new central dead-time-free trigger logic unit (TLU) has been developed to provide LHC-speed response with one-trigger-per-particle operating mode and a synchronous clock for all conn...

  17. Cherenkov Fibers for Beam Loss Monitoring at the CLIC Two Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Holzer, E B

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at a nominal center of mass energy of 3TeV and is based on normal conducting travelling-wave accelerating structures, operating at very high field gradients of 100 MV/m. Such high fields require high peak power and hence a novel power source, the CLIC two beam system, has been developed, in which a high intensity, low energy drive beam (DB) supplies energy to a high energy, low intensity main beam (MB). At the Two Beam Modules (TBM), which compose the 2x21km long CLIC main linac, a protection against beam losses resulting from badly controlled beams is necessary and particularly challenging, since the beam power of both main beam (14 MW) and drive beam (70 MW) is impressive. To avoid operational downtimes and severe damages to machine components, a general Machine Protection System (MPS) scheme has been developed. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a key element of the CLIC machine protection system. Its main role will be to detect p...

  18. Simulation and Measurements of Beam Losses on LHC Collimators During Beam Abort Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bruce, R; Goddard, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Faus-Golfe, A

    2013-01-01

    One of the main purposes of tracking simulations for collimation studies is to produce loss maps along the LHC ring, in order to identify the level of local beam losses during nominal and abnormal operation scenarios. The SixTrack program is the standard tracking tool used at CERN to perform these studies. Recently, it was expanded in order to evaluate the proton load on different collimators in case of fast beam failures. Simulations are compared with beam measurements at 4 TeV. Combined failures are assumed which provide worst-case scenarios of the load on tungsten tertiary collimators.

  19. Thin silicon strip detectors for beam monitoring in Micro-beam Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Povoli, Marco; Bravin, Alberto; Cornelius, Iwan; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Fournier, Pauline; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Lerch, Michael; Monakhov, Edouard; Morse, John; Petasecca, Marco; Requardt, Herwig; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Röhrich, Dieter; Sandaker, Heidi; Salomé, Murielle; Stugu, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an emerging cancer treatment that is currently being developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. This technique uses a highly collimated and fractionated X-ray beam array with extremely high dose rate and very small divergence, to benefit from the dose-volume effect, thus sparing healthy tissue. In case of any beam anomalies and system malfunctions, special safety measures must be installed, such as an emergency safety shutter that requires continuous monitoring of the beam intensity profile. Within the 3DMiMic project, a novel silicon strip detector that can tackle the special features of MRT, such as the extremely high spatial resolution and dose rate, has been developed to be part of the safety shutter system. The first prototypes have been successfully fabricated, and experiments aimed to demonstrate their suitability for this unique application have been performed. Design, fabrication and the experimental results as well as any...

  20. Beam Loss Monitoring for Run 2 of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliokoski, Matti; Dehning, Bernd; Domingues Sousa, Fernando; Effinger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Jackson, Stephen; Kolad, Blazej; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Picha, Ondrej; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Sobieszek, Marcin; Zamantzas, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the LHC consists of over 3600 ionization chambers. The main task of the system is to prevent the superconducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage, as a result of critical beam losses. The BLM system therefore requests a beam abort when the measured dose in the chambers exceeds a threshold value. During Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) a series of modifications were made to the system. Based on the experience from Run 1 and from improved simulation models, all the threshold settings were revised, and modified where required. This was done to improve the machine safety at 7 TeV, and to reduce beam abort requests when neither a magnet quench or damage to machine components is expected. In addition to the updates of the threshold values, about 800 monitors were relocated. This improves the response to unforeseen beam losses in the millisecond time scale due to micron size dust particles present in the vacuum chamber. This contribution will discuss...

  1. The LEP RF Trip and Beam Loss Diagnostics System

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaudon, L; Beetham, G; Ciapala, Edmond; Juillard, J C; Olsen, R

    2002-01-01

    During the last years of operation the number of operationally independent RF stations distributed around LEP reached a total of 40. A serious difficulty when running at high energy and high beam intensities was to establish cause and effect in beam loss situations, where the trip of any single RF station would result in beam loss, rapidly producing further multiple RF station trips. For the last year of operation a fast post-mortem diagnostics system was developed to allow precise time-stamping of RF unit trips and beam intensity changes. The system was based on eight local DSP controlled fast acquisition and event recording units, one in each RF sector, connected to critical RF control signals and fast beam intensity monitors and synchronised by GPS. The acquisition units were armed and synchronised at the start of each fill. At the end of the fill the local time-stamped RF trip and beam intensity change history tables were recovered, events ordered and the results stored in a database for subsequent analys...

  2. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihl, M.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam-gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam-beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam-gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam-gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  3. Tracking Simulation for Beam Loss Studies with Application to FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Boscolo, M

    2015-01-01

    We present first results on FCC-ee beam losses using a tracking simulation tool originally developed and successfully applied to Flav or Factories designs. After a brief description of the tool, we discuss first results obtained for FCC-ee at top energy, both for the Touschek effect and radiative Bhabha scattering.

  4. A Gigabit Ethernet link for an FPGA based Beam Loss Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiatkowski, M; Dehning, B; Vigano, W; Zamantzas, C

    2013-01-01

    A new Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is under development at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) within the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project. The multi-channel system will have the ability to measure beam losses from various types of detectors with high precision and wide dynamic range. Several modes of data acquisition are supported. The data rate in the singlechannel mode is 16 Mbps and in the multi-channel mode 128 Mbps. The Gigabit Ethernet link is implemented in an FPGA, which allows both a high throughput and a quick validation of the digital data processing algorithms using standard PCs in the initial stages of the development. Both TCP and UDP protocols were explored. The implementation of the Ethernet link is flexible and proved to be highly reliable, leading to its planned use in other measurement systems developed at CERN. The implementation details of the Ethernet link and the results achieved will be described in this paper.

  5. Real-Time Beam Loss Monitor Display Using FPGA Technology

    CERN Document Server

    North, Matt R W

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the design of a Real-time Beam Loss Monitor Display for the ISIS Synchrotron based at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Oxon, UK). Beam loss is monitored using 39 argon filled ionisation chambers positioned around the synchrotron, the levels of which are sampled four times in each cycle. The new BLM display acquires the signals and displays four histograms, each relating to an individual sample period; the data acquisition and signal processing required to build the display fields are completed within each machine cycle (50 Hz). Attributes of the new system include setting limits for individual monitors; displaying over-limit detection, and freezing the display field when a beam trip has occurred. The design is based around a reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array, interfacing to a desktop monitor via the VGA standard. Results gained using simulated monitor signals have proven the system.

  6. H- Beam Stripping Loss at Background Partial Pressure of Ar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Chundong; Wang Shaohu; Hu Liqun

    2005-01-01

    It has been observed that H- current could be improved by adding Ar to H2 plasma.But due to a slower pumping speed for Ar with the existing pumping scheme, the tank pressure will increase quickly during the length of a beam pulse. Since H- stripping loss depends on the tank pressure and gas species, part of the H- beam can be converted to H0 and then H0 can be converted into H+ with background H2 and Ar gas thickness. Therefore, the H- beam current,measured by a Faraday cup, situated at a distance L from GG (ground grid), will decrease because it will be converted into a H+ current. This gives a ratio of the Faraday cup net current to the H- beam current before stripping at background partial pressure of Ar.

  7. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  8. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, J., E-mail: kamiya.junichiro@jaea.go.jp; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni–Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  9. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT barrel module response to LHC beam loss scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Fadeyev, V; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Domingo, M

    2014-01-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beam line may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth in the sensors which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than ...

  10. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Loss and Tune Measurements (3/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  11. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppert, W.J.C., E-mail: wkoppert@nikhef.nl [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bakel, N. van [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bilevych, Y. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Colas, P. [IRFU, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Desch, K. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Fransen, M.; Graaf, H. van der; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaminski, J. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Schmitz, J. [University of Twente, Mesa Institute for Nanotechnology, Enschede (Netherlands); Schön, R.; Zappon, F. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-21

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  12. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-12-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  13. Application of Diamond Based Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080642; Lohmann, W; Rüdiger, S

    2013-05-14

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due...

  14. Performance and calibration studies of silicon strip detectors in a test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzuzi, K.; Haapakorpi, M.; Heikkinen, A.; Heinonen, J.V.; Honkanen, A.; Karimaeki, V. E-mail: veikko.karimaki@hip.fi; Maeenpaeae, T.; Pietarinen, E.; Salomaeki, T.; Tuominiemi, J

    2000-10-21

    Performance of single-sided DC-coupled silicon strip detectors is studied in the CERN H2 test beam. A great emphasis is put on the calibration of the detector response as well as on the geometric alignment of the detector planes. Performance results are presented for different angles of incidence for the particles.

  15. Study of the 2004 End-Cap beam tests of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bieri, Marco

    The ATLAS detector is an all-purpose detector to study high-ener gy proton–proton colli- sions. ATLAS is located at the LHC (Lar ge Hadron Collider) at CERN in Gene va, Switzer - land. Before first data taking, man y beam tests have been carried out in order to fully understand each detector component. The studies in this thesis will concentrate on the 2004 beam test of the entire combined end-cap calorimeter system. The first section of this thesis outlines particle selection in the incoming test beam, eliminating contamination in order to have an accurate calibration environment. The remainder of the thesis focuses on detector calibration and performance studies, including signal-to-ener gy calibration con- stant determination, and various detector ener gy summation methods studying their effect on response. Ov erall detector ener gy sharing characteristics including the response of dead detector regions is also presented.

  16. RFQ Designs and Beam-Loss Distributions for IFMIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, Robert A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The IFMIF 125 mA cw 40 MeV accelerators will set an intensity record. Minimization of particle loss along the accelerator is a top-level requirement and requires sophisticated design intimately relating the accelerated beam and the accelerator structure. Such design technique, based on the space-charge physics of linear accelerators (linacs), is used in this report in the development of conceptual designs for the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) section of the IFMIF accelerators. Design comparisons are given for the IFMIF CDR Equipartitioned RFQ, a CDR Alternative RFQ, and new IFMIF Post-CDR Equipartitioned RFQ designs. Design strategies are illustrated for combining several desirable characteristics, prioritized as minimum beam loss at energies above ~ 1 MeV, low rf power, low peak field, short length, high percentage of accelerated particles. The CDR design has ~0.073% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7,is 12.3 m long, and accelerates ~89.6% of the input beam. A new Post-CDR design has ~0.077% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7 and ~8 m length, and accelerates ~97% of the input beam. A complete background for the designs is given, and comparisons are made. Beam-loss distributions are used as input for nuclear physics simulations of radioactivity effects in the IFMIF accelerator hall, to give information for shielding, radiation safety and maintenance design. Beam-loss distributions resulting from a ~1M particle input distribution representative of the IFMIF ECR ion source are presented. The simulations reported were performed with a consistent family of codes. Relevant comparison with other codes has not been possible as their source code is not available. Certain differences have been noted but are not consistent over a broad range of designs and parameter range. The exact transmission found by any of these codes should be treated as indicative, as each has various sensitivities in

  17. Benchmarking of collimation tracking using RHIC beam loss data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert-Demolaize,G.; Drees, A.

    2008-06-23

    State-of-the-art tracking tools were recently developed at CERN to study the cleaning efficiency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system. In order to estimate the prediction accuracy of these tools, benchmarking studies can be performed using actual beam loss measurements from a machine that already uses a similar multistage collimation system. This paper reviews the main results from benchmarking studies performed with specific data collected from operations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  18. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  19. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT Barrel Module Response to LHC Beam Loss Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Fadeyev, V; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Domingo, M

    2013-01-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beamline may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than we have previous...

  20. The role of a microDiamond detector in the dosimetry of proton pencil beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, Carles [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Centre for Proton Therapy; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca [Roma Univ. ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Industriale; INFN, Roma (Italy); Safai, Sairos [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Centre for Proton Therapy; Wuerfel, Jan [PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the performance of a microDiamond detector in a scanned proton beam is studied and its potential role in the dosimetric characterization of proton pencil beams is assessed. The linearity of the detector response with the absorbed dose and the dependence on the dose-rate were tested. The depth-dose curve and the lateral dose profiles of a proton pencil beam were measured and compared to reference data. The feasibility of calibrating the beam monitor chamber with a microDiamond detector was also studied. It was found the detector reading is linear with the absorbed dose to water (down to few cGy) and the detector response is independent of both the dose-rate (up to few Gy/s) and the proton beam energy (within the whole clinically-relevant energy range). The detector showed a good performance in depth-dose curve and lateral dose profile measurements; and it might even be used to calibrate the beam monitor chambers-provided it is cross-calibrated against a reference ionization chamber. In conclusion, the microDiamond detector was proved capable of performing an accurate dosimetric characterization of proton pencil beams.

  1. Dosimetry for ion-beam therapy using fluorescent nuclear track detectors and an automated reader

    CERN Document Server

    Greilich, Steffen; Klimpki, Grischa M; Kouwenberg, Jasper J M; Neuholz, Alexander; Pfeiler, Tina; Rahmanian, Shirin; Stadler, Alexander; Ulrich, Leonie

    2016-01-01

    For the assessment of effects of clinical ion-beams, dosimetry has to be complemented by information on particle-energy distribution or related quantities. Fluorescence nuclear track detectors made from C,Mg-doped alumina single crystals allow for the quantification of ion track density and energy loss on a single-track basis. In this study, their feasibility and accuracy to quantify fluence, linear-energy-transfer (LET) distributions, and eventually dose for a spread-out carbon ion Bragg peak was investigated. We found that while for the primary ions track densities agreed within a percent range with the reference data generated by Monte-Carlo radiation transport, the number of low-LET fragments in the beam was largely underestimated by approximately a factor three - the effect was most pronounced for protons where the measured fluence deviates at least an order of magnitude. Nevertheless, due to the dose major contribution of carbon ions, the determination of the individual detector sensitivity could be ide...

  2. Observation of alpha particle loss from JET plasmas during ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating using a thin foil Faraday cup detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecil, F. E. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kiptily, V.; Fullard, K.; Horton, A. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom/CCFE Fusion Assoc., Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The loss of MeV alpha particles from JET plasmas has been measured with a set of thin foil Faraday cup detectors during third harmonic heating of helium neutral beam ions. Tail temperatures of {approx}2 MeV have been observed, with radial scrape off lengths of a few centimeters. Operational experience from this system indicates that such detectors are potentially feasible for future large tokamaks, but careful attention to screening rf and MHD induced noise is essential.

  3. A micro-pattern gaseous detector for beam monitoring in ion-therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terakawa, A.; Ishii, K.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Togashi, T.; Arikawa, J.; Yamashita, W.; Takahashi, Y.; Fujishiro, F. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University (Japan); Yamazaki, H.; Sakemi, Y. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    A micro-pattern gaseous detector based on gas electron multiplier technology (GEM detector) was developed as a new transmission beam monitor for charged-particle therapy to obtain real-time information about the parameters of a therapeutic beam. Feasibility tests for the GEM detector were performed using an 80-MeV proton beam to evaluate the lateral intensity distributions of a pencil beam and the dose delivered to a target. The beam intensity distributions measured with the GEM detector were in good agreement with those measured with an imaging plate while the charge output from the GEM detector was in proportion to that of a reference dose monitor of an ionization chamber design. These experimental results showed that the GEM detector can be used not only as a beam monitor for the position and two-dimensional intensity distribution but also as a dose monitor. Thus, it is possible to simultaneously measure these beam parameters for beam control in charged-particle therapy using a single GEM-based transmission monitor.

  4. SiPM-based veto detector for the pion beam at FOPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Gamal, E-mail: gsmoawad@hotmail.com; Buehler, Pual; Hartmann, Olaf; Marton, Johann; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria)

    2012-05-15

    Recently the FOPI collaboration carried out an experiment to study the in medium properties of the K{sup + }K{sup - } system by using the pion beam interactions at 1.7 GeV/c. The experiment with a pion beam poses specific requirements to the detectors and therefore the original FOPI setup needed modifications. The new hardware developments for this experiment include the replacement of the veto detector with another more compact design. Within this report we describe the design and results of a test measurement of the new FOPI veto detector system with the pion beam.

  5. Thin silicon strip detectors for beam monitoring in Micro-beam Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povoli, M.; Alagoz, E.; Bravin, A.; Cornelius, I.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Fournier, P.; Hansen, T. E.; Kok, A.; Lerch, M.; Monakhov, E.; Morse, J.; Petasecca, M.; Requardt, H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Röhrich, D.; Sandaker, H.; Salomé, M.; Stugu, B.

    2015-11-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an emerging cancer treatment that is currently being developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. This technique uses a highly collimated and fractionated X-ray beam array with extremely high dose rate and very small divergence, to benefit from the dose-volume effect, thus sparing healthy tissue. In case of any beam anomalies and system malfunctions, special safety measures must be installed, such as an emergency safety shutter that requires continuous monitoring of the beam intensity profile. Within the 3DMiMic project, a novel silicon strip detector that can tackle the special features of MRT, such as the extremely high spatial resolution and dose rate, has been developed to be part of the safety shutter system. The first prototypes have been successfully fabricated, and experiments aimed to demonstrate their suitability for this unique application have been performed. Design, fabrication and the experimental results as well as any identified inadequacies for future optimisation are reported and discussed in this paper.

  6. Characterization of scintillator materials for fast-ion loss detectors in nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; García López, J.; García-Muñoz, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, M.; Carmona Gázquez, M.; Zurro, B.

    2014-08-01

    In fusion plasma reactors, fast ion generated by heating systems and fusion born particles must be well confined. The presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can lead to a significant loss of these ions, which may reduce drastically the heating efficiency and may cause damage to plasma facing components in the vacuum vessel. In order to understand the physics underlying the fast ion loss mechanism, scintillator based detectors have been installed in several fusion devices. In this work we present the absolute photon yield and its degradation with ion fluence in terms of the number of photons emitted per incident ion of several scintillators thin coatings: SrGa2S4:Eu2+ (TG-Green), Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (P46) and Y2O3:Eu3+ (P56) when irradiated with light ions of different masses (deuterium ions, protons and α-particles) at energies between approximately 575 keV and 3 MeV. The photon yield will be discussed in terms of the energy deposited by the particles into the scintillator. For that, the actual composition and thickness of the thin layers were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). A collimator with 1 mm of diameter, which defines the beam size for the experiments, placed at the entrance of the chamber. An electrically isolated sample holder biased to +300 V to collect the secondary electrons, connected to a digital current integrator (model 439 by Ortec) to measure the incident beam current. A home made device has been used to store the real-time evolution of the beam current in a computer file allowing the correction of the IL yields due to the current fluctuations. The target holder is a rectangle of 150 × 112 mm2 and can be tilted. The X and Y movements are controlled through stepping motors, which permits a fine control of the beam spot positioning as well as the study of several samples without venting the chamber. A silica optical fiber of 1 mm diameter fixed to the vacuum chamber, which collects the light from the scintillators

  7. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The US-CERN-JAPAN-RUSSIA Joint International Accelerator School is organising a course on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection to be held in Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November, 2014.    This school is intended for physicists and engineers who are or may be engaged in the design, construction, and/or operation of accelerators with high power photon or particle beams and/or accelerator sub-systems with large stored energy. Application deadlines are 15 August and 4 September. Further information on this Joint School can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/JAS/Newport%20Beach%202014/NPBadvert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/287647/ http://uspas.fnal.gov/programs/JAS/JAS14.shtml

  8. Low-intensity beam diagnostics with particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovelli, A.; Ciavola, G.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Raia, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 44/A Catania, 95125 (Italy); De Martinis, C.; Giove, D. [INFN-LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201 Segrate (Midway Islands), 20090 (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    The measure of low intensity beams at low-medium energy is one of the major challenge in beam diagnostics. This subject is of great interest for the design of accelerator-based medical and radioactive beam facilities. In this paper we discuss new developments in image-based devices to measure low-intensity beams. All the investigated devices must guarantee measurement of the total beam current and its transverse distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. The Beam and Detector for the NA48 Neutral Kaon CP Violation Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fanti, V; Marras, D; Musa, L; Nappi, A; Batley, J Richard; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Galik, R; Gershon, T; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Katvars, S; Lazzeroni, C; Moore, R; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; Patel, M; Slater, M; Takach, S; White, T O; Wotton; Bal, F; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Brodier-Yourstone, P; Buchholz, P; Burns, M; Ceccucci, A; Clément, M; Cuhadar-Donzelsmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels; Falaleev, V; Formenti, F; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Grafström, P; Hallgren, B; Kapusta, P; Kesseler, G; Kubischta, Werner; Iwanski, W; Lacourt, A; Laverriere, G; Linser, G; Ljuslin, C; Marchioro, A; Mast, M; Matheys, J P; Morel, M; Norton, A; Orlic, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Seidl, W; Taureg, H; Tarlé, J C; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wertelaers, P; Weterings, J; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kalinin, A; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhevnikov, Yu; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tkatchev, A; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Peach, K J; Sacco, R; Veitch, E; Walker, A; Carassiti, V; Contalbrigo, M; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Duclos, J; Ferretti, P; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Rossi, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Simani, C; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Michetti, A; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Behler, M; Blümer, H; Coward, D; Ebersberger, C; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Geib, K H; Hirstius, A; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Luitz, S; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Melzer-Pellmann, I; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Peters, A; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Staeck, J; Wanke, R; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Zeitnitz, O; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; de La Taille, C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Martin-Chassard, G; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Bordacchini, F; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lariccia, P; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Papi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Punturo, M; Talamonti, C; Tondini, F; Bertanza, L; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Francesco; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Gorini, B; Laico, F; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V; Passuello, D; Pierazzini, G M; Raffaelli, F; Sozzi, M; Tripiccione, R; Anvar, S; Bédérède, D; Bugeon, F; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Durand, D; Edard, S; Fallou, J L; Formica, A; Gosset, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Heitzmann, J; Le Provost, H; Louis, F; Mandzhavidze, I; Mazzucato, E; Migliori, A; Mur, M; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Steinkamp, O; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Maier, A; Schwarz, I; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Barberis, P L; Benotto, F; Bertolino, F; Biino, C; Brunasso, O; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Dattola, D; Goy-Lopez, S; Govi, G; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Palestini, S; Pastrone, N; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, E; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    The Beam and Detector, used for the NA48 experiment, devoted to the measurement of $Re(\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon)$, and for the NA48/1 experiment on rare K_S and neutral hyperon decays, are described.

  10. A Cherenkov-based Beam Loss Scintillator system for beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R

    2013-01-01

    The installation of a scintillator-based system in the LHCb cavern was initially proposed in order to observe injection problems around the LHCb interaction region. Thanks to the fact that LHCb had already developed a custom-made electronics board (BPIM) for the LHCb beam pickups and global LHCb timing monitoring, a complete, inexpensive but flexible and robust system was quickly developed and installed few cm from the beam pipe just in front of the LHCb VELO detector in time for the very first beams injected in the LHC. The current and final system – commonly referred to as Beam Loss Scintillator (BLS) system - ultimately played a central role in the fast beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at LHCb. In this paper, the features of the detector – based on quartz radiator and Cherenkov light - are described, including the functionalities that the system acquired during the proton-proton physics programmes in 2009- 2013 thanks to its flexibility, reliability and sensitivity to beam hal...

  11. Impedances and power losses for an off-axis beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    1996-01-01

    A method for calculating coupling impedances and power losses for off-axis beams is developed. It is applied to calculate impedances of small localized discontinuities like holes and slots, as well as the impedance due to a finite resistivity of chamber walls, in homogeneous chambers with an arbitrary shape of the chamber cross section. The approach requires to solve a two-dimensional electrostatic problem, which can be easily done numerically in the general case, while for some particular cases analytical solutions are obtained.

  12. The LHC beam loss monitoring system commissioning for 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Chery, C; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Grishin, S; Hajdu, C F; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Kurfuerst, C; Marsili, A; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Tissier, R; Venturini, G G

    2010-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. In addition to protecting the collider, the system also needs to provide a means of diagnosing machine faults and deliver feedback of the losses to the control room as well as to several systems for their setup and analysis. It has to transmit and process signals from approximately 4’000 monitors, and has nearly 3 million configurable parameters. This paper will discuss its performance and ability to provide the expected measurements, the problems encountered and necessary improvements, the adequacy of related software and databases, and in general its readiness and suitability for 3.5 TeV operation.

  13. Beam test results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Appel, J A

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector tests carried out in the MTest beam at Fermilab in 1999-2000. The pixel detector spatial resolution has been studied as a function of track inclination, sensor bias, and readout threshold.

  14. Nuclear physics with simple and multi-element detectors and with stable and radioactive beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neil Rowley

    2001-07-01

    The phenomenon of fusion barrier distributions is discussed in the context of a problem already investigated in some detail with simple detection systems, but possessing avenues to studies with multi-detector arrays. The complementarity of research with simple and complex detectors, as well as with stable and radioactive beams, will be highlighted.

  15. Hadron-therapy beam monitoring: Towards a new generation of ultra-thin p-type silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouterfa, M.; Aouadi, K. [Inst. of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics ICTEAM, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bertrand, D. [Particle Therapy Dept., Ion Beam Application IBA, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Olbrechts, B.; Delamare, R. [Inst. of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics ICTEAM, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Raskin, J. P.; Gil, E. C. [Institut de Recherche en Mathematique et Physique IRMP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Flandre, D. [Inst. of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics ICTEAM, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    Hadron-therapy has gained increasing interest for cancer treatment especially within the last decade. System commissioning and quality assurance procedures impose to monitor the particle beam using 2D dose measurements. Nowadays, several monitoring systems exist for hadron-therapy but all show a relatively high influence on the beam properties: indeed, most devices consist of several layers of materials that degrade the beam through scattering and energy losses. For precise treatment purposes, ultra-thin silicon strip detectors are investigated in order to reduce this beam scattering. We assess the beam size increase provoked by the Multiple Coulomb Scattering when passing through Si, to derive a target thickness. Monte-Carlo based simulations show a characteristic scattering opening angle lower than 1 mrad for thicknesses below 20 {mu}m. We then evaluated the fabrication process feasibility. We successfully thinned down silicon wafers to thicknesses lower than 10 {mu}m over areas of several cm{sup 2}. Strip detectors are presently being processed and they will tentatively be thinned down to 20 {mu}m. Moreover, two-dimensional TCAD simulations were carried out to investigate the beam detector performances on p-type Si substrates. Additionally, thick and thin substrates have been compared thanks to electrical simulations. Reducing the pitch between the strips increases breakdown voltage, whereas leakage current is quite insensitive to strips geometrical configuration. The samples are to be characterized as soon as possible in one of the IBA hadron-therapy facilities. For hadron-therapy, this would represent a considerable step forward in terms of treatment precision. (authors)

  16. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, M

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam–gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam–beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam–gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam–gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  17. 3D Medipix2 detector characterization with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Mac Raighne, A.; Parkes, C.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Fleta, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Alianelli, L.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photodiode detectors offer advantages over standard planar photodiodes in a wide range of applications. The main advantage of these sensors for X-ray imaging is their reduced charge sharing between adjacent pixels, which could improve spatial and spectral resolution. However, a drawback of 3D sensors structures is the loss of detection efficiency due to the presence in the pixel structure of heavily doped electrode columns which are insensitive to X-ray. In this work two types of 3D silicon detectors: n-type wafer with hole collecting readout-columns (N-TYPE) and p-type wafer with electron collecting readout-columns (P-TYPE), bump-bounded to a Medipix2 read-out chip were characterized with a 14.5 keV micro-focused X-ray beam from a synchrotron. Measurements of the detection efficiency and the charge sharing were performed at different bias voltages and Medipix2 energy thresholds and compared with those of a standard planar silicon sensor.

  18. Prototype detectors for measuring poloidal magnetic flux with an ion beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J.; Kile, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Development of a detector and associated techniques to determine the localized magnetic flux, and therefore poloidal magnetic field and current density profile, in an axisymmetric plasma device is underway. This will provide invaluable information on equilibrium, transport and stability studies of fusion plasmas. A singly charged ion beam is injected into the plasma and the detector located outside the plasma measures doubly charged ions created within a cm-scale sample volume of the plasma. The ions are split into beamlets at the detector. The toroidal angle of the beam's velocity is determined by measuring the fraction of the beamlets that strike detection plates and wires. The corresponding angle is used to determine the beam's toroidal velocity component. Due to canonical momentum conservation, that toroidal velocity is proportional to the poloidal flux function in the sample volume. We have built several prototype detectors and measured the angle of a 45 keV potassium ion beam. The cross-section of the plasma that can be studied will be maximized and system costs will be minimized if the detector has a direct view of the plasma and is operated close to it. However, this subjects the detector to noise due to UV-induced photoelectrons and plasma particles. We have conducted experiments that demonstrate reductions of this noise to facilitate measurement of ion beam signals. Experimental and design results will be presented. This work is supported by US DoE Award No. DE-SC0006077.

  19. CZT strip detectors for imaging and spectroscopy: Collimated beam and ASIC readout experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurczynski, P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Krizmanic, J.F.; Parsons, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We report the status of ongoing investigations into Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) strip detectors for application in hard x-ray astronomy. We have instrumented a nine strip by nine strip region of a two sided strip detector made in our detector fabrication facility. In order to measure the position resolution of our detectors, we have implemented a collimated beam that concentrates radiation to a spot size less than the strip width of our detector. We have also performed charge collection studies as a function of incident photon energy and bias voltage with a single sided, 100{mu}m pitch CZT strip detector wire bonded to an SVX ASIC charge amplifier. The detectors exhibited excellent strip uniformity in terms of photon count rate and spectroscopic information.

  20. Advanced Si IR detectors using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. L.; Jones, E. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detectors have been fabricated by MBE. The SiGe/Si HIP detector offers a tailorable spectral response in the long wavelength infrared regime by varying the SiGe/Si heterojunction barrier. Degenerately doped p(+) SiGe layers were grown using elemental boron, as the dopant source allows a low growth temperature. Good crystalline quality was achieved for boron-doped SiGe due to the reduced growth temperature. The dark current density of the boron-doped HIP detectors was found to be thermionic emission limited. HIP detectors with a 0.066 eV were fabricated and characterized using activation energy analysis, corresponding to a 18 micron cutoff wavelength. Photoresponse of the detectors at wavelengths ranging from 2 to 12 microns has been characterized with corresponding quantum efficiencies of 5 - 0.1 percent.

  1. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  2. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peřina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ondřej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell' Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  3. Online monitor detector for the protontherapy beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-Catania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Givehchi, N. [Dipt. di Fisica Sperimentale, Univ. di Torino, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy)]|[INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Marchetto, F. [INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy)]. E-mail: marchetto@to.infn.it; Boriano, A. [Dipt. di Fisica Sperimentale, Univ. di Torino, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy)]|[INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Attili, A. [INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Bourhaleb, F. [Dipt. di Fisica Sperimentale, Univ. di Torino, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Cirio, R. [INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F. [INFN Lab. Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 44, Catania 95123 (Italy); Donetti, M. [INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy)]|[Fondazione CNAO, via Caminadella 16, Milan 20123 (Italy); Garella, M.A.; Giordanengo, S.; Iliescu, S. [INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); La Rosa, A. [Dipt. di Fisica Sperimentale, Univ. di Torino, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy)]|[INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Lojacono, P.A.; Russo, G. [INFN Lab. Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 44, Catania 95123 (Italy); Nicotra, P. [Si.a.tel s.r.l., via G. Marconi 94, Tremestieri Etneo (Ct) 95030 (Italy); Peroni, C. [Dipt. di Fisica Sperimentale, Univ. di Torino, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy)]|[INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy); Pecka, A. [Dipt. di Fisica Sperimentale, Univ. di Torino, via P.Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy)]|[INFN, via P.Giuria 1, Turin 10125 (Italy); Pitta, G. [Fondazione TERA, via Puccini 1, Novara 28100 (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN Lab. Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 44, Catania 95123 (Italy)]|[U.O.Radiologia e Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedaliero-Univ. Policlinico dell' Univ. di Catania, via S. Sofia 44, Catania 95123 (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [INFN Lab. Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 44, Catania 95123 (Italy)]|[A.O. Cannizzaro, via Messina 829, Catania 95126 (Italy); Valastro, L.M.

    2007-03-21

    A detector to monitor online the protontherapy beam at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) has been built and characterized. The detector is made of two ionization chambers: each chamber has the anode splitted into 256 0.5 mm strips with vertical and horizontal orientation. The chambers are part of the beam line: signals can be processed online at a speed up to 100 Hz and results are promptly available. Thus the beam geometry can be controlled continuously during patient treatment, and in case of deviation from the required conditions, the treatment can be directly concluded.

  4. Online monitor detector for the protontherapy beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-Catania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givehchi, N.; Marchetto, F.; Boriano, A.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.; Donetti, M.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Iliescu, S.; La Rosa, A.; Lojacono, P. A.; Nicotra, P.; Peroni, C.; Pecka, A.; Pitta, G.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L. M.

    2007-03-01

    A detector to monitor online the protontherapy beam at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) has been built and characterized. The detector is made of two ionization chambers: each chamber has the anode splitted into 256 0.5 mm strips with vertical and horizontal orientation. The chambers are part of the beam line: signals can be processed online at a speed up to 100 Hz and results are promptly available. Thus the beam geometry can be controlled continuously during patient treatment, and in case of deviation from the required conditions, the treatment can be directly concluded.

  5. A parametrisation of the energy loss distributions of charged particles and its applications for silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sikler, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    The energy loss distribution of charged particles in silicon is approximated by a simple analytical parametrization. Its use is demonstrated through several examples. With the help of energy deposits in sensing elements of the detector, the position of track segments and the corresponding deposited energy are estimated with improved accuracy and less bias. The parametrization is successfully used to estimate the energy loss rate of charged particles, and it is applied to detector gain calibration tasks.

  6. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Iguaz, F J; Kebbiri, M; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Tsinganis, A; Vlachoudis, V; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Corté-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Marítnez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A J M; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n\\_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a B-10 based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n\\_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental ...

  7. Loss of accuracy using smeared properties in composite beam modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning

    Advanced composite materials have broad, proven applications in many engineering systems ranging from sports equipment sectors to components on the space shuttle because of their lightweight characteristics and significantly high stiffness. Together with this merit of composite materials is the challenge of improving computational simulation process for composites analysis. Composite structures, particularly composite laminates, usually consist of many layers with different lay-up angles. The anisotropic and heterogeneous features render 3D finite element analysis (FEA) computationally expensive in terms of the computational time and the computing power. At the constituent level, composite materials are heterogeneous. But quite often one homogenizes each layer of composites, i.e. lamina, and uses the homogenized material properties as averaged (smeared) values of those constituent materials for analysis. This is an approach extensively used in design and analysis of composite laminates. Furthermore, many industries tempted to use smeared properties at the laminate level to further reduce the model of composite structures. At this scale, smeared properties are averaged material properties that are weighted by the layer thickness. Although this approach has the advantage of saving computational time and cost of modeling significantly, the prediction of the structural responses may not be accurate, particularly the pointwise stress distribution. Therefore, it is important to quantify the loss of accuracy when one uses smeared properties. In this paper, several different benchmark problems are carefully investigated in order to exemplify the effect of the smeared properties on the global behavior and pointwise stress distribution of the composite beam. In the classical beam theory, both Newtonian method and variational method include several ad hoc assumptions to construct the model, however, these assumptions are avoided if one uses variational asymptotic method. VABS

  8. Absolute efficiency estimation of photon-number-resolving detectors using twin beams

    CERN Document Server

    Worsley, A P; Lundeen, J S; Mosley, P J; Smith, B J; Puentes, G; Thomas-Peter, N; Walmsley, I A; 10.1364/OE.17.004397

    2009-01-01

    A nonclassical light source is used to demonstrate experimentally the absolute efficiency calibration of a photon-number-resolving detector. The photon-pair detector calibration method developed by Klyshko for single-photon detectors is generalized to take advantage of the higher dynamic range and additional information provided by photon-number-resolving detectors. This enables the use of brighter twin-beam sources including amplified pulse pumped sources, which increases the relevant signal and provides measurement redundancy, making the calibration more robust.

  9. Development towards a fast ion loss detector for the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Kim, J.; Clark, J.; Capecchi, W.; Sears, S. H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-11-01

    A fast ion loss detector has been constructed and implemented on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to investigate energetic ion losses and transport due to energetic particle and MHD instabilities. The detector discriminates particle orbits solely on pitch and consists of two thin-foil, particle collecting plates that are symmetric with respect to the device aperture. One plate collects fast ion signal, while the second aids in the minimization of background and noise effects. Initial measurements are reported along with suggestions for the next design phase of the detector.

  10. Development of a Beam Loss Measurement System with Gigabit Ethernet Readout at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiatkowski, M; Angelogiannopoulos, E; Dehning, B; Jackson, S; Vigano, W; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the BLM Dual Polarity module under development at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is to measure and digitise with high precision the current produced by several types of beam loss detectors. In its default configuration, it is expected to provide data to the processing electronics through two point-to-point connections with bidirectional multi-gigabit optical links. For the development phases as well as later serving as a standalone measurement system, its reconfigurable FPGA device is exploited to provide a soft-core CPU with a custom made server. This server, running on the CPU, will expose through the Gigabit Ethernet connection and the TCP/IP protocol different types of data in the network. In this paper the development of the system and of the communication protocol is explored as well as the accompanying client ap- plication that is realised with the purpose of commanding, collecting storing and viewing the different types of data.

  11. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-01

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few μA for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  12. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braccini, Saverio [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-04-19

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few {mu}A for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  13. A beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Braccini, S; Giacoppo, F; Kreslo, I; Nesteruk, K P; Nirkko, M; Weber, M; Scampoli, P; Neff, M; Pilz, S; Romano, V

    2011-01-01

    A beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed and tested, mainly for accelerators used in medical applications. We conceived a general-purpose device, suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for high currents typical for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moved across the beam is measured, giving information on its position, shape and intensity. The coupling of the doped fibre to an ordinary optical fibre allows the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. Mostly based on commercial components, the detector is easy to install and operate also in a high radiation environment due to the absence of any radiation sensitive electronics located near the fibre. The first successful beam tests triggered new developments toward the realization of a two-dimensional beam profiler and the miniaturization of the full device.

  14. Pulse-mode measurement of electron beam halo using diamond-based detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Hideki; Asano, Yoshihiro; Itoga, Toshiro; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Bizen, Teruhiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2012-02-01

    Using a diamond-based detector, the electron beam halo in a high-energy accelerator can be measured with a lower detection limit than that using other instruments, such as a core monitor, a dose meter, or an optical fiber. We have successfully measured an electron beam halo using diamond-based detectors operating in the ionization mode, which were installed in the beam duct to measure the intensity of the beam halo directly. Pulse-by-pulse measurements were adopted to suppress the background noise efficiently. Feasibility tests on the diamond-based detector and beam halo monitor were performed in the beam dump area of the 8 GeV SPring-8 synchrotron booster and at the 250 MeV SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator for the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA), respectively. We achieved a lower detection limit of 2×103electrons/pulse for single-shot measurement, which corresponds to a ratio of about 10-6 relative to the typical charge of the beam core of 0.3 pC. We also confirmed the feasibility of the electron beam halo monitor for use as an interlock sensor to protect undulator permanent magnets used in SACLA from radiation damage.

  15. Preliminary studies of PQS PET detector module for dose verification of carbon beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.-I.; An, S. Jung; Lee, C. Y.; Jo, W. J.; Min, E.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.; Joung, J.; Chung, Y. H.

    2014-05-01

    PET imaging can be used to verify dose distributions of therapeutic particle beams such as carbon ion beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a PET detector module which was designed for an in-beam PET scanner geometry integrated into a carbon beam therapy system, and to evaluate its feasibility as a monitoring system of patient dose distribution. A C-shaped PET geometry was proposed to avoid blockage of the carbon beam by the detector modules. The proposed PET system consisted of 14 detector modules forming a bore with 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module is composed of a 9 × 9 array of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm × 20.0 mm LYSO crystal module optically coupled with four 29 mm diameter PMTs using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. Because the crystal pixel was identified based upon the distribution of scintillation lights of four PMTs, the design of the reflector between crystal elements should be well optimized. The optical design of reflectors was optimized using DETECT2000, a Monte Carlo code for light photon transport. A laser-cut reflector set was developed using the Enhanced Specular Reflector (ESR, 3M Co.) mirror-film with a high reflectance of 98% and a thickness of 0.064 mm. All 81 crystal elements of detector module were identified. Our result demonstrates that the C-shaped PET system is under development and we present the first reconstructed image.

  16. Requirements for a New Detector at the South Pole Receiving an Accelerator Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    There are recent considerations to increase the photomultiplier density in the IceCube detector array beyond that of DeepCore, which will lead to a lower detection threshold and a huge fiducial mass for the neutrino detection. This initiative is known as "Phased IceCube Next Generation Upgrade" (PINGU). We discuss the possibility to send a neutrino beam from one of the major accelerator laboratories in the Northern hemisphere to such a detector. Such an experiment would be unique in the sense that it would be the only neutrino beam where the baseline crosses the Earth's core. We study the detector requirements for a beta beam, a neutrino factory beam, and a superbeam, where we consider both the cases of small theta_13 and large theta_13, as suggested by the recent T2K hint. We illustrate that a flavor-clean beta beam best suits the requirements of such a detector, in particular, that PINGU may replace a magic baseline detector for small values of theta_13 -- even in the absence of any energy resolution capabi...

  17. Real-time control of the beam attenuation with XPAD hybrid pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawiec, A.; Garreau, Y.; Bisou, J.; Hustache, S.; Kanoute, B.; Picca, F.; Renaud, G.; Coati, A.

    2016-12-01

    In order to fully benefit from a beam produced by modern synchrotron light sources, characterised by a wide and continuous energy spectrum, high brightness and a very high intensity, advancement in detector technology has been made over the last decades. However, one of the main limitations of the state-of-the-art counting hybrid pixel detectors is the maximum count-rate that is very often few orders of magnitudes lower than of the incident, reflected or diffracted beam flux. Therefore, direct beam attenuation is mandatory in order to perform the measurements according to the detector's characteristics. In this work we present a major upgrade of a fast attenuation system developed at Synchrotron SOLEIL, which allows for a dynamical change of the beam attenuation as a function of the photon flux received by XPAD S140 photon counting detector. The system performs a cyclic real-time estimation of the flux received by every pixel during acquisition of an image and searches for clusters of at least two pixels that exceed user defined levels of counts/s. The beam attenuation is immediately and automatically changed in order to guarantee that the detector will always operate in its linear range even during a long continuous scan, by acting on the direct attenuators.

  18. The Fermilab Main Injector: high intensity operation and beam loss control

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bruce C; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at ~400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  19. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/a, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  20. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  1. Reliability Tests of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring FPGA Firmware

    CERN Document Server

    Hajdu, C F; Dehning, B; Jackson, S

    2010-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. In addition to protecting the collider, the system also needs to provide a means of diagnosing machine faults and deliver a feedback of losses to the control room as well as to several systems for their setup and analysis. It has to transmit and process signals from almost 4’000 monitors, and has nearly 3 million configurable parameters. In a system of such complexity, firmware reliability is a critical issue. The integrity of the signal chain of the LHC BLM system and its ability to correctly detect unwanted scenarios and thus provide the required protection level must be ensured. In order to analyze the reliability and functionality, an advanced verification environment has been developed to evaluate the performance and response of the FPGA-based data analysis firmware. This paper will report on the numerous tests that have been performed and on how the results are used to quantify the reliabi...

  2. Identification and Classification of Beam Loss Patterns in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotis, Theodoropoulos; Valentino, Gianluca; Redaelli, Stefano; Herbster, Mark

    The Large Hadron Collider, is the largest particle accelerator ever built, achieving record beam energy and beam intensity. Beam losses are unavoidable and can risk the safety of accelerator’s components. Beam loss maps are used to validate the collimation system, designed to protect the accelerator against beam losses. The complexity of this system requires well defined inspection methods and well defined case studies that ensure normal operation and efficient performance evaluation. In this work, enhancements are proposed to the existing validation methods with extensions towards automating the inspection mechanisms, introducing pattern recognition and statistical learning methods.

  3. Watch Dog detector for beam diagnostic in hadrontherapy application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojatti, E.; Bazzano, G.; Bosser, J.; Caldara, M.; Calvi, G.; Lanzavecchia, L.; Parravicini, A.; Pullia, M.; Viviani, C.

    2013-12-01

    The "Watch Dog" is a beam monitor designed for medical accelerators, that will be installed at the end of the CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica) extraction lines. Its main goal is to achieve a real time monitoring of the beam position during patient treatments; the system can generate an interlock signal in case the measured quantity is out of the nominal range. In this paper the Watch Dog is described, and preliminary tests are presented.

  4. On the detector arrangement for in-beam PET for hadron therapy monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Paulo; Shakirin, Georgy; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2006-05-07

    In-beam positron emission tomography (in-beam PET) is currently the only method for an in situ monitoring of highly tumour-conformed charged hadron therapy. At the experimental carbon ion tumour therapy facility, running at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany, all treatments have been monitored by means of a specially adapted dual-head PET scanner. The positive clinical impact of this project triggered the construction of a hospital-based hadron therapy facility, with in-beam PET expected to monitor more delicate radiotherapeutic situations. Therefore, we have studied possible in-beam PET improvements by optimizing the arrangement of the gamma-ray detectors. For this, a fully 3D, rebinning-free, maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm applicable to several closed-ring or dual-head tomographs has been developed. The analysis of beta(+)-activity distributions simulated from real-treatment situations and detected with several detector arrangements allows us to conclude that a dual-head tomograph with narrow gaps yields in-beam PET images with sufficient quality for monitoring head and neck treatments. For monitoring larger irradiation fields, e.g. treatments in the pelvis region, a closed-ring tomograph was seen to be highly desirable. Finally, a study of the space availability for patient and bed, tomograph and beam portal proves the implementation of a closed-ring detector arrangement for in-beam PET to be feasible.

  5. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacheban, O.; Afanaciev, K.; Hempel, M.; Henschel, H.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J. L.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Schuwalow, S.

    2015-08-01

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitors at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Currently artificial diamond sensors are widely used. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm2 size and 525 μ m thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the detector was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam. The charge collection efficiency measured as a function of the bias voltage rises with the voltage, reaching about 10% at 095 V. The signal size obtained from electrons crossing the stack at this voltage is about 02200 e, where e is the unit charge. The signal size is measured as a function of the hit position, showing variations of up to 20% in the direction perpendicular to the beam and to the electric field. The measurement of the signal size as a function of the coordinate parallel to the electric field confirms the prediction that mainly electrons contribute to the signal. Also evidence for the presence of a polarisation field was observed.

  6. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-07

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  7. Beam test results of the irradiated Silicon Drift Detector for ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Kushpil, S; Giubellino, P.; Idzik, M.; Kolozhvari, A.; Kushpil, V.; Martinez, M.I.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Nouais, D.; Petracek, V.; Piemonte, C.; Rashevsky, A.; Riccati, L.; Rivetti, A.; Tosello, F.; Vacchi, A.; Wheadon, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Silicon Drift Detectors will equip two of the six cylindrical layers of high precision position sensitive detectors in the ITS of the ALICE experiment at LHC. In this paper we report the beam test results of a SDD irradiated with 1 GeV electrons. The aim of this test was to verify the radiation tolerance of the device under an electron fluence equivalent to twice particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation.

  8. Mitigation of Numerical Noise for Beam Loss Simulations Proc. HB2016 Malmo, Sweden

    CERN Document Server

    Kesting, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Numerical noise emerges in self-consistent simulations of charged particles, and its mitigation is investigated since the first numerical studies in plasma physics. In accelerator physics, recent studies find an artificial diffusion of the particle beam due to numerical noise in particle-in-cell tracking, which is of particular importance for high intensity machines with a long storage time, as the SIS100 at FAIR or in context of the LIU upgrade at CERN. In beam loss simulations for these projects artificial effects must be distinguished from physical beam loss. Therefore, it is important to relate artificial diffusion to artificial beam loss, and to choose simulation parameters such that physical beam loss is well resolved. As a practical tool, we therefore suggest a scaling law to find optimal simulation parameters for a given maximum percentage of acceptable artificial beam loss.

  9. Test beam results from the prototype L3 Silicon Microvertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Ahlen, S.; Ambrosi, G.; Babucci, E.; Baksay, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Bencze, G.L.; Bertucci, B.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bosetti, M.; Brooks, M.L.; Burger, W.J.; Busenitz, J.; Camps, C.; Caria, M.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Checcucci, B.; Chen, A.; Coan, T.E.; Commichau, V.; DiBitonto, D.; Duinker, P.; Easo, S.; Extermann, P.; Fiandrini, E.; Gabbanini, A.; Gougas, A.; Hangarter, K.; Hauviller, C.; Herve, A.; Hu, G.; Josa, M.I.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Kim, D.; Kinnison, W.W.; Kornis, J.; Krastev, V.R.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lee, D.M.; Leiste, R.; Lin, W.; Lohmann, W.; Marin, A.; Massetti, R.; Matay, G.; Mills, G.B.; Nowak, H.; Passaleva, G.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perrin, E.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rattaggi, M.; Rosch, A.; Santocchia, A.; Siedling, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schmitz, P.; Schoeneich, B.; Servoli, L.; Susinno, G.F.; Terzi, G.; Tesi, M.; Tonisch, F.; Toth, J.; Trowitzsch, G.; Viertel, G.; Vogt, H.; Waldmeier, S.

    1994-05-15

    We report test beam results on the overall system performance of two modules of the L3 Silicon Microvertex Detector exposed to a 50 GeV pion beam. Each module consists of two AC coupled double-sided silicon strip detectors equipped with VLSI readout electronics. The associated data acquisition system comprises an 8 bit FADC, an optical data transmission circuit, a specialized data reduction processor and a synchronization module. A spatial resolution of 7.5 [mu]m and 14 [mu]m for the two coordinates and a detection efficiency in excess of 99% are measured. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of neutrino velocity with the MINOS detectors and NuMI neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coleman, S J; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Fitzpatrick, T; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Lucas, P; Luebke, W; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Perry, C; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Saranen, D; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    The velocity of a ~3 GeV neutrino beam is measured by comparing detection times at the Near and Far detectors of the MINOS experiment, separated by 734 km. A total of 473 Far Detector neutrino events was used to measure (v-c)/c = 5.1 +/- 2.9 x 10^-5 (at 68% C.L.). By correlating the measured energies of 258 charged-current neutrino events to their arrival times at the Far Detector, a limit is imposed on the neutrino mass of m_nu < 50 MeV/c^2 (99% C.L.).

  11. Development, Production and Testing of 4500 Beam Loss Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, E B; Dehning, B; Ferioli, G; Grishin, V; Jimenez, T M; Koshelev, A; Kramer, Daniel; Larionov, A; Taborelli, M; Seleznev, V; Sleptsov, M; Sytin, A; Wevers, I

    2008-01-01

    Beam-loss monitoring (BLM) [1] is a key element in the LHC machine protection. 4250 nitrogen filled ionization chambers (IC) and 350 secondary emission monitors (SEM) have been manufactured and tested at the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Protvino, Russia, following their development at CERN. Signal speed and robustness against aging were the main design criteria. Each monitor is permanently sealed inside a stainless-steel cylinder. The quality of the welding was a critical aspect during production. The SEMs are requested to hold a vacuum of $10^{-7}$ bar. Impurity levels from thermal and radiationinduced desorption should remain in the range of parts per million in the ICs. To avoid radiation aging (up to $2·10^{8}$ Gy in 20 years) production of the chambers followed strict UHV requirements. IHEP designed and built the UHV production stand. Due to the required dynamic range of $10^{8}$, the leakage current of the monitors has to stay below 2 pA. Several tests during and after production were ...

  12. X-ray micro-beam characterization of a small pixel spectroscopic CdTe detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.

    2012-07-01

    A small pixel, spectroscopic, CdTe detector has been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) for X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch with 50 μm inter-pixel spacing. Measurements with an 241Am γ-source demonstrated that 96% of all pixels have a FWHM of better than 1 keV while the majority of the remaining pixels have FWHM of less than 4 keV. Using the Diamond Light Source synchrotron, a 10 μm collimated beam of monochromatic 20 keV X-rays has been used to map the spatial variation in the detector response and the effects of charge sharing corrections on detector efficiency and resolution. The mapping measurements revealed the presence of inclusions in the detector and quantified their effect on the spectroscopic resolution of pixels.

  13. Investigation of GEM-Micromegas Detector on X-ray Beam of Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, YuLian; Hu, BiTao; Fan, ShengNan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Jian; Liu, RongGuang; Chang, GuangCai; Liu, Peng; Ouyang, Qun; Chen, YuanBo; Yi, FuTing

    2013-01-01

    To solve the discharge of the standard Bulk Micromegas and GEM detector, the GEM-Micromegas detector was developed in Institute of High Energy Physics. Taking into account the advantages of the two detectors, one GEM foil was set as a preamplifier on the mesh of Micromegas in the structure and the GEM preamplification decreased the working voltage of Micromegas to reduce the effect of the discharge significantly. In the paper, the performance of detector in X-ray beam was studied at 1W2B laboratory of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Finally, the result of the energy resolution under various X-ray energies was given in different working gases. It indicated that the GEM-Micromegas detector had the energy response capability in all the energy range and it could work better than the standard Bulk-Micromegas.

  14. Beam tests of an integrated prototype of the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; Adamczyk, L.; Avoni, G.; Banas, E.; Brandt, A.; Bruschi, M.; Buglewicz, P.; Cavallaro, E.; Caforio, D.; Chiodini, G.; Chytka, L.; Cieśla, K.; Davis, P. M.; Dyndal, M.; Grinstein, S.; Janas, K.; Jirakova, K.; Kocian, M.; Korcyl, K.; Lopez Paz, I.; Northacker, D.; Nozka, L.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Seabra, L.; Staszewski, R.; Świerska, P.; Sykora, T.

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is intended to measure protons scattered at small angles from the ATLAS interaction point. To this end, a combination of 3D Silicon pixel tracking modules and Quartz-Cherenkov time-of-flight (ToF) detectors is installed 210 m away from the interaction point at both sides of ATLAS. Beam tests with an AFP prototype detector combining tracking and timing sub-detectors and a common readout have been performed at the CERN-SPS test-beam facility in November 2014 and September 2015 to complete the system integration and to study the detector performance. The successful tracking-timing integration was demonstrated. Good tracker hit efficiencies above 99.9% at a sensor tilt of 14°, as foreseen for AFP, were observed. Spatial resolutions in the short pixel direction with 50 μm pitch of 5.5 ± 0.5 μm per pixel plane and of 2.8 ± 0.5 μm for the full four-plane tracker at 14° were found, largely surpassing the AFP requirement of 10 μm. The timing detector showed also good hit efficiencies above 99%, and a full-system time resolution of 35±6 ps was found for the ToF prototype detector with two Quartz bars in-line (half the final AFP size) without dedicated optimisation, fulfilling the requirements for initial low-luminosity AFP runs.

  15. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  16. A fast feedback controlled magnetic drive for the ASDEX Upgrade fast-ion loss detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J.; Herrmann, A.; Vorbrugg, S.; Leitenstern, P.; Zoletnik, S.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Dominguez, A. D.; Kocan, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Garcia-Vallejo, D.; Dominguez, J.

    2016-11-01

    A magnetically driven fast-ion loss detector system for the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak has been designed and will be presented here. The device is feedback controlled to adapt the detector head position to the heat load and physics requirements. Dynamic simulations have been performed taking into account effects such as friction, coil self-induction, and eddy currents. A real time positioning control algorithm to maximize the detector operational window has been developed. This algorithm considers dynamical behavior and mechanical resistance as well as measured and predicted thermal loads. The mechanical design and real time predictive algorithm presented here may be used for other reciprocating systems.

  17. Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, J B

    2011-01-01

    The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron ( PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with bett...

  18. A fast beam loss monitor system for the KEK proton synchrotron complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J. A.; Kishiro, J.; Arakawa, D.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1991-06-01

    Efforts to increase the intensity of the KEK proton synchrotron have led to the need for a new fast response beam loss monitor system. The design and some prelimitary test results of a new beam loss monitor system are presented.(AIP)

  19. The Long-Term Beam Losses in the CERN Injector Chain

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067411; Bartosik, Hannes; Benedetto, Elena; Damerau, Heiko; Forte, Vincenzo; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Goddard, Brennan; Hancock, Steven; Hanke, Klaus; Huschauer, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Mcateer, Meghan Jill; Metral, Elias; Mikulec, Bettina; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Rumolo, Giovanni; Sterbini, Guido; Wasef, Raymond; Arduini, Gianluigi; Meddahi, Malika; Chapochnikova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    For the production of the LHC type beams, but also for the high intensity ones, the budget allocated to losses in the CERN injector chain is maintained as tight as possi- ble, in particular to keep as low as possible the activation of the different machine elements. Various beam dynamics effects, like for example beam interaction with betatronic resonances, beam instabilities, but also reduced efficiency of the RF capture processes or RF noise, can produce losses even on a very long time scale. The main different mecha- nisms producing long term losses observed in the CERN injectors, and their cure or mitigation, will be revised.

  20. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy)); Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)); Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneide

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given.

  1. Design studies and sensor tests for the beam calorimeter of the ILC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, E.

    2007-03-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is being designed to explore particle physics at the TeV scale. The design of the Very Forward Region of the ILC detector is considered in the presented work. The Beam Calorimeter - one of two electromagnetic calorimeters situated there - is the subject of this thesis. The Beam Calorimeter has to provide a good hermeticity for high energy electrons, positrons and photons down to very low polar angles, serve for fast beam diagnostics and shield the inner part of the detector from backscattered beamstrahlung remnants and synchrotron radiation. As a possible technology for the Beam Calorimeter a diamond-tungsten sandwich calorimeter is considered. Detailed simulation studies are done in order to explore the suitability of the considered design for the Beam Calorimeter objectives. Detection efficiency, energy and angular resolution for electromagnetic showers are studied. At the simulation level the diamondtungsten design is shown to match the requirements on the Beam Calorimeter performance. Studies of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamond as a sensor material for the Beam Calorimeter are done to explore the properties of the material. Results of the measurements performed with pCVD diamond samples produced by different manufacturers are presented. (orig.)

  2. Two beams circulating in the LHC! First collisions in four detectors! Monday 23 November 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    Geneva, 23 November 2009. Today the LHC circulated two beams simultaneously for the first time, allowing the operators to test the synchronization of the beams and giving the experiments their first chance to look for proton-proton collisions. With just one bunch of particles circulating in each direction, the beams can be made to cross in up to two places in the ring. From early in the afternoon, the beams were made to cross at points 1 and 5, home to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, both of which were on the lookout for collisions. Later, beams crossed at points 2 and 8, ALICE and LHCb. “It’s a great achievement to have come this far in so short a time,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “But we need to keep a sense of perspective – there’s still much to do before we can start the LHC physics programme.” Beams were first tuned to produce collisions in the ATLAS detector, which recorded its first candidate for collisions at 14:22 this afternoon. Later, the beams were optimised for CMS. In the ...

  3. Matching X-ray beam and detector properties to protein crystals of different perfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, Colin, E-mail: colin.nave@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-18

    Expressions are given to match X-ray data collection facilities to the intrinsic diffraction properties of crystals with different degrees of perfection. An analysis is given of the effect of different beam and detector parameters on the sharpness of recorded diffraction features for macromolecular crystals of different quality. The crystal quality parameters include crystal strain, crystal or mosaic block size and mosaic block misorientation. Calculations are given for instrument parameters such as angular resolution of the detector, beam divergence and wavelength bandpass to be matched to the intrinsic diffraction properties from these crystals with the aim of obtaining the best possible data out of each crystal. Examples are given using typical crystal imperfections obtained from the literature for both room-temperature and cryo-cooled crystals. Possible implications for the choice of X-ray source, beamline design, detector specifications, instrument set-up and data processing are discussed, together with the limitations of the approach.

  4. Design and performance of beam test electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The system architecture and test results of the custom circuits and beam test system for the Multiplicity-Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX detector collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented in this paper. The final detector per-channel signal processing chain will consist of a preamplifier-gain stage, a current-mode summed multiplicity discriminator, a 64-deep analog memory (simultaneous read-write), a post-memory analog correlator, and a 10-bit 5 {mu}s ADC. The Heap Manager provides all timing control, data buffering, and data formatting for a single 256-channel multi-chip module (MCM). Each chip set is partitioned into 32-channel sets. Beam test (16-cell deep memory) performance for the various blocks will be presented as well as the ionizing radiation damage performance of the 1.2 {mu} n-well CMOS process used for preamplifier fabrication.

  5. In-beam evaluation of a medium-size Resistive-Plate WELL gaseous particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moleri, L

    2016-01-01

    In-beam evaluation of a fully-equipped medium-size 30$\\times$30 cm$^2$ Resistive Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector is presented. It consists here of a single element gas-avalanche multiplier with Semitron ESD225 resistive plate, 1 cm$^2$ readout pads and APV25/SRS electronics. Similarly to previous results with small detector prototypes, stable operation at high detection efficiency (>98%) and low average pad multiplicity (~1.2) were recorded with 150 GeV muon and high-rate pion beams, in Ne/(5%CH$_4$), Ar/(5%CH$_4$) and Ar/(7%CO$_2$). This is an important step towards the realization of robust detectors suitable for applications requiring large-area coverage; among them Digital Hadron Calorimetry.

  6. In-beam evaluation of a medium-size Resistive-Plate WELL gaseous particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleri, L.; Amaro, F. D.; Arazi, L.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Breskin, A.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Oliveri, E.; Pereira, F. A.; Shaked Renous, D.; Schaarschmidt, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Bressler, S.

    2016-09-01

    In-beam evaluation of a fully-equipped medium-size 30 × 30 cm2 Resistive Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector is presented. It consists here of a single element gas-avalanche multiplier with Semitron ESD225 resistive plate, 1 cm2 readout pads and APV25/SRS electronics. Similarly to previous results with small detector prototypes, stable operation at high detection efficiency (> 98%) and low average pad multiplicity (~ 1.2) were recorded with 150 GeV muon and high-rate pion beams, in Ne/(5%CH4), Ar/(5%CH4) and Ar/(7%CO2). This is an important step towards the realization of robust detectors suitable for applications requiring large-area coverage; among them Digital Hadron Calorimetry.

  7. MINERvA neutrino detector response measured with test beam data

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, L; Del Castillo, C Araujo; Bagby, L; Bellantoni, L; Bergan, W F; Bodek, A; Bradford, R; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Diaz, G A; Dytman, S A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Flight, R; Gago, A M; Golan, T; Gomez, A; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Howley, I J; Hurtado, K; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Lanari, M; Le, T; Leister, A J; Lovlein, A; Maher, E; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Miller, W; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Ochoa, N; OConnor, C D; Osmanov, B; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Patrick, C E; Patrick, L; Perdue, G N; Lara, C E Perez; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Rubinov, P; Rude, C R; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Urrutia, Z; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Westerberg, A; Wolcott, J; Woodward, N; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2015-01-01

    The MINERvA collaboration operated a scaled-down replica of the solid scintillator tracking and sampling calorimeter regions of the MINERvA detector in a hadron test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. This article reports measurements with samples of protons, pions, and electrons from 0.35 to 2.0 GeV/c momentum. The calorimetric response to protons, pions, and electrons are obtained from these data. A measurement of the parameter in Birks' law and an estimate of the tracking efficiency are extracted from the proton sample. Overall the data are well described by a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector and particle interactions with agreements better than 4%, though some features of the data are not precisely modeled. These measurements are used to tune the MINERvA detector simulation and evaluate systematic uncertainties in support of the MINERvA neutrino cross section measurement program.

  8. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.; Takemoto, H.; Silver, M. D.; Nagesh, S. V. S.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm x 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panettieri, Vanessa [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Duch, Maria Amor [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jornet, Nuria [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Ginjaume, Merce [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carrasco, Pablo [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Badal, Andreu [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ortega, Xavier [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-01-07

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson and Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm{sup 2} and a thickness of 0.5 {mu}m which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water(TM) build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water(TM) cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system

  10. Beam tests of an integrated prototype of the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00397348

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is intended to measure protons scattered at small angles from the ATLAS interaction point. To this end, a combination of 3D Silicon pixel tracking modules and Quartz-Cherenkov time-of-flight (ToF) detectors is installed 210m away from the interaction point at both sides of ATLAS. Beam tests with an AFP prototype detector combining tracking and timing sub-detectors and a common readout have been performed at the CERN-SPS test-beam facility in November 2014 and September 2015 to complete the system integration and to study the detector performance. The successful tracking-timing integration was demonstrated. Good tracker hit efficiencies above 99.9% at a sensor tilt of 14{\\deg}, as foreseen for AFP, were observed. Spatial resolutions in the short pixel direction with 50 {\\mu}m pitch of 5.5 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m per pixel plane and of 2.8 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m for the full four-plane tracker at 14{\\deg} were found, largely surpassing the AFP requirement of 10 {\\mu}m. The timing detector...

  11. Proof of concept demonstration for coherent beam pattern measurements of KID detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristina K.; Baryshev, Andrey M.; Jellema, Willem; Yates, Stephen J. C.; Ferrari, Lorenza; Baselmans, Jochem J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Here we summarize the initial results from a complex field radiation pattern measurement of a kinetic inductance detector instrument. These detectors are phase insensitive and have thus been limited to scalar, or amplitude-only, beam measurements. Vector beam scans, of both amplitude and phase, double the information received in comparison to scalar beam scans. Scalar beam measurements require multiple scans at varying distances along the optical path of the receiver to fully constrain the divergence angle of the optical system and locate the primary focus. Vector scans provide this information with a single scan, reducing the total measurement time required for new systems and also limiting the influence of system instabilities. The vector scan can be taken at any point along the optical axis of the system including the near-field, which makes beam measurements possible for large systems at high frequencies where these measurements may be inconceivable to be tested in-situ. Therefore, the methodology presented here should enable common heterodyne analysis for direct detector instruments. In principle, this coherent measurement strategy allows phase dependent analysis to be performed on any direct-detect receiver instrument.

  12. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A pixelated luminosity detector counts coincidences in several three layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to measure the luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point.The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background.A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fused quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules...

  13. Energy and time of flight measurements of REX-ISOLDE stable beams using Si detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D; Fraser, M A; Lanaia, D; Sosa, A; Voulot, D; Zocca, F

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present energy and time spectroscopy measurements for the stable beams of REX-ISOLDE obtained using Si detectors. By using an alpha source as a calibration reference, the absolute energy E of stable beam particles (A/q = 4) was determined in spectroscopy mode in the energy range 1 MeV < E < 8 MeV (0.30 MeV/u < E/A < 1.87 MeV/u). The time of flight of the beam particles (2.18 MeV/u < E/A < 2.27 MeV/u) was determined by installing identical Si detectors in two diagnostic boxes separated by 7.7 m. The results obtained with these two techniques are compared with the values obtained by dipole scans using a bending magnet. The measurements took place between January and February of 2013.

  14. IBIC characterization of an ion-beam-micromachined multi-electrode diamond detector

    CERN Document Server

    Forneris, J; Jaksic, M; Giudice, A Lo; Olivero, P; Picollo, F; Skukan, N; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Vittone, E

    2016-01-01

    Deep Ion Beam Lithography (DIBL) has been used for the direct writing of buried graphitic regions in monocrystalline diamond with micrometric resolution. Aiming at the development and the characterization of a fully ion-beam-micromachined solid state ionization chamber, a device with interdigitated electrodes was fabricated by using a 1.8 MeV He+ ion microbeam scanning on a homoepitaxial, grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). In order to evaluate the ionizing-radiation-detection performance of the device, charge collection efficiency (CCE) maps were extracted from Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out by probing different arrangements of buried microelectrodes. The analysis of the CCE maps allowed for an exhaustive evaluation of the detector features, in particular the individuation of the different role played by electrons and holes in the formation of the induced charge pulses. Finally, a comparison of the performances of the detector with buried graphitic electrodes with those releva...

  15. Impact of detector geometry for compressive fan beam snapshot coherent scatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mehadi; Holmgren, Andrew; Greenberg, Joel A.; Odinaka, Ikenna; Brady, David

    2016-05-01

    Previous realizations of coded-aperture X-ray diffraction tomography (XRDT) techniques based on pencil beams image one line through an object via a single measurement but require raster scanning the object in multiple dimensions. Fan beam approaches are able to image the spatial extent of the object while retaining the ability to do material identification. Building on these approaches we present our system concept and geometry of combining a fan beam with energy sensitive/photon counting detectors and a coded aperture to capture both spatial and spectral information about an object at each voxel. Using our system we image slices via snapshot measurements for four different detector configurations and compare their results.

  16. Energy response of an aluminium oxide detector in kilovoltage and megavoltage photon beams: an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyingi, Ephraim O; Mobit, Paul N; Sandison, George A

    2006-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the energy response of an aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) detector in kilovoltage and megavoltage photon beams relative to (60)Co gamma rays has been performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitive volume of the Al(2)O(3) detector was simulated as a disc of diameter 2.85 mm and thickness 1 mm. The phantom material was water and the irradiation depth chosen was 2.0 cm in kilovoltage photon beams and 5.0 cm in megavoltage photon beams. The results show that the energy response of the Al(2)O(3) detector is constant within 3% for photon beam energies in the energy range of (60)Co gamma rays to 25 MV X rays. However, the Al(2)O(3) detector shows an enhanced energy response for kilovoltage photon beams, which in the case of 50 kV X rays is 3.2 times higher than that for (60)Co gamma rays. There is essentially no difference in the energy responses of LiF and Al(2)O(3) detectors irradiated in megavoltage photon beams when these Al(2)O(3) results are compared with literature data for LiF thermoluminescence detectors. However, the Al(2)O(3) detector has a much higher enhanced response compared with LiF detectors in kilovoltage X-ray beams, more than twice as much for the case of 50 kV X rays.

  17. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Adam James [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10.9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31.1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  18. Dysprosium detector for neutron dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostinelli, A.; Berlusconi, C.; Conti, V.; Duchini, M.; Gelosa, S.; Guallini, F.; Vallazza, E.; Prest, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy treatments with high-energy (>8 MeV) photon beams are a standard procedure in clinical practice, given the skin and near-target volumes sparing effect, the accurate penetration and the uniform spatial dose distribution. On the other hand, despite these advantages, neutrons may be produced via the photo-nuclear (γ,n) reactions of the high-energy photons with the high-Z materials in the accelerator head, in the treatment room and in the patient, resulting in an unwanted dose contribution which is of concern, given its potential to induce secondary cancers, and which has to be monitored. This work presents the design and the test of a portable Dysprosium dosimeter to be used during clinical treatments to estimate the "in vivo" dose to the patient. The dosimeter has been characterized and validated with tissue-equivalent phantom studies with a Varian Clinical iX 18 MV photon beam, before using it with a group of patients treated at the S. Anna Hospital in Como. The working principle of the dosimeter together with the readout chain and the results in terms of delivered dose are presented.

  19. Dysprosium detector for neutron dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostinelli, A.; Berlusconi, C.; Conti, V.; Duchini, M.; Gelosa, S. [Medical Physics - Sant' Anna Hospital, Como (Italy); Guallini, F. [EL.SE s.r.l. (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN, Trieste (Italy); Prest, M. [University of Insubria, Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    Radiotherapy treatments with high-energy (>8MeV) photon beams are a standard procedure in clinical practice, given the skin and near-target volumes sparing effect, the accurate penetration and the uniform spatial dose distribution. On the other hand, despite these advantages, neutrons may be produced via the photo-nuclear (γ,n) reactions of the high-energy photons with the high-Z materials in the accelerator head, in the treatment room and in the patient, resulting in an unwanted dose contribution which is of concern, given its potential to induce secondary cancers, and which has to be monitored. This work presents the design and the test of a portable Dysprosium dosimeter to be used during clinical treatments to estimate the “in vivo” dose to the patient. The dosimeter has been characterized and validated with tissue-equivalent phantom studies with a Varian Clinical iX 18 MV photon beam, before using it with a group of patients treated at the S. Anna Hospital in Como. The working principle of the dosimeter together with the readout chain and the results in terms of delivered dose are presented.

  20. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Tuszewski, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}0{sub 12}:Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss.

  1. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    CERN Document Server

    Karacheban, O; Hempel, M; Henschel, H; Lange, W; Leonard, J L; Levy, I; Lohmann, W; Schuwalow, S

    2015-01-01

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the dete...

  2. Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Bassler, Niels

    be seriously hampered by variations in detector efficiency (light output per energy imparted) due to high-LET effects and gradients along the physical size (~mm) of the detector crystals. Amorphous track models (ATMs) such as the Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach by Katz and co-workers or the ECLaT code by Geiß et...... assumptions in a variety of detectors. The library also includes simple particle transportation or can be interfaced to external transport codes. We applied our code to RL and OSL data from fiber-coupled Al2O3:C-detectors in a proton (nominal energies 10 MeV to 60 MeV) and a carbon beam (270 MeV/u). Results...

  3. Test of a fine pitch SOI pixel detector with laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi; Ju, Xudong; Ouyang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    A fine pitch pixel detector, developed on SOI (Silicon on Insulator) technology, has been tested under the illumination of infrared laser pulses. As an alternative way beside particel beam test, the laser pulses are tuned to very short duration and small transverse profile to simulate tracks of MIPs (Minimum Ionization Particles) in silicon. Hit cluster size and substrate depletion characteristics of this SOI detector are obtained. When focused laser pulses propagate through SOI detector perpendicularly to its surface, the hit cluster is measured, and most of signal charges are collected directly by the seed pixel. The signal amplitude as a function of applied bias voltage has been measured on this SOI detector for the first time, which helps us better understand of depletion characteristics.

  4. Propagation of Gaussian beams in the presence of gain and loss

    CERN Document Server

    Graefe, Eva-Maria; Schubert, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We consider the propagation of Gaussian beams in a waveguide with gain and loss in the paraxial approximation governed by the Schr\\"odinger equation. We derive equations of motion for the beam in the semiclassical limit that are valid when the waveguide profile is locally well approximated by quadratic functions. For Hermitian systems, without any loss or gain, these dynamics are given by Hamilton's equations for the center of the beam and its conjugate momentum. Adding gain and/or loss to the waveguide introduces a non-Hermitian component, causing the width of the Gaussian beam to play an important role in its propagation. Here we show how the width affects the motion of the beam and how this may be used to filter Gaussian beams located at the same initial position based on their width.

  5. Investigation of GEM-Micromegas detector on X-ray beam of synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Lian; Qi, Hui-Rong; Hu, Bi-Tao; Fan, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Rong-Guang; Chang, Guang-Cai; Liu, Peng; Ouyang, Qun; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Yi, Fu-Ting

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the discharge of the standard bulk Micromegas and GEM detectors, a GEM-Micromegas detector was developed at the Institute of High Energy Physics. Taking into account the advantages of the two detectors, one GEM foil was set as a preamplifier on the mesh of Micromegas in the structure and the GEM preamplification decreased the working voltage of Micromegas to significantly reduce the effect of the discharge. At the same gain, the spark probability of the GEM-Micromegas detector can be reduced to a factor 0.01 compared to the standard Micromegas detector, and an even higher gain could be obtained. This paper describes the performance of the X-ray beam detector that was studied at 1W2B Laboratory of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Finally, the result of the energy resolution under various X-ray energies was given in different working gases. This indicates that the GEM-Micromegas detector has an energy response capability in an energy range from 6 keV to 20 keV and it could work better than the standard bulk-Micromegas.

  6. TITUS: An Intermediate Distance Detector for the Hyper-Kamiokande Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Lasorak, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The Tokai Intermediate Tank with Unoscillated Spectrum (TITUS) detector is a proposed addition to the Hyper-Kamiokande (HK) experiment located approximately 2 km from the J-PARC neutrino beam. The design consists of a 2 kton Gadolinium (Gd) doped water Cherenkov detector, surrounded by a magnetized iron detector designed to range-out muons. The target material and location are chosen so that the neutrino interactions and beam spectrum at TITUS will match those of HK. Including a 0.1% Gd concentration allows for neutrino/antineutrino discrimination via neutron tagging. The primary goal of TITUS is to directly measure the neutrino flux and make cross-section measurements that reduce the systematic uncertainty of the long-baseline oscillation physics program at HK and enhance its sensitivity to CP violation. TITUS can also be used for physics unrelated to the J-PARC beam, functioning as an independent detector for supernova neutrino bursts and measuring the neutron rate to improve HK proton decay searches.

  7. Effect of Power Losses on Self-Focusing of High Intensity Laser Beam in Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Semak, V V

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical study of power loss from periphery of an ultrashort pulse laser beam and temporally resolved defocussing produced by laser induced plasma are performed using paraxial approximation. Our analysis incorporate consideration of spatial distribution of the laser beam irradiance and the results show that substantial power losses (10%-80%) occur from the beam periphery limiting length of a filament. It was also shown that generally accepted concept of self-focusing critical power is inconsistent with consideration of self-induced refraction of spatially distributed laser beam. A new criterion for self-focusing and hypothesis for multiple filamentation are proposed.

  8. Beam losses due to the foil scattering for CSNS/RCS

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shou-Yan

    2012-01-01

    For the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS/RCS), the stripping foil scattering generates the beam halo and gives rise to additional beam losses during the injection process. The interaction between the proton beam and the stripping foil was discussed and the foil scattering was studied. A simple model and the realistic situation of the foil scattering were considered. By using the codes ORBIT and FLUKA, the multi-turn phase space painting injection process with the stripping foil scattering for CSNS/RCS was simulated and the beam losses due to the foil scattering were obtained.

  9. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2017-02-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A dedicated pixelated luminosity detector measures coincidences in several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at a luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point. The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two-pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cherenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fuzed quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules with high bandwidth digitizers developed in both VME and microTCA standards for per bunch beam measurements and gain monitoring. All new and upgraded sub-detectors have been taking data from the first day of LHC operation in April 2015. Results on their commissioning and essential characteristics using data since the start-up of LHC will be presented.

  10. Characterization of a wide dynamic-range, radiation-tolerant charge-digitizer asic for monitoring of Beam losses

    CERN Document Server

    Guido Venturini, G G; Dehning, B; Kayal, M

    2012-01-01

    An Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) has been designed and fabricated to provide a compact solution to digitize current signals from ionization chambers and diamond detectors, employed as beam loss monitors at CERN and several other high energy physics facilities. The circuit topology has been devised to accept positive and negative currents, to have a wide dynamic range (above 120 dB), withstand radiation levels over 10 Mrad and offer different modes of operation, covering a broad range of applications. Furthermore, an internal conversion reference is employed in the digitization, to provide an accurate absolute measurement. This paper discusses the detailed characterization of the first prototype: linearity, radiation tolerance and temperature dependence of the conversion, as well as implications and system-level considerations regarding its use for beam instrumentation applications in a high energy physics facility.

  11. Measurements of Variable-Shaped Electron Beams with Solid-State Detector and Scattering Aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Makoto; Ohta, Hiroya; Kanosue, Tadashi; Sohda, Yasunari; Ban, Naoma

    2007-09-01

    A highly accurate method for measuring beam properties in a variable-shaped electron beam (VSB) system has been developed. This method is based on a knife-edge method with a solid-state detector (SSD) and scattering apertures. In VSB system, it is necessary to measure both beam profile and beam position for a long time. To meet this requirement, many aperture marks on a silicon membrane were prepared in a measurement unit. Using this unit, the accuracy and stability of beam-size and beam position measurements were evaluated in VBS system (HL-7000D, Hitachi-HITEC). As a result, the repeatability error for beam size was obtained to be smaller than 2 nm (3σ) and the repeatability error for beam position was obtained to be 0.82 nm (3σ). Moreover, a multitude of repeat experiments showed that this measurement unit can be used for more than ten years. Consequently, it was confirmed that this measurement method is useful for the high accuracy of a VSB system.

  12. TCDQ-TCT retraction and losses during asynchronous beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Quaranta, Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the β* reach.

  13. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  14. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  15. Exact cone beam reconstruction formulae for functions and their gradients for spherical and flat detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2016-11-01

    We derive unified inversion formulae for the cone beam transform similar to the Radon transform. Reinterpreting Grangeat’s formula we find a relation between the Radon transform of the gradient of the searched-for function and a quantity computable from cone beam data. This gives a uniqueness result for the cone beam transform of compactly supported functions under much weaker assumptions than the Tuy-Kirillov condition. Furthermore this relation leads to an exact formula for the direct calculation of derivatives of the density distribution; but here, similar to the classical Radon transform, complete Radon data are needed, hence the Tuy-Kirillov condition has to be imposed. Numerical experiments reported in Hahn B N et al (2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 125601) indicate that these calculations are less corrupted by beam-hardening noise. Finally, we present flat detector versions for these results, which are mathematically less attractive but important for applications.

  16. Proposal for SPS beam time for the baby MIND and TASD neutrino detector prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Bross, A.; Cadoux, F.; Cervera, A.; Izmaylov, A.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karpikov, I.; Khabibulin, M.; Khotyantsev, A.; Kopylov, A.; Kudenko, Y.; Matev, R.; Mineev, O.; Musienko, Y.; Nessi, M.; Noah, E.; Rubbia, A.; Shaykiev, A.; Soler, P.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Yershov, N.

    2015-01-01

    The design, construction and testing of neutrino detector prototypes at CERN are ongoing activities. This document reports on the design of solid state baby MIND and TASD detector prototypes and outlines requirements for a test beam at CERN to test these, tentatively planned on the H8 beamline in the North Area, which is equipped with a large aperture magnet. It is hoped that this will allow for the current proposal to be considered in light of the recently approved projects related to neutrino activities with the SPS in the North Area in the medium term 2015-2020.

  17. NA61/SHINE facility at the CERN SPS: beams and detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgrall, N.; Andreeva, O.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bogusz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Christakoglou, P.; Cirkovic, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Ereditato, A.; Fabich, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Fulop, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Idczak, R.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Jokovic, D.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kielczewska, D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kiss, T.; Kleinfelder, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Koversarski, P.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; Laszlo, A.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Maletic, D.; Manglunki, D.; Manic, D.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Marin, V.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Messina, M.; Mrówczyński, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paul, T.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadala, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzovic, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Savic, M.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Sipos, R.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Sosin, Z.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Stroebele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tolyhi, T.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberic, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarz, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2014-06-01

    NA61/SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) is a multi-purpose experimental facility to study hadron production in hadron-proton, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. It recorded the first physics data with hadron beams in 2009 and with ion beams (secondary 7Be beams) in 2011. NA61/SHINE has greatly profited from the long development of the CERN proton and ion sources and the accelerator chain as well as the H2 beamline of the CERN North Area. The latter has recently been modified to also serve as a fragment separator as needed to produce the Be beams for NA61/SHINE. Numerous components of the NA61/SHINE set-up were inherited from its predecessors, in particular, the last one, the NA49 experiment. Important new detectors and upgrades of the legacy equipment were introduced by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration. This paper describes the state of the NA61/SHINE facility — the beams and the detector system — before the CERN Long Shutdown I, which started in March 2013.

  18. A Triple-GEM Detector with Pixel Readout for High-Rate Beam Tracking in COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nagel, T; Haas, F; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Krämer, M; Mann, A; Paul, S

    2008-01-01

    For its physics program with a high-intensity hadron beam of $2 · 10^{7}$ particles/s, the COMPASS experiment at CERN requires tracking of charged particles scattered by very small angles with respect to the incident beam direction. While good resolution in time and space is mandatory, the challenge is imposed by the high beam intensity, requiring radiation-hard detectors which add very little material to the beam path in order to minimise secondary interactions. To this end, a set of triple-GEM detectors with pixel readout in the beam region and 2-D strip readout in the periphery is currently being built. The pixel size has been chosen to be 1×1 mm2, which constitutes a compromise between the spatial resolution achievable and the number of readout channels. Surrounding the pixel area, a 2-D strip readout with a pitch of 400 μm has been realised on the same printed circuit foil. In total an active area of 10 × 10 cm2 is covered using 2048 readout channels. Analogue readout by the APV25 ASIC has been chose...

  19. NA61/SHINE facility at the CERN SPS: beams and detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Aduszkiewicz, A; Ali, Y; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Baatar, B; Bay, F; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Bogomilov, M; Bogusz, M; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bunyatov, S A; Christakoglou, P; Czopowicz, T; Davis, N; Debieux, S; Dembinski, H; Diakonos, F; Di Luise, S; Dominik, W; Drozhzhova, T; Dumarchez, J; Dynowski, K; Engel, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Ereditato, A; Fabich, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Fulop, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Haesler, A; Hasegawa, T; Hierholzer, M; Idczak, R; Igolkin, S; Ivashkin, A; Jokovic, D; Kadija, K; Kapoyannis, A; Kaptur, E; Kielczewska, D; Kirejczyk, M; Kisiel, J; Kiss, T; Kleinfelder, S; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kondratiev, V P; Korzenev, A; Koversarski, P; Kowalski, S; Krasnoperov, A; Kurepin, A; Larsen, D; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M; Majka, Z; Maksiak, B; Malakhov, A I; Maletic, D; Manglunki, D; Manic, D; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Marin, V; Marton, K; Mathes, H J; Matulewicz, T; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Messina, M; Mrowczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Paul, T; Peryt, W; Petukhov, O; Pistillo, C; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Pulawski, S; Puzovic, J; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Redij, A; Renfordt, R; Richter-Was, E; Robert, A; Rohrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rustamov, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovsky, A; Sakashita, K; Savic, M; Schmidt, K; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Sgalaberna, D; Shibata, M; Sipos, R; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sosin, Z; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Stroebele, H; Susa, T; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Tereshchenko, V; Tolyhi, T; Tsenov, R; Turko, L; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Veberic, D; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Vinogradov, L; Wilczek, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek-Szwarz, A; Wyszynski, O; Zambelli, L; Zipper, W

    2014-01-01

    NA61/SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) is a multi-purpose experimental facility to study hadron production in hadron-proton, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. It recorded the first physics data with hadron beams in 2009 and with ion beams (secondary 7Be beams) in 2011. NA61/SHINE has greatly profited from the long development of the CERN proton and ion sources and the accelerator chain as well as the H2 beamline of the CERN North Area. The latter has recently been modified to also serve as a fragment separator as needed to produce the Be beams for NA61/SHINE. Numerous components of the NA61/SHINE set-up were inherited from its predecessors, in particular, the last one, the NA49 experiment. Important new detectors and upgrades of the legacy equipment were introduced by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration. This paper describes the state of the NA61/SHINE facility - the beams and the detector system - before the CERN Long Shutdown I, which started in March ...

  20. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebel, O.; Braibant, S.; de Jong, S. J.; Hammarström, R.; Hilgers, R.; Honma, A. K.; Jovanovic, P.; Lauber, J. A.; Neal, H. A.

    1998-02-01

    The radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector is described. This system was designed and implemented to measure the radiation dose over time scales varying from a millisecond to a year, and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation exceeds a given threshold in dose and in dose rate within a very small time interval. The system uses reverse-biased silicon diodes as sensitive elements and good stability is achieved by AC coupling of the amplifiers to the sensors.

  1. Studies on the Electron Reconstruction Efficiency for the Beam Calorimeter of an ILC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Novgorodova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    In this talk recent simulation results on the single high energy electron reconstruction with the Beam Calorimeter for the ILD detector are presented. Guinea Pig is used to generate the e+e- pair background and GEANT4 for the simulation of electron showers in the calorimeter. An algorithm was developed for the sHEe reconstruction on top of the large e+e- background. The efficiency of the sHEe reconstruction is estimated for the nominal and SB-2009 ILC beam parameters.

  2. Test beam Results of the Forward RPC Prototype Chamber for the CMS Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aftab, Zia; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Jan, J A; Khan, Mohammad Khalid; Solaija, Tariq

    2001-01-01

    A full size prototype of the second forward RPC station (RE2/2) for the CMS detector has been tested during the 2000 beam test. The prototype was exposed to high irradiation flux using the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) and the 200 GeV muon beam from X5 beamline. We have studied number of chamber parameters which are relevant for the trigger such as: time resolution, efficiency, cluster size and rate capability. We have used two different gas mixtures to understand the effect of SF6 on the efficiency plateau and the rate capability of the chamber. We have also studied the intrinsic chamber rate for different discrimination thresholds.

  3. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Measurement of the effect of Non Ionising Energy Losses on the leakage current of Silicon Drift Detector prototypes for the LOFT satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Del Monte, E; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Azzarello, P; Bozzo, E; Campana, R; Diebold, S; Evangelista, Y; Perinati, E; Feroci, M; Pohl, M; Vacchi, A

    2014-01-01

    The silicon drift detectors are at the basis of the instrumentation aboard the {Large Observatory For x-ray Timing} (LOFT) satellite mission, which underwent a three year assessment phase within the "Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025" long-term science plan of the European Space Agency. Silicon detectors are especially sensitive to the displacement damage, produced by the non ionising energy losses of charged and neutral particles, leading to an increase of the device leakage current and thus worsening the spectral resolution. During the LOFT assessment phase, we irradiated two silicon drift detectors with a proton beam at the Proton Irradiation Facility in the accelerator of the Paul Scherrer Institute and we measured the increase in leakage current. In this paper we report the results of the irradiation and we discuss the impact of the radiation damage on the LOFT scientific performance.

  5. Observation of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Michael, D G; Alexopoulos, T; Allison, W W M; Alner, G J; Anderson, K; Andreopoulos, C; Andrews, M; Andrews, R; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Arroyo, C; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barker, M A; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bocean, V; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Boyd, S; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Byon-Wagner, A; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Chase, T R; Cherdack, D; Chernichenko, S K; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Cossairt, J D; Courant, H; Crane, D A; Culling, A J; Dawson, J W; De Jong, J K; De Muth, D M; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drake, G; Drakoulakos, D; Ducar, R; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Fackler, O D; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Felt, N; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gebhard, M; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gornushkin, Yu; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E; Grossman, N; Grudzinski, J J; Grzelak, K; Guarino, V; Habig, A; Halsall, R; Hanson, J; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Hill, N; Ho, Y; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Ignatenko, M A; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M; Kilmer, J; Kim, H; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kostin, M; Kotelnikov, S K; Krakauer, D A; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Ladran, A S; Lang, K; Laughton, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Lee, W Y; Libkind, M A; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Longley, N P; Lucas, P; Luebke, W; Madani, S; Maher, E; Makeev, V; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McDonald, J; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morf, J; Morse, R; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Murtagh, M J; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, C; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nezrick, F A; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, J; Oliver, W P; Onuchin, V A; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovich, Z; Pearce, G F; Pearson, N; Peck, C W; Perry, C; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Pla-Dalmau, A; Plunkett, R K; Price, L E; Proga, M; Pushka, D R; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Read, A L; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schoessow, P V; Schreiner, P; Schwienhorst, R; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Shield, P D; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, A V; Smith, C; Smith, P N; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Stefanik, A; Sullivan, P; Swan, J M; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trendler, R; Trevor, J; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G S; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Vakili, M; Vaziri, K; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Wai, L; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; White, R F; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yan, W G; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Yun, J C; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2006-01-01

    This letter reports results from the MINOS experiment based on its initial exposure to neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI beam. The rate and energy spectra of charged current muon neutrino interactions are compared in two detectors located along the beam axis at distances of 1 km and 735 km. With 1.27 x 10^{20} 120 GeV protons incident on the NuMI target, 215 events with energies below 30 GeV are observed at the Far Detector, compared to an expectation of 336 \\pm 14.4 events. The data are consistent with muon neutrino disappearance via oscillation with |\\Delta m^2_{23}| = 2.74^{+0.44}_{-0.26} x 10^{-3} eV^2/c^4 and sin^2(2\\theta_{23}) > 0.87 (at 60% C.L.).

  6. Observation of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, D.G.; /Caltech; Adamson, P.; Alexopoulos, T.; Allison, W.W.M.; Alner, G.J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; /Argonne /Athens U. /Benedictine U. /Brookhaven /Caltech /Cambridge U. /Campinas State U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /APC, Paris /Columbia U. /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    This letter reports results from the MINOS experiment based on its initial exposure to neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI beam. The rates and energy spectra of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions are compared in two detectors located along the beam axis at distances of 1 km and 735 km. With 1.27 x 10{sup 20} 120GeV protons incident on the NuMI target, 215 events with energies below 30GeV are observed at the Far Detector, compared to an expectation of 336 {+-} 14.4 events. The data are consistent with {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance via oscillations with |{Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}| = 2.74{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 23}) > 0.87 (68% C.L.).

  7. Observation of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors in the NuMI neutrino beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, D G; Adamson, P; Alexopoulos, T; Allison, W W M; Alner, G J; Anderson, K; Andreopoulos, C; Andrews, M; Andrews, R; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Arroyo, C; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barker, M A; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bocean, V; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Boyd, S; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Byon-Wagner, A; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Chase, T R; Cherdack, D; Chernichenko, S K; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Cossairt, J D; Courant, H; Crane, D A; Culling, A J; Dawson, J W; de Jong, J K; DeMuth, D M; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drake, G; Drakoulakos, D; Ducar, R; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Fackler, O D; Falk Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Felt, N; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gebhard, M; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gornushkin, Yu; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E; Grossman, N; Grudzinski, J J; Grzelak, K; Guarino, V; Habig, A; Halsall, R; Hanson, J; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Hill, N; Ho, Y; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Ignatenko, M; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M S; Kilmer, J; Kim, H; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kostin, M; Kotelnikov, S K; Krakauer, D A; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Ladran, A S; Lang, K; Laughton, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Lee, W Y; Libkind, M A; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Longley, N P; Lucas, P; Luebke, W; Madani, S; Maher, E; Makeev, V; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McDonald, J; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Morse, R; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Murtagh, M J; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, C; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nezrick, F; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, J; Oliver, W P; Onuchin, V A; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pearce, G F; Pearson, N; Peck, C W; Perry, C; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Pla-Dalmau, A; Plunkett, R K; Price, L E; Proga, M; Pushka, D R; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Read, A L; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schoessow, P V; Schreiner, P; Schwienhorst, R; Semenov, V K; Seun, S-M; Shanahan, P; Shield, P D; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Smith, P N; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Stefanik, A; Sullivan, P; Swan, J M; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Terekhov, A; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trendler, R; Trevor, J; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Vakili, M; Vaziri, K; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Wai, L; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; White, R F; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yan, W G; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Yun, J C; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2006-11-10

    This Letter reports results from the MINOS experiment based on its initial exposure to neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI beam. The rates and energy spectra of charged current nu(mu) interactions are compared in two detectors located along the beam axis at distances of 1 and 735 km. With 1.27 x 10(20) 120 GeV protons incident on the NuMI target, 215 events with energies below 30 GeV are observed at the Far Detector, compared to an expectation of 336+/-14 events. The data are consistent with nu(mu) disappearance via oscillations with |Delta(m)2/32|=2.74 +0.44/-0.26 x10(-3)eV(2) and sin(2)(2theta(23))>0.87 (68% C.L.).

  8. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-07-02

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  9. Enabling High Fidelity Measurements of Energy and Pitch Angle for Escaping Energetic Ions with a Fast Ion Loss Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, R.; Pace, D. C.; Marcy, G. R.; Taussig, D.

    2016-10-01

    Energetic ion losses must be minimized in burning plasmas to maintain fusion power, and existing tokamaks provide access to energetic ion parameter regimes that are relevant to burning machines. A new Fast Ion Loss Detector (FILD) probe on the DIII-D tokamak has been optimized to resolve beam ion losses across a range of 30 - 90 keV in energy and 40° to 80° in pitch angle, thereby providing valuable measurements during many different experiments. The FILD is a magnetic spectrometer; once inserted into the tokamak, the magnetic field allows energetic ions to pass through a collimating aperture and strike a scintillator plate that is imaged by a wide view camera and narrow view photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The design involves calculating scintillator strike patterns while varying probe geometry. Calculated scintillator patterns are then used to design an optical system that allows adjustment of the focus regions for the 1 MS/s resolved PMTs. A synthetic diagnostic will be used to determine the energy and pitch angle resolution that can be attained in DIII-D experiments. Work supported in part by US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  10. IBIC characterization of an ion-beam-micromachined multi-electrode diamond detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forneris, J., E-mail: forneris@to.infn.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro di Eccellenza NIS, INFN, sez. Torino, CNISM, sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Grilj, V.; Jakšić, M. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Lo Giudice, A.; Olivero, P.; Picollo, F. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro di Eccellenza NIS, INFN, sez. Torino, CNISM, sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Skukan, N. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Vittone, E. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro di Eccellenza NIS, INFN, sez. Torino, CNISM, sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Deep Ion Beam Lithography (DIBL) has been used for the direct writing of buried graphitic regions in monocrystalline diamond with micrometric resolution. As part of the development and the characterization of a fully ion-beam-micromachined solid-state ionization chamber, a device with interdigitated electrodes was fabricated by using a 1.8 MeV He{sup +} ion microbeam, which scanned a 40 μm thick homoepitaxial detector grade diamond sample grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In order to evaluate the ionizing-radiation-detection performance of the device, charge collection efficiency (CCE) maps were extracted from Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out by probing different arrangements of buried micro-electrodes. The analysis of the CCE maps allowed an exhaustive evaluation of the detector features, in particular the individuation of the different role played by electrons and holes in the formation of the induced charge pulses. Finally, a comparison of the performances of the detector with buried graphitic electrodes with those relevant to conventional metallic surface electrodes evidenced the formation of a dead layer overlying the buried electrodes as a result of the fabrication process.

  11. Development of a multi-detector and a systematic imaging system on the AGLAE external beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, L., E-mail: laurent.pichon@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Moignard, B.; Lemasson, Q.; Pacheco, C. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Walter, P. [Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS-UMR 8220, Laboratoire d’archéologie moléculaire et structurale, LAMS, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-01-01

    The New AGLAE external beamline provides analytical data for the understanding of the structure of archaeological and artistic objects, their composition, properties, and changes over time. One of the objectives of this project is to design and set up a new non-invasive acquisition system increasing the quality of the X-ray spectra and reducing the beam current on sensitive materials from work of art. To that end, the surface and the number of PIXE detectors have been increased to implement a cluster of SDD detectors. This can also provide the possibility to accomplish large and/or fast maps on artifacts with a scanning of the beam on the sample. During the mapping, a multi-parameter system saves each event from X-ray, gamma and particle detectors, simultaneously with the X and Y positions of the beam on the sample. To process the data, different softwares have been developed or updated. A first example on a decorated medieval shard highlights the perspectives of the technique.

  12. Test beam results on single-sided irradiated silicon microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Azzi, Patrizia; Bisello, Dario; Busetto, Giovanni; Castro, Andrea; Loreti, Maurizio; Martignon, G; Pantano, Devis; Stavitski, I

    1999-01-01

    Test beam results on irradiated AC-coupled, poly biased, single sided ( P+/N bulk) silicon microstrip detectors are presented. Detectors were fabricated at SINTEF ( Oslo, Norway); they have 128 strips, strip pitch of 50um, strip width of 12.5um and length of 5.5 cm. Neutron doses were 1*10^13 and 3.6*10^13 n/cm^2 and we estimated the gamma dose from the neutron irradiation facility background to be enough to induce full saturation in the oxide trapped charge value. Reverse-annealing processes were accelerated via heat treatment to ensure stable operational depletion and leakage current values during data taking. Three modules were contructed, one for each value of neutron dose, and one with non irradiated detectors using two crystals bonded together to form a 11cm long readout unit for each of the modules. Data was taken at room temperature using the CERN 120 GeV pion beam at X7 for different beam angle of incidence ( 0, 20, 35) as a function of Vbias up to values of 330V. For the most irradiated module we al...

  13. Charge collection mapping of a novel ultra-thin silicon strip detector for hadrontherapy beam monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouterfa, Mohamed, E-mail: mohamed.bouterfa@uclouvain.be [ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Alexandre, Geoffrey; Cortina Gil, Eduardo [IRPM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Flandre, Denis [ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-12-21

    In precise hadrontherapy treatments, the particle beam must be monitored in real time without being degraded. Silicon strip detectors have been fabricated over an area as large as 4.5×4.5 cm{sup 2} with ultra low thickness of 20μm. These offer the following considerable advantages: significantly reduced beam scattering, higher radiation hardness which leads to improved detector lifetime, and much better collection efficiency. In a previous work, the novel sensor has been described and a global macroscopic dosimetry characterization has been proposed. This provides practical information for the detector daily use but not about the local microscopic knowledge of the sensor. This work therefore presents a micrometric-accuracy charge-collection characterization of this new generation of ultra-thin silicon strip detectors. This goal is reached thanks to a 1060 nm-wavelength micrometric-sized laser that can be positioned relatively to the sensor with a submicron precision for the three different axes. This study gives a much better knowledge of the inefficient areas of the sensor and allows therefore optimization for future designs.

  14. Charge collection mapping of a novel ultra-thin silicon strip detector for hadrontherapy beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouterfa, Mohamed; Alexandre, Geoffrey; Cortina Gil, Eduardo; Flandre, Denis

    2013-12-01

    In precise hadrontherapy treatments, the particle beam must be monitored in real time without being degraded. Silicon strip detectors have been fabricated over an area as large as 4.5×4.5 cm2 with ultra low thickness of 20 μm. These offer the following considerable advantages: significantly reduced beam scattering, higher radiation hardness which leads to improved detector lifetime, and much better collection efficiency. In a previous work, the novel sensor has been described and a global macroscopic dosimetry characterization has been proposed. This provides practical information for the detector daily use but not about the local microscopic knowledge of the sensor. This work therefore presents a micrometric-accuracy charge-collection characterization of this new generation of ultra-thin silicon strip detectors. This goal is reached thanks to a 1060 nm-wavelength micrometric-sized laser that can be positioned relatively to the sensor with a submicron precision for the three different axes. This study gives a much better knowledge of the inefficient areas of the sensor and allows therefore optimization for future designs.

  15. Edge sensitivity of “edgeless” silicon pad detectors measured in a high-energy beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2005-09-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in “edgeless” planar silicon pad diode detectors. The edgeless side of these rectangular diodes is formed by a cut and break through the contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of this device above the full depletion voltage, but we have shown that the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at a low temperature. A pair of these edgeless silicon diode pad sensors was exposed to the X5 high-energy pion beam at CERN, to determine the edge sensitivity. The signal of the detector pair triggered a reference telescope made of silicon microstrip detector modules. The gap width between the edgeless sensors, determined using the tracks measured by the reference telescope, was then compared with the results of precision metrology. It was concluded that the depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is compatible with zero within the statistical precision of ±8 μm and systematic error of ±6 μm.

  16. Development of the microstrip silicon detector for imaging of fast processes at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulchenko, V.; Pruuel, E.; Shekhtman, L.; Ten, K.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-02-01

    In situ imaging of explosions allows to study material properties under very high pressures and temperatures. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is a powerful tool for such studies because of its unique time structure. Flashes of X-rays from individual bunches in a storage ring are so short that an object under study does not move more than 1-10 μm during exposure. If a detector is able to store images synchronously with bunches of an SR source the time resolution of such method will be determined by the duration of SR flash from individual bunch. New beam line at the VEPP-4M storage ring will allow to get X-Ray flux from each bunch close to 106 photons/channel where channel area is 0.05×0.5 mm2 and average beam energy is about 30 keV. Bunches in the machine can be grouped into trains with 20 ns time gap. In order to meet these requirements a new detector development was started based on Si microstrip technology. The detector with a new dedicated front-end chip will be able to record images with maximum signal equivalent to 106 photons/channel, with signal to noise ratio of ∼103, spatial resolution of 50 μm and maximum frame rate of 50 MHz. The detector has to drive very high peak and average currents without affecting the front-end chip, therefore a specific design of Si sensor should be developed. The front-end chip has to provide signal measurements with the dynamic range of about 104 or more and recording of the signal to an analogue memory with the rate of 50 MHz. The concept of such detector is discussed in the paper. The results of the simulations of the main detector parameters and the results of the first measurements with the prototype sensors are presented.

  17. An FPGA Based Implementation for Real-Time Processing of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System's Data

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Emery, J; Ferioli, G; Zamantzas, C

    2006-01-01

    The strategy for machine protection and quench prevention of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is mainly based on the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system. At each turn, there will be several thousands of data to record and process in order to decide if the beams should be permitted to continue circulating or their safe extraction is necessary to be triggered. The processing involves a proper analysis of the loss pattern in time and for the decision the energy of the beam needs to be accounted. This complexity needs to be minimized by all means to maximize the reliability of the BLM system and allow a feasible implementation. In this paper, a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based implementation is explored for the real-time processing of the LHC BLM data. It gives emphasis on the highly efficient Successive Running Sums (SRS) technique used that allows many and long integration periods to be maintained for each detector's data with relatively small leng...

  18. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, Gianluca; Santoni, C

    2004-01-01

    The employment of superconducting magnets, in the high energies colliders, opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standar...

  19. KEKB Beam Collision Stability at the Picosecond Timing and Micron Position Resolution as observed with the Belle Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kichimi, H; Uehara, S; Nakao, M; Akai, K; Ieiri, T; Tobiyama, M; Jones, M D; Peters, M W; Varner, G S; Browder, T E

    2010-01-01

    Using the Belle detector we study the characteristics of beam collisions at the KEKB 3.5 GeV $e^+$ on 8 GeV $e^-$ asymmetric energy collider. We investigate the collision timing {\\tip} and its $z$-coordinate along the beam axis {\\zip} as a function of the position of the colliding bunch in a beam train. The various {\\tip} and {\\zip} behaviors observed by Belle are attributed to beam loading effects in the radio frequency cavities that accelerate the beams with a beam abort gap. We report these results in detail and discuss the prospects for the SuperKEKB collider.

  20. KEKB beam collision stability at the picosecond timing and micron position resolution as observed with the Belle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichimi, H.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Nakao, M.; Akai, K.; Ieiri, T.; Tobiyama, M.; Jones, M. D.; Peters, M. W.; Varner, G. S.; Browder, T. E.

    2010-03-01

    Using the Belle detector we study the characteristics of beam collisions at the KEKB 3.5 GeV e+ on 8 GeV e- asymmetric energy collider. We investigate the collision timing tIP and its z-coordinate along the beam axis zIP as a function of the position of the colliding bunch in a beam train. The various tIP and zIP behaviors observed by Belle are attributed to beam loading effects in the radio frequency cavities that accelerate the beams with a beam abort gap. We report these results in detail and discuss the prospects for the SuperKEKB collider.

  1. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm-2s-1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  2. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  3. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Crandall, K.R. [TECHSOURCE, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  4. Data evaluation and CNGS beam localization with the precision tracker of the OPERA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, D.

    2007-04-15

    In this diploma thesis, the data evaluation for the OPERA precision tracker is presented. Furthermore investigations of a precise CNGS beam localization with the precision tracker are performed. After an overview of past and present developments in neutrino physics, the OPERA detector is presented in this thesis. Emphasis is given to the precision tracker which has been partly commissioned in the end of the last year. A first analysis of the functionality with cosmic muons has been performed, as well as the inclusion of data in the OPERA software framework. Within this thesis some useful tools have been developed which are also presented. Finally, divergence effects from the nominal beam line of the CNGS neutrino beam and possible detection with the precision tracker are studied. (orig.)

  5. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097, USA and Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 and the Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) of the Technical Design Report (TDR) (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  6. Determination of internal-target thickness and experimental luminosity from beam energy loss at HIRFL-CSRe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Cao-Jie; Yu, De-Yang; Lu, Rong-Chun; Zhao, Tie-Cheng; Mao, Rui-Shi; Li, Jie; Xue, Ying-Li; Wang, Wei; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Ming-Wu; Liu, Jun-Liang; Song, Zhang-Yong; Cai, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Xi-Meng; Yin, Da-Yu; Mao, Li-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, You-Jin

    2016-11-01

    The target thickness for nitrogen was determined from the beam energy loss in HIRFL-CSRe during the experimental study of the K-REC process in 197 MeV/u Xe54+-N2 collisions. Furthermore, the corresponding integrated luminosity of (1.15±0.06) × 1030 cm-2 was obtained. As an independent check on the energy-loss method, we have also determined the integrated luminosity by measuring the produced X-rays from the K-REC process with a known differential cross section. The values of (1.12±0.06) × 1030 and (1.09±0.06) × 1030 cm-2 were obtained by using two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors which were oriented at 90° and 120° with respect to the beam path, respectively. The consistent results confirmed the feasibility of the energy-loss method, which may have an important impact on future internal target experiments at HIRFL-CSRe. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179017, 11105201, U1532130, and U1332206)

  7. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, Gianluca; Santoni, C

    2005-01-01

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data...

  8. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Baumbaugh, A; Brown, B C; Capista, D; Drennan, C; Fellenz, B; Knickerbocker, K; Lewis, J D; Marchionni, A; Needles, C; Olson, M; Pordes, S; Shi, Z; Still, D; Thurman-Keup, R; Utes, M; Wu, J

    2011-01-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and...

  9. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  10. LHC magnet quench test with beam loss generated by wire scan

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Dehning, B; Emery, j; Ferrari, A; Guerrero, A; Holzer, E B; Koujili, M; Lechner, A; Nebot, E; Scheubel, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Wenninger, J

    2011-01-01

    Beam losses with millisecond duration have been observed in the LHC in 2010 and 2011. They are thought to be provoked by dust particles falling into the beam. These losses could compromise the LHC availability if they provoke quenches of superconducting magnets. In order to investigate the quench limits for this loss mechanism, a quench test using a wire scanner has been performed, with the wire movement through the beam mimicking a loss with similar spatial and temporal distribution as in the case of dust particles. This paper will show the conclusions reached for millisecond-duration dust-provoked quench limits. It will include details on the maximum energy deposited in the coil as estimated using FLUKA code, showing a reasonable agreement with quench limit estimated from the heat transfer code QP3. In addition, information on the damage limit for carbon wires in proton beamswill be presented, following electronmicroscope analysis which revealed strong wire sublimation.

  11. Design of dual Beam multi-wavelength UV-visible absorbance detectors based on CCD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shuang; TANG Zhen-an; LI Tong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Because the general multi-wavelength UV-Visible absorbance detector cannot avoid the noise and drift resulting from the intensity fluctuation of the light source,a dual beam multi-wavelength UV-Visible detector based on CCD was designed.The ray of light source is divided into a signal ray and a reference ray by the beam splitter after it passes through the chopper.The signal ray shines into the sample cell.The signal ray passing through the sample cell falls onto a concave mirror which focuses it onto a slot that is imaged on one portion of CCD by a concave grating.The reference ray is imaged on the other portion of CCD by the concave grating after the slot.The signal spectrum,the reference spectrum and the dark current of CCD can be measured on the same CCD under the cooperation of the optical system and accessorial circuits.The real-time compensation for the signal spectrum by using the reference spectrum and the dark current of CCD can effectively depress the noise and drift of the detector.The short-term noise is 10-5AU and the drift is 10-4AU/h.

  12. MINERvA neutrino detector response measured with test beam data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, L. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Altinok, O. [Physics Department, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Araujo Del Castillo, C. [Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima (Peru); Bagby, L.; Bellantoni, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bergan, W.F. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Bodek, A.; Bradford, R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Bravar, A. [University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Budd, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Butkevich, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martinez Caicedo, D.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Carneiro, M.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Christy, M.E. [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Chvojka, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Motta, H. da [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Devan, J. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); and others

    2015-07-21

    The MINERvA collaboration operated a scaled-down replica of thesolid scintillator tracking and sampling calorimeter regions of the MINERvA detector in a hadron test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. This paper reports measurements with samples of protons, pions, and electrons from 0.35 to 2.0 GeV/c momentum. The calorimetric response to protons, pions, and electrons is obtained from these data. A measurement of the parameter in Birks' law and an estimate of the tracking efficiency are extracted from the proton sample. Overall the data are well described by a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector and particle interactions with agreements better than 4% for the calorimetric response, though some features of the data are not precisely modeled. These measurements are used to tune the MINERvA detector simulation and evaluate systematic uncertainties in support of the MINERvA neutrino cross-section measurement program.

  13. Dosimetric characteristics of four PTW microDiamond detectors in high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolat, F.; De Marzi, L.; Patriarca, A.; Nauraye, C.; Moignier, C.; Pomorski, M.; Moignau, F.; Heinrich, S.; Tromson, D.; Mazal, A.

    2016-09-01

    Small diamond detectors are useful for the dosimetry of high-energy proton beams. However, linear energy transfer (LET) dependence has been observed in the literature with such solid state detectors. A novel synthetic diamond detector has recently become commercially available from the manufacturer PTW-Freiburg (PTW microDiamond type 60019). This study was designed to thoroughly characterize four microDiamond detectors in clinical proton beams, in order to investigate their response and their reproducibility in high LET regions. Very good dosimetric characteristics were observed for two of them, with good stability of their response (deviation less than 0.4% after a pre-irradiation dose of approximately 12 Gy), good repeatability (coefficient of variation of 0.06%) and a sensitivity of approximately 0.85 nC Gy-1. A negligible dose rate dependence was also observed for these two microDiamonds with a deviation of the sensitivity less than 0.7% with respect to the one measured at the reference dose rate of 2.17 Gy min-1, in the investigated dose rate range from 1.01 Gy min-1 to 5.52 Gy min-1. Lateral dose profile measurements showed the high spatial resolution of the microDiamond oriented with its stem perpendicular to the beam axis and with its small sensitive thickness of about 1 μm in the scanning profile direction. Finally, no significant LET dependence was found with these two diamond dosimeters in comparison to a reference ionization chamber (model IBA PPC05). These good results were in accordance to the literature. However, this study showed also a non reproducibility between the devices in terms of stability, sensitivity and LET dependence, since the two other microDiamonds characterized in this work showed different dosimetric characteristics making them not suitable for proton beam dosimetry with a maximum difference of the peak-to-plateau ratio of 6.7% relative to the reference ionization chamber in a clinical 138 MeV proton beam.

  14. Incoherent vertical ion losses during multiturn stacking cooling beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syresin, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    The efficiency of the multiturn ion injection with electron cooling depends on two parameters, namely, cooling efficiency and ion lifetime. The lifetime of freshly injected ions is usually shorter than the lifetime of strongly cooled stacked ions. Freshly injected ions are lost in the vertical direction because the vertical acceptance of the synchrotron is usually a few times smaller than the horizontal acceptance. Incoherent vertical losses of freshly injected ions arise from their multiple scattering by residual gas atoms and transverse diffusion caused by stack noise. Reduced ion lifetime limits the multiturn injection efficiency. Analytical estimations and BETACOOL-based numerical evaluations of the vertical ion losses during multiturn injection are presented in comparison with the experimental data obtained at the HIMAC synchrotron and the S-LSR storage ring.

  15. Ion beam evaluation of silicon carbide membrane structures intended for particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallon, J., E-mail: jan.pallon@nuclear.lu.se [Division of Nuclear Physics, Physics Department, Lund University, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Syväjärvi, M. [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linköping (Sweden); Wang, Q. [Sensor System, ACREO Swedish ICT AB, Box 1070, SE-164 25 Kista (Sweden); Yakimova, R.; Iakimov, T. [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linköping (Sweden); Elfman, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Nilsson, E.J.C.; Ros, L. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Physics Department, Lund University, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    Thin ion transmission detectors can be used as a part of a telescope detector for mass and energy identification but also as a pre-cell detector in a microbeam system for studies of biological effects from single ion hits on individual living cells. We investigated a structure of graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) with the purpose to explore a thin transmission detector with a very low noise level and having mechanical strength to act as a vacuum window. In order to reach very deep cavities in the SiC wafers for the preparation of the membrane in the detector, we have studied the Inductive Coupled Plasma technique to etch deep circular cavities in 325 μm prototype samples. By a special high temperature process the outermost layers of the etched SiC wafers were converted into a highly conductive graphitic layer. The produced cavities were characterized by electron microscopy, optical microscopy and proton energy loss measurements. The average membrane thickness was found to be less than 40 μm, however, with a slightly curved profile. Small spots representing much thinner membrane were also observed and might have an origin in crystal defects or impurities. Proton energy loss measurement (also called Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy, STIM) is a well suited technique for this thickness range. This work presents the first steps of fabricating a membrane structure of SiC and graphene which may be an attractive approach as a detector due to the combined properties of SiC and graphene in a monolithic materials structure.

  16. Demonstration of low-loss electron beam transport and mm-wave experiments of the fusion-FEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, W. H.; Bongers, W. A.; van Dijk, G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; de Kruif, R.; Manintveld, P.; Pluygers, J.; Poelman, A. J.; Schüller, F. C.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Valentini, M.; van der Wiel, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    In the Fusion-FEM electrostatic Free Electron Maser, an electron beam loss current of less than 0.2% is essential for long-pulse operation. At reduced beam current, 3 A instead of the nominal 12 A, we have demonstrated electron beam acceleration and transport through the undulator at current losses

  17. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E.

    2003-09-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25∗25 cm2. The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification.

  18. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C.J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E

    2003-09-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25*25 cm{sup 2}. The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification.

  19. Beam profile investigation of the new collimator system for the J-PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kubicz, E; Wieczorek, A; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Mohammed, M; Moskal, I; Niedźwiecki, S; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Strzelecki, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zgardzińska, B; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) is a multi-purpose detector which will be used for search for discrete symmetries violations in the decays of positronium atoms and for investigations with positronium atoms in life-sciences and medical diagnostics. In this article we present three methods for determination of the beam profile of collimated annihilation gamma quanta. Precise monitoring of this profile is essential for time and energy calibration of the J-PET detector and for the determination of the library of model signals used in the hit-time and hit-position reconstruction. We have we have shown that usage of two lead bricks with dimensions of 5x10x20 cm^3 enables to form a beam of annihilation quanta with Gaussian profile characterized by 1 mm FWHM. Determination of this characteristic is essential for designing and construction the collimator system for the 24-module J-PET prototype. Simulations of the beam profile for different collimator dimensions were performed. This allowed us to choo...

  20. FNAL Proton Source High Intensity Operations and Beam Loss Control

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, F G

    2014-01-01

    The 40-year-old Fermilab Proton Source machines, constituted by the Pre-Injector, Linac and the synchrotron Booster, have been the workhorse of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). During this time, the High Energy Physics Program has demanded an increase in proton throughput, especially during the past decade with the beginning of the neutrino program at Fermilab. In order to achieve a successful program, major upgrades and changes were made in Booster. Once again, the Proton Source has been charged to double their beam throughput, while maintain the present residual activation levels, to meet the laboratory Intensity Frontier program goals until new machines are built and operational to replace the Proton Source machines. This paper discusses the present performance of Booster and the plans involved in reaching even higher intensities.

  1. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental shielding to the NSLS-II accelerators and

  2. GEANT4 simulation diagram showing the architecture of the ATLAS test line: the detectors are positioned to receive the beam from the SPS. A muon particle which enters the magnet and crosses all detectors is shown (blue line).

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GEANT4 simulation diagram showing the architecture of the ATLAS test line: the detectors are positioned to receive the beam from the SPS. A muon particle which enters the magnet and crosses all detectors is shown (blue line).

  3. Characterization of coplanar grid CZT detectors with highly collimated x-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Gabriella A.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Wright, Gomez W.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Siddons, D. P.; James, Ralph B.

    2004-10-01

    CdZnTe detectors demonstrated great potentials for detection of gamma radiation. However, energy resolution of CdZnTe detectors is significantly affected by uncollected holes which have low mobility and short lifetime. To overcome this deleterious effects upon energy resolution special detector designs have to be implemented. The most practical of them are the small pixel effect device, the co-planar grid device, and the virtual Frisch-grid device. We routinely use a highly collimated high-intensity X-ray beams provided by National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study of CdZnTe material and performances of the different types of devices on the micron-scale. This powerful tool allows us to evaluate electronic properties of the material, device performance, uniformity of the detector responses, effects related to the device's contact pattern and electric field distribution, etc. In particular, in this paper we present new results obtained from the performance studies of 15 x 15 x 7.5 mm3 coplanar-grid devices coupled to readout ASIC. We observed the effect of the strip contacts comprising the grids on the energy resolution of the coplanar-grid device.

  4. Detector Response and Beam Line Transmission Measurements with Far-Infrared Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, O; Fröhlich, L

    2005-01-01

    Various activities at the TTF linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, that drives the VUV-FEL are geared towards measuring the longitudinal charge distribution of electron bunches with coherent far-infrared radiation. Examples are beam lines transporting synchrotron or transition radiation to interferometers mounted inside or outside the tunnel, and studies of single-shot grating spectrometers. All such approaches require a good understanding of the radiation generation and transport mechanism and of the detector characteristics to extract useful information on the charge distribution. Simulations and measurements of the expected transverse intensity distribution and polarization of synchrotron radiation emitted at the first bunch compressor of TTF have been performed. The transverse intensity scanning provided for the first time at DESY a visual image of the footprint of terahertz radiation. Detector response measurements have been performed at the FELIX facility, Netherlands, for wavelengths between 100-160 mi...

  5. Bringing the SciBar detector to the booster neutrino beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Alcaraz, J.; Andringa, S.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Catala, J.; Cervera, A.; Conrad, J.M.; Couce, E.; Dore, U.; Espinal, X.; Finley,; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ishii, T.; Jover, G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kurimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, Y.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona, IFAE /Tokyo

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the physics case for bringing SciBar, the fully active, finely segmented tracking detector at KEK, to the FNAL Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) line. This unique opportunity arose with the termination of K2K beam operations in 2005. At that time, the SciBar detector became available for use in other neutrino beam lines, including the BNB, which has been providing neutrinos to the MiniBooNE experiment since late 2002. The physics that can be done with SciBar/BNB can be put into three categories, each involving several measurements. First are neutrino cross section measurements which are interesting in their own right, including analyses of multi-particle final states, with unprecedented statistics. Second are measurements of processes that represent the signal and primary background channels for the upcoming T2K experiment. Third are measurements which improve existing or planned MiniBooNE analyses and the understanding of the BNB, both in neutrino and antineutrino mode. For each of these proposed measurements, the SciBar/BNB combination presents a unique opportunity or will significantly improve upon current or near-future experiments for several reasons. First, the fine granularity of SciBar allows detailed reconstruction of final states not possible with the MiniBooNE detector. Additionally, the BNB neutrino energy spectrum is a close match to the expected T2K energy spectrum in a region where cross sections are expected to vary dramatically with energy. As a result, the SciBar/BNB combination will provide cross-section measurements in an energy range complementary to MINERvA and complete the knowledge of neutrino cross sections over the entire energy range of interest to the upcoming off-axis experiments.

  6. Energy dependent charge spread function in a dedicated synchrotron beam pnCCD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Hazem

    2011-05-20

    A scan on the pixel edges is the method which is used to resolve the electron cloud size in the pixel array of the pnCCD detector. The EDR synchrotron radiation in BESSY is the source of the X-ray photons which are used in the scans. The radius of the electron cloud as a function of the impinging photon energy is analyzed. The angle of incidence of the X-ray beam is employed in the measurements. The measurements are validated by the numerical simulation models. The inclined X-ray track leads to distribute the electron clouds in a certain number of pixels according to the incident angle of the X-ray beam. The pixels detect different electron clouds according to their generation position in the detector bulk. A collimated X-ray beam of 12.14 keV is used in the measurements with 30 and 40 entrance angles. It is shown that the two factors that leads to expand the electron clouds namely the diffusion and the mutual electrostatic repulsion can be separated from the measured electron clouds. It is noticed as well that the influence of the mutual electrostatic repulsion dominates the cloud expansion over the diffusion process in the collection time of the detector. The perpendicular X-ray track leads to determine the average radius of the electron cloud per photon energy. The results show that the size of the electron clouds (RMS) in the energy range of [5.0-21.6] keV is smaller than the pixel size. (orig.)

  7. Study of Acquisition Electronics with a High Dynamic Range for a Beam Loss Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Venturini, G; Dehning, B; Effinger, E

    2010-01-01

    The particles accelerated in CERN accelerator chain reach high energies, topped by the particle energy at collision in the LHC, 7 GeV. During the operation, an amount of particles is inevitably lost from the beam. Depending on the extent of the losses, physical damage to machine components may be caused and the shower of secondary emission particles deposits energy in the surrounding equipment constituting the accelerator. The hadronic cascade also activates their materials, representing a hazard to the workers at CERN. In the LHC, the superconducting magnets that constitute the synchrotron lattice are kept at an operating temperature of 1:9K through a cryogenic facility employing superliquid helium, the increase in their temperature potentially initiates a quench. In the SPS, the damage due to a lost beam is also visible. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has been developed to reliably protect the machines composing CERN’s accelerator chain and additionally provide information about the beam status: th...

  8. Simulation of ion beam losses in LHC magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068843; Jowett, John M; Riklund, R

    2005-01-01

    At the particle physics laboratory CERN, the largest accelerator ever, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is under construction. In the LHC ultra relativistic particles, mainly protons but also lead ions, will be brought into collision. One problem that arises in the operation is that colliding ion beams in the machine have a very large cross section for electromagnetic interactions, in particular Bound Free Pair Production (BFPP). An electron-positron pair is created by the electromagnetic field between two colliding particles and the electron is created in a bound state of one of the ions. Because of this reaction the ion changes its charge and therefore leaves the wanted trajectory and crashes in a superconducting magnet, depositing heat. The impact of the wrongly charged ions on the inside of the vacuum pipe was simulated with the simulation program FLUKA. It was concluded that it is not likely that enough heat is deposited in the coils of the superconducting magnet to induce a quench, although some uncerta...

  9. Beam-loss-induced electrical stress test on CMS Silicon Strip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, M; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; MacPherson, A; Muller, T H; Weiler, T h

    2004-01-01

    Based on simulated LHC beam loss scenarios, fully depleted CMS silicon tracker modules and sensors were exposed to 42 ns-long beam spills of approximately 10**1**1 protons per spill at the PS at CERN. The ionisation dose was sufficient to short circuit the silicon sensors. The dynamic behaviour of bias voltage, leakage currents and voltages over coupling capacitors were monitored during the impact. Results of pre- and post-qualification as well as the dynamic behaviour are shown.

  10. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  11. First test beam results of prototype modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS strip tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is foreseen to be upgraded to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). This will result in higher particle rates and radiation doses. The ATLAS experiment plans to replace its inner tracking detector by a new all-silicon tracker which is based on the concept of modularity. For the new silicon strip tracker a large prototyping and evaluation campaign is ongoing. Many modules of different types were built and tested both in the laboratories and in test beams. In the following first results obtained in test beams are presented. Both mini and full-size modules for the central and forward regions were tested before and after irradiation to fluences as expected at the HL-LHC.

  12. Evaluation of source term induced by beam loss in the superconducting linear accelerator at RAON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Su Na; Nam, Shin Woo; Chung, Yon Sei [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    As a new world-class heavy ion accelerator, RAON is able to accelerate heavy ions from proton to uranium with the energy up to -400 MeV/u and produce rare isotopes. These high purity, high intensity, and high energy beams generate the various secondary radiation which will impact on the shielding aspects of the main linear accelerator tunnels. In the main tunnel the secondary neutrons are produced by uniform beam-loss or accident criteria. In this paper evaluations of several source terms induced by beam-loss will be discussed along with the physics model of the Monte Carlo simulation codes. The beam-loss criteria were tested for the evaluation of source term for the main beam line tunnel of the RAON accelerator. It was found that the amount of the secondary neutrons depends on the incident angle of projectile on the beam pipe and the mass and energy of projectile. The influence of selected physics models and libraries of MCNPX and PHITS has been examined. The secondary neutrons were produced most in the CEM and LAQGSM model.

  13. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R; Boccone, V; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cauchi, M; Cerutti, F; Deboy, D; Ferrari, A; Lari, L; Marsili, A; Mereghetti, A; Mirarchi, D; Quaranta, E; Redaelli, S; Robert-Demolaize, G; Rossi, A; Salvachua, B; Skordis, E; Tambasco, C; Valentino, G; Weiler, T; Vlachoudis, V; Wollmann, D

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010--2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5--4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An un-controlled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multi-stage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the co...

  14. In situ micro-focused X-ray beam characterization with a lensless camera using a hybrid pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachatkou, Anton, E-mail: anton.kachatkou@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Sackville Street Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Marchal, Julien [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Silfhout, Roelof van, E-mail: anton.kachatkou@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Sackville Street Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-04

    Position and size measurements of a micro-focused X-ray beam, using an X-ray beam imaging device based on a lensless camera that collects radiation scattered from a thin foil placed in the path of the beam at an oblique angle, are reported. Results of studies on micro-focused X-ray beam diagnostics using an X-ray beam imaging (XBI) instrument based on the idea of recording radiation scattered from a thin foil of a low-Z material with a lensless camera are reported. The XBI instrument captures magnified images of the scattering region within the foil as illuminated by the incident beam. These images contain information about beam size, beam position and beam intensity that is extracted during dedicated signal processing steps. In this work the use of the device with beams for which the beam size is significantly smaller than that of a single detector pixel is explored. The performance of the XBI device equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid pixel X-ray imaging sensor is analysed. Compared with traditional methods such as slit edge or wire scanners, the XBI micro-focused beam characterization is significantly faster and does not interfere with on-going experiments. The challenges associated with measuring micrometre-sized beams are described and ways of optimizing the resolution of beam position and size measurements of the XBI instrument are discussed.

  15. Beam test measurements with planar and 3D silicon strip detectors irradiated to sLHC fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Michael; Wiik, Liv; /Freiburg U.; Bates, Richard; /Glasgow U.; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; /INFN, Trento /Trento U.; Fleta, Celeste; /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron.; Harkonen, Jaakko; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, Karl; /Freiburg U.; Lozano, Manuel; /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron.; Maenpaa, Teppo; Moilanen, Henri; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Parkes, Chris; /Glasgow U. /Freiburg U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade of the CERN LHC to the super LHC (sLHC) requires investigation of new radiation hard tracking detectors. Compared to the LHC, tracking detectors must withstand a 5-10 times higher radiation fluence. Promising radiation hard options are planar silicon detectors with n-side readout and silicon detectors in 3D technology, where columnar electrodes are etched into the silicon substrate. This article presents beam test measurements per formed with planar and 3D n-in-p silicon strip detectors. The detectors were irradiated to different fluences, where the maximum fluence was 3 x 10{sup 15} 1 MeV neutron equivalent particles per square centimeter (n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}) for the planar detectors and 2 x 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} for the 3D detectors. In addition to signal measurements, charge sharing and resolution of both detector technologies are compared. An increased signal from the irradiated 3D detectors at high bias voltages compared to the signal from the unirradiated detector indicates that charge multiplication effects occur in the 3D detectors. At a bias voltage of 260 V, the 3D detector irradiated to 2 x 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} yields a signal almost twice as high as the signal of the unirradiated detector. Only 30% of the signal of an unirradiated detector could be measured with the planar detector irradiated to 3 x 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of 600 V, which was the highest bias voltage applied to this sensor.

  16. Propagation of Gaussian beam in longitudinally inhomogeneous nonlinear graded index waveguides with gain and losses

    CERN Document Server

    Yesayan, G L

    2001-01-01

    The equations for the width and curvature radius of the wave front for a Gaussian beam of light propagating along the axis of the longitudinally inhomogeneous graded index waveguide with gain and losses in the presence of third-order nonlinearity are obtained. By means of numerical calculations it is shown that in such waveguides the mode of stabilization of the beam width is possible, when the absorption of radiation on the edges of the beam compensates its spreading caused by the longitudinal inhomogeneity and nonlinearity of the waveguide

  17. Precision measurement of the neutrino velocity with the ICARUS detector in the CNGS beam

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M; Benetti, P.; Boffelli, F.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.G.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zani, A.; Zaremba, K.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Biagi, L.; Barzaghi, R.; Betti, B.; Bernier, L.G.; Cerretto, G.; de Gaetani, C.; Esteban, H.; Feldmann, T.; Gonzalez Cobas, J.D.; Passoni, D.; Pettiti, V.; Pinto, L.; Serrano, J.; Spinnato, P.; Visconti, M.G.; Wlostowski, T.

    2012-01-01

    During May 2012, the CERN-CNGS neutrino beam has been operated for two weeks for a total of 1.8 10^17 pot in bunched mode, with a 3 ns narrow width proton beam bunches, separated by 100 ns. This tightly bunched beam structure allows a very accurate time of flight measurement of neutrinos from CERN to LNGS on an event-by-event basis. Both the ICARUS-T600 PMT-DAQ and the CERN-LNGS timing synchronization have been substantially improved for this campaign, taking ad-vantage of additional independent GPS receivers, both at CERN and LNGS as well as of the deployment of the "White Rabbit" protocol both at CERN and LNGS. The ICARUS-T600 detector has collected 25 beam-associated events; the corresponding time of flight has been accurately evaluated, using all different time synchronization paths. The measured neutrino time of flight is compatible with the arrival of all events with speed equivalent to the one of light: the difference between the expected value based on the speed of light and the measured value is tof_...

  18. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the ICARUS detector at the CNGS beam

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Ceolin, M.Baldo; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Berzolari, A.Gigli; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Serrano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The CERN-SPS accelerator has been briefly operated in a new, lower intensity neutrino mode with ~10^12 p.o.t. /pulse and with a beam structure made of four LHC-like extractions, each with a narrow width of ~3 ns, separated by 524 ns. This very tightly bunched beam structure represents a substantial progress with respect to the ordinary operation of the CNGS beam, since it allows a very accurate time-of-flight measurement of neutrinos from CERN to LNGS on an event-to-event basis. The ICARUS T600 detector has collected 7 beam-associated events, consistent with the CNGS delivered neutrino flux of 2.2 10^16 p.o.t. and in agreement with the well known characteristics of neutrino events in the LAr-TPC. The time of flight difference between the speed of light and the arriving neutrino LAr-TPC events has been analysed. The result is compatible with the simultaneous arrival of all events with equal speed, the one of light. This is in a striking difference with the reported result of OPERA [1] that claimed that high en...

  19. Simulation of Heavy-Ion Beam Losses with the SixTrack-FLUKA Active Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal; Cerutti, Francesco; Ferrari, Alfredo; Jowett, John; Lechner, Anton; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Ortega, Pablo; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Skordis, Eleftherios; Valentino, Gianluca; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The LHC heavy-ion program aims to further increase the stored ion beam energy, putting high demands on the LHC collimation system. Accurate simulations of the ion collimation efficiency are crucial to validate the feasibility of new proposed configurations and beam parameters. In this paper we present a generalized framework of the SixTrack-FLUKA coupling to simulate the fragmentation of heavy-ions in the collimators and their motion in the LHC lattice. We compare heavy-ion loss maps simulated on the basis of this framework with the loss distributions measured during heavy-ion operation in 2011 and 2015.

  20. Low loss power splitter for antenna beam forming networks using probes in a waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Mikael; Mortensen, Mette Dahl

    1994-01-01

    The design of a low loss one-to-four power splitter suitable for beam forming networks in antenna arrays is presented. The power splitter is constructed of a shorted waveguide in which five coaxial probes are inserted. Methods for the design of the power splitter are presented together with an ex......The design of a low loss one-to-four power splitter suitable for beam forming networks in antenna arrays is presented. The power splitter is constructed of a shorted waveguide in which five coaxial probes are inserted. Methods for the design of the power splitter are presented together...

  1. Special diagnostic methods and beam loss control on high intensity proton synchrotrons and storage rings Circular proton accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Warsop, C M

    2002-01-01

    Two topics concerning high intensity, medium energy, circular proton accelerators have been studied: specialist diagnostics and beam loss control. The use of specially configured, low intensity diagnostic beams to help measure, understand and control high intensity beams is described. The ideas are developed and demonstrated on the ISIS 800 MeV, high intensity proton synchrotron at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. It is shown that these techniques make much new and valuable information available, which is particularly useful in achieving the precise beam optimisation required for low and controlled losses. Beam loss control in the proposed European Spallation Source (ESS) accumulator rings is studied. The expected losses are summarised, and a design for the beam collimation system presented. A new code for the simulation of loss control is outlined, and then used to test the collimation system under most foreseeable conditions. It is expected that the required loss control levels will be achievab...

  2. Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector and discusses methods to tag and remove background contaminated events in data. Trigger-rate based monitoring of beam-related backgrounds is presented. The correlations of backgrounds with machine conditions, such as residual pressure in the beam-pipe, are discussed. Results from dedicated beam-background simulations are shown, and their qualitative agreement with data is evaluated. Data taken during the passage of unpaired, i.e. non-colliding, proton bunches is used to obtain background-enriched data samples. These are used to identify characteristic features of beam-induced backgrounds, which then are exploited to develop dedicated background tagging tools. These tools, based on observables in the Pixel detector, the muon spectrometer and the calorimeters, are described in detail and their efficiencies are evaluated. Finally an example of an application of these techniques to a monojet analysis is given, which demonstra...

  3. The Evaluation of the Residual Dose Caused by the Large-Angle Foil Scattering Beam Loss for the High Intensity Beam Operation in the J-PARC RCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazami; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Saha, Pranab K.; Kinsho, Michikazu

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) has adopted the multi-turn charge-exchange injection scheme that uses H- beams. During injection, both the injected and circulating beams scatter from the charge-exchange foil. Therefore, the beam loss caused by the large-angle scattering from the foil occurs downstream of the injection point. For countermeasure against the uncontrolled beam loss, a new collimation system was developed and installed in the summer shutdown period in 2011. During beam commissioning, this uncontrolled beam loss was successfully localized for a 300 kW beam. Since the present target power of the RCS is 1 MW, the accurate simulation model to reproduce experimental results has been constructed in order to evaluate residual dose at higher power operation.

  4. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector of the AMS experiment: test beam results with a prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda, Luísa; Goncalves, Patrícia; Pereira, Rui

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the velocity and electric charge of the charged cosmic particles. This detector will contribute to the high level of redundancy required for AMS as well as to the rejection of albedo particles. Charge separation up to iron and a velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are expected. A RICH protoptype consisting of a detection matrix with 96 photomultiplier units, a segment of a conical mirror and samples of the radiator materials was built and its performance was evaluated. Results from the last test beam performed with ion fragments resulting from the collision of a 158 GeV/c/nucleon primary beam of indium ions (CERN SPS) on a lead target are reported. The large amount of collected data allowed to test and characterize different aerogel samples and the sodium fluoride radiator. In addition, the reflec...

  5. Fast IR Array Detector for Transverse Beam Diagnostics at DA{\\Phi}NE

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A; Clozza, A; Drago, A; Grilli, A; Marcelli, A; Raco, A; Sorchetti, R; Gambicorti, L; De Sio, A; Pace, E; Piotrowski, J

    2010-01-01

    At the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) an infrared (IR) array detector with fast response time has been built and assembled in order to collect the IR image of e-/e+ sources of the DA{\\Phi}NE collider. Such detector is made by 32 bilinear pixels with an individual size of 50x50 {\\mu}m2 and a response time of ~1 ns. In the framework of an experiment funded by the INFN Vth Committee dedicated to beam diagnostics, the device with its electronic board has been tested and installed on the DA{\\Phi}NE positron ring. A preliminary characterization of few pixels of the array and of the electronics has been carried out at the IR beamline SINBAD at DA{\\Phi}NE. In particular the detection of the IR source of the e- beam has been observed using four pixels of the array acquiring signals simultaneously with a four channels scope at 1 GHz and at 10 Gsamples/s. The acquisition of four pixels allowed monitoring in real time differences in the bunch signals in the vertical d...

  6. Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors in clinical photon beams using liquid water and PMMA phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, Luciana C., E-mail: lmatsushima@ipen.br [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Veneziani, Glauco R. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sakuraba, Roberto K. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Jose C. da [Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was the dosimetric evaluation of thermoluminescent detectors of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) produced by IPEN compared to the TL response of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti) dosimeters and microdosimeters produced by Harshaw Chemical Company to clinical photon beams dosimetry (6 and 15 MV) using liquid water and PMMA phantoms. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg,Ti and {mu}LiF:Mg,Ti. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clinical (6 and 15 MV) photon beams dosimetry using liquid water and PMMA phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear behavior to the dose range (0.1 to 5 Gy). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL response reproducibility better than {+-}4.34%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaSO{sub 4}:Dy represent a cheaper alternative to the TLD-100.

  7. Micro-strip metal foil detectors for the beam profile monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugatch, V.; Aushev, V.; Fedorovitch, O.; Mikhailenko, A.; Prystupa, S. [Pylypchenko, KINR, Kiev (Ukraine); Karengin, V.; Perevertailo, V. [IMD, Kiev, (Ukraine); Braeuer, M.; Franz, H.; Wittenburg, K. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Bauer, Ch.; Schmelling, M. [MPIfK, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors (MMFD) designed and used for the Beam Profile Monitoring (BPM) are discussed. The results obtained for the MMFDs produced by different technologies are presented. The MMFD deposited onto the 20 {mu}m thick Si-wafer has been used for the BPM of the 32 MeV alpha-particle beam at the MPIfK (Heidelberg) Tandem generator. Another MMFD with totally removed Si-wafer at the working area has been applied for the on-line X-ray BPM at the HASYLAB (DESY). One may conclude that the developed technology of the micro-strip metal detector manufacturing allows to provide non-destructive measurement of X-ray intensity distribution over area of up to 50 mm{sup 2} with an accuracy of 10-20 {mu}m with a possibility of its improvement by a factor 5. A sub-micron position resolution is expected by applying electron lithography for the strip pattern production.

  8. Bringing the SciBar Detector to the Booster Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A A; Andringa, S; Brice, S J; Brown, B C; Bugel, L; Catala, J; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Conrad, J M; Couce, E; Dore, U; Espinal, X; Finley, D A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Hayato, Y; Hiraide, K; Ishii, T; Jover, G; Kobilarcik, T; Kurimoto, Y; Kurosawa, Y; Louis, W C; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Lux, T; Martín-Albo, J; Mariani, C; Mahn, K B M; Matsuoka, K; Metcalf, W; Monroe, J; Nakaya, T; Nova, F; Novella, P; Rodriguez, A Y; Sánchez, F; Shaevitz, M H; Sorel, M; Stefanski, R; Taguchi, M; Tanaka, H; Tornero, A; Vande Water, R; Wascko, M O; Wilking, M; Yokoyama, M; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the physics case for bringing SciBar, the fully active, finely segmented tracking detector at KEK, to the FNAL Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) line. This unique opportunity arose with the termination of K2K beam operations in 2005. The physics that can be done with SciBar/BNB can be put into three categories, each involving several measurements. First are neutrino cross section measurements which are interesting in their own right, including analyses of multi-particle final states, with unprecedented statistics. Second are measurements of processes that represent the signal and primary background channels for the upcoming T2K experiment. Third are measurements which improve existing or planned MiniBooNE analyses and the understanding of the BNB, both in neutrino and antineutrino mode. SciBar and BNB have both been built and operated with great success. As a result, the cost of SciBar/BNB is far less than building a detector from scratch and both systems are well understood with existing det...

  9. Applications of pixellated GaAs X-ray detectors in a synchrotron radiation beam

    CERN Document Server

    Watt, J; Campbell, M; Mathieson, K; Mikulec, B; O'Shea, V; Passmore, M S; Schwarz, C; Smith, K M; Whitehill, C

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors are being investigated as imaging devices for radiography and synchrotron radiation beam applications. Based on previous work in the CERN RD19 and the UK IMPACT collaborations, a photon counting GaAs pixel detector (PCD) has been used in an X-ray powder diffraction experiment. The device consists of a 200 mu m thick SI-LEC GaAs detector patterned in a 64*64 array of 170 mu m pitch square pixels, bump-bonded to readout electronics operating in single photon counting mode. Intensity peaks in the powder diffraction pattern of KNbO/sub 3/ have been resolved and compared with results using the standard scintillator, and a PCD predecessor (the Omega 3). The PCD shows improved speed, dynamic range, 2-D information and comparable spatial resolution to the standard scintillator based systems. It also overcomes the severe dead time limitations of the Omega 3 by using a shutter based acquisition mode. A brief demonstration of the possibilities of the system for dental radiography and...

  10. Applications of pixellated GaAs X-ray detectors in a synchrotron radiation beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, J. E-mail: j.watt@physics.gla.ac.uk; Bates, R.; Campbell, M.; Mathieson, K.; Mikulec, B.; O' Shea, V.; Passmore, M-S.; Schwarz, C.; Smith, K.M.; Whitehill, C

    2001-03-11

    Hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors are being investigated as imaging devices for radiography and synchrotron radiation beam applications. Based on previous work in the CERN RD19 and the UK IMPACT collaborations, a photon counting GaAs pixel detector (PCD) has been used in an X-ray powder diffraction experiment. The device consists of a 200 {mu}m thick SI-LEC GaAs detector patterned in a 64x64 array of 170 {mu}m pitch square pixels, bump-bonded to readout electronics operating in single photon counting mode. Intensity peaks in the powder diffraction pattern of KNbO{sub 3} have been resolved and compared with results using the standard scintillator, and a PCD predecessor (the {omega}3). The PCD shows improved speed, dynamic range, 2-D information and comparable spatial resolution to the standard scintillator based systems. It also overcomes the severe dead time limitations of the {omega}3 by using a shutter based acquisition mode. A brief demonstration of the possibilities of the system for dental radiography and image processing are given, showing a marked reduction in patient dose and dead time compared with film.

  11. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, F.; Biegun, A. K.; Dendooven, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Golnik, C.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Petzoldt, J.; Römer, K. E.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2015-09-01

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range assessment and even three-dimensional in vivo dosimetry. Multiple position sensitive gamma ray detectors arranged in scatter and absorber planes, together with an imaging algorithm, are required to reconstruct the prompt gamma emission density map. Conventional block detectors deployed in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which are based on Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO) and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillators, are suitable candidates for the absorber of a Compton camera due to their high density and absorption efficiency with respect to the prompt gamma energy range (several MeV). We compare experimentally LSO and BGO block detectors in clinical-like radiation fields in terms of energy, spatial and time resolution. The high energy range compensates for the low light yield of the BGO material and boosts significantly its performance compared to the PET scenario. Notwithstanding the overall superiority of LSO, BGO catches up in the field of prompt gamma imaging and can be considered as a competitive alternative to LSO for the absorber plane due to its lower price and the lack of intrinsic radioactivity.

  12. On detector linearity and precision of beam shift detection for quantitative differential phase contrast applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweck, Josef; Schwarzhuber, Felix; Wild, Johannes; Galioit, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Differential phase contrast is a STEM imaging mode where minute sideways deflections of the electron probe are monitored, usually by using a position sensitive device (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Lohr et al., 2012 [2]) or, alternatively in some cases, a fast camera (Müller et al., 2012 [3,4]; Yang et al., 2015 [5]; Pennycook et al., 2015 [6]) as a pixelated detector. While traditionally differential phase contrast electron microscopy was mainly focused on investigations of micro-magnetic domain structures and their specific features, such as domain wall widths, etc. (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Chapman et al., 1978, 1981, 1985 [7-9]; Sannomiya et al., 2004 [10]), its usage has recently been extended to mesoscopic (Lohr et al., 2012, 2016 [2,12]; Bauer et al., 2014 [11]; Shibata et al., 2015 [13]) and nano-scale electric fields (Shibata et al., 2012 [14]; Mueller et al., 2014 [15]). In this paper, the various interactions which can cause a beam deflection are reviewed and expanded by two so far undiscussed mechanisms which may be important for biological applications. As differential phase contrast microscopy strongly depends on the ability to detect minute beam deflections we first treat the linearity problem for an annular four quadrant detector and then determine the factors which limit the minimum measurable deflection angle, such as S/N ratio, current density, dwell time and detector geometry. Knowing these factors enables the experimenter to optimize the set-up for optimum performance of the microscope and to get a clear figure for the achievable field resolution error margins.

  13. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. I. Theoretical concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.bouchard@npl.co.uk; Duane, Simon [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Kamio, Yuji [Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Palmans, Hugo [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Medical Physics, EBG MedAustron GmbH, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To explain the reasons for significant quality correction factors in megavoltage small photon fields and clarify the underlying concepts relevant to dosimetry under such conditions. Methods: The validity of cavity theory and the requirement of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are addressed from a theoretical point of view in the context of nonstandard beams. Perturbation effects are described into four main subeffects, explaining their nature and pointing out their relative importance in small photon fields. Results: It is demonstrated that the failure to meet classical cavity theory requirements, such as CPE, is not the reason for significant quality correction factors. On the contrary, it is shown that the lack of CPE alone cannot explain these corrections and that what matters most, apart from volume averaging effects, is the relationship between the lack of CPE in the small field itself and the density of the detector cavity. The density perturbation effect is explained based on Fano’s theorem, describing the compensating effect of two main contributions to cavity absorbed dose. Using the same approach, perturbation effects arising from the difference in atomic properties of the cavity medium and the presence of extracameral components are explained. Volume averaging effects are also discussed in detail. Conclusions: Quality correction factors of small megavoltage photon fields are mainly due to differences in electron density between water and the detector medium and to volume averaging over the detector cavity. Other effects, such as the presence of extracameral components and differences in atomic properties of the detection medium with respect to water, can also play an accentuated role in small photon fields compared to standard beams.

  14. Very Fast Losses of the Circulating LHC Beam, their Mitigation and Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Tobias; Elsen, Eckhard

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a nominal energy of 362MJ stored in each of its two counter-rotating beams - over two orders of magnitude more than any previous accelerator and enough to melt 880kg of copper. Therefore, in case of abnormal conditions comprehensive machine protection systems extract the beams safely from the LHC within not more than three turns $\\approx$270$\\mu$s. The first years of LHC operation demonstrated a remarkable reliability of the major machine protection systems. However, they also showed that the LHC is vulnerable to losses of the circulating beams on very fast timescales, which are too fast to ensure an active protection. Very fast equipment failures, in particular of normal-conducting dipole magnets and the transverse damper can lead to such beam losses. Whereas these failures were already studied in the past, other unexpected beam loss mechanisms were observed after the LHC start-up: so-called (un)identified falling objects (UFOs), which are believed to be micrometer-sized m...

  15. Photon reconstruction in the ATLAS Inner Detector and Liquid Argon Barrel Calorimeter at the 2004 Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Abat, E; Addy, T N; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Ahmad, A; Akesson, T.P A; Aleksa, M; Alexa, C; Anderson, K; Andreazza, A; Anghinolfi, F; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G; Arik, E; Atkinson, T; Baines, J; Baker, O K; Banfi, D; Baron, S; Barr, A J; Beccherle, R; Beck, H P; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Benchekroun, D; Benjamin, D P; Benslama, K; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Bernabeu, J; Bertelsen, H; Binet, S; Biscarat, C; Boldea, V; Bondarenko, V G; Boonekamp, M; Bosman, M; Bourdarios, C; Broklova, Z; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Calvet, D; Canneri, M; Capeans Garrido, M; Caprini, M; Cardiel Sas, L; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Catinaccio, A; Cauz, D; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cetin, S A; Chen, H; Cherkaoui, R; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chouridou, S; Ciobotaru, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, B; Cobal, M; Cogneras, E; Conde Muino, P; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Cornelissen, T; Correard, S; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cuneo, S; Cwetanski, P; Da Silva, D; Dam, M; Dameri, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Darbo, G; Davidek, T; De, K; Defay, P O; Dekhissi, B; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Dobos, D; Dobson, M; Dolgoshein, B A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Drasal, Z; Dressnandt, N; Driouchi, C; Drohan, J; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, P; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egorov, K; Eifert, T F; Einsweiler, K; El Kacimi, M; Elsing, M; Emelyanov, D; Escobar, C; Etienvre, A I; Fabich, A; Facius, K; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farthouat, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fayard, L; Febbraro, R; Fedin, O L; Fenyuk, A; Fergusson, D; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Filippini, G; Flick, T; Fournier, D; Francavilla, P; Francis, D; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Fullana, E; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Gallas, M; Gallop, B J; Gameiro, S; Gan, K K; Garcia, R; Garcia, C; Gavrilenko, I L; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Ghodbane, N; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Giokaris, N; Glonti, G; Gottfert, T.; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; Gomez, M D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodrick, M J; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Goujdami, D; Grahn, K J; Grenier, P; Grigalashvili, N; Grishkevich, Y; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwe, M; Guicheney, C; Gupta, A; Haeberli, C; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hance, M; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R J; Heinemann, F.E W; Henriques Correia, A; Henss, T; Hervas, L; Higon, E; Hill, J C; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, J Y; Hruska, I; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hulsbergen, W; Hurwitz, M; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Jansen, E; Jen-La Plante, I; Johansson, P.D C; Jon-And, K; Joos, M; Jorgensen, S; Joseph, J; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Karyukhin, A; Kataoka, M; Kayumov, F; Kazarov, A; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Kerschen, N; Kersten, S; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khramov, E; Khristachev, A; Khubua, J; Kittelmann, T H; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Kolos, S; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T Z; Kruger, K.; Kramarenko, V; Kudin, L G; Kulchitsky, Y; Lacasta, C; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Lari, T; Le Bihan, A C; Lechowski, M; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lehmann, G; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lester, C G; Liang, Z; Lichard, P; Liebig, W; Lipniacka, A; Lokajicek, M; Louchard, L; Loureiro, K F; Lucotte, A; Luehring, F; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Ma, H; Mackeprang, R; Maio, A; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mandelli, L; Maneira, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Manousakis, A; Mapelli, L; Marques, C; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, F; Mathes, M; Mazzanti, M; McFarlane, K W; McPherson, R; Mchedlidze, G; Mehlhase, S; Meirosu, C; Meng, Z; Meroni, C; Mialkovski, V; Mikulec, B; Milstead, D; Minashvili, I; Mindur, B; Mitsou, V A; Moed, S; Monnier, E; Moorhead, G; Morettini, P; Morozov, S V; Mosidze, M; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E.W J; Munar, A; Myagkov, A; Nadtochi, A V; Nakamura, K; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Nemecek, S; Nessi, M; Nesterov, S Y; Newcomer, F M; Nikitine, I; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Oleshko, S B; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, S; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paolone, V; Parodi, F; Parsons, J; Parzhitski, S; Pasqualucci, E; Passmore, S M; Pater, J; Patrichev, S; Peez, M; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petti, R; Phillips, P W; Pilcher, J; Pina, J; Pinto, B; Podlyski, F; Poggioli, L; Poppleton, A; Poveda, J; Pralavorio, P; Pribyl, L; Price, M J; Prieur, D; Puigdengoles, C; Puzo, P; Ragusa, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reeves, K; Reisinger, I; Rembser, C; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Reznicek, P; Ridel, M; Risso, P; Riu, I; Robinson, D; Roda, C; Roe, S; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Ruiz, A; Rusakovich, N; Rust, D; Ryabov, Y F; Ryjov, V; Salto, O; Salvachua, B; Salzburger, A; Sandaker, H; Santamarina Rios, C.Santamarina; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Sauvage, G; Says, L P; Schaefer, M; Schegelsky, V A; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, C; Schultes, J; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seixas, J M; Seliverstov, D M; Serin, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalanda, N; Shaw, C; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Silva, J; Simion, S; Simonyan, M; Sloper, J E; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, O; Soloviev, I; Sosnovtsev, V V; Spano, F; Speckmayer, P; Stancu, S; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Straessner, A; Suchkov, S I; Suk, M; Szczygiel, R; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, F; Tas, P; Tayalati, Y; Tegenfeldt, F; Teuscher, R; Thioye, M; Tikhomirov, V O; Timmermans, C.J.W P; Tisserant, S; Toczek, B; Tremblet, L; Troncon, C; Tsiareshka, P; Tyndel, M; Karagoz Unel, M.; Unal, G; Unel, G; Usai, G; Van Berg, R; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valls, J A; Vandelli, W; Vannucci, F; Vartapetian, A; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vasilyeva, L; Vazeille, F; Vernocchi, F; Vetter-Cole, Y; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; de Vivie, J B; Volpi, M; Vu Anh, T; Wang, C; Warren, M; Weber, J; Weber, M; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Wells, P S; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wiesmann, M; Wilkens, H; Williams, H H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Yasu, Y; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zhang, H; Zhelezko, A; Zhou, N

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction of photons in the ATLAS detector is studied with data taken during the 2004 Combined Test Beam, where a full slice of the ATLAS detector was exposed to beams of particles of known energy at the CERN SPS. The results presented show significant differences in the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic shower between converted and unconverted photons as well as in the total measured energy. The potential to use the reconstructed converted photons as a means to precisely map the material of the tracker in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter is also considered. All results obtained are compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of the test-beam setup which is based on the same simulation and reconstruction tools as those used for the ATLAS detector itself.

  16. Multiple-electron losses in uranium ion beams in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozyk, L.; Chill, F.; Litsarev, M. S.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Charge changing processes as the result of collisions with residual gas particles are the main cause of beam loss in high energy medium charge state heavy ion beams. To investigate the magnitude of this effect for heavy ion synchrotrons like the planned SIS100 at GSI, the multiple-electron and the total electron-loss cross sections are calculated for Uq+ ions, q = 10, 28, 40, 73, colliding with typical gas components H2, He, C, N2, O2, and Ar at ion energies E = 1 MeV/u-10 GeV/u. The total electron-capture cross sections for U28+ and U73+ ions interacting with these gases are also calculated. Most of these cross sections are new and presented for the first time. Calculated charge-changing cross sections are used to determine the ion-beam lifetimes τ for U28+ ions which agree well with the recently measured values at SIS18/GSI in the energy range E = 10-200 MeV/u. Using simulations made by the StrahlSim code with the reference ion U28+, it is found that in SIS100 the beam loss caused by single and multiple electron losses has only little impact on the residual gas density due to the high efficiency of the ion catcher system.

  17. A Real-Time FPGA based Algorithm for the combination of Beam Loss Acquisition Methods used for Measurement Dynamic Range expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiatkowski, M; Alsdorf, M; Dehning, B; Vigano, W

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Beam Loss Monitoring Dual Polarity (BLEDP) module under development at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is to measure and digitise with high precision the current produced by several types of beam loss detectors. The BLEDP module consists of eight analogue channels each with a fully differential integrator and an accompanying 16 bit ADC at the output of each analogue integrator. The on-board FPGA device controls the integral periods, instructs the ADC devices to perform measurements at the end of each period and collects the measurements. In the next stage it combines the number of charge and discharge cycles accounted in the last interval together with the cycle fractions observed using the ADC samples to produce a digitised high precision value of the charges collected. This paper describes briefly the principle of the fully differential integrator and focuses on the algorithm employed to process the digital data.

  18. Enhanced relativistic-electron-beam energy loss in warm dense aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisseau, X; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J J; Hulin, S; Morace, A; Nicolaï, Ph; Sawada, H; Vauzour, B; Batani, D; Beg, F N; Davies, J R; Fedosejevs, R; Gray, R J; Kemp, G E; Kerr, S; Li, K; Link, A; McKenna, P; McLean, H S; Mo, M; Patel, P K; Park, J; Peebles, J; Rhee, Y J; Sorokovikova, A; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Wei, M; Santos, J J

    2015-03-01

    Energy loss in the transport of a beam of relativistic electrons in warm dense aluminum is measured in the regime of ultrahigh electron beam current density over 2×10^{11}  A/cm^{2} (time averaged). The samples are heated by shock compression. Comparing to undriven cold solid targets, the roles of the different initial resistivity and of the transient resistivity (upon target heating during electron transport) are directly observable in the experimental data, and are reproduced by a comprehensive set of simulations describing the hydrodynamics of the shock compression and electron beam generation and transport. We measured a 19% increase in electron resistive energy loss in warm dense compared to cold solid samples of identical areal mass.

  19. Design and Development of a Diagnostics Client for a Beam Loss Measurement System at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Angelogiannopoulos, Emmanouil; Jackson, Stephen

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, is one of the biggest research centers in the field of particle physics. Its main function is to provide particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high energy physics research. Particles are accelerated through a complex of accelerators and are brought into collision, in order to study the fundamental elements of matter and the forces acting between them. Of course, such complex and expensive machines need control and protection. For that purpose, a variety of different systems -hardware and/or software- is needed. One such system is the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of an accelerator. This kind of system is designed for measuring beam losses around an accelerator. An appropriate design of the BLM system and an appropriate location of the monitors enable a wide field of very useful beam diagnostics and machine protection possibilities. This thesis focuses on the design and development of a client application, which is realized ...

  20. Dosimetric Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Diode Array Detector Irradiated with Passively Scattered Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Sahoo, Nanayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michale T.; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald, E-mail: xrzhu@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) diode array detector irradiated with passively scattered proton beams. Materials and Methods: A diode array detector, MapCHECK (Model 1175, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL, USA) was characterized in passive-scattered proton beams. The relative sensitivity of the diodes and absolute dose calibration were determined using a 250 MeV beam. The pristine Bragg curves (PBCs) measured by MapCHECK diodes were compared with those of an ion chamber using a range shift method. The water-equivalent thickness (WET) of the diode array detector’s intrinsic buildup also was determined. The inverse square dependence, linearity, and other proton dosimetric quantities measured by MapCHECK were also compared with those of the ion chambers. The change in the absolute dose response of the MapCHECK as a function of accumulated radiation dose was used as an indicator of radiation damage to the diodes. 2D dose distribution with and without the compensator were measured and compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Results: The WET of the MapCHECK diode’s buildup was determined to be 1.7 cm. The MapCHECK-measured PBC were virtually identical to those measured by a parallel-plate ion chamber for 160, 180, and 250 MeV proton beams. The inverse square results of the MapCHECK were within ±0.4% of the ion chamber results. The linearity of MapCHECK results was within 1% of those from the ion chamber as measured in the range between 10 and 300 MU. All other dosimetric quantities were within 1.3% of the ion chamber results. The 2D dose distributions for non-clinical fields without compensator and the patient treatment fields with the compensator were consistent with the TPS results. The absolute dose response of the MapCHECK was changed by 7.4% after an accumulated dose increased by 170 Gy. Conclusions: The MapCHECK is a convenient and useful tool for 2D dose distribution measurements using passively

  1. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  2. Beam Loss Control for the Unstripped Ions from the PS2 Charge Exchange Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Benedikt, M; Goddard, B; Kramer, T; Papaphilippou, Y; Vincke, Hel

    2010-01-01

    Control of beam losses is an important aspect of the H-injection system for the PS2, a proposed replacement of the CPS in the CERN injector complex. H- ions may pass the foil unstripped or be partially stripped to excited H0 states which may be stripped in the subsequent strong-field chicane magnet. Depending on the choice of the magnetic field, atoms in the ground and first excited states can be extracted and dumped. The conceptual design of the waste beam handling is presented, including local collimation and the dump line, both of which must take into account the divergence of the beam from stripping in fringe fields. Beam load estimates and activation related requirements of the local collimators and dump are briefly discussed.

  3. Loss of balance during balance beam walking elicits a multifocal theta band electrocortical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipp, Amy R; Gwin, Joseph T; Makeig, Scott; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Determining the neural correlates of loss of balance during walking could lead to improved clinical assessment and treatment for individuals predisposed to falls. We used high-density electroencephalography (EEG) combined with independent component analysis (ICA) to study loss of balance during human walking. We examined 26 healthy young subjects performing heel-to-toe walking on a treadmill-mounted balance beam as well as walking on the treadmill belt (both at 0.22 m/s). ICA identified clusters of electrocortical EEG sources located in or near anterior cingulate, anterior parietal, superior dorsolateral-prefrontal, and medial sensorimotor cortex that exhibited significantly larger mean spectral power in the theta band (4-7 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. Left and right sensorimotor cortex clusters produced significantly less power in the beta band (12-30 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. For each source cluster, we also computed a normalized mean time/frequency spectrogram time locked to the gait cycle during loss of balance (i.e., when subjects stepped off the balance beam). All clusters except the medial sensorimotor cluster exhibited a transient increase in theta band power during loss of balance. Cluster spectrograms demonstrated that the first electrocortical indication of impending loss of balance occurred in the left sensorimotor cortex at the transition from single support to double support prior to stepping off the beam. These findings provide new insight into the neural correlates of walking balance control and could aid future studies on elderly individuals and others with balance impairments.

  4. Summary of the 3rd International Workshop on a Far Detector in Korea for the J-PARC Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kajita, T; Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on a Far Detector in Korea for the J-PARC Neutrino Beam was held at the Hongo Campus of Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan on Sep. 30th and October 1, 2007. Forty seven physicists from Japan and Korea, as well as Europe and USA, participated in the workshop and discussed the physics opportunities offered by the J-PARC conventional neutrino beam detected by a new large underground neutrino detector in Korea. In this paper, we highlight some of the most relevant findings of the workshop.

  5. Measurements of the T2K neutrino beam properties using the INGRID on-axis near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. [University of Tokyo, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Kamioka Observatory, Kamioka (Japan); Abgrall, N. [University of Geneva, Section de Physique, DPNC, Geneva (Switzerland); Ajima, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Aihara, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Albert, J.B. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Andreopoulos, C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Andrieu, B. [UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Anerella, M.D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Aoki, S. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Araoka, O. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Argyriades, J. [University of Geneva, Section de Physique, DPNC, Geneva (Switzerland); Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), Bern (Switzerland); Assylbekov, S. [Colorado State University, Department of Physics, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Autiero, D. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, IPN Lyon (IN2P3), Villeurbanne (France); Badertscher, A. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Particle Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Barbi, M. [University of Regina, Physics Department, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Barker, G.J. [University of Warwick, Department of Physics, Coventry (United Kingdom); Barr, G. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bass, M. [Colorado State University, Department of Physics, Fort Collins, CO (United States); and others

    2012-12-01

    Precise measurement of neutrino beam direction and intensity was achieved based on a new concept with modularized neutrino detectors. INGRID (Interactive Neutrino GRID) is an on-axis near detector for the T2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. INGRID consists of 16 identical modules arranged in horizontal and vertical arrays around the beam center. The module has a sandwich structure of iron target plates and scintillator trackers. INGRID directly monitors the muon neutrino beam profile center and intensity using the number of observed neutrino events in each module. The neutrino beam direction is measured with accuracy better than 0.4 mrad from the measured profile center. The normalized event rate is measured with 4% precision.

  6. Measurements of the T2K neutrino beam properties using the INGRID on-axis near detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Ajima, Y; Aihara, H; Albert, J B; Andreopoulos, C; Andrieu, B; Anerella, M D; Aoki, S; Araoka, O; Argyriades, J; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Bertram, I; Besnier, M; Beucher, J; Beznosko, D; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Brook-Roberge, D G; Buchanan, N; Budd, H; Calvet, D; Cartwright, S L; Carver, A; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cazes, A; Cervera, A; Chavez, C; Choi, S; Christodoulou, G; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Coleman, W; Connolly, K; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davies, G S; Davis, S; Day, M; De Rosa, G; de André, J P A M; de Perio, P; Dealtry, T; Delbart, A; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Tran, P Dinh; Dobson, J; Dore, U; Drapier, O; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Dziomba, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escallier, J E; Escudero, L; Esposito, L S; Fechner, M; Ferrero, A; Finch, A J; Frank, E; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Galymov, V; Ganetis, G L; Gannaway, F C; Gaudin, A; Gendotti, A; George, M; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Ghosh, A K; Golan, T; Goldhaber, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gomi, S; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Grant, A; Gumplinger, P; Guzowski, P; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamano, K; Hansen, C; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Haruyama, T; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayashi, K; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Henderson, R; Higashi, N; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Hirose, E; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hyndman, A; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Iida, M; Ikeda, M; Ilic, J; Imber, J; Ishida, T; Ishihara, C; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwasaki, M; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Joo, K K; Jover-Manas, G V; Jung, C K; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Karlen, D; Kasami, K; Kato, I; Kawamuko, H; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khanam, F; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, J; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kimura, N; Kirby, B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Koike, S; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Kowalik, K; Kravtsov, V; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kubota, J; Kudenko, Y; Kulkarni, N; Kurimoto, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Laveder, M; Lee, K P; Le, P T; Levy, J M; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Litchfield, R P; Litos, M; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Lux, T; Macaire, M; Mahn, K; Makida, Y; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marone, A J; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Maryon, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matsumura, C; Matsuoka, K; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLachlan, T; Messina, M; Metcalf, W; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A D; Mituka, G; Miura, M; Mizouchi, K; Monfregola, L; Moreau, F; Morgan, B; Moriyama, S; Muir, A; Murakami, A; Muratore, J F; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagai, N; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakajima, K; Nakamoto, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Naples, D; Navin, M L; Nelson, B; Nicholls, T C; Nielsen, C; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Nitta, K; Nobuhara, T; Nowak, J A; Obayashi, Y; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, H; Okamura, T; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Ozaki, T; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Paul, P; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perkin, J D; Pettinacci, V; Pierre, F; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Qian, W; Raaf, J L; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Raufer, T M; Ravonel, M; Raymond, M; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roney, J M; Rossi, B; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sabouri, S; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sarrat, A; Sasaki, K; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Scully, D I; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shibata, M; Shimizu, Y; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Siyad, M; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Stahl, A; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Stone, J; Stodulski, M; Strabel, C; Sulej, R; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, Y; Swierblewski, J; Szeglowski, T; Szeptycka, M; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Taguchi, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, M M; Tanimoto, N; Tashiro, K; Taylor, I; Terashima, A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Toki, W; Tobayama, S; Tomaru, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Walding, J J; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wanderer, P J; Wang, J; Ward, M A; Ward, G P; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; West, N; Whitehead, L H; Wikström, G; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamanoi, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamauchi, T; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2011-01-01

    Precise measurement of neutrino beam direction and intensity was achieved based on a new concept with modularized neutrino detectors. INGRID (Interactive Neutrino GRID) is an on-axis near detector for the T2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. INGRID consists of 16 identical modules arranged in horizontal and vertical arrays around the beam center. The module has a sandwich structure of iron target plates and scintillator trackers. INGRID directly monitors the muon neutrino beam profile center and intensity using the number of observed neutrino events in each module. The neutrino beam direction is measured with accuracy better than 0.4 mrad from the measured profile center. The normalized event rate is measured with 4% precision.

  7. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraz, J.F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the “quenching” factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  8. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arduini, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruce, R.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. 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R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. 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Meyer Zu; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muskinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Garzon, G. Otero y.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palm, M.; Palma, A.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; RØhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β* are studied.

  9. Evaluation of Beam Losses and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Doyle, E; Ferrari, A; Keller, L; Lundgren, S; Keller, L; Mauri, M; Redaelli, S; Sarchiapone, L; Smith, J; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can ...

  10. Optimization of electron beam patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane mask edge roughness for low-loss silicon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael G.; Chen, Li; Burr, Justin R.; Reano, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a multiparameter fabrication study designed to reduce the line edge roughness (LER) of electron beam (e-beam) patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane resist for the purpose of producing low-loss silicon strip waveguides. Reduced mask roughness was achieved for 50°C pre-exposure baking, 5000 μC/cm2 dose with a beam spot size more than twice as large as the electron beam step size, development in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and postdevelopment baking with rapid thermal annealing in an O2 ambient at 1000°C. The LER caused by pattern fracturing and stage stitches was reduced with multipass writing and per-pass linear and rotational offsets. Si strip waveguides patterned with the optimized mask have root-mean-square sidewall roughness of 2.1 nm with a correlation length of 94 nm, as measured by three-dimensional atomic force microscopy. Measured optical propagation losses of these waveguides across the telecommunications C-band were 2.5 and 2.8 dB/cm for the transverse magnetic and transverse electric modes, respectively. These reduced loss waveguides enable the fabrication of advanced planar lightwave circuit topologies.

  11. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  12. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  13. Design and characterization of the beam monitor detectors of the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, S., E-mail: giordane@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Donetti, M.; Garella, M.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Fondazione CNAO, strada Campeggi, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Marchetto, F.; Alampi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ansarinejad, A. [Nuclear Science Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monaco, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Mucchi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pecka, I.A. [Kantonsspital Luzern, Zurich Area (Switzerland); Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Scalise, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomba, C. [Institut Néel/CNRS-Université Joseph Fourier, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Cirio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2013-01-11

    A new hadron-therapy facility implementing an active beam scanning technique has been developed at the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO). This paper presents the design and the characterization of the beam monitor detectors developed for the on-line monitoring and control of the dose delivered during a treatment at CNAO. The detectors are based on five parallel-plate transmission ionization chambers with either a single large electrode or electrodes segmented in 128 strips (strip chambers) and 32×32 pixels (pixel chamber). The detectors are arranged in two independent boxes with an active area larger than 200×200 mm{sup 2} and a total water equivalent thickness along the beam path of about 0.9 mm. A custom front-end chip with 64 channels converts the integrated ionization channels without dead-time. The detectors were tested at the clinical proton beam facility of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) which implements a spot scanning technique, each spot being characterized by a predefined number of protons delivered with a pencil beam in a specified point of the irradiation field. The short-term instability was measured by delivering several identical spots in a time interval of few tenths of seconds and is found to be lower than 0.3%. The non-uniformity, measured by delivering sequences of spots in different points of the detector surface, results to be lower than 1% in the single electrode chambers and lower than 1.5% in the strip and pixel chambers, reducing to less than 0.5% and 1% in the restricted 100×100 mm{sup 2} central area of the detector.

  14. Design and characterization of the beam monitor detectors of the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, S.; Donetti, M.; Garella, M. A.; Marchetto, F.; Alampi, G.; Ansarinejad, A.; Monaco, V.; Mucchi, M.; Pecka, I. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Scalise, M.; Tomba, C.; Cirio, R.

    2013-01-01

    A new hadron-therapy facility implementing an active beam scanning technique has been developed at the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO). This paper presents the design and the characterization of the beam monitor detectors developed for the on-line monitoring and control of the dose delivered during a treatment at CNAO. The detectors are based on five parallel-plate transmission ionization chambers with either a single large electrode or electrodes segmented in 128 strips (strip chambers) and 32×32 pixels (pixel chamber). The detectors are arranged in two independent boxes with an active area larger than 200×200 mm2 and a total water equivalent thickness along the beam path of about 0.9 mm. A custom front-end chip with 64 channels converts the integrated ionization channels without dead-time. The detectors were tested at the clinical proton beam facility of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) which implements a spot scanning technique, each spot being characterized by a predefined number of protons delivered with a pencil beam in a specified point of the irradiation field. The short-term instability was measured by delivering several identical spots in a time interval of few tenths of seconds and is found to be lower than 0.3%. The non-uniformity, measured by delivering sequences of spots in different points of the detector surface, results to be lower than 1% in the single electrode chambers and lower than 1.5% in the strip and pixel chambers, reducing to less than 0.5% and 1% in the restricted 100×100 mm2 central area of the detector.

  15. Test beam analysis of ultra-thin hybrid pixel detector assemblies with Timepix readout ASICs

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Dannheim, Dominik; Firu, Elena; Kulis, Szymon; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for the vertex detector at the proposed Compact Linear Collider imply a very small material budget: less than 0.2% of a radiation length per detection layer including services and mechanical supports. We present here a study using Timepix readout ASICs hybridised to pixel sensors of 50 − 500 μm thickness, including assemblies with 100 μm thick sensors bonded to thinned 100μm thick ASICs. Sensors from three producers (Advacam, Micron Semiconductor Ltd, Canberra) with different edge termination technologies (active edge, slim edge) were bonded to Timepix ASICs. These devices were characterised with the EUDET telescope at the DESY II test beam using 5.6 GeV electrons. Their performance for the detection and tracking of minimum ionising particles was evaluated in terms of charge sharing, detection efficiency, single-point resolution and energy deposition.

  16. RF device for precision location of the beam-position detectors in the Energy Saver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Biallas, G.H.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.C.; Wehmann, A.

    1983-03-01

    The task is to measure the center line of the beam detector with respect to the magnetic centerline with a precision of +-0.2 mm; the measurement must be made on 250 magnets (they come in 6 lengths, from 25'' to 99'') by a technician. Optical, mechanical, and electrical techniques for carrying out this procedure were considered. An RF device operating at 53 MHZ was adopted for the following reasons: (a) it provides complete electrical checkout of the hardware at operating frequency, including the bidirectional operation of the pickup, (b) no mechanical contact with the strip lines is required, and (c) the demands of production measurements and maintenance of calibration are better matched to the skills of an average technician. We describe the conceptual design, fabrication, and performance of this device.

  17. Beam-size effect and particle losses at Super$B$ factory developed in Italy

    CERN Document Server

    Kotkin, G L

    2009-01-01

    In the colliders, the macroscopically large impact parameters give a substantial contribution to the standard cross section of the $e^+ e^- \\to e^+ e^- \\gamma$ process. These impact parameters may be much larger than the transverse sizes of the colliding bunches. It means that the standard cross section of this process has to be substantially modified. In the present paper such a beam-size effect is calculated for bremsstrahlung at Super$B$ factory developed in Italy. We find out that this effect reduces beam losses due to bremsstrahlung by about 40%.

  18. Beam-size effect and particle losses at B-factories KEKB and PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G. E-mail: serbo@math.nsc.ru

    2005-01-01

    In the colliders, the macroscopically large impact parameters give a substantial contribution to the standard cross section of the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma} process. These impact parameters may be much larger than the transverse sizes of the colliding bunches. It means that the standard cross section of this process has to be substantially modified. In the present paper such a beam-size effect is calculated for bremsstrahlung at B-factories KEKB and PEP-II. We find out that this effect reduces beam losses due to bremsstrahlung by about 20%.

  19. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Jiajie [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2010-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |Δm232|, sin2 θ23. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  20. Tests of Bubble Damage Detectors in a Heavy Ion Beam from the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is designed to investigate the properties of a bubble damage polymer (BDP) using ion beams from the SPS. These polymers are already used commercially for making neutron and gamma-ray dosimeters. \\\\ \\\\ An attractive feature of BDP detectors is the ability to ``design'' a material to have a particular dE/dx threshold which can be used to detect such objects as monopoles and heavy ions as well as relativistic, singly charged tracks originating f particle interactions. \\\\ \\\\ The BDP detector is a polymer which holds droplets of super-heated liquid in suspension. The droplet size is typically a few microns and the droplet density is normally between 10|5 and 10|7 droplets/cm|3. The passage of a particle with a dE/dx exceeding the threshold of the material will cause the droplets with a sufficiently s parameter to change state, giving rise to bubbles. The dE/dx threshold of the BDP varies with pressure and temperature. The growth of bubbles in the bubble trail is limited by the polymer matrix and th...

  1. Performance analysis of MIMO FSO systems with radial array beams and finite sized detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Muhsin C.; Kamacıoǧlu, Canan; Uysal, Murat; Baykal, Yahya

    2014-10-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems are employed in free space optical (FSO) links to mitigate the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we consider a MIMO FSO system with practical transmitter and receiver configurations that consists of a radial laser array with Gaussian beams and finite sized detectors. We formulate the average received intensity and the power scinitillation as a function of the receiver coordinates in the presence of weak atmospheric turbulence by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Then, integrations over the finite sized multiple detectors are performed and the effect of the receiver aperture averaging is quantified. We further derive an outage probability expression of this MIMO system in the presence of turbulence-induced fading channels. Using the derived expressions, we demonstrate the effect of several practical system parameters such as the ring radius, the number of array beamlets, the source size, the link length, structure constant and the receiver aperture radius on the system performance.

  2. Beam test results of a 15 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cartiglia, N; Sola, V; Arcidiacono, R; Cirio, R; Cenna, F; Ferrero, M; Monaco, V; Mulargia, R; Obertino, M; Ravera, F; Sacchi, R; Bellora, A; Durando, S; Mandurrino, M; Minafra, N; Fadeyev, V; Freeman, P; Galloway, Z; Gkougkousis, E; Grabas, H; Gruey, B; Labitan, C A; Losakul, R; McKinney-Martinez, F; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Seiden, A; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Woods, N; Zatserklyaniy, A; Pellegrini, G; Hidalgo, S; Carulla, M; Flores, D; Merlos, A; Quirion, D; Cindro, V; Kramberger, G; Mandic, I; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution of the first production of 50 micro-meter thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) as obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum. UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test belongs to the first production of thin (50 {\\mu}m) sensors, with an pad area of 1.4 mm2. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution, determined comparing the time of arrival of the particle in one or more UFSD and the trigger counter, for single UFSD was measured to be 35 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 26 ps for a bias voltage of 240 V, and for the combination of 3 UFSD to be 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, ...

  3. Limits on neutrino oscillations in the CNGS neutrino beam and event classification with the OPERA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferber, Torben

    2012-09-15

    OPERA, the oscillation project with emulsion-tracking apparatus, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It combines an almost pure, high-energy {nu}{sub {mu}} beam produced at the SPS accelerator at CERN, Switzerland, with the OPERA neutrino detector located at a distance of about 730 km in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. By using a lead/photo emulsion target, {nu}{sub {tau}} charged current (CC) interactions of {nu}{sub {tau}} from {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations can be observed on an event-by-event basis with very low background rates. Within this thesis, a {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance search is described that uses a flux normalization. independent measurement of the CC event fraction as a function of the hadronic energy as measured by the electronic detectors of OPERA. This allows to derive limits on {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations, complementary to the main {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance analysis. For maximal mixing, vertical stroke {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 23} vertical stroke >4.4 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} is excluded at 90% C.L. by the disappearance analysis. This thesis represents the first application of this method, including systematic uncertainties, in a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment.

  4. Beam test results of a 16 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartiglia, N.; Staiano, A.; Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Cirio, R.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Bellora, A.; Durando, S.; Mandurrino, M.; Minafra, N.; Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gkougkousis, E.; Grabas, H.; Gruey, B.; Labitan, C. A.; Losakul, R.; Luce, Z.; McKinney-Martinez, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Hidalgo, S.; Carulla, M.; Flores, D.; Merlos, A.; Quirion, D.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum at CERN for the first production of 45 μm thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test had a pad area of 1.7 mm2. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the sensor bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution was determined by doing Gaussian fits to the time-of-flight of the particles between one or more UFSD and the trigger counter. For a single UFSD the resolution was measured to be 34 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 27 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V. For the combination of 3 UFSD the timing resolution was 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 16 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V.

  5. A diffracted-beam monochromator for long linear detectors in X-ray diffractometers with Bragg-Brentano parafocusing geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Pers, N.M.; Hendrikx, R.W.A.; Delhez, R.; Böttger, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    A new diffracted-beam monochromator has been developed for Bragg-Brentano X-ray diffractometers equipped with a linear detector. The monochromator consists of a cone-shaped graphite highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal oriented out of the equatorial plane such that the parafocusing geometry is

  6. Controlled Transverse Blow-up of Highenergy Proton Beams for Aperture Measurements and Loss Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Hӧfle, W; Redaelli, S; Schmidt, R; Valuch, D; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    A technique was developed to blow-up transversely in a controlled way high energy proton beams in the LHC. The technique is based on band limited white noise excitation that is injected into the transverse damper feedback loop. The injected signal can be gated to selectively blow-up individual trains of bunches. The speed of transverse blow-up can be precisely controlled. This opens the possibility to perform safely and efficiently aperture measurements and loss maps with high intensity bunch trains well above stored beam energies that are considered to be safe. In particular, lengthy procedures for measurements at top energy, otherwise requiring multiple fills of individual bunches, can be avoided. In this paper, the method is presented and results from beam measurements are discussed and compared with alternative blowup methods.

  7. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, J; Morin, O [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry.

  8. Reducing the extraction loss via laser notching the H- beam at the Booster injection revolution frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    With the requirement for more protons per hour from Booster, the radiation is a limiting factor. Laser notching the H{sup -} beam at the Booster injection revolution frequency and properly aligning those notches on top of each other at the injection and relative to the trigger of firing extraction kickers can remove most of the extraction loss caused by the slow rise time of the kicker field.

  9. Reliability of the Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, G; Santoni, C

    2005-01-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out....

  10. Beam filling loss adjustments for ASR-9 weather channel reflectivity estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engholm, Cynthia D.; Troxel, Seth W.

    1990-10-01

    The FAA is deploying over 100 new airport surveillance radars (ASR-9) across the country. In contrast to earlier ASRs, the ASR-9 utilizes a separate digital weather processing channel to provide air traffic controllers with timely, calibrated displays of precipitation intensity. The ASR-9 utilizes dual selectable fan shaped elevation beams designed to track aircraft over a large volume. As a consequence, weather echoes received from these fan shaped beams represent vertically averaged quantities. If the precipitation only partially or nonuniformly fills the beam, then the vertically integrated reflectivity may underestimate the actual intensity of the storm. The ASR-9 weather channel corrects for this by adjusting the range dependent six level reflectivity thresholds. The appropriateness of the currently implemented correction has not been carefully examined and may require modification to take into account regional and morphological variability in storm structure. The method used to derive new beam filling loss adjustments is discussed. An extensive database of volumetric pencil beam radar data were used in conjunction with the ASR-9 simulation facility to derive adjustments aimed at calibrating the precipitation intensity reports to the maximum perceived hazard. Results from this calibration indicate that a single correction is appropriate for all sites and intensities. The new corrections yield substantially improved results over the current corrections in producing these reflectivity reports.

  11. Estimation of losses in a 300 m filter cavity and quantum noise reduction in the KAGRA gravitational-wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capocasa, Eleonora; Barsuglia, Matteo; Degallaix, Jérôme; Pinard, Laurent; Straniero, Nicolas; Schnabel, Roman; Somiya, Kentaro; Aso, Yoichi; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detector KAGRA, presently under construction, will be limited by quantum noise in a large fraction of its spectrum. The most promising technique to increase the detector sensitivity is the injection of squeezed states of light, where the squeezing angle is dynamically rotated by a Fabry-Pérot filter cavity. One of the main issues in the filter cavity design and realization is the optical losses due to the mirror surface imperfections. In this work we present a study of the specifications for the mirrors to be used in a 300 m filter cavity for the KAGRA detector. A prototype of the cavity will be constructed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, inside the infrastructure of the former TAMA interferometer. We also discuss the potential improvement of the KAGRA sensitivity, based on a model of various realistic sources of losses and their influence on the squeezing amplitude.

  12. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  13. A method for the dynamic range extension of a pixelated Silicon detector beam profilometer based on the incomplete reset mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, M.; Santoro, R.; Antonello, M.

    2017-03-01

    The SUCIMA collaboration, within a project supported by the European Commission in the Fifth Framework Program, developed a sensor for non-disruptive real-time beam profilometry for hadron therapy centres. The sensor, named MIMOTERA, has been used at different European facilities, imaging beams by direct impact on the sensor and by the detection of secondary electrons emitted by thin targets. In 2015, the detector has been thinned to 50 μm, integrated in a high vacuum and cryogenic temperature compliant assembly and successfully commissioned as antiproton beam monitor for the AEbar gIS experiment at CERN. The detector contributed to the optimisation of the experiment functionality providing the shape and position of the beam on a spill-by-spill basis. However, it failed in measuring the fluctuations of the beam intensity because the deposited energy exceeded the full well capacity and saturated the output signal. In order to recover this information, a method was developed based on the persistence of the signal in a series of frames that follows the one corresponding to the beam impact, due to the incomplete sensor reset. A laboratory test that makes use of a laser with tuneable intensity was designed and the method was qualified. This paper reports the description of the procedure and the main outcomes.

  14. The applications of in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy to the study of electron beam nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiahn J; Howitt, David G; Gierhart, Brian C; Smith, Rosemary L; Collins, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    An in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique has been developed to investigate the dynamic processes associated with electron-beam nanofabrication on thin membranes. In this article, practical applications germane to e-beam nanofabrication are illustrated with a case study of the drilling of nanometer-sized pores in silicon nitride membranes. This technique involves successive acquisitions of the plasmon-loss and the core-level ionization-loss spectra in real time, both of which provide the information regarding the hole-drilling kinetics, including two respective rates for total mass loss, individual nitrogen and silicon element depletion, and the change of the atomic bonding environment. In addition, the in situ EELS also provides an alternative method for endpoint detection with a potentially higher time resolution than by imaging. On the basis of the time evolution of in situ EELS spectra, a qualitative working model combining knock-on sputtering, irradiation-induced mass transport, and phase separation can be proposed.

  15. Characterization of a GEM-based scintillation detector with He-CF4 gas mixture in clinical proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichiporov, D.; Coutinho, L.; Klyachko, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate, high-spatial resolution dosimetry in proton therapy is a time consuming task, and may be challenging in the case of small fields, due to the lack of adequate instrumentation. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel dose imaging detector with high spatial resolution and tissue equivalent response to dose in the Bragg peak, suitable for beam commissioning and quality assurance measurements. A scintillation gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector based on a double GEM amplification structure with optical readout was filled with a He/CF4 gas mixture and evaluated in pristine and modulated proton beams of several penetration ranges. The detector’s performance was characterized in terms of linearity in dose rate, spatial resolution, short- and long-term stability and tissue-equivalence of response at different energies. Depth-dose profiles measured with the GEM detector in the 115-205 MeV energy range were compared with the profiles measured under similar conditions using the PinPoint 3D small-volume ion chamber. The GEM detector filled with a He-based mixture has a nearly tissue equivalent response in the proton beam and may become an attractive and efficient tool for high-resolution 2D and 3D dose imaging in proton dosimetry, and especially in small-field applications.

  16. Quench Tests of LHC Magnets with Beam: Studies on Beam Loss development and determination of Quench levels

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Sapinski, M

    The application of superconducting materials in the field of high energy accelerator physics not only opens the doors to the generation of the magnetic fields unattainable to normal conductors but also demands facing new challenges. A transition fromthe superconducting state, which is characterized by a resistance-free flow of the electric current, to the normal conducting state is called quenching. This process might be extremely dangerous and even lead to destruction of amagnet superconducting coil if no protecting actions are taken. Therefore, the knowledge of a magnet quench level, i.e. amount of energy which causes the transition to the resistive state, is crucial for the safety and operational efficiency of the accelerator. Regarding that, specific thresholds are incorporated to dedicated quench prevention systems in order to suppress the origin of detected energy perturbation, for example beam losses, or mitigate the consequences of the quenching process by dissipating the energy stored in the magnetic...

  17. Status of Beam Line Detectors for the BigRIPS Fragment Separator at RIKEN RI Beam Factory: Issues on High Rates and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuki; Fukuda, Naoki; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kameda, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yohei; Ahn, DeukSoon; Murai, Daichi; Inabe, Naohito; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi; Kumagai, Hidekazu; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiromi; Yoshida, Koichi; Kubo, Toshiyuki

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) and parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPACs) were installed within the superconducting in-flight separator, named BigRIPS, at the RIKEN Nishina Center for particle identification of RI beams. The MUSIC detector showed negligible charge collection inefficiency from recombination of electrons and ions, up to a 99-kcps incidence rate for high-energy heavy ions. For the PPAC detectors, the electrical discharge durability for incident heavy ions was improved by changing the electrode material. Finally, we designed a single crystal diamond detector, which is under development for TOF measurements of high-energy heavy ions, that has a very fast response time (pulse width <1 ns).

  18. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; /SLAC; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  19. Prestress Loss and Bending Capacity of Pre-cracked 40 Year-Old PC Beams Exposed to Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasar Amry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Six prestressed concrete beams (PC beam were used for evaluation, consist of four post-tension beams (PC-O and two pre-tension beams (PC-R. In order to investigate the effect of crack on prestress loss and bending capacity after long-term exposed, prestressed concrete beams were pre-crack and then exposed to marine environment. Experimental work was carried out to evaluate PC beams performance after long-term exposed. In addition, visual observations and load bearing capacity test was carried out. Furthermore, evaluation of prestress loss conducted using three-point loading bending test and the remaining tendon forces in the beam were determined using Crack Re-opening Method. The experimental results revealed that prestress loss was increased due to corrosion of strand/wire which affected by the pre-crack on the prestressed beams. Approximately a prestress loss around 26% and 30% was recorded for post-tension and pre-tension beams respectively.

  20. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  1. Test beam studies of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for the upgrade of CMS endcap muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ram Krishna

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide exceptional high instantaneous and integrated luminosity. The forward region $\\mid \\eta \\mid \\geq 1.5$ of the CMS detector will face extremely high particle rates in tens of $KHz/cm^{2}$ and hence it will affect the momentum resolution and longevity of the muon detectors. To overcome these issues the CMS collaboration has decided to install new large size rate capable Triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors in the forward region of CMS muon system. The first set of Triple GEM detectors will be installed in the GE1/1 region $(1.5 \\leq \\eta \\leq 2.2)$ of muon endcap during the LS2 of the LHC and the next one will be installed in the GE2/1 region $(1.6 \\leq \\eta \\leq 2.5)$, during the LS3. Towards this goal, full-size CMS Triple GEM prototype chambers have been fabricated and put under the test beam at the CERN SPS test beam facility. The GEM detectors were operated with two gas mixtures $Ar/CO_{2}$ (70/30) and $Ar/CO_{2}/CF_{4}$ (40/15/45). In 2014 and 2016, ...

  2. Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Rakhno, I L; Mokhov, N V; Sidorov, V I; Tropin, I S

    2012-01-01

    Currently a fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-5 straight section is used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-6 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using two horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. The STRUCT calculations show that using such horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 99% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 96% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerabl...

  3. Determination of electron beam polarization using electron detector in Compton polarimeter with less than 1% statistical and systematic uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Amrendra [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Q-weak experiment aims to measure the weak charge of proton with a precision of 4.2%. The proposed precision on weak charge required a 2.5% measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in elastic electron - proton scattering. Polarimetry was the largest experimental contribution to this uncertainty and a new Compton polarimeter was installed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab to make the goal achievable. In this polarimeter the electron beam collides with green laser light in a low gain Fabry-Perot Cavity; the scattered electrons are detected in 4 planes of a novel diamond micro strip detector while the back scattered photons are detected in lead tungstate crystals. This diamond micro-strip detector is the first such device to be used as a tracking detector in a nuclear and particle physics experiment. The diamond detectors are read out using custom built electronic modules that include a preamplifier, a pulse shaping amplifier and a discriminator for each detector micro-strip. We use field programmable gate array based general purpose logic modules for event selection and histogramming. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations and data acquisition simulations were performed to estimate the systematic uncertainties. Additionally, the Moller and Compton polarimeters were cross calibrated at low electron beam currents using a series of interleaved measurements. In this dissertation, we describe all the subsystems of the Compton polarimeter with emphasis on the electron detector. We focus on the FPGA based data acquisition system built by the author and the data analysis methods implemented by the author. The simulations of the data acquisition and the polarimeter that helped rigorously establish the systematic uncertainties of the polarimeter are also elaborated, resulting in the first sub 1% measurement of low energy (?1 GeV) electron beam polarization with a Compton electron detector. We have demonstrated that diamond based micro-strip detectors can be used for tracking in a

  4. A diffracted-beam monochromator for long linear detectors in X-ray diffractometers with Bragg-Brentano parafocusing geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pers, N M; Hendrikx, R W A; Delhez, R; Böttger, A J

    2013-04-01

    A new diffracted-beam monochromator has been developed for Bragg-Brentano X-ray diffractometers equipped with a linear detector. The monochromator consists of a cone-shaped graphite highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal oriented out of the equatorial plane such that the parafocusing geometry is preserved over the whole opening angle of the linear detector. In our standard setup a maximum wavelength discrimination of 3% is achieved with an overall efficiency of 20% and a small decrease in angular resolution of only 0.02 °2θ. In principle, an energy resolution as low as 1.5% can be achieved.

  5. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  6. Stochastic orbit loss of neutral beam ions from NSTX due to toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Crocker, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkova, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kubota, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Medley, S. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Podestà, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shi, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); White, R. B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-12-17

    Short toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and could also cause a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions takes place. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding centre code that incorporates the plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are like those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary and the trajectories along which modes may transport particles extend from the deposition volume to the loss boundary.

  7. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS beam

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, T; Altinok, O; Alvarez Sanchez, P; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Dhahbi, A Ben; Bertolin, A; Bozza, C; Brugiére, T; Brunet, F; Brunetti, G; Buontempo, S; Cavanna, F; Cazes, A; Chaussard, L; Chernyavskiy, M; Chiarella, V; Chukanov, A; Colosimo, G; Crespi, M; D'Ambrosios, N; Déclais, Y; del Amo Sanchez, P; De Lellis, G; De Serio, M; Di Capua, F; Cavanna, F; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Ferdinando, D; Di Marco, N; Dmitrievsky, S; Dracos, M; Duchesneau, D; Dusini, S; Ebert, J; Eftimiopolous, I; Egorov, O; Ereditato, A; Esposito, L S; Favier, J; Ferber, T; Fini, R A; Fukuda, T; Garfagnini, A; Giacomelli, G; Girerd, C; Giorgini, M; Giovannozzi, M; Goldberg, J; Göllnitz, C; Goncharova, L; Gornushkin, Y; Grella, G; Griantia, F; Gschewentner, E; Guerin, C; Guler, A M; Gustavino, C; Hamada, K; Hara, T; Hierholzer, M; Hollnagel, A; Ieva, M; Ishida, H; Ishiguro, K; Jakovcic, K; Jollet, C; Jones, M; Juget, F; Kamiscioglu, M; Kawada, J; Kim, S H; Kimura, M; Kitagawa, N; Klicek, B; Knuesel, J; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; Lazzaro, C; Lenkeit, J; Ljubicic, A; Longhin, A; Malgin, A; Mandrioli, G; Marteau, J; Matsuo, T; Mauri, N; Mazzoni, A; Medinaceli, E; Meisel, F; Meregaglia, A; Migliozzi, P; Mikado, S; Missiaen, D; Morishima, K; Moser, U; Muciaccia, M T; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Nakatsuka, Y; Naumov, D; Nikitina, V; Ogawa, S; Okateva, N; Olchevsky, A; Palamara, O; Paoloni, A; Park, B D; Park, I G; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Pistillo, C; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Pretzl, K; Pupilli, F; Rescigno, R; Roganova, T; Rokujo, H; Rosa, G; Rostovtseva, I; Rubbia, A; Russo, A; Sato, O; Sato, Y; Schembri, A; Schuler, J; Scotto Lavina, L; Serrano, J; Sheshukov, A; Shibuya, H; Shoziyoev, G; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Song, J S; Spinetti, M; Starkov, N; Stellacci, M; Stipcevic, M; Strauss, T; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Tenti, M; Terranova, F; Tezuka, I; Tioukov, V; Tolun, P; Tran, T; Tufanli, S; Vilain, P; Vladimirov, M; Votano, L; Vuilleumier, J-L; Wilquet, G; Wonsak, B; Wurtz, J; Yoon, C S; Yoshida, J; Zaitsev, Y; Zemskova, S; Zghiche, A; Agafonova, N

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory has measured the velocity of neutrinos from the CERN CNGS beam over a baseline of about 730 km with much higher accuracy than previous studies conducted with accelerator neutrinos. The measurement is based on high-statistics data taken by OPERA in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Dedicated upgrades of the CNGS timing system and of the OPERA detector, as well as a high precision geodesy campaign for the measurement of the neutrino baseline, allowed reaching comparable systematic and statistical accuracies. An early arrival time of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum of (60.7 \\pm 6.9 (stat.) \\pm 7.4 (sys.)) ns was measured. This anomaly corresponds to a relative difference of the muon neutrino velocity with respect to the speed of light (v-c)/c = (2.48 \\pm 0.28 (stat.) \\pm 0.30 (sys.)) \\times 10-5.

  8. LENDA, a Low Energy Neutron Detector Array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Perdikakis, G; Austin, Sam M; Bazin, D; Caesar, C; Cannon, S; Deaven, J M; Doster, H J; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Marks, J; Meharchand, R; Nguyen, D T; Peterman, D; Prinke, A; Scott, M; Shimbara, Y; Thorne, K; Valdez, L; Zegers, R G T

    2011-01-01

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab- oratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p, n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (> 100 MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV - 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neut...

  9. Focused ion beam fabrication and IBIC characterization of a diamond detector with buried electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Jaksic, M; Pastuovic, Z; Picollo, F; Skukan, N; Vittone, E

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a high purity monocrystalline diamond detector with buried electrodes realized by the selective damage induced by a focused 6 MeV carbon ion beam scanned over a pattern defined at the micrometric scale. A suitable variable-thickness mask was deposited on the diamond surface in order to modulate the penetration depth of the ions and to shallow the damage profile toward the surface. After the irradiation, the sample was annealed at high temperature in order to promote the conversion to the graphitic phase of the end-of-range regions which experienced an ion-induced damage exceeding the damage threshold, while recovering the sub-threshold damaged regions to the highly resistive diamond phase. This process provided conductive graphitic electrodes embedded in the insulating diamond matrix; the presence of the variable-thickness mask made the terminations of the channels emerging at the diamond surface and available to be connected to an external electro...

  10. Beam-size effect and particle losses at SuperB factory developed in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G L; Serbo, V G [Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk, Pirogova st., 2 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: serbo@math.nsc.ru

    2009-06-15

    In the colliders, the macroscopically large impact parameters give a substantial contribution to the standard cross section of the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma} process. These impact parameters may be much larger than the transverse sizes of the colliding bunches. It means that the standard cross section of this process has to be substantially modified. In the present paper such a beam-size effect is calculated for bremsstrahlung at SuperB factory developed in Italy. We find out that this effect reduces beam losses due to bremsstrahlung by about 40%. We perform a critical comparison of our result with that presented in the Conceptual Design Report of the Italian SuperB factory.

  11. Heavy ion beam test results of the silicon charge detector for the CREAM cosmic ray balloon mission

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I H; Bok, J B; Ganel, O; Hahn, J H; Han, W; Hyun, H J; Kim, H J; Kim, M Y; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lutz, L; Malinine, A; Min, K W; Nam, S W; Nam, W; Park, H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Seon, K I; Sone, J H; Yang, J; Zinn, S Y

    2004-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to measure cosmic ray elemental spectra to help understand the source and acceleration mechanisms of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The payload is planned to launch in December 2004 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as a balloon mission. A Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) was designed and constructed for the CREAM experiment to provide precision charge measurements of incident cosmic rays with a resolution of 0.2 charge unit or better. The SCD was exposed to heavy ion beams at CERN's H2 beam line in November 2003. The results reported here show the SCD performs as designed.

  12. Aging of imaging properties of a CMOS flat-panel detector for dental cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; Han, J. C.; Yun, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the long-term stability of imaging properties of a flat-panel detector in conditions used for dental x-ray imaging. The detector consists of a CsI:Tl layer and CMOS photodiode pixel arrays. Aging simulations were carried out using an 80-kVp x-ray beam at an air-kerma rate of approximately 5 mGy s-1 at the entrance surface of the detector with a total air kerma of up to 0.6 kGy. Dark and flood-field images were periodically obtained during irradiation, and the mean signal and noise levels were evaluated for each image. We also evaluated the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The aging simulation showed a decrease in both the signal and noise of the gain-offset-corrected images, but there was negligible change in the signal-to-noise performance as a function of the accumulated dose. The gain-offset correction for analyzing images resulted in negligible changes in MTF, NPS, and DQE results over the total dose. Continuous x-ray exposure to a detector can cause degradation in the physical performance factors such the detector sensitivity, but linear analysis of the gain-offset-corrected images can assure integrity of the imaging properties of a detector during its lifetime.

  13. Radiation-hard Beam Position Detector for Use in the Accelerator Dump Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Degtiarenko, Pavel; Popov, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    Proper transport of the electron beam with over 0.5MW of power to the beam dump is a prerequisite for operations at Jefferson Lab. Operations has relied on imaging the beam on a beam viewer located at the entrance to the beam dump. The large beam size at the dump entrance, due to beam scattering in the experimental target, sometimes results in no observable image on the view-screen. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD) material with its large thermal conductivity and high melting point is well suited for surviving the thermal effects of beam exposure with this power density. We are exploring the CVD properties and how it can be used as a robust beam position monitor. Results of some beam tests with 0.5MW beams will be presented.

  14. Monte Carlo investigations of megavoltage cone-beam CT using thick, segmented scintillating detectors for soft tissue visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Sawant, Amit; Du, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) is a highly promising technique for providing volumetric patient position information in the radiation treatment room. Such information has the potential to greatly assist in registering the patient to the planned treatment position, helping to ensure accurate delivery of the high energy therapy beam to the tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Presently, CBCT systems using conventional MV active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are commonly used in portal imaging, require a relatively large amount of dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is due to the fact that the phosphor screen detector employed in conventional MV AMFPIs utilizes only approximately 2% of the incident radiation (for a 6 MV x-ray spectrum). Fortunately, thick segmented scintillating detectors can overcome this limitation, and the first prototype imager has demonstrated highly promising performance for projection imaging at low doses. It is therefore of definite interest to examine the potential performance of such thick, segmented scintillating detectors for MV CBCT. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation energy deposition were used to examine reconstructed images of cylindrical CT contrast phantoms, embedded with tissue-equivalent objects. The phantoms were scanned at 6 MV using segmented detectors having various design parameters (i.e., detector thickness as well as scintillator and septal wall materials). Due to constraints imposed by the nature of this study, the size of the phantoms was limited to approximately 6 cm. For such phantoms, the simulation results suggest that a 40 mm thick, segmented CsI detector with low density septal walls can delineate electron density differences of approximately 2.3% and 1.3% at doses of 1.54 and 3.08 cGy, respectively. In addition, it was found that segmented detectors with greater thickness, higher density scintillator material, or lower density

  15. Beam Test Studies of 3D Pixel Sensors Irradiated Non-Uniformly for the ATLAS Forward Physics Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, S; Boscardin, M; Christophersen, M; Da Via, C; Betta, G -F Dalla; Darbo, G; Fadeyev, V; Fleta, C; Gemme, C; Grenier, P; Jimenez, A; Lopez, I; Micelli, A; Nelist, C; Parker, S; Pellegrini, G; Phlips, B; Pohl, D L; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sicho, P; Tsiskaridze, S

    2013-01-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  16. GaAs Based InAs/GaSb Superlattice Short Wavelength Infrared Detectors Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Bao; XU Ying-Qiang; ZHOU Zhi-Qiang; HAO Rui-Ting; WANG Guo-Wei; REN Zheng-Wei; NIU Zhi-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) short wavelength infrared photoconduction detectors are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(O01) semi-insulating substrates. An interracial misfit mode A1Sb quantum dot layer and a thick GaSb layer are grown as buffer layers. The detectors containing a 200-period 2 ML/8 ML InAs/GaSb SL active layer are fabricated with a pixel area of 800×800 μm2 without using passivation or antireflection coatings. Corresponding to the 50% cutoff wavelengths of 2.05 μm at 77K and 2.25 μ m at 300 K, the peak detectivities of the detectors are 4 × 109 cm·Hz1/2/W at 77K and 2 × 108 cm.Hz1/2/W at 30OK, respectively.

  17. Concept of a novel fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM for fan-beam tomography applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cortesi, M; Adams, R; Dangendorf, V; Prasser, H -M

    2012-01-01

    The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, cool...

  18. Concept of a novel fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM for fan-beam tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, M.; Zboray, R.; Adams, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2012-02-01

    The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5 MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, coolant dynamics, and liquid metal flow).

  19. Beam Test Results Monitoring the Drift Velocity in Silicon Drift Detectors by use of MOS Charge Injectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Cerello, P G; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    1999-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) have been developed in the context of the ALICE experiment R&D program. They consist of high resolution 2D position-sensitive detectors based on the measurement of the drift time of an electron cloud produced by the passage of a particle, under the action of a constant electrostatic field. The largest prototype produced has a drift path of 35 mm which corresponds to the design value for the ALICE experiment. For a given electrostatic field, the drift velocity is very sensitive to the temperature variations. For this reason, MOS charge injectors have been implanted on the surface of the detectors in order to monitor the drift velocity during data taking. For the first time, this feature has been successfully used during test beam, leading to an optimal space resolution of 28 um.

  20. Beam test studies of 3D pixel sensors irradiated non-uniformly for the ATLAS forward physics detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, S., E-mail: sgrinstein@ifae.es [ICREA and Institut de Física d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); Baselga, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, FBK-CMM, Trento (Italy); Christophersen, M. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington (United States); Da Via, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Universita degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Trento (Italy); Darbo, G. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Fadeyev, V. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz (United States); Fleta, C. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Gemme, C. [Universita degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Trento (Italy); Grenier, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park (United States); Jimenez, A.; Lopez, I.; Micelli, A. [ICREA and Institut de Física d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); Nelist, C. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Parker, S. [University of Hawaii, c/o Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); Pellegrini, G. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Phlips, B. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington (United States); Pohl, D.-L. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Sadrozinski, H.F.-W. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  1. A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokland, Willem [ORNL; Armstrong, Gary A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  2. Real-Time System Supervision for the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Jackson, S

    2014-01-01

    The strategy for machine protection and quench prevention of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is mainly based on the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system. The LHC BLM system is one of the most complex and large instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. In addition to protecting the collider, the system also needs to provide a means of diagnosing machine faults and deliver feedback of the losses to the control room as well as to several systems for their setup and analysis. In order to augment the dependability of the system several layers of supervision has been implemented internally and externally to the system. This paper describes the different methods employed to achieve the expected availability and system fault detection.

  3. Distortion of the per-pixel signal in the Timepix detector observed in high energy carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, B.; Soukup, P.; Granja, C.; Jakubek, J.; Pospíšil, S.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2014-09-01

    Within the application of the pixelated semiconductor Timepix detector for ion beam therapy purposes, distortion and non-linearity in the spectrometric pixel response to high energy carbon ions were observed. In this contribution, these effects are studied in detail. A distinct correlation between the arrival time of a particle during the exposure time and the respective detector signal was found. The hypothesis to explain these findings by oscillations in the pixel electronics leading to a second rise of the preamplifier output above threshold is discussed. Depending on the particle arrival time, the distortions can result in an artificially increased counter value and consequently an enlarged detector signal in energy mode. The effect appears when the signal per-pixel is above approximately 1 MeV, therefore becomig especially significant for measurements with heavy ions. The results presented in this publication are part of: B. Hartmann, A Novel Approach to Ion Spectroscopy of Therapeutic Ion Beams Using a Pixelated Semiconductor Detector, Ph.D. thesis, University of Heidelberg, Germany (2013).

  4. SU-E-T-778: Use of the 2D MatriXX Detector for Measuring Scanned Ion Beam Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anvar, M Varasteh; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Guarachi, L Fanola; Cirio, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); University of Torino, Turin, TO (Italy); Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Vignati, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); Donetti, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia, PV (Italy); Ciocca, M; Panizza, D [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia, PV (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quality assurance (QA) procedure has to check the most relevant beam parameters to ensure the delivery of the correct dose to patients. Film dosimetry, which is commonly used for scanned ion beam QA, does not provide immediate results. The purpose of this work is to answer whether, for scanned ion beam therapy, film dosimetry can be replaced with the 2D MatriXX detector as a real-time tool. Methods: MatriXX, equipped with 32×32 parallel plate ion-chambers, is a commercial device intended for pre-treatment verification of conventional radiation therapy.The MatriXX, placed at the isocenter, and GAFCHROMIC films, positioned on the MatriXX entrance, were exposed to 131.44 MeV proton and 221.45 MeV/u Carbon-ion beams.The OmniPro-I’mRT software, applied for the data taking of MatriXX, gives the possibility of acquiring consecutive snapshots. Using the NI LabVIEW, the data from snapshots were logged as text files for further analysis. Radiochromic films were scanned with EPSON scanner and analyzed using software programs developed in-house for comparative purposes. Results: The field dose uniformity, flatness, beam position and beam width were investigated. The field flatness for the region covering 6×6 cm{sup 2} square field was found to be better than 2%. The relative standard deviations, expected to be constant over 2×2, 4×4 and 6×6 pixels from MatriXX measurement gives a uniformity of 1.5% in good agreement with the film results.The beam center position is determined with a resolution better than 200 µm for Carbon and less than 100 µm for proton beam.The FWHM determination for a beam wider than 10 mm is satisfactory, whilst for smaller beams the determination is uncertain. Conclusion: Precise beam position and fast 2D dose distribution can be determined in real-time using MatriXX detector. The results show that MatriXX is quick and accurate enough to be used in charged-particle therapy QA.

  5. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - II. Mixed energy losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Dobranskis, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider simultaneous analytical solutions of continuity equations for electron beam precipitation (a) in collisional losses and (b) in ohmic losses, or mixed energy losses (MEL) by applying the iterative method to calculate the resulting differential densities at given precipitation depth. The differential densities of precipitating electrons derived from the analytical solutions for MELs reveal increased flattening at energies below 10-30 keV compared to a pure collisional case. This flattening becomes stronger with an increasing precipitation depth turning into a positive slope at greater precipitation depths in the chromosphere resulting in a differential density distribution with maximum that shifts towards higher energies with increase in column depth, while the differential densities combining precipitating and returning electrons are higher at lower energies than those for a pure collisional case. The resulting hard X-ray (HXR) emission produced by the beams with different initial energy fluxes and spectral indices is calculated using the MEL approach for different ratios between the differential densities of precipitating and returning electrons. The number of returning electrons can be even further enhanced by a magnetic mirroring, not considered in the present model, while dominating at lower atmospheric depths where the magnetic convergence and magnitude are the highest. The proposed MEL approach provides an opportunity to account simultaneously for both collisional and ohmic losses in flaring events, which can be used for a quick spectral fitting of HXR spectra and evaluation of a fraction of returning electrons versus precipitating ones. The semi-analytical MEL approach is used for spectral fitting to Reuven High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations of nine C, M and X class flares revealing a close fit to the observations and good resemblance to numerical FP solutions.

  6. A study of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, John Stuart [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01

    This thesis presents the results of an analysis of vμ disappearance with the MINOS experiment, which studies the neutrino beam produced by the NuMI facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The rates and energy spectra of charged current vμ interactions are measured in two similar detectors, located at distances of 1 km and 735 km along the NuMI beamline. The Near Detector provides accurate measurements of the initial beam composition and energy, while the Far Detector is sensitive to the effects of neutrino oscillations. The analysis uses data collected between May 2005 and March 2007, corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 1020 protons on target. As part of the analysis, sophisticated software was developed to identify muon tracks in the detectors and to reconstruct muon kinematics. Events with reconstructed tracks were then analyzed using a multivariate technique to efficiently isolate a pure sample of charged current vμ events. An extrapolation method was also developed, which produces accurate predictions of the Far Detector neutrino energy spectrum, based on data collected at the Near Detector. Finally, several techniques to improve the sensitivity of an oscillation measurement were implemented, and a full study of the systematic uncertainties was performed. Extrapolating from observations at the Near Detector, 733 ± 29 Far Detector events were expected in the absence of oscillations, but only 563 events were observed. This deficit in event rate corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations. The deficit is energy dependent and clear distortion of the Far Detector energy spectrum is observed. A maximum likelihood analysis, which fully accounts for systematic uncertainties, is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters and identifies the best fit values as Δm$2\\atop{32}$ = 2.29$+0.14\\atop{-0.14}$ x 10-3 eV2 and sin223

  7. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction from Cone-Beam Projections for Flat and Curved Detectors: Reconstruction Method Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui

    This dissertation is principally concerned with improving the performance of a prototype image-intensifier -based cone-beam volume computed tomography system by removing or partially removing two of its restricting factors, namely, the inaccuracy of current cone-beam reconstruction algorithm and the image distortion associated with the curved detecting surface of the image intensifier. To improve the accuracy of cone-beam reconstruction, first, the currently most accurate and computationally efficient cone-beam reconstruction method, the Feldkamp algorithm, is investigated by studying the relation of an original unknown function with its Feldkamp estimate. From this study, a partial knowledge on the unknown function can be derived in the Fourier domain from its Feldkamp estimate. Then, based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm, a modified iterative algorithm efficiently incorporating the Fourier knowledge as well as the a priori spatial knowledge on the unknown function is devised and tested to improve the cone-beam reconstruction accuracy by postprocessing the Feldkamp estimate. Two methods are developed to remove the distortion associated with the curved surface of image intensifier. A calibrating method based on a rubber-sheet remapping is designed and implemented. As an alternative, the curvature can be considered in the reconstruction algorithm. As an initial effort along this direction, a generalized convolution -backprojection reconstruction algorithm for fan-beam and any circular detector arrays is derived and studied.

  8. A Proposal for a Three Detector Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Program in the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M; Bellini, V.; Benetti, P.; Bertolucci, S.; Bilokon, H.; Boffelli, F.; Bonesini, M.; Bremer, J.; Calligarich, E.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A.G.; Dermenev, A.; Falcone, A.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Guglielmi, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kose, U.; Mammoliti, F.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Mladenov, D.; Montanari, C.; Nessi, M.; Nicoletto, M.; Noto, F.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Potenza, R.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scaramelli, A.; Sobczyk, J.; Spanu, M.; Stefan, D.; Sulej, R.; Sutera, C.M.; Torti, M.; Tortorici, F.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wachala, T.; Zani, A.; Adams, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.; Bagby, L.; Baller, B.; Barros, N.; Bass, M.; Bishai, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Chi, C.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; De Geronimo, G.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Ereditato, A.; Esquivel, J.; Evans, J.; Fleming, B.T.; Foreman, W.M.; Freestone, J.; Gamble, T.; Garvey, G.; Genty, V.; Goldi, D.; Gramellini, E.; Greenlee, H.; Guenette, R.; Hackenburg, A.; Hanni, R.; Ho, J.; Howell, J.; James, C.; Jen, C.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Kalousis, L.N.; Karagiorgi, G.; Ketchum, W.; Klein, J.; Klinger, J.; Kreslo, I.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lissauer, D.; Livesly, P.; Louis, W.C.; Luthi, M.; Mariani, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCauley, N.; McConkey, N.; Mercer, I.; Miao, T.; Mills, G.B.; Montanari, D.; Moon, J.; Moss, Z.; Mufson, S.; Norris, B.; Nowak, J.; Pal, S.; Palamara, O.; Pater, J.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perkin, J.; Pulliam, G.; Qian, X.; Qiuguang, L.; Radeka, V.; Rameika, R.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richardson, M.; von Rohr, C.Rudolf; Russell, B.; Schmitz, D.W.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Sippach, B.; Soderberg, M.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spitz, J.; Spooner, N.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Terao, K.; Thiesse, M.; Thompson, L.; Thomson, M.; Thorn, C.; Toups, M.; Touramanis, C.; Van de Water, R.G.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Wongjirad, T.; Yu, B.; Zeller, G.P.; Zennamo, J.; Acciarri, R.; An, R.; Barr, G.; Blake, A.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Caratelli, D.; Carls, B.; Convery, M.; Dytmam, S.; Eberly, B.; Gollapinni, S.; Graham, M.; Grosso, R.; Hen, O.; Hewes, J.; Horton-Smith, G.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kaleko, D.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Kobilarcik, T.; Li, Y.; Littlejohn, B.; Lockwitz, S.; Lundberg, B.; Marchionni, A.; Marshall, J.; McDonald, K.; Meddage, V.; Miceli, T.; Mooney, M.; Moulai, M.H.; Murrells, R.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Paolone, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.L.; Rebel, B.; Rochester, L.; Schukraft, A.; Seligman, W.; St. John, J.; Tagg, N.; Tsai, Y.; Usher, T.; Van de Water, R.; Wolbers, S.; Woodruff, K.; Xu, M.; Yang, T.; Zhang, C.; Badgett, W.; Biery, K.; Brice, S.J.; Dixon, S.; Geynisman, M.; Moore, C.; Snider, E.; Wilson, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program of three LAr-TPC detectors located along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab is presented. This new SBN Program will deliver a rich and compelling physics opportunity, including the ability to resolve a class of experimental anomalies in neutrino physics and to perform the most sensitive search to date for sterile neutrinos at the eV mass-scale through both appearance and disappearance oscillation channels. Using data sets of 6.6e20 protons on target (P.O.T.) in the LAr1-ND and ICARUS T600 detectors plus 13.2e20 P.O.T. in the MicroBooNE detector, we estimate that a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino appearance can be performed with ~5 sigma sensitivity for the LSND allowed (99% C.L.) parameter region. In this proposal for the SBN Program, we describe the physics analysis, the conceptual design of the LAr1-ND detector, the design and refurbishment of the T600 detector, the necessary infrastructure required to execute the program, and a possible...

  9. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2011-10-07

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  10. Determination of average LET of therapeutic proton beams using Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Sahoo, Narayan; Gasparian, Patricia B R; Rodriguez, Matthew G; Archambault, Louis; Titt, Uwe; Yukihara, Eduardo G

    2010-09-07

    In this work we present a methodology and proof of concept to experimentally determine average linear energy transfer (LET) of therapeutic proton beams using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of small Al(2)O(3):C detectors. Our methodology is based on the fact that the shape of the OSL decay curve of Al(2)O(3):C detectors depends on the LET of the radiation field. Thus, one can use the shape of the OSL decay curves to establish an LET calibration curve, which in turn permits measurements of LET. We performed irradiations at the M D Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center, Houston (PTCH), with passive scattering beams. We determined the average LET of the passive scattering beams using a validated Monte Carlo model of the PTCH passive scattering nozzle and correlated them with the shape of the OSL decay curve to obtain an LET calibration curve. Using this calibration curve and OSL measurements, we determined the averaged LET at various water-equivalent depths for therapeutic spread-out Bragg peaks and compared the results with averaged LETs determined using the Monte Carlo simulations. Agreement between measured and simulated fluence-averaged LET was within 24% for low energy spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) fields and within 14% for high energy SOBP fields. Agreement between measured and simulated dose-averaged LET was within 12% for low energy SOBP fields and within 47% for high energy SOBP fields. The data presented in this work demonstrated the correlation between the OSL decay curve shapes and the average LET of the radiation fields, providing proof of concept of the feasibility of using OSL from Al(2)O(3):C detectors to measure average LET of therapeutic proton beams.

  11. Silicon detectors for the neutron flux and beam profile measurements of the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumarra, Agatino; Cosentino, Luigi; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Damone, Lucia; Pappalardo, Alfio; Piscopo, Massimo; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The demand of new and high precision cross section data for neutron-induced reactions is continuously growing, driven by the requirements from several fields of fundamental physics, as well as from nuclear technology, medicine, etc. Several neutron facilities are operational worldwide, and new ones are being built. In the coming years, neutron beam intensities never reached up to now will be available, thus opening new scientific and technological frontiers. Among existing facilities, n_TOF at CERN provides a high intensity pulsed neutron beam in a wide energy range (thermal to GeV) and with an extremely competitive energy resolution that also allows spectroscopy studies. In order to ensure high quality measurements, the neutron beams must be fully characterized as a function of the neutron energy, in particular by measuring the neutron flux and the beam transverse profile with high accuracy. In 2014 a new experimental area (EAR2), with a much higher neutron flux, has been completed and commissioned at n_TOF. In order to characterize the neutron beam in the newly built experimental area at n_TOF, two suitable diagnostics devices have been built by the INFN-LNS group. Both are based on silicon detectors coupled with 6Li converter foils, in particular Single Pad for the flux measurement and Position Sensitive (strips and others) for the beam profile. The devices have been completely characterized with radioactive sources and with the n_TOF neutron beam, fulfilling all the specifications and hence becoming immediately operational. The performances of these devices and their high versatility, in terms of neutron beam intensity, make them suitable to be used in both n_TOF experimental areas. A description of the devices and the main results obtained so far will be presented.

  12. SU-E-T-571: Newly Emerging Integrated Transmission Detector Systems Provide Online Quality Assurance of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D; Chung, E; Hess, C; Stern, R; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Two newly emerging transmission detectors positioned upstream from the patient have been evaluated for online quality assurance of external beam radiotherapy. The prototype for the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), developed by iRT Systems GmbH (Koblenz, Germany) is a large-area ion chamber mounted on the linac accessory tray to monitor photon fluence, energy, beam shape, and gantry position during treatment. The ion chamber utilizes a thickness gradient which records variable response dependent on beam position. The prototype of Delta4 Discover™, developed by ScandiDos (Uppsala, Sweden) is a linac accessory tray mounted 4040 diode array that measures photon fluence during patient treatment. Both systems are employable for patient specific QA prior to treatment delivery. Methods: Our institution evaluated the reproducibility of measurements using various beam types, including VMAT treatment plans with both the IQM ion chamber and the Delta4 Discover diode array. Additionally, the IQM’s effect on photon fluence, dose response, simulated beam error detection, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer were characterized. The evaluated photon beam errors are based on the annual tolerances specified in AAPM TG-142. Results: Repeated VMAT treatments were measured with 0.16% reproducibility by the IQM and 0.55% reproducibility by the Delta4 Discover. The IQM attenuated 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43±0.02%, 4.60±0.02%, and 4.21±0.03% respectively. Photon beam profiles were affected <1.5% in the non-penumbra regions. The IQM’s ion chamber’s dose response was linear and the thermometer, barometer, and inclinometer agreed with other calibrated devices. The device detected variations in monitor units delivered (1%), field position (3mm), single MLC leaf positions (13mm), and photon energy. Conclusion: We have characterized two new transmissions detector systems designed to provide in-vivo like measurements upstream

  13. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  14. Study of electron beams within ISTTOK tokamak by means of a multi-channel Cherenkov detector; their correlation with hard X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, L., E-mail: Lech.Jakubowski@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M.J.; Zebrowski, J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Plyusnin, V.V. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Rabinski, M. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Jakubowski, M.J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2010-11-11

    The paper describes experimental studies of electron beams emitted from a plasma torus within the ISTTOK tokamak, which were performed by means of a new four-channel detector of the Cherenkov type. A range of electron energy was estimated. There were also measured hard X-rays, and their correlation with the fast run-away electron beams was investigated experimentally.

  15. Annihilation detector for an in-beam spectroscopy apparatus to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens; Capon, Aaron A.; Diermaier, Martin; Fleck, Markus; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Simon, Martin C.; Vamosi, Stefan; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2017-02-01

    The matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe today still lacks a quantitative explanation. One possible mechanism that could contribute to the observed imbalance is a violation of the combined Charge-, Parity- and Time symmetries (CPT). A test of CPT symmetry using anti-atoms is being carried out by the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator using a low temperature beam of antihydrogen-the most simple atomic system built only of antiparticles. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, antihydrogen is produced in very small quantities in a laboratory framework. A detector for in-beam measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen has to be able to detect very low signal rates within high background. To fulfil this challenging task, a two layer barrel hodoscope detector was developed. It is built of plastic scintillators with double sided readout via Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The SiPM readout is done using novel, compact and cost efficient electronics that incorporate power supply, amplifier and discriminator on a single board. This contribution will evaluate the performance of the new hodoscope detector.

  16. The intrinsic mechanical loss factor of hydroxy-catalysis bonds for use in the mirror suspensions of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneddon, P H [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bull, S [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, University of Newcastle, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Cagnoli, G [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Crooks, D R M [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Elliffe, E J [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Faller, J E [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Fejer, M M [Edward L Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4088 (United States); Hough, J [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Rowan, S [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-07

    This paper describes investigations into the mechanical losses of bonds created by hydroxy-catalysis bonding. Evaluation of the magnitude of such losses is important for determining thermal noise levels in bonded suspensions for gravitational wave detectors. Three samples were investigated with bonds of varying geometries and surface areas. In two cases, the bonds were between two pieces of fused silica, whilst in the third a fused silica piece was attached to a sapphire substrate. In each case sodium silicate solution was used as the bonding agent. The thickness and Young's modulus of the bond material were evaluated enabling values for the intrinsic mechanical loss factor of the bonding material to be obtained.

  17. 10 Orders of Magnitude Current Measurement Digitisers for the CERN Beam Loss Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vigano, W; Dehning, B; Kwiatkowski, M; Venturini, G G; Zamantzas, C

    2014-01-01

    A wide range current digitizer card is needed for the acquisition module of the beam loss monitoring systems in the CERN Injector Complex. The fully differential frequency converter allows measuring positive and negative input currents with a resolution of 31nA in an integration window of 2μs. Increasing the integration window, the dynamic range covers 2•1010 were the upper part of the range is converted by measuring directly the voltage drop on a resistor. The key elements of this design are the fully differential integrator and the switches operated by an FPGA. The circuit is designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and reliability and failsafe operational considerations are main design goals. The circuit will be discussed in detail and lab and field measurements will be shown.

  18. Improved design and construction of an ionization chamber for the CSNS beam loss monitor (BLM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jian-Min; XU Mei-Hang; ZHAO Zhong-Liang; CHEN Chang; RUAN Xiang-Dong; CHEN Yuan-Bo; XU Tao-Guang; LU Shuang-Tong

    2012-01-01

    Based on the first ionization chamber (IC) prototype,the structure,working gas component and electrode material of the IC are improved.The test of the improved IC shows that the plateau length is about 2000 V,the plateau slope is less than 0.2%/100 V,the sensitivity is 19.6 pA/rad.h-1,the up-limitation of the linearity can be up to 3.6× 105 rad/h,and the applied voltage can be operated to 3500 V.The test results show that the performance of the improved IC meets the requirements of the beam loss monitor.

  19. Effects of Optical Loss Factors on Heliostat Field Layout for Beam-Down Solar Concentrating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Takamatsu, Tadahiko; Yuasa, Minoru; Kajita, Rina; Yamamoto, Takashi

    A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for beam-down concentrating solar tower systems. Given the maximum solar power together with optical parameters, the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower. Various optical losses such as cosine factor, shadowing and blocking at heliostats are considered in the calculation. Furthermore, spillage at the receiver is taken into account due to the spread of light caused by the effects of a finite solar disk, flat facet and various stochastic errors in optical hardware and control. It is found the effect of spillage becomes significant at heliostats from the tower at the distance farther than four times of upper focus height of the reflector when receiver diameter is one fifteenth of the height and dominates the configuration of the optimal heliostat layout.

  20. 10 orders of magnitude current measurement digitisers for the CERN beam loss systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, W.; Alsdorf, M.; Dehning, B.; Kwiatkowski, M.; Venturini, G. G.; Zamantzas, C.

    2014-02-01

    A wide range current digitizer card is needed for the acquisition module of the beam loss monitoring systems in the CERN Injector Complex. The fully differential frequency converter allows measuring positive and negative input currents with a resolution of 31 nA in an integration window of 2 μs. Increasing the integration window, the dynamic range covers 21010 were the upper part of the range is converted by measuring directly the voltage drop on a resistor. The key elements of this design are the fully differential integrator and the switches operated by an FPGA. The circuit is designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and reliability and failsafe operational considerations are main design goals. The circuit will be discussed in detail and lab and field measurements will be shown.

  1. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    OpenAIRE

    Onofre, A.; Castro, Nuno Filipe Silva Fernandes; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge a...

  2. Increasing the effective aperture of a detector and enlarging the receiving field of view in a 3D imaging lidar system through hexagonal prism beam splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xiaobao; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Tianxiang; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-11

    The detector in a highly accurate and high-definition scanning 3D imaging lidar system requires high frequency bandwidth and sufficient photosensitive area. To solve the problem of small photosensitive area of an existing indium gallium arsenide detector with a certain frequency bandwidth, this study proposes a method for increasing the receiving field of view (FOV) and enlarging the effective photosensitive aperture of such detector through hexagonal prism beam splitting. The principle and construction of hexagonal prism beam splitting is also discussed in this research. Accordingly, a receiving optical system with two hexagonal prisms is provided and the splitting beam effect of the simulation experiment is analyzed. Using this novel method, the receiving optical system's FOV can be improved effectively up to ±5°, and the effective photosensitive aperture of the detector is increased from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm.

  3. Study on the radiation problem caused by electron beam loss in accelerator tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Quan-Feng; GUO Bing-Qi; ZHANG Jie-Xi; CHEN Huai-Bi

    2008-01-01

    The beam dynamic code PARMELA was used to simulate the transportation process of accelerating electrons in S-band SW linacs with different energies of 2.5, 6 and 20 MeV. The results indicated that in the ideal condition, the percentage of electron beam loss was 50% in accelerator tubes. Also we calculated the spectrum, the location and angular distribution of the lost electrons. Calculation performed by Monte Carlo code MCNP demonstrated that the radiation distribution of lost electrons was nearly uniform along the tube axis, the angular distributions of the radiation dose rates of the three tubes were similar, and the highest leaking dose was at the angle of 160° with respect to the axis. The lower the energy of the accelerator, the higher the radiation relative leakage. For the 2.5 MeV accelerator, the maximum dose rate reached 5% of the main dose and the one on the head of the electron gun was 1%, both of which did not meet the eligible protection requirement for accelerators. We adopted different shielding designs for different accelerators. The simulated result showed that the shielded radiation leaking dose rates fulfilled the requirement.

  4. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Christophersen, M.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gimenez, E.; Kachkanov, V.; Kalliopuska, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Maneuski, D.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Zain, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced edge or ``edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  5. Elemental boron-doped p(+)-SiGe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for infrared detector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. L.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detectors have been fabricated utilizing molecular beam epitaxy of p(+)-SiGe layers on p(-)-Si substrates. Elemental boron from a high-temperature effusion cell was used as the dopant source during MBE growth, and high doping concentrations have been achieved. Strong infrared absorption, mainly by free-carrier absorption, was observed for the degenerately doped SiGe layers. The use of elemental boron as the dopant source allows a low MBE growth temperature, resulting in improved crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology of the Si(0.7)Ge(0.3) layers. Nearly ideal thermionic emission dark current characteristics have been obtained. Photoresponse of the HIP detectors in the long-wavelength infrared regime has been demonstrated.

  6. Dosimetry and microdosimetry using LET spectrometer based on the track-etch detector: radiotherapy Bremsstrahlung beam, onboard aircraft radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadrnickova, I. [Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 180 86 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Dept. of Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation, Czech Technical University, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Spurny, F. [Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 180 86 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    The spectrometer of linear energy transfer (Let) based on the chemically etched poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (P.A.D.C.) track-etch detector was developed several years ago in our institute. This Let spectrometer enables determining Let of particles approximately from 10 to 700 keV/{mu}m. From the Let spectra, dose characteristics can be calculated. The contribution presents the Let spectra and other dosimetric characteristics obtained onboard a commercial aircraft during more than 6 months long exposure and in the 18 MV radiotherapy Bremsstrahlung beam. (authors)

  7. Energy loss of a fast-electron beam due to the excitation of collective oscillation in hot plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jin-Yi; Qiu Xi-Jun; Zhu Zhi-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Energy loss due to a fast-electron beam interacting with the hot plasma at a high density is analysed theoretically.By splitting the particle density fluctuations into the individual part due to the random thermal motion of the individual electrons and the collective part due to plasma-wave excitation, we are concerned with the collective interaction of the relativistic plasma electrons resulting from the Coulomb interactions. Consequently, we derive the frequency of the hot plasma and the "Debye length" with the modification of the relativistic effect. And finally we calculate the energy loss of a fast-electron beam due to the excitation of collective oscillation in the hot plasma.

  8. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  9. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D.; Meyners, J.; Delfs, B.; Muru, A.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.; Looe, HK

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation. The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector with

  10. Evaluation of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters for cone-beam CT imaging of the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer; Sisniega, Alejandro; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Dang, Hao; Stayman, J Webster; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassillis E; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2016-08-21

    The effects of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and dose were characterized for a new CBCT system developed for point-of-care imaging of the head, with potential application to diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and stroke. A detector performance model was extended to include the effects of detector readout gain on electronic digitization noise. The noise performance for high-gain (HG), low-gain (LG), and dual-gain (DG) detector readout was evaluated, and the benefit associated with HG mode in regions free from detector saturation was quantified. Such benefit could be realized (without detector saturation) either via DG mode or by incorporation of a bowtie filter. Therefore, three bowtie filters were investigated that varied in thickness and curvature. A polyenergetic gain correction method was developed to equalize the detector response between the flood-field and projection data in the presence of a bowtie. The effect of bowtie filters on dose, scatter-to-primary ratio, contrast, and noise was quantified in phantom studies, and results were compared to a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to characterize x-ray scatter and dose distributions in the head. Imaging in DG mode improved the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by ~15% compared to LG mode at a dose (D 0, measured at the center of a 16 cm CTDI phantom) of 19 mGy. MC dose calculations agreed with CTDI measurements and showed that bowtie filters reduce peripheral dose by as much as 50% at the same central dose. Bowtie filters were found to increase the CNR per unit square-root dose near the center of the image by ~5-20% depending on bowtie thickness, but reduced CNR in the periphery by ~10-40%. Images acquired at equal CTDIw with and without a bowtie demonstrated a 24% increase in CNR at the center of an anthropomorphic head phantom. Combining a thick bowtie filter with a short arc (180°  +  fan angle) scan centered

  11. Evaluation of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters for cone-beam CT imaging of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer; Sisniega, Alejandro; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Dang, Hao; Webster Stayman, J.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassillis E.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and dose were characterized for a new CBCT system developed for point-of-care imaging of the head, with potential application to diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and stroke. A detector performance model was extended to include the effects of detector readout gain on electronic digitization noise. The noise performance for high-gain (HG), low-gain (LG), and dual-gain (DG) detector readout was evaluated, and the benefit associated with HG mode in regions free from detector saturation was quantified. Such benefit could be realized (without detector saturation) either via DG mode or by incorporation of a bowtie filter. Therefore, three bowtie filters were investigated that varied in thickness and curvature. A polyenergetic gain correction method was developed to equalize the detector response between the flood-field and projection data in the presence of a bowtie. The effect of bowtie filters on dose, scatter-to-primary ratio, contrast, and noise was quantified in phantom studies, and results were compared to a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to characterize x-ray scatter and dose distributions in the head. Imaging in DG mode improved the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by ~15% compared to LG mode at a dose (D 0, measured at the center of a 16 cm CTDI phantom) of 19 mGy. MC dose calculations agreed with CTDI measurements and showed that bowtie filters reduce peripheral dose by as much as 50% at the same central dose. Bowtie filters were found to increase the CNR per unit square-root dose near the center of the image by ~5-20% depending on bowtie thickness, but reduced CNR in the periphery by ~10-40%. Images acquired at equal CTDIw with and without a bowtie demonstrated a 24% increase in CNR at the center of an anthropomorphic head phantom. Combining a thick bowtie filter with a short arc (180°  +  fan angle) scan centered

  12. STUDY OF THE BEAM INDUCED RADIATION IN THE CMS DETECTOR AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Amandeep P; Mokhov, Nikolai; Beri, Suman Bala

    2009-01-01

    point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. We have recently carried out extensive monte carlo simulation studies using MARS program to estimate particle fluxes and radiation dose in the CMS silicon pixel and strip trackers from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt s $=14 TeV and from machine induced background such as beam-gas interactions and beam-halo. We will present results on radiation dose, particle fluxes and spectra from these studies and discuss implications for radiation damage and performance of the CMS silicon tracker detec...

  13. The Localized Discovery and Recovery for Query Packet Losses in Wireless Sensor Networks with Distributed Detector Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Miura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An essential application of wireless sensor networks is to successfully respond to user queries. Query packet losses occur in the query dissemination due to wireless communication problems such as interference, multipath fading, packet collisions, etc. The losses of query messages at sensor nodes result in the failure of sensor nodes reporting the requested data. Hence, the reliable and successful dissemination of query messages to sensor nodes is a non-trivial problem. The target of this paper is to enable highly successful query delivery to sensor nodes by localized and energy-efficient discovery, and recovery of query losses. We adopt local and collective cooperation among sensor nodes to increase the success rate of distributed discoveries and recoveries. To enable the scalability in the operations of discoveries and recoveries, we employ a distributed name resolution mechanism at each sensor node to allow sensor nodes to self-detect the correlated queries and query losses, and then efficiently locally respond to the query losses. We prove that the collective discovery of query losses has a high impact on the success of query dissemination and reveal that scalability can be achieved by using the proposed approach. We further study the novel features of the cooperation and competition in the collective recovery at PHY and MAC layers, and show that the appropriate number of detectors can achieve optimal successful recovery rate. We evaluate the proposed approach with both mathematical analyses and computer simulations. The proposed approach enables a high rate of successful delivery of query messages and it results in short route lengths to recover from query losses. The proposed approach is scalable and operates in a fully distributed manner.

  14. Design of a beam position sensitive cavity as a Schottky noise detector for mass measurements in CR rate at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiangcheng; Huelsmann, Peter; Nolden, Fritz; Steck, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Sanjari, Shahab [ExtreMe Matter Institute, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Litvinov, Yuri [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Piotrowski, Jeremi [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Mass is one of fundamental characteristics of a nucleus. It plays an important role in many areas of physics, as well as other science branches. Especially in nuclear astrophysics, the masses of unstable nuclei close to nucleon drip lines are of great interests, since they are indispensable quantities for modelling nucleosynthesis processes in stellar objects. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), by providing high-intensity high-energy secondary beams, will enable unprecedented opportunities to investigate such nuclei. In particular, the collector ring (CR) is designed to be operated in the isochronous ion-optical mode as a high precision mass spectrometer. In order to satisfy the stringent requirements on accuracy and sensitivity for the future mass measurements, a non-destructive detector that is sensitive to single ions is being developed. Owing to the position sensitivity, it will be possible to correct for errors originating from different orbit lengths. In this work, we present simulation results of several possible designs of a cavity-based detector and discuss their potential applications as Schottky-noise detectors.

  15. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, J., E-mail: julianna.szabo@energia.mta.hu [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Palfalvi, J.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  16. Using Quasi-Elastic Events to Measure Neutrino Oscillations with MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watabe, Masaki [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has been designed to search for a change in the avor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as they travel between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Far Detector in the Soudan mine in Minnesota, 735 km from the target. The MINOS oscillation analysis is mainly performed with the charged current (CC) events and sensitive to constrain high- Δm2 values. However, the quasi-elastic (QEL) charged current interaction is dominant in the energy region important to access low- m2 values. For further improvement, the QEL oscillation analysis is performed in this dissertation. A data sample based on a total of 2.50 x 1020 POT is used for this analysis. In summary, 55 QEL-like events are observed at the Far detector while 87.06 ± 13.17 (syst:) events are expected with null oscillation hypothesis. These data are consistent with disappearance via oscillation with m2 = 2:10 0.37 (stat:) ± 0.24 (syst:) eV2 and the maximal mixing angle.

  17. Simulation of ion beam induced current in radiation detectors and microelectronic devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2009-10-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause Single Event Effects (SEE) in a variety of electronic devices. The mechanism that leads to these SEEs is current induced by the radiation in these devices. While this phenomenon is detrimental in ICs, this is the basic mechanism behind the operation of semiconductor radiation detectors. To be able to predict SEEs in ICs and detector responses we need to be able to simulate the radiation induced current as the function of time. There are analytical models, which work for very simple detector configurations, but fail for anything more complex. On the other end, TCAD programs can simulate this process in microelectronic devices, but these TCAD codes costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and they require huge computing resources. In addition, in certain cases they fail to predict the correct behavior. A simulation model based on the Gunn theorem was developed and used with the COMSOL Multiphysics framework.

  18. Measurement of peak fluence of neutron beams using Bi-fission detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Jain; Ashok Kumar; N L Singh; L Tommasino; B K Singh

    2012-03-01

    Fission fragments and other charged particles leave tracks of permanent damage in most of the insulating solids. Damage track detectors are useful for personal dosimeters and for flux/dose determination of high-energy particles from accelerators or cosmic rays. A detector that has its principal response at nucleon energy above 50 MeV is provided by the fission of Bi-209. Neutrons produce the largest percentage of hadron dose in most high-energy radiation fields. In these fields, the neutron spectrum is typically formed by low-energy neutrons (evaporation spectrum) and high-energy neutrons (knock-on spectrum). We used Bi-fission detectors to measure neutron peak fluence and compared the result with the calculated value of neutron peak fluence. For the exposure to 100 MeV we have used the iThemba Facility in South Africa.

  19. Orbital angular moment of a partially coherent beam propagating through an astigmatic ABCD optical system with loss or gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yangjian; Zhu, Shijun

    2014-04-01

    We derive the general expression for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) flux of an astigmatic partially coherent beam carrying twist phase [i.e., twisted anisotropic Gaussian-Schell model (TAGSM) beam] propagating through an astigmatic ABCD optical system with loss or gain. The evolution properties of the OAM flux of a TAGSM beam in a Gaussian cavity or propagating through a cylindrical thin lens are illustrated numerically with the help of the derived formula. It is found that we can modulate the OAM of a partially coherent beam by varying the parameters of the cavity or the orientation angle of the cylindrical thin lens, which will be useful in some applications, such as free-space optical communications and particle trapping.

  20. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass rod detector in high-energy photon beams from a linear accelerator and cyber-knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakia, Fujio; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2004-07-01

    A fully automatic radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. This article discusses the dosimetric properties of the GRD including uniformity and reproducibility of signal, dose linearity, and energy and directional dependence in high-energy photon beams. In addition, energy response is measured in electron beams. The uniformity and reproducibility of the signal from 50 GRDs using a 60Co beam are both +/- 1.1% (one standard deviation). Good dose linearity of the GRD is maintained for doses ranging from 0.5 to 30 Gy, the lower and upper limits of this study, respectively. The GRD response is found to show little energy dependence in photon energies of a 60Co beam, 4 MV (TPR20(10)=0.617) and 10 MV (TPR(20)10=0.744) x-ray beams. However, the GRD responses for 9 MeV (mean energy, Ez = 3.6 MeV) and 16 MeV (Ez = 10.4 MeV) electron beams are 4%-5% lower than that for a 60Co beam in the beam quality dependence. The measured angular dependence of GRD, ranging from 0 degrees (along the long axis of GRD) to 120 degrees is within 1.5% for a 4 MV x-ray beam. As applications, a linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system and Cyber-Knife output factors are measured by a GRD and compared with those from various detectors including a p-type silicon diode detector, a diamond detector, and an ion chamber. It is found that the GRD is a very useful detector for small field dosimetry, in particular, below 10 mm circular fields.

  1. Low-resistance strip sensors for beam-loss event protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullán, M., E-mail: Miguel.Ullan@imb-cnm.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus Universitario de Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Benítez, V.; Quirion, D.; Zabala, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus Universitario de Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lacasta, C.; Soldevila, U.; García, C. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC, CSIC-UV), Valencia (Spain); Fadeyev, V.; Wortman, J.; DeFilippis, J.; Shumko, M.; Grillo, A.A; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP), University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-11-21

    AC-coupled silicon strip sensors can be damaged in case of a beam loss due to the possibility of a large charge accumulation in the bulk, developing very high voltages across the coupling capacitors which can destroy them. Punch-through structures are currently used to avoid this problem helping to evacuate the accumulated charge as large voltages are developing. Nevertheless, previous experiments, performed with laser pulses, have shown that these structures can become ineffective in relatively long strips. The large value of the implant resistance can effectively isolate the “far” end of the strip from the punch-through structure leading to large voltages. We present here our developments to fabricate low-resistance strip sensors to avoid this problem. The deposition of a conducting material in contact with the implants drastically reduces the strip resistance, assuring the effectiveness of the punch-through structures. First devices have been fabricated with this new technology. Initial results with laser tests show the expected reduction in peak voltages on the low resistivity implants. Other aspects of the sensor performance, including the signal formation, are not affected by the new technology.

  2. Localization of the large-angle foil-scattering beam loss caused by the multiturn charge-exchange injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazami; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kinsho, Michikazu

    2013-07-01

    In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, significant losses were observed at the branching of the H0 dump line and the beam position monitor that was inserted downstream of the H0 dump branch duct. These losses were caused by the large-angle scattering of the injection and circulating beams at the charge-exchange foil. To realize high-power operation, these losses must be mitigated. Therefore, a new collimation system was developed and installed in October 2011. To efficiently optimize this system, the behavior of particles scattered by the foil and produced by the absorber were simulated, and the optimal position and angle of the absorber were investigated. During this process, an angle regulation method for the absorber was devised. An outline of this system, the angle regulation method for the absorber, and the performance of this new collimation system are described.

  3. Measurement of the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam with the ND280 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwai, E; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    The T2K experiment has reported the first observation of the appearance of electron neutrinos in a muon neutrino beam. The main and irreducible background to the appearance signal comes from the presence in the neutrino beam of a small intrinsic component of electron neutrinos originating from muon and kaon decays. In T2K, this component is expected to represent 1.2% of the total neutrino flux. A measurement of this component using the near detector (ND280), located 280 m from the target, is presented. The charged current interactions of electron neutrinos are selected by combining the particle identification capabilities of both the time projection chambers and electromagnetic calorimeters of ND280. The measured ratio between the observed electron neutrino beam component and the prediction is 1.01+-0.10 providing a direct confirmation of the neutrino fluxes and neutrino cross section modeling used for T2K neutrino oscillation analyses. Electron neutrinos coming from muons and kaons decay are also separately ...

  4. On the H8 beam line of the SPS in the North Area, a complete slice of the ATLAS detector is taking shape

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The Inner Detector and Calorimetry setup. The Liquid Argon electromagnetic calorimeter in its cryostat, and the tile calorimeter (centre) are mounted such that they can be repositioned in the beam, which travels from left to right. Also visible is the magnet housing the Pixel and SCT detectors (far left), the Transition Radiation Tracker (left) and part of a MDT/RPC Muon chamber (far right).

  5. Test-beam and laboratory characterisation of the TORCH prototype detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ros, A; Castillo-Garcia, L; Conneely, T; Cussans, D; Foehl, K; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gao, R; Gys, T; Harnew, N; Milnes, J; Piedigrossi, D; Rademacker, J; Van Dijk, M

    2016-01-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight (TOF) detector is being developed to provide particle identification up to a momentum of 10 GeV/c over a flight distance of 10 m. It has a DIRC-like construction with View the MathML source10mm thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a Cherenkov radiator. Photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate periphery where they are focused onto an array of customised position-sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple photons. The MCPs have pixels of effective size 0.4 mm×6.6 mm2 in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, by incorporating a novel charge-sharing technique to improve the spatial resolution to better than the pitch of the readout anodes. Prototype photon detectors and readout electronics have been tested and calibrated in the laboratory. Preliminary results from testbeam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector are a...

  6. A beam test of prototype time projection chamber using micro-pattern gas detectors at KEK

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Makoto Kobayashi; on behalf of part of the ILC{TPC Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    We conducted a series of beam tests of prototype TPCs for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment, equipped with an MWPC, a MicroMEGAS, or GEMs as a readout device. The prototype operated successfully in a test beam at KEK under an axial magnetic field of up to 1 T. The analysis of data is now in progress and some of the preliminary results obtained with GEMs and MicroMEGAS are presented along with our interpretation. Also given is the extrapolation of the obtained spatial resolution to that of a large TPC expected as the central tracker of the ILC experiment.

  7. Influence of the beam-size effect on particle losses at B-factories PEP-II and KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G. E-mail: serbo@math.nsc.ru

    2004-01-21

    In the colliders, the macroscopically large impact parameters give a substantial contribution to the standard cross-section of the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma} process. These impact parameters may be much larger than the transverse sizes of the colliding bunches. It means that the standard cross-section of this process has to be substantially modified. In the present paper such a beam-size is calculated for bremsstrahlung at B-factories PEP-II and KEKB. We find out that this effect reduces beam losses due to bremsstrahlung by about 20%.

  8. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hueso-Gonzalez, F.; Biegun, A. K.; Dendooven, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Golnik, C.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Petzoldt, J.; Roemer, K. E.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2015-01-01

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range a

  9. Latest beam test results from RICH prototypes using hybrid photo detectors and multi anode PMTs

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, E; Barber, G J; Bibby, J H; Brook, N H; Duane, A; Easo, S; Eklund, L; Gibson, V; Gys, Thierry; Halley, A W; Harnew, N; John, M; Piedigrossi, D; Simmons, B; Smale, N J; Teixeira-Dias, P; Websdale, David M; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, Ken H

    1999-01-01

    Beam tests were performed in 1998 to investigate the performance of a prototype of the downstream RICH of the LHCb using hybrid photo- diodes and multi anode PMTs. The angular resolutions obtained from these photodetectors under various experimental configurations are compared with the expectations from simulation. (6 refs).

  10. Latest beam test results from RICH prototypes using hybrid photo detectors and multi anode PMTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, E.; Alemi, M.; Barber, G.; Bibby, J.H.; Brook, N.H.; Duane, A.; Easo, S.; Eklund, L.; Gibson, V.; Gys, T.; Halley, A.W.; Harnew, N.; John, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Simmons, B.; Smale, N.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Websdale, D.; Wotton, S.A.; Wyllie, K

    1999-08-21

    Beam tests were performed in 1998 to investigate the performance of a prototype of the downstream RICH of the LHCb using hybrid photo-diodes and multi anode PMTs. The angular resolutions obtained from these photodetectors under various experimental c