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Sample records for beam induced pressure

  1. Beam Induced Pressure Rise at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Y; Bai, Mei; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Gullotta, Justin; He, Ping; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Peggs, Steve; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smart, Loralie; Snydstrup, Louis; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Zeno, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Beam induced pressure rise in RHIC warm sections is currently one of the machine intensity and luminosity limits. This pressure rise is mainly due to electron cloud effects. The RHIC warm section electron cloud is associated with longer bunch spacings compared with other machines, and is distributed non-uniformly around the ring. In addition to the countermeasures for normal electron cloud, such as the NEG coated pipe, solenoids, beam scrubbing, bunch gaps, and larger bunch spacing, other studies and beam tests toward the understanding and counteracting RHIC warm electron cloud are of interest. These include the ion desorption studies and the test of anti-grazing ridges. For high bunch intensities and the shortest bunch spacings, pressure rises at certain locations in the cryogenic region have been observed during the past two runs. Beam studies are planned for the current 2005 run and the results will be reported.

  2. Beam-induced pressure variations in a TFTR neutral-beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, J.E.; Berkner, K.H.

    1981-10-01

    In neutral-beam injection systems either all or part of the gas flow into the neutralizer comes from the plasma source. When the beam is switched on, ions from the plasma source, which used to contribute to the gas flow, are converted to an energetic beam and are pumped away: hence reducing the gas input to the neutralizer. The large volume of the neutralizer and its high conductance damp out rapid changes; for example, when the gas to the source is first turned on, there is a 230 msec exponential rise time associated with pressure in the neutralizer. The neutralizer in turn acts as a source of gas to the first chamber and the first chamber to the second and so on. Beam dumps become additional sources of gas in the second chamber and target tank as gas molecules are collisionally desorbed from the surface of the dump. A simple analytical model (the equivalent of an electrical RC circuit) of the volumes and conductances of the system has been used to describe the pressure variations. The use of time dependent sources terms in the model gives an estimate of the desorption rate from the dumps and its time variation during a beam pulse

  3. Analysis of radiation pressure force exerted on a biological cell induced by high-order Bessel beams using Debye series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Renxian; Ren, Kuan Fang; Han, Xiang'e; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Shuxi

    2013-01-01

    Debye series expansion (DSE) is employed to the analysis of radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted on biological cells induced by high-order Bessel beams (BB). The beam shape coefficients (BSCs) for high-order Bessel beams are calculated using analytical expressions obtained by the integral localized approximation (ILA). Different types of cells, including a real Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell and a lymphocyte which are respectively modeled by a coated and five-layered sphere, are considered. The RPF induced by high-order Bessel beams is compared with that by Gaussian beams and zeroth-order Bessel beams, and the effect of different scattering processes on RPF is studied. Numerical calculations show that high-order Bessel beams with zero central intensity can also transversely trap particle in the beam center, and some scattering processes can provide longitudinal pulling force. -- Highlights: ► BSCs for high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) is derived using ILA. ► DSE is employed to study the RPF induced by HOBB exerted on multilayered cells. ► RPF is decided by radius relative to the interval of peaks in intensity profile. ► HOBB can also transversely trap high-index particle in the vicinity of beam axis. ► RPF for some scattering processes can longitudinally pull particles back

  4. Pressure control of a proton beam-irradiated water target through an internal flow channel-induced thermosyphon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2017-07-01

    A water target was designed to enhance cooling efficiency using a thermosyphon, which is a system that uses natural convection to induce heat exchange. Two water targets were fabricated: a square target without any flow channel and a target with a flow channel design to induce a thermosyphon mechanism. These two targets had the same internal volume of 8 ml. First, visualization experiments were performed to observe the internal flow by natural convection. Subsequently, an experiment was conducted to compare the cooling performance of both water targets by measuring the temperature and pressure. A 30-MeV proton beam with a beam current of 20 μA was used to irradiate both targets. Consequently, the target with an internal flow channel had a lower mean temperature and a 50% pressure drop compared to the target without a flow channel during proton beam irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Highly efficient generation of ultraintense high-energy ion beams using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Raczka, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Euratom Association, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-08-20

    Results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fast ion generation in the recently proposed laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) scheme in which a picosecond circularly polarized laser pulse of intensity {approx}10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} irradiates a carbon target placed in a cavity are presented. It is shown that due to circulation of the laser pulse in the cavity, the laser-ions energy conversion efficiency in the LICPA scheme is more than twice as high as that for the conventional (without a cavity) radiation pressure acceleration scheme and a quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beam of the mean ion energy {approx}0.5 GeV and the energy fluence {approx}0.5 GJ/cm{sup 2} is produced with the efficiency {approx}40%. The results of PIC simulations are found to be in fairly good agreement with the predictions of the generalized light-sail model.

  6. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  7. Beam-Loss Induced Pressure Rise of LHC Collimator Materials Irradiated with 158 GeV/u $In^{49+}$ Ions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, Edgar; Hansen, Jan; Page, Eric; Vincke, Helmut H

    2004-01-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 1044 to 107 molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measure-ment of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for LHC ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the SPS to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316 LN stainless steel, were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental set-up, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the deri...

  8. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u $In^{49+}$ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, Edgar; Hansen, Jan; Page, Eric; Vincke, H

    2004-01-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 7/ molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the super proton synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental ...

  9. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreshkin, E V; Barengolts, S A; Chaikovsky, S A; Oreshkin, V I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes. (paper)

  10. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  11. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158  GeV/u In^{49+} ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10^{4} to 10^{7} molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158  GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  12. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  13. Contrastive Analysis and Research on Negative Pressure Beam Tube System and Positive Pressure Beam Tube System for Mine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyi; Shen, Jialong; Liu, Xinbo

    2018-01-01

    Against the technical defects of universally applicable beam tube monitoring system at present, such as air suction in the beam tube, line clogging, long sampling time, etc., the paper analyzes the current situation of the spontaneous combustion fire disaster forecast of mine in our country and these defects one by one. On this basis, the paper proposes a research thought that improving the positive pressure beam tube so as to substitute the negative pressure beam tube. Then, the paper introduces the beam tube monitoring system based on positive pressure technology through theoretical analysis and experiment. In the comparison with negative pressure beam tube, the paper concludes the advantage of the new system and draws the conclusion that the positive pressure beam tube is superior to the negative pressure beam tube system both in test result and test time. At last, the paper proposes prospect of the beam tube monitoring system based on positive pressure technology.

  14. Proposed dedicated high pressure beam lines at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruoff, A.L.; Vohra, Y.K.; Bassett, W.A.; Batterman, B.W.; Bilderback, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    An instrumentation proposal for dedicated high pressure beam lines at CHESS is described. It is the purpose of this proposed program to provide researchers in high pressure science with beam lines for X-ray diffraction studies in the megabar regime. This will involve radiation from a bending magnet as well as from a wiggler. Examples of the high pressure results up to 2.16 Mbar are shown. Diffraction patterns from bending magnet and wiggler beams are shown and compared. The need for this facility by the high pressure community is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation in an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear contribution from ion-induced nucleation and consider this to be the first unambiguous observation of the ion......-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  16. Beam-Induced Damage Mechanisms and their Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid interaction of highly energetic particle beams with matter induces dynamic responses in the impacted component. If the beam pulse is sufficiently intense, extreme conditions can be reached, such as very high pressures, changes of material density, phase transitions, intense stress waves, material fragmentation and explosions. Even at lower intensities and longer time-scales, significant effects may be induced, such as vibrations, large oscillations, and permanent deformation of the impacted components. These lectures provide an introduction to the mechanisms that govern the thermomechanical phenomena induced by the interaction between particle beams and solids and to the analytical and numerical methods that are available for assessing the response of impacted components. An overview of the design principles of such devices is also provided, along with descriptions of material selection guidelines and the experimental tests that are required to validate materials and components exposed to interactio...

  17. Beam steering effects in turbulent high pressure flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B; Kaeppeli, B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The propagation of a laser beam through a flame is influenced by variations of the optical density. Especially in turbulent high pressure flames this may seriously limit the use of laser diagnostic methods. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  18. Electron-beam-induced conduction in dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acris, F C; Davies, P M; Lewis, T J [University Coll. of North Wales, Bangor (UK). School of Electronic Engineering Science

    1976-03-14

    A model for the enhanced conduction induced in dielectric films under electron bombardment while electrically stressed is discussed. It is assumed that the beam produces a virtual electrode at the end of its range in the dielectric and, as a consequence, the induced conduction is shown to depend on the properties of that part of the dielectric beyond the range of the beam. This model has also been discussed recently by Nunes de Oliviera and Gross. In the present treatment, it is shown how the model permits investigation of beam scattering and carrier generation and recombination processes. Experiments on electron-bombardment-induced conduction of thin (72 to 360 nm) films of anodic tantalum oxide are reported and it is shown that the theoretical model provides a very satisfactory explanation of all features of the results including the apparent threshold energy for enhanced conduction.

  19. Modeling beam-front dynamics at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.; Yu, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of space charge neutralization at the front of an intense self-focused electron beam pulse exhibits important differences in different gas pressure regimes. At very low pressures, the beam front is in the so-called ion-focused regime (IFR) where all secondary electrons are expelled from the beam region by the radial electric field without causing significant additional ionization. We estimate the upper pressure boundary of this regime by considering the distance scale length for cascade (avalanche) ionization. Data from the FX-25 diode experiments indicate a critical transition pressure (P/sub c/) that agrees with this estimate and with its scaling among various gas types. Normal mobility-limited treatments (local conductivity models) of the secondary electrons at the beam front are not justified until the gas pressure is 10 to 50 times higher than P/sub c/, due to runaway of these secondary electrons in the strong space-charge electric field at the lower pressures. The main conclusion of this study is that a non-local phase space (Boltzmann) treatment of the secondary electrons is required to accurately describe these different beam front regimes and the transitions between them; such a code model is currently under development

  20. Beam induced rf cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Wang, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    The authors calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ω r of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω ο . The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(hω ο t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting rf cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kinds of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  1. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  2. Electron beam generation in the fore-vacuum pressure range

    CERN Document Server

    Burachevskij, Y A; Kuzemchenko, M N; Mytnikov, A V; Oks, E M

    2001-01-01

    One presents the results of investigations to generate electron beams within 0.01-0.1 Torr gas pressure range. To generate a beam one used a plasma source based on a hollow cathode discharge in combination with a plane accelerating gap. Peculiar features of electron emission and acceleration within the mentioned pressure range are associated with high probability of gas ionization in an accelerating gap and with generation of ion flow meeting electron beam. It results in reduction of discharge combustion intensification, as well as, in plasma concentration range. The developed design of an electron source enables to generate cylindrical beams with up to 1 A current and with up to 10 keV energy

  3. Generation of runaway electron beams in high-pressure nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Burachenko, A. G.; Baksht, E. Kh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the results of experimental studies of the amplitude-temporal characteristics of a runaway electron beam, as well as breakdown voltage in nitrogen are presented. The voltage pulses with the amplitude in incident wave ≈120 kV and the rise time of ≈0.3 ns was used. The supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) was detected by a collector behind the flat anode. The amplitude-time characteristics of the voltage and SAEB current were studied with subnanosecond time resolution. The maximum pressure at which a SAEB is detectable by collector was ∼1 MPa. This pressure increases with decreasing the voltage rise time. The waveforms of the discharge and runaway electron beam currents was synchronized with the voltage pulses. The mechanism of the runaway electron generation in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  4. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  5. Pressure History Measurement in a Microwave Beaming Thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Ushio, Masato; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2006-01-01

    In a microwave beaming thruster with a 1-dimensional nozzle, plasma and shock wave propagates in the nozzle absorbing microwave power. In this study, pressure histories in the thruster are measured using pressure gauges. Measured pressure history at the thruster wall shows constant pressure during plasma propagation in the nozzle. The result of measurement of the propagating velocities of shock wave and plasma shows that both propagate in the same velocity. These result shows that thrust producing model of analogy of pulse detonation engine is successful for the 1D thruster

  6. Method and Apparatus for Characterizing Pressure Sensors using Modulated Light Beam Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Embodiments of apparatuses and methods are provided that use light sources instead of sound sources for characterizing and calibrating sensors for measuring small pressures to mitigate many of the problems with using sound sources. In one embodiment an apparatus has a light source for directing a beam of light on a sensing surface of a pressure sensor for exerting a force on the sensing surface. The pressure sensor generates an electrical signal indicative of the force exerted on the sensing surface. A modulator modulates the beam of light. A signal processor is electrically coupled to the pressure sensor for receiving the electrical signal.

  7. Beam induced heating reduction by bunch flattening

    CERN Document Server

    Argyropoulos, T; Esteban Müller, JF; Jakobsen, S; Mastoridis, T; Metral, E; Mounet, N; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E; Timko, H

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this MD was to modify the beam induced heating on some critical LHC components by flattening the bunch distribution by applying an RF phase modulation. In this way, the beam spectrum was modified so that the power spectral density is reduced at low frequencies (below 1.1 GHz), which is the band of frequencies where the beam interaction with different component impedances is most critical. We present temperature measurements showing the beneficial effect of this latter distribution on some of the monitored devices. Longitudinal peak detected Schottky spectrum was also acquired during the first part of the MD with the intention of estimating the synchrotron frequency shift due to the reactive part of the longitudinal impedance. In the second part of the MD, an attempt to cure the transverse instability during the beta-squeeze was done by reducing the RF voltage to lengthen the bunches and enhance Landau Damping.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma analysis by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aranda Gonzalvo, Y.; Whitmore, T.D.; Rees, J.A.; Seymour, D.L.; Stoffels - Adamowicz, E.

    2006-01-01

    Fractional no. d. measurements for a radiofrequency plasma needle operating at atm. pressure were obtained using a mol. beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system designed for diagnostics of atm. plasmas. The MBMS system comprises three differentially pumped stages and a mass/energy analyzer and includes

  9. Laser induced focusing for over-dense plasma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Mulser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The capability of ion acceleration with high power, pulsed lasers has become an active field of research in the past years. In this context, the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism has been the topic of numerous theoretical and experimental publications. Within that mechanism, a high power, pulsed laser beam hits a thin film target. In contrast to the target normal sheath acceleration, the entire film target is accelerated as a bulk by the radiation pressure of the laser. Simulations predict heavy ion beams with kinetic energy up to GeV, as well as solid body densities. However, there are several effects which limit the efficiency of the RPA: On the one hand, the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability limits the predicted density. On the other hand, conventional accelerator elements, such as magnetic focusing devices are too bulky to be installed right after the target. Therefore, we present a new beam transport method, suitable for RPA-like/over-dense plasma beams: laser induced focusing

  10. Beam-beam-induced orbit effects at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaumann, M; Fernandez, R Alemany

    2014-01-01

    For high bunch intensities the long-range beam-beam interactions are strong enough to provoke effects on the orbit. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are presented in this paper

  11. Limits for Beam Induced Damage: Reckless or too Cautious?

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Accidental events implying direct beam impacts on collimators are of the utmost importance as they may lead to serious limitations of the overall LHC Performance. In order to assess damage threshold of components impacted by high energy density beams, entailing changes of phase and extreme pressures, state-of-the-art numerical simulation methods are required. In this paper, a review of the different dynamic response regimes induced by particle beams is given along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each regime. Particular attention is paid to the most critical case, that of shock waves, for which standard Finite Element codes are totally unfit. A novel category of numerical tools, named Hydrocodes, has been adapted and used to analyse the consequences of an asynchronous beam abort on Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT). A number of simulations has been carried out with varying beam energy, number of bunches and bunch sizes allowing to identify different damage levels for the TCT up to catastr...

  12. Initial operation of the LEDA beam-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, James H.; Gurd, Pamela A.; Martinez, Derwin G.; Gilpatrick, J. Douglas; Shurter, R. Bradford; Stettler, Matthew W.; Madsen, David W.; O'Hara, James F.; Sage, Joan; Schaefer, Timothy L.

    2000-01-01

    A diagnostic based on beam-induced fluorescence has been developed and used to examine the expanded beam in the High-Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) section of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA). The system consists of a camera, a gas injector, a spectrometer, and a control system. Gas is injected to provide a medium for the beam to excite, the camera captures the resulting image of the fluorescing gas, and the spectrometer measures the spectrum of the emitted light. EPICS was used to control the camera and acquire and store images. Data analysis is presently being performed offline. A Kodak DCS420m professional CCD camera is the primary component of the optical system. InterScience, Inc. modified the camera with the addition of a gain of 4000 image intensifier, thereby producing an intensified camera with a sensitivity of ∼0.5 milli-lux. Light is gathered with a 1 '' format, 16-160 mm, Computar zoom lens. This lens is attached to the camera via a Century Precision Optics relay lens. Images obtained using only hydrogen from the beam stop exhibited features not yet understood. Images with good signal-to-noise ratio were obtained with the injection of sufficient nitrogen to raise the HEBT pressure to 2-8x10 -6 torr. Two strong nitrogen lines, believed to be of the first negative group of N 2 + , were identified at 391 and 428 nm

  13. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure

  14. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  15. Temperature distribution induced by electron beam in a closed cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molhem, A.G.; Soulayman, S.Sh.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate heat transfer phenomena induced by EB in a closed cavity an experimental arrangement, which allows generating and focusing an electron beam in to closed cavity within 1 mm in diameter and measuring temperature all over any perpendicular section to the EB, is used for this purpose. Experimental data show that the radial distribution of current density and temperature is normal with pressure and location dependent parameters. Moreover, there is two distinguishable regions in the EB: one is central while the other surrounds the first one. (orig.)

  16. Beam induced transit time signals at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Beam induced signals at frequencies related to inter-cavity transit times have been detected at SPEAR. Whether this effect enters significantly into beam instabilities has not yet been determined. Preliminary experiments suggest that under certain conditions at low energy (1.5 GeV) , when μ/sub s/, passes through one of the transit time resonances, some current is lost. Care must be taken, however, not to confuse this effect, if it exists, with synchrobetatron resonances and with an as yet unexplained vertical instability in SPEAR. At high energy (3.7 GeV), no effect has been shown to exist, though detectable signals are present. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  17. Seismic induced earth pressures in buried vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of earth pressures acting on buried structures and induced by a seismic event are considered in this paper. A soil-structure-interaction analysis is performed for typical Department of Energy high level waste storage tanks using a lumped parameter model. The resulting soil pressure distributions are determined and compared with the static soil pressure to assess the design significance of the seismic induced soil pressures. It is found that seismic pressures do not control design unless the peak ground acceleration exceeds about 0.3 G. The effect of soil non linearities (resulting from local soil failure) are also found to have little effect on the predictions of the seismic response of the buried structure. The seismic induced pressures are found to be very similar to those predicted using the elastic model in ASCE 4-86

  18. Laser induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilecce, G; De Benedictis, S; Martini, L M; Tosi, P; Scotoni, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an outline of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics and practical recommendations for its use in atmospheric pressure discharges. LIF principles, technical requirements and rationalization of experimental outcomes by modelling are addressed. Important issues that are particularly relevant to small scale, spatially inhomogeneous discharges, like plasma-jets, are emphasized. For the first time, all collision processes and the spatial non-homogeneity of the laser beam are together accounted for in the LIF model. Saturation characteristics are discussed and used for the assessment of model parameters. A calibration procedure is discussed and implemented. Gas temperature measurements by LIF are also addressed. The whole description of the technique is given, without loss of generality, through the example of its application to the OH radical. Notes on other diatomic radicals, CH, NO and CN, are given along the paper. Some results in a RF plasma-jet are presented as an example of application in a discharge system where all the concepts developed in the paper are applied. (paper)

  19. Pressure induced deep tissue injury explained

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, C.W.J.; Bader, D.L.; Loerakker, S.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    The paper describes the current views on the cause of a sub-class of pressure ulcers known as pressure induced deep tissue injury (DTI). A multi-scale approach was adopted using model systems ranging from single cells in culture, tissue engineered muscle to animal studies with small animals. This

  20. A critical literature review of focused electron beam induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, W. F. van; Hagen, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive review is given of the results from literature on electron beam induced deposition. Electron beam induced deposition is a complex process, where many and often mutually dependent factors are involved. The process has been studied by many over many years in many different experimental setups, so it is not surprising that there is a great variety of experimental results. To come to a better understanding of the process, it is important to see to which extent the experimental results are consistent with each other and with the existing model. All results from literature were categorized by sorting the data according to the specific parameter that was varied (current density, acceleration voltage, scan patterns, etc.). Each of these parameters can have an effect on the final deposit properties, such as the physical dimensions, the composition, the morphology, or the conductivity. For each parameter-property combination, the available data are discussed and (as far as possible) interpreted. By combining models for electron scattering in a solid, two different growth regimes, and electron beam induced heating, the majority of the experimental results were explained qualitatively. This indicates that the physical processes are well understood, although quantitatively speaking the models can still be improved. The review makes clear that several major issues remain. One issue encountered when interpreting results from literature is the lack of data. Often, important parameters (such as the local precursor pressure) are not reported, which can complicate interpretation of the results. Another issue is the fact that the cross section for electron induced dissociation is unknown. In a number of cases, a correlation between the vertical growth rate and the secondary electron yield was found, which suggests that the secondary electrons dominate the dissociation rather than the primary electrons. Conclusive evidence for this hypothesis has not been found. Finally

  1. Origins of pressure-induced protein transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikian, Tigran V; Macgregor, Robert B

    2009-12-18

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pressure-induced protein denaturation can be analyzed based on the pressure-dependent differences in the apparent volume occupied by amino acids inside the protein and when they are exposed to water in an unfolded conformation. We present here an analysis for the peptide group and the 20 naturally occurring amino acid side chains based on volumetric parameters for the amino acids in the interior of the native state, the micelle-like interior of the pressure-induced denatured state, and the unfolded conformation modeled by N-acetyl amino acid amides. The transfer of peptide groups from the protein interior to water becomes increasingly favorable as pressure increases. Thus, solvation of peptide groups represents a major driving force in pressure-induced protein denaturation. Polar side chains do not appear to exhibit significant pressure-dependent changes in their preference for the protein interior or solvent. The transfer of nonpolar side chains from the protein interior to water becomes more unfavorable as pressure increases. We conclude that a sizeable population of nonpolar side chains remains buried inside a solvent-inaccessible core of the pressure-induced denatured state. At elevated pressures, this core may become packed almost as tightly as the interior of the native state. The presence and partial disappearance of large intraglobular voids is another driving force facilitating pressure-induced denaturation of individual proteins. Our data also have implications for the kinetics of protein folding and shed light on the nature of the folding transition state ensemble.

  2. High Pressure, High Gradient RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R P

    2004-01-01

    High intensity, low emittance muon beams are needed for new applications such as muon colliders and neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. Ionization cooling, where muon energy is lost in a low-Z absorber and only the longitudinal component is regenerated using RF cavities, is presently the only known cooling technique that is fast enough to be effective in the short muon lifetime. RF cavities filled with high-pressure hydrogen gas bring two advantages to the ionization technique: the energy absorption and energy regeneration happen simultaneously rather than sequentially, and higher RF gradients and better cavity breakdown behavior are possible than in vacuum due to the Paschen effect. These advantages and some disadvantages and risks will be discussed along with a description of the present and desired RF R&D efforts needed to make accelerators and colliders based on muon beams less futuristic.

  3. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  4. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  5. Electron beam induced conductivity in 'PET' and 'FEP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzade, S.J.; Jog, J.P.; Dake, S.B.; Bhoraskar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Electron Beam Induced Conductivity (EBIC), classified into EBIC (bulk) and EBIC (surface) have been measured in PET and FEP respectively. The peculiar oscillatory nature of the induced gain versus beam energy variations is explained in terms of the spatial distributions of the trapping centres near the surface of the polymers. (author)

  6. Full scale measurement of wind induced pressures : 1 configuration of wind induced pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Wijen, H.L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A research project 10 the spectral characteristics of wind induced pressures is in progress in Eindhoven. This project includes both wind tunnel and full scale measurements. Wind induced pressures are measured in full scale at the main building of Eindhoven University of Technology. This paper

  7. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  8. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  9. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  10. A novel polarization demodulation method using polarization beam splitter (PBS) for dynamic pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Yiming; Shen, Huiping

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we propose a new design to demodulate polarization properties induced by pressure using a PBS (polarization beam splitter), which is different with traditional polarimeter based on the 4-detector polarization measurement approach. The theoretical model is established by Muller matrix method. Experimental results confirm the validity of our analysis. Proportional relationships and linear fit are found between output signal and applied pressure. A maximum sensitivity of 0.092182 mv/mv is experimentally achieved and the frequency response exhibits a <0.14 dB variation across the measurement bandwidth. The sensitivity dependence on incident SOP (state of polarization) is investigated. The simple and all-fiber configuration, low-cost and high speed potential make it promising for fiber-based dynamic pressure sensing.

  11. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  12. Ultrasonic testing of electron beam closure weld on pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    One of the special products manufactured at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department (GEND) is a small stainless steel vessel designed to hold a component under high pressure for long periods. The vessel is a thick-walled cylinder with a threaded receptacle into which a plug is screwed and welded after receiving the unit to be tested. The test cavity is then pressurized through a small diameter opening in the bottom and that opening is welded closed. When x-ray inspection techniques did not reveal defective welds at the threaded plug in a pressured vessel, occasional ''leakers'' occurred. With normal equipment tolerances, the electron beam spike tends to wander from the desired path, particularly at the root of the weld. Ultrasonic techniques were used to successfully inspect the weld. The testing technique is based on the observation that ultrasonic energy is reflected from the unwelded screw threads and not from the regions where the threads are completely fused together by welding. Any gas pore or any threaded region outside the weld bead can produce an echo. The units are rotated while the ultrasonic transducer travels in a direction parallel to the axis of rotation and toward the welded end. This produces a helical scan which is converted to a two-dimensional presentation in which incomplete welds can be noted. (U.S.)

  13. Electron beam induced modification of grafted polyamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timus, D.M.; Brasoveanu, M.M.; Bradley, D.A.; Popov, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that irradiation, when applied on its own or in combination with other physical and chemical treatments, can manifest in radiation damage to materials. Radiation processing technology focuses upon producing favourable modification of materials through use of relatively high dose and dose rates. Current interest is in modifying the thermal and electrical properties of textured polymers in an effort to improve safety and wear comfort of clothing. No less important is the production of textiles which are safe to use, both in homes and offices. Present investigations provide additional data in support of findings which show that polyamides, a particular class of textured polymer, are amenable to radiation processing. Accelerated electron beam irradiation of sheets of polyamide fibre results in induced grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acids. The degree of grafting is critically dependent upon irradiation dose and the extent of monomers dilution. Of particular importance is the high correlation which is found between degree of grafting and a decrease in the softening rate of the modified polyamide. A systematic modification of electrical conductivity is also observed. (author)

  14. Pressure-induced polymerization of phenoxyethyl acrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, K; Wrzalik, R; Paluch, M; Ziolo, J [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Roland, C M [Naval Research Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Code 6120, Washington, DC 20375-5342 (United States)

    2008-06-18

    Polymerization of phenoxyethyl acrylate was induced without catalyst or initiators by the application of hydrostatic pressure at elevated temperature. Broadband dielectric and infrared spectroscopy were employed to follow the course of the reaction, which reached a degree of conversion of 60%. The structure of the obtained polymer was determined from density functional theory calculations.

  15. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Avery, S; Sehgal, C M

    2014-01-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  16. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Veldhoven, E. van; Maas, D.J.; Sadeghian Marnani, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope (AFM) probes by He+ beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+ beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the

  17. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Auchmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2009–2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012 instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  18. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  19. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  20. Resistance and sheet resistance measurements using electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, A.; Pluska, M.; Ratajczak, J.; Szerling, A.; KaPtcki, J.

    2006-01-01

    A method for measurement of spatially uniform or nonuniform resistance in layers and strips, based on electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique, is described. High electron beam currents are used so that the overall resistance of the measurement circuit affects the EBIC signal. During the evaluation, the electron beam is scanned along the measured object, whose load resistance varies with the distance. The variation is compensated by an adjustable resistance within an external circuit. The method has been experimentally deployed for sheet resistance determination of buried regions of lateral confinements in semiconductor laser heterostructures manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy

  1. Pressure Induced Phase Transformations in Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimanis, Ivar [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cioabanu, Cristian [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The study of materials with unusual properties offers new insight into structure-property relations as well as promise for the design of novel composites. In this spirit, the PIs seek to (1) understand fundamental mechanical phenomena in ceramics that exhibit pressure-induced phase transitions, negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and negative compressibility, and (2) explore the effect of these phenomena on the mechanical behavior of composites designed with such ceramics. The broad and long-term goal is to learn how to utilize these unusual behaviors to obtain desired mechanical responses. While the results are expected to be widely applicable to many ceramics, most of the present focus is on silicates, as they exhibit remarkable diversity in structure and properties. Eucryptite, a lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSiO4), is specifically targeted because it exhibits a pressure-induced phase transition at a sufficiently low pressure to be accessible during conventional materials processing. Thus, composites with eucryptite may be designed to exhibit a novel type of transformation toughening. The PIs have performed a combination of activities that encompass synthesis and processing to control structures, atomistic modeling to predict and understand structures, and characterization to study mechanical behavior. Several materials behavior discoveries were made. It was discovered that small amounts of Zn (as small as 0.1 percent by mol) reverse the sign of the coefficient of thermal expansion of beta-eucryptite from negative to slightly positive. The presence of Zn also significantly mitigates microcracking that occurs during thermal cycling of eucryptite. It is hypothesized that Zn disrupts the Li ordering in beta-eucryptite, thereby altering the thermal expansion behavior. A nanoindentation technique developed to characterize incipient plasticity was applied to examine the initial stages of the pressure induced phase transformation from beta to

  2. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  3. Ion beam induced stress formation and relaxation in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T., E-mail: Tobias.Steinbach@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Reupert, A.; Schmidt, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Ion irradiation of crystalline solids leads not only to defect formation and amorphization but also to mechanical stress. In the past, many investigations in various materials were performed focusing on the ion beam induced damage formation but only several experiments were done to investigate the ion beam induced stress evolution. Especially in microelectronic devices, mechanical stress leads to several unwanted effects like cracking and peeling of surface layers as well as changing physical properties and anomalous diffusion of dopants. To study the stress formation and relaxation process in semiconductors, crystalline and amorphous germanium samples were irradiated with 3 MeV iodine ions at different ion fluence rates. The irradiation induced stress evolution was measured in situ with a laser reflection technique as a function of ion fluence, whereas the damage formation was investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The investigations show that mechanical stress builds up at low ion fluences as a direct consequence of ion beam induced point defect formation. However, further ion irradiation causes a stress relaxation which is attributed to the accumulation of point defects and therefore the creation of amorphous regions. A constant stress state is reached at high ion fluences if a homogeneous amorphous surface layer was formed and no further ion beam induced phase transition took place. Based on the results, we can conclude that the ion beam induced stress evolution seems to be mainly dominated by the creation and accumulation of irradiation induced structural modification.

  4. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  5. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Caretta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440  GeV/c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ∼45  μm diameter spheres (not compacted reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45  μm grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250  μm mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  6. Dynamic analysis of an axially moving beam subject to inner pressure using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Hongliang; Qiu, Ming; Liao, Zhenqiang [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2017-06-15

    A dynamic model of an axially moving flexible beam subject to an inner pressure is present. The coupling principle between a flexible beam and inner pressure is analyzed first, and the potential energy of the inner pressure due to the beam bending is derived using the principle of virtual work. A 1D hollow beam element contain inner pressure is established. The finite element method and Lagrange’s equation are used to derive the motion equations of the axially moving system. The dynamic responses are analyzed by Newmark-β time integration method. Based on the computed dynamic responses, the effects of inner pressure on beam dynamics are discussed. Some interesting phenomenon is observed.

  7. Influence of laser beam profile on electromagnetically induced absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Radonjic, M.; Krmpot, A. J.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    We compared, experimentally and theoretically, Hanle electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) obtained using Gaussian and Π-shaped laser beams 3 mm in diameter. The study was done by measuring the transmission of a laser locked to the F g =2→F e =3 transition at the D 2 line of 87 Rb in a vacuum cell. EIA linewidths obtained for the two laser profiles were significantly different in the range of laser intensities 1-4 mW/cm 2 . EIA with the Π-shaped laser beam has a broad intensity maximum and linewidths larger than those obtained with the Gaussian beam profile. We also studied Hanle EIA by measuring the transmission of selected segments of the entire laser beam by placing a small movable aperture in front of the detector. Waveforms so obtained in Hanle EIA resonances were strongly influenced both by the radial distance of the transmitted segment from the beam center and by the radial profile of the laser beam. We show that outer regions of Gaussian beam, and central regions of the Π-shaped beam generate the narrowest lines. The different behaviors of EIA owing to different beam profiles revealed by both theory and experiment indicate the importance of the radial profile of the laser beam for proper modeling of coherent effects in alkali metal vapors.

  8. Acoustic Pressure Waves in Vibrating 3-D Laminated Beam-Plate Enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Osheku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of structural vibration on the propagation of acoustic pressure waves through a cantilevered 3-D laminated beam-plate enclosure is investigated analytically. For this problem, a set of well-posed partial differential equations governing the vibroacoustic wave interaction phenomenon are formulated and matched for the various vibrating boundary surfaces. By employing integral transforms, a closed form analytical expression is computed suitable for vibroacoustic modeling, design analysis, and general aerospace defensive applications. The closed-form expression takes the form of a kernel of polynomials for acoustic pressure waves showing the influence of linear interface pressure variation across the axes of vibrating boundary surfaces. Simulated results demonstrate how the mode shapes and the associated natural frequencies can be easily computed. It is shown in this paper that acoustic pressure waves propagation are dynamically stable through laminated enclosures with progressive decrement in interfacial pressure distribution under the influence of high excitation frequencies irrespective of whether the induced flow is subsonic, sonic , supersonic, or hypersonic. Hence, in practice, dynamic stability of hypersonic aircrafts or jet airplanes can be further enhanced by replacing their noise transmission systems with laminated enclosures.

  9. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  10. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P.P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E.B.; Lechner, A.; Del Busto, E. Nebot; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-25

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam- induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy depositio...

  11. Pressure-induced polymerization in substituted acetylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chellappa, Raja S.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David (LANL)

    2012-04-10

    A fundamental understanding of shock-induced chemical reactions in organics is still lacking and there are limited studies devoted to determining reaction mechanisms, evolution of bonding, and effect of functional group substitutions. The fast timescale of reactions occurring during shock compression create significant experimental challenges (diagnostics) to fully quantify the mechanisms involved. Static compression combined with temperature provides a complementary route to investigate the equilibrium phase space and metastable intermediates under extreme P-T conditions. In this study, we present our results from our ongoing high pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments on substituted acetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-C=CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-SiC=CH]. We observed that the onset pressure of chemical reactions (at room temperature) in these compounds is higher under static compression (TBA: 12 GPa and ETMS: 17.6 GPa) when compared to shock input pressures (TBA: 6.1 GPa and ETMS: 6.6 GPa). At elevated temperatures, reactivity was observed to occur at pressures comparable to shock conditions. The products were polymeric in nature, recovered to ambient conditions with little degradation.

  12. Electron beam induced emission from carbon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetstone, S.; Kammash, T.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma use as a lasing medium has many potential advantages over conventional techniques including increased power levels and greater wavelength ranges. The basic concept is to heat and then rapidly cool a plasma forcing inversion through bottleneck creation between the recombination reaction populating a given energy level and the subsequent decay processes. Much effort has been devoted to plasmas heated by lasers and pinch devices. The authors are concerned here with electron beam heated plasmas focusing on the CIV 5g-4f transition occurring at 2530 Angstroms. These studies were initiated to provide theoretical support for experiments being performed at the University of Michigan using the Michigan Electron Long-Pulse Beam Accelerator (MELBA)

  13. Silicon radiation detector analysis using back electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guye, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique for the observation and analysis of defects in silicon radiation detectors is described. This method uses an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) impinging on the rear side of the p + n junction of the silicon detector, which itself is active and detects the electron beam induced current (EBIC). It is shown that this current is a sensitive probe of localized trapping centers, either at the junction surface or somewhere in the volume of the silicon crystal. (orig.)

  14. SRF cavity alignment detection method using beam-induced HOM with curved beam orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Ayaka; Hayano, Hitoshi

    2017-09-01

    We have developed a method to obtain mechanical centers of nine cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from localized dipole modes, that is one of the higher order modes (HOM) induced by low-energy beams. It is to be noted that low-energy beams, which are used as alignment probes, are easy to bend in fringe fields of accelerator cavities. The estimation of the beam passing orbit is important because only information about the beam positions measured by beam position monitors outside the cavities is available. In this case, the alignment information about the cavities can be obtained by optimizing the parameters of the acceleration components over the beam orbit simulation to consistently represent the position of the beam position monitors measured at every beam sweep. We discuss details of the orbit estimation method, and estimate the mechanical center of the localized modes through experiments performed at the STF accelerator. The mechanical center is determined as (x , y) =(0 . 44 ± 0 . 56 mm , - 1 . 95 ± 0 . 40 mm) . We also discuss the error and the applicable range of this method.

  15. Social Stress Induced Pressure Breathing and Consequent Blood Pressure Oscillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Dirk S.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Meulen, Jan van der; Schoemaker, Regien

    1986-01-01

    A large amplitude blood pressure oscillation occurs during social defeat in a territorial fight between male rats, and during the application of a psychosocial stimulus associated with this defeat. Synchronous recording of blood pressure, intrathoracic pressure and diaphragm activity shows that the

  16. Electron-beam induced conduction in some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Yasuo; Mizutani, Teruyoshi; Ieda, Masayuki

    1976-01-01

    The charge signal induced by pulsed electron beam consists of two components, i.e. the fast and the slow components. The slow component which corresponds to carrier transport via shallow traps exhibited an asymmetry with respect to the bias field polarity. The asymmetry revealed that the main carriers which drifted via shallow traps were electrons in PET, both electrons and holes in PEN, and holes in PS. TSC spectra of electron-beam induced electrets proved directly the existence of electron shallow traps in PET and both electron and hole traps in PEN. Their trap energies were 0.1 to 0.2 eV. (auth.)

  17. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miniati, Francesco [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Elyiv, Andrii, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  18. Analysis of the beam induced heat loads on the LHC arc beam screens during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    During Run 2 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been routinely operated with 25 ns bunch spacing. In these conditions large heat loads have been measured on the beam screens of the superconducting magnets, together with other observations indicating that an electron cloud develops in the beam chambers. The analysis of these heat loads has revealed several interesting features allowing to pinpoint peculiar characteristics of the observed beam-induced heating. This document describes the main findings of this analysis including the evolution taking place during the run, the observed dependence on the beam conditions and the results from special tests and dedicated instrumentation. The differences observed in the behavior of the eight LHC arcs are also discussed.

  19. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H. E-mail: yhiroya@nias.affrc.go.jp; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  20. Investigation based on nano-electromechanical system double Si3N4 resonant beam pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Guo, Can; Yuan, Xiaowei

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a type of NEMS (Nano-Electromechanical System) double Si3N4 resonant beams pressure sensor. The mathematical models are established in allusion to the Si3N4 resonant beams and pressure sensitive diaphragm. The distribution state of stress has been analyzed theoretically based on the mathematical model of pressure sensitive diaphragm; from the analysis result, the position of the Si3N4 resonant beams above the pressure sensitive diaphragm was optimized and then the dominance observed after the double resonant beams are adopted is illustrated. From the analysis result, the position of the Si3N4 resonant beams above the pressure sensitive diaphragm is optimized, illustrating advantages in the adoption of double resonant beams. The capability of the optimized sensor was generally analyzed using the ANSYS software of finite element analysis. The range of measured pressure is 0-400 Kpa, the coefficient of linearity correlation is 0.99346, and the sensitivity of the sensor is 498.24 Hz/Kpa, higher than the traditional sensors. Finally the processing techniques of the sensor chip have been designed with sample being successfully processed.

  1. Pressure induced phase transition behaviour in -electron based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present review on the high pressure phase transition behaviour of ... For instance, closing of energy gaps lead to metal–insulator transitions [4], shift in energy ... systematic study of the pressure induced structural sequences has become ...

  2. Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-07-17

    This paper presents a summary of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector and discusses methods to tag and remove background contaminated events in data. Trigger-rate based monitoring of beam-related backgrounds is presented. The correlations of backgrounds with machine conditions, such as residual pressure in the beam-pipe, are discussed. Results from dedicated beam-background simulations are shown, and their qualitative agreement with data is evaluated. Data taken during the passage of unpaired, i.e. non-colliding, proton bunches is used to obtain background-enriched data samples. These are used to identify characteristic features of beam-induced backgrounds, which then are exploited to develop dedicated background tagging tools. These tools, based on observables in the Pixel detector, the muon spectrometer and the calorimeters, are described in detail and their efficiencies are evaluated. Finally an example of an application of these techniques to a monojet analysis is given, which demonstra...

  3. Melting and Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Quartz

    OpenAIRE

    Badro, James; Gillet, Philippe; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    1997-01-01

    It has recently been shown that amorphization and melting of ice were intimately linked. In this letter, we infer from molecular dynamics simulations on the SiO2 system that the extension of the quartz melting line in the metastable pressure-temperature domain is the pressure-induced amorphization line. It seems therefore likely that melting is the physical phenomenon responsible for pressure induced amorphization. Moreover, we show that the structure of a "pressure glass" is similar to that ...

  4. Electron Beam Induced Functionalization of Fluoropolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappan, U.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation affects the properties of polymers by chain scission and cross-linking reactions. One process will usually predominate, depending on the chemical structure of the polymer and the irradiation conditions such as temperature and atmosphere. Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and the perfluorinated copolymers poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (FEP) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropylvinyl ether) (PFA) undergo predominantly chain scission, if the irradiation is performed at room temperature. This shortcoming is exploited by converting PTFE into low molecular weight micropowders. The irradiation of PTFE in the presence of air results in micropowders functionalized with oxygen-containing groups. The concentration of end groups was investigated by FTIR and 19F solid-state NMR. The data were used to calculate number-average molecular weights. It was demonstrated that PTFE can be cross-linked by irradiation above its crystalline melting temperature in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Evidence for cross-links in PTFE was derived directly from structural information using 19 F solid-state NMR. FEP is understood to undergo cross-linking by irradiation above the glass transition temperature. It was found that also PFA can be branched and cross-linked by irradiation under special conditions. Radiation-induced grafting of styrene into fluoropolymer films and subsequent sulfonation offers an attractive way to prepare proton exchange membranes. Recently, radiation-induced grafting into cross-linked PTFE was reported. Modified FEP, PFA and ETFE films have been used as base material in this study. The modified films have been prepared by irradiation in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures up to temperatures above the melting temperature of the fluoropolymer

  5. The future of focused electron beam-induced processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    A perspective is sketched for the field of focused electron beam-induced processing (FEBIP). The FEBIP lithography technique is compared to the very successful resist-based electron beam lithography (EBL) technique. The advantages of FEBIP over EBL are identified, the main advantage being its high spatial resolution. This will enable FEBIP to become an important lithography technique for the fabrication of devices with critical dimension in the range between 1 and 20 nm and serve as a complementary technique to EBL. It will be discussed what needs to be done to achieve this and what the potential applications are. (orig.)

  6. Graphene defects induced by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Grzegorz; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Baranowski, Jacek; Jagielski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    The CVD graphene deposited on the glass substrate was bombarded by molecular carbon ions C3+ C6+ hydrocarbon ions C3H4+ and atomic ions He+, C+, N+, Ar+, Kr+ Yb+. Size and density of ion induced defects were estimated from evolution of relative intensities of Raman lines D (∼1350 1/cm), G (∼1600 1/cm), and D‧ (∼1620 1/cm) with ion fluence. The efficiency of defect generation by atomic ions depend on ion mass and energy similarly as vacancy generation directly by ion predicted by SRIM simulations. However, efficiency of defect generation in graphene by molecular carbon ions is essentially higher than summarized efficiency of similar group of separate atomic carbon ions of the same energy that each carbon ion in a cluster. The evolution of the D/D‧ ratio of Raman lines intensities with ion fluence was observed. This effect may indicate evolution of defect nature from sp3-like at low fluence to a vacancy-like at high fluence. Observed ion graphene interactions suggest that the molecular ion interacts with graphene as single integrated object and should not be considered as a group of atomic ions with partial energy.

  7. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  8. Supershort avalanche electron beams and x-ray in high-pressure nanosecond discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasenko, V F; Baksht, E H; Kostyrya, I D; Lomaev, M I; Rybka, D V

    2008-01-01

    The properties of a supershort avalanche electron beam (S AEB) and X-ray radiation produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. An electron beam of the runaway electrons with amplitude of ∼ 50 A has been obtained in air atmospheric pressure. It is reported that S AEB is formed in the angle above 2π sr. Three groups of the runaway electrons are formed in a gas diode under atmospheric air pressure, when nanosecond voltage pulses with amplitude of hundreds of kilovolts are applied. The electron beam has been generated behind a 45 μm thick AlBe foil in SF 6 and Xe under the pressure of 2 arm, and in He under the pressure of about 12 atm. The paper gives the analysis of a generation mechanism of SAEB.

  9. Surface treatment by the ion flow from electron beam generated plasma in the forevacuum pressure range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimov Aleksandr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research results of peculiarities of gas ion flows usage and their generation from large plasma formation (>50 sq.cm obtained by electron beam ionization of gas in the forevacuum pressure range. An upgraded source was used for electron beam generation, which allowed obtaining ribbon electron beam with no transmitting magnetic field. Absence of magnetic field in the area of ion flow formation enables to obtain directed ion flows without distorting their trajectories. In this case, independent control of current and ion energy is possible. The influence of electron beam parameters on the parameters of beam plasma and ion flow – current energy and density – was determined. The results of alumina ceramics treatment with a beam plasma ions flow are given.

  10. Electron-beam-induced conduction in polyethylene terephthalate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckley, L M; Lewis, T J; Taylor, D M [University Coll. of North Wales, Bangor (UK). School of Electronic Engineering Science

    1976-06-21

    Measurements are reported of electron-beam-induced conduction in thin polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films for electron energies up to 10 keV. The ratio of induced dielectric current to incident beam current (the gain) is orders of magnitude less than unity over practically the whole range of beam penetration. This result is quite unlike that normally found for inorganic dielectrics where the gain will exceed unity and reach a maximum at or near full penetration. In spite of the very different gain characteristics it is shown that the model recently proposed by Nunes de Oliviera and Gross (J. App. Phys.; 46:3132 (1975)), and by Aris et al (IEE Conf. Publ. No.129.; 267 (1975) and J. Phys. C. Solid State Phys.; 9:797 (1976)) and applied to mica and tantalum oxide respectively is also applicable to PET. Use is made of the known carrier mobility and lifetime data for this polymer and it is shown that very large space-charge distortions of the field can be produced by the beam which may well account for the frequent sample failure experienced during the experiments. The work supports suggestions by earlier workers that the current in unirradiated PET is electrode limited and predicts the maximum (space-charge limited) current likely to occur in this polymer.

  11. Feasibility of a fast optical pressure interlock for the ITER neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, Andrew; Surrey, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of using Balmer-α emission for a high-speed pressure diagnostic and beam interlock for the ITER neutral beam heating system is investigated. An interlock is needed to prevent excessive re-ionisation of the neutral beam when rapid excursions of pressure occur in either the electrostatic residual ion dump (ERID), or the neutral beam duct (NBD). The re-ionised fraction of the beam, will be deflected by stray tokamak fields, potentially causing excessive thermal loads on beam line components. Experience from JET indicates that a response time of order 100 μs is required in order to prevent fast pressure excursions. Fast penning gauges have a time response of around 30-50 ms, however, a faster response (around 1 μs) is possible by monitoring the H α (656.3 nm)/D α (656.1 nm) emission from collisional excitation of the background gas and neutral beam. Published total cross-sections are used to calculate a signal of 3.5x10 13 -3.0x10 17 photons s -1 m -2 sr -1 for normal conditions. This signal must be distinguished from the background light of the tokamak plasma (line emission and bremsstrahlung). The beam emission is Doppler shifted by up to 21 nm (D operation) and up to 27 nm (H operation) depending on angle of observation and this can be used to help distinguish against background line emission. The distribution of background light along the beam line is calculated with a two-dimensional radiosity code, solving the equilibrium energy balance within the beam line enclosure. The Balmer-α signal and background signal due to bremsstrahlung are compared for a 500-MW reference plasma.

  12. Cavitation-induced reactions in high-pressure carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.W.A.; van Eck, D.; Kemmere, M.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of ultrasound-induced in situ radical formation in liquid carbon dioxide was demonstrated. The required threshold pressure for cavitation could be exceeded at a relatively low acoustic intensity, as the high vapor pressure of CO2 counteracts the hydrostatic pressure. With the use of

  13. (d,p)-transfer induced fission of heavy radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, Martin

    2012-01-01

    (d,p)-transfer induced fission is proposed as a tool to study low energy fission of exotic heavy nuclei. Primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission offers a possibility for systematic study the low energy fission of heavy exotic nuclei at the ISOLDE.

  14. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  15. Effects of Cross-Linking on the Hydrostatic Pressure Testing for HDPE Pipe Material using Electron Beam Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jamil Bin Hashim

    2011-01-01

    One of the most inventive, sustainable strategies used in engineering field is to improve the quality of material and minimize production cost of material for example in this paper is HDPE material. This is because HDPE is an oil base material. This paper proposes to improve its hydrostatic pressure performance for HDPE pipe. The burst test is the most direct measurement of a pipe materials resistance to hydrostatic pressure. Test will be conducted in accordance with ASTM standard for HDPE pipe that undergo electron beam irradiation cross-linking. Studies show the effect of electron beam irradiation will improve the mechanical properties of HDPE pipe. When cross-linking is induced, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and young modulus is increase correspond to the radiation dose. This happen because the structure of HDPE, which is thermoplastic change to thermosetting. This will indicate the variability of irradiation dose which regard to the pipe pressure rating. Hence, the thickness ratio of pipe will be re-examining in order to make the production of HDPE pipe become more economical. This research review the effects of electron beam on HDPE pipe, as well as to reduce the cost of its production to improve key properties of selected plastic pipe products. (author)

  16. A change in the electro-physical properties of narrow-band CdHgTe solid solutions acted upon by a volume discharge induced by an avalanche electron beam in the air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a nanosecond volume discharge forming in an inhomogeneous electrical field at atmospheric pressure on the CdHgTe (MCT) epitaxial films of the p-type conduction with the hole concentration 2·1016 cm3 and mobility 500 cm2·V-1·s-1 is studied. The measurement of the electrophysical parameters of the MCT specimens upon irradiation shows that a layer exhibiting the n-type conduction is formed in the near-surface region of the epitaxial films. After 600 pulses and more, the thickness and the parameters of the layer are such that the measured field dependence of the Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of the n-type conduction. Analysis of the preliminary results reveals that the foregoing nanosecond volume discharge in the air at atmospheric pressure is promising for modification of electro-physical MCT properties.

  17. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  18. Pressure-induced weak ferromagnetism in uranium dioxide, UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, H; Kato, H; Tokunaga, Y; Kambe, S; Walstedt, R E; Nakamura, A; Tateiwa, N; Kobayashi, T C

    2003-01-01

    The dc magnetization of insulating UO 2 under high pressure up to ∼1 GPa has been measured using a piston-cylinder cell. Pressure-induced weak ferromagnetism appeared at low pressure (∼0.2 GPa). Both the remanent magnetization and the coercive force increase as pressure increases. This weak ferromagnetism may come from spin canting or from uncompensated moments around grain boundaries

  19. Numerical simulations of self-pinched transport of intense ion beams in low-pressure gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.; Olson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    The self-pinched transport of intense ion beams in low-pressure background gases is studied using numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. The simulations are carried out in a parameter regime that is similar to proton beam experiments being fielded on the Gamble II pulsed power generator [J. D. Shipman, Jr., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-18, 243 (1971)] at the Naval Research Laboratory. Simulation parameter variations provide information on scaling with background gas species, gas pressure, beam current, beam energy, injection angles, and boundaries. The simulation results compare well with simple analytic scaling arguments for the gas pressure at which the effective net current should peak and with estimates for the required confinement current. The analysis indicates that the self-pinched transport of intense proton beams produced on Gamble II (1.5 MeV, 100 kA, 3 cm radius) is expected to occur at gas pressures between 30 and 80 mTorr of He or between 3 and 10 mTorr of Ar. The significance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion is discussed. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, Andrew A.; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-belle; Tao, Ye; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (<100 nm), a sensitive detection system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique

  1. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers. - Highlights: • Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. • Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. • However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. • Optical tweezers can trap, move and positioned micron size particles with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. • One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. • Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the force scales as the field intensity divided by its propagation speed. • However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. • We propose a review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical

  2. Pressure-induced melting of micellar crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K.; Schwahn, D.; Janssen, S.

    1993-01-01

    that pressure improves the solvent quality of water, thus resulting in decomposition of the micelles and consequent melting of the micellar crystal. The combined pressure and temperature dependence reveals that in spite of the apparent increase of order on the 100 angstrom length scale upon increasing......Aqueous solutions of triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide) aggregate at elevated temperatures into micelles which for polymer concentrations greater-than-or-equal-to 20% make a hard sphere crystallization to a cubic micellar crystal. Structural studies show...... temperature (decreasing pressure) the overall entropy increases through the inverted micellar crystallization characteristic....

  3. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    The effect of ions in aerosol nucleation is a subject where much remains to be discovered. That ions can enhance nucleation has been shown by theory, observations, and experiments. However, the exact mechanism still remains to be determined. One question is if the nature of the ionization affects...... the nucleation. This is an essential question since many experiments have been performed using radioactive sources that ionize differently than the cosmic rays which are responsible for the majority of atmospheric ionization. Here we report on an experimental study of sulphuric acid aerosol nucleation under near...... atmospheric conditions using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear and significant contribution from ion induced nucleation and consider this to be an unambiguous observation of the ion-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions not far...

  4. Ion and laser beam induced metastable alloy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westendorp, J.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with ion and laser beam induced thin film mixing. It describes the development of an Ultra High Vacuum apparatus for deposition, ion irradiation and in situ analysis of thin film sandwiches. This chamber has been developed in close collaboration with High Voltage Engineering Europa. Thin films can be deposited by an e-gun evaporator. The atom flux is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A comparison is made between ion beam and laser mixing of Cu with Au and Cu with W. The comparison provides a better understanding of the relative importance of purely collisional mixing, the role of thermodynamic effects and the contribution of diffusion due to defect generation and migration. (Auth.)

  5. Acoustical and optical radiation pressures and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas , Jean-Louis; Marchiano , Régis; Baresch , Diego

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and positioned micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimens...

  6. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy ε n deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 μm thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of ε e HRF =(10.5±1.0) kev nm -1 was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation ε e S a =(12±2) keV nm -1 for the first time extracted for a Ge the characteristic linear behaviour of the

  7. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  8. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Bae, Chang-Hyu [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea); Ozaki, Takuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Wang, Jing Ming [Akita Prefectural Univ. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M{sub 1} seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M{sub 3} progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to {sup 14}N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M{sub 1} progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M{sub 1} seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  9. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo; Bae, Chang-Hyu; Ozaki, Takuo

    2000-01-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M 1 seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M 3 progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to 14 N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M 1 progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M 1 seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  10. A simulation study of electron-cloud instability and beam-induced multipacting in the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1997-02-01

    In the LHC beam pipe, photoemission and secondary emission give rise to a quasi-stationary electron cloud, which is established after a few bunch passages. The response of this electron cloud to a transversely displaced bunch resembles a short-range wakefield and can cause a fast instability. In addition, beam-induced multipacting of the electrons may lead to an enhanced gas desorption and an associated pressure increase. In this paper the authors report preliminary simulation results of the electron-cloud build-up both in a dipole magnet and in a straight section of the LHC at top energy. The effective wakefield created by the electron cloud translates into an instability rise time of about 25 ms horizontally and 130 ms vertically. This rise time is not much larger than that of the resistive-wall instability at injection energy

  11. Preservation of beam loss induced quenches, beam lifetime and beam loss measurements with the HERA-p beam-loss-monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenburg, K.

    1994-01-01

    The beam-loss-monitors (BLMs) in the HERA-Proton-ring (HERAp) must fulfil the following requirements: They have to measure losses sensitive and fast enough to prevent the superconducting magnets from beam loss induced quenching; the dynamic range of the monitors must exceed several decades in order to measure losses during beam lifetimes of hundreds of hours as well as the much stronger losses that may quench superconducting magnets; they have to be insensitive to the synchrotron radiation of the adjacent electron-ring (HERAe); and their radiation hardness must allow a monitor-lifetime of a few years of HERA operation. These requirements are well satisfied by the HERAp-BLM-System. (orig.)

  12. A simulation of earthquake induced undrained pore pressure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Plains, Kandla River and Gulf of Kachch, between .... We consider the role of induced pore pressure ... location of the Bhuj earthquake epicentre as estimated by US Geological Survey. .... war R 2001 Changes in Ocean; GIS @ development 5.

  13. Inducing Peer Pressure to Promote Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ankur; Rahwan, Iyad; Pentland, Alex

    2013-04-01

    Cooperation in a large society of self-interested individuals is notoriously difficult to achieve when the externality of one individual's action is spread thin and wide on the whole society. This leads to the `tragedy of the commons' in which rational action will ultimately make everyone worse-off. Traditional policies to promote cooperation involve Pigouvian taxation or subsidies that make individuals internalize the externality they incur. We introduce a new approach to achieving global cooperation by localizing externalities to one's peers in a social network, thus leveraging the power of peer-pressure to regulate behavior. The mechanism relies on a joint model of externalities and peer-pressure. Surprisingly, this mechanism can require a lower budget to operate than the Pigouvian mechanism, even when accounting for the social cost of peer pressure. Even when the available budget is very low, the social mechanisms achieve greater improvement in the outcome.

  14. Inducing peer pressure to promote cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ankur; Rahwan, Iyad; Pentland, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Cooperation in a large society of self-interested individuals is notoriously difficult to achieve when the externality of one individual's action is spread thin and wide on the whole society. This leads to the 'tragedy of the commons' in which rational action will ultimately make everyone worse-off. Traditional policies to promote cooperation involve Pigouvian taxation or subsidies that make individuals internalize the externality they incur. We introduce a new approach to achieving global cooperation by localizing externalities to one's peers in a social network, thus leveraging the power of peer-pressure to regulate behavior. The mechanism relies on a joint model of externalities and peer-pressure. Surprisingly, this mechanism can require a lower budget to operate than the Pigouvian mechanism, even when accounting for the social cost of peer pressure. Even when the available budget is very low, the social mechanisms achieve greater improvement in the outcome.

  15. Macroscopic Description of Pressure-anisotropy-driven Collective Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasburg, Sean; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    The macroscopic warm-fluid model developed by Lund and Davidson [Phys.Plasmas 5, 3028 (1998)] is used in the smooth-focusing approximation to investigate detailed stability properties of an intense charged particle beam with pressure anisotropy, assuming small-amplitude electrostatic perturbations about a waterbag equilibrium

  16. Reconstruction of Sound Source Pressures in an Enclosure Using the Phased Beam Tracing Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2009-01-01

    . First, surfaces of an extended source are divided into reasonably small segments. From each source segment, one beam is projected into the field and all emitted beams are traced. Radiated beams from the source reach array sensors after traveling various paths including the wall reflections. Collecting...... all the pressure histories at the field points, source-observer relations can be constructed in a matrix-vector form for each frequency. By multiplying the measured field data with the pseudo-inverse of the calculated transfer function, one obtains the distribution of source pressure. An omni......-directional sphere and a cubic source in a rectangular enclosure were taken as examples in the simulation tests. A reconstruction error was investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in terms of field point locations. When the source information was reconstructed by the present method, it was shown that the sound power...

  17. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-01-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ∼5 × 10 10 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  18. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  19. Optically induced rotation of Rayleigh particles by vortex beams with different states of polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Lei, Ming; Yang, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Optical vortex beams carry optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and can induce an orbital motion of trapped particles in optical trapping. We show that the state of polarization (SOP) of vortex beams will affect the details of this optically induced orbital motion to some extent. Numerical results demonstrate that focusing the vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations can induce a uniform orbital motion on a trapped Rayleigh particle, while in the focal field of the vortex beam with linear polarization the particle experiences a non-uniform orbital motion. Among the formers, the vortex beam with circular polarization induces a maximum optical torque on the particle. Furthermore, by varying the topological charge of the vortex beams, the vortex beam with circular polarization gives rise to an optimum torque superior to those given by the other three vortex beams. These facts suggest that the circularly polarized vortex beam is more suitable for rotating particles. - Highlights: • States of polarization of vortex beams affect the optically induced orbital motion of particles. • The dependences of the force and orbital torque on the topological charge, the size and the absorptivity of particles were calculated. • Focused vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations induce a uniform orbital motion on particles. • Particles experience a non-uniform orbital motion in the focused linearly polarized vortex beam. • The circularly polarized vortex beam is a superior candidate for rotating particles.

  20. Soft X-ray beam induced current technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, B; Ade, H [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Queen, D; Hellman, F [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kilcoyne, A L D; Tyliszczak, T, E-mail: benjamin.watts@gmail.co [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Direct mapping of the charge transport efficiency of polymer solar cell devices using a soft X-ray beam induced current (SoXBIC) method is described. By fabricating a polymer solar cell on an x-ray transparent substrate, we demonstrate the ability to map polymer composition and nanoscale structure within an operating solar cell device and to simultaneously measure the local charge transport efficiency via the short-circuit current. A simple model is calculated and compared to experimental SoXBIC data of a PFB:F8BT bulk-heterojunction device in order to gain greater insight into the device operation and physics.

  1. Electron-beam-induced fracture of Kevlar single fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, J.T.; Jensen, L.C.; Klakken, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    We examine the unique situation involving the exposure of polymers to both electron bombardment and mechanical stress. Under certain conditions, crack formation, crack growth, and fracture can occur due to this combination of stimuli. These studies relate to the performance of a number of materials under hostile environments such as space, plasma, and propulsion systems. In this paper we present our initial measurements on the response of single Kevlar fibers loaded in tension to bombardment by 3-keV electrons. We present evidence that the resulting electron-beam-induced fracture is due to bond breaking

  2. Weak-beam electron microscopy of radiation-induced segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saka, H.

    1983-01-01

    The segregation of solute atoms to dislocations during irradiation by 1 MeV electrons in a HVEM was studied by measuring the dissociation width of extended dislocations in Cu-5.1 at.%Si, Cu-5.3 at.%Ge, Ag-9.4 at.% In and Ag-9.6 at.%Al alloys. 'Weak-beam' electron microscopy was used. In Cu-Si (oversized solute), Cu-Ge (oversize) and Ag-Al (undersize), solute enrichment was observed near dislocations, while in Ag-In (oversize) solute depletion was observed. The results are discussed in terms of current mechanisms for radiation-induced segregation. (author)

  3. Capillarity Induced Negative Pressure of Water Plugs in Nanochannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Niels Roelof; Mela, P.; Kramer, Tobias; Berenschot, Johan W.; van den Berg, Albert

    2003-01-01

    We have found evidence that water plugs in hydrophilic nanochannels can be at significant negative pressure due to tensile capillary forces. The negative pressure of water plugs in nanochannels induces bending of the thin channel capping layer, which results in a visible curvature of the liquid

  4. Pressure-induced changes in the electronic structure of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, A.K.

    1985-07-01

    A variety of high-pressure metalization and metal-semimetal transitions, crystallographic phase transitions, and equation of state and lattice vibrational anomalies are reviewed in terms of the concepts of electronic transition and pressure-induced loss of covalency. 46 refs., 10 figs

  5. Macroparticle acceleration by laser induced ablation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.D.J.; Motz, H.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that the theoretical scaling of plasma pressure is very closely obeyed using ordinary Q-switched laser pulses, resulting in velocities of over 2 x 10 4 cm s -1 . The problems associated with increasing this velocity whilst still not rupturing the pellet have also been examined and an experiment to determine the results described. (orig.) [de

  6. Numerical Simulations for the Beam-Induced Electron Cloud in the LHC Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Oliver Sim

    1998-01-01

    The following work summarises simulation results obtained at CERN for the beam-induced electron cloud and looks at possible cures for the heat load in the LHC beam screen. The synchrotron radiation in the LHC creates a continuous flow of photoelectrons. These electrons are accelerated by the electric field of the bunch and hit the vacuum chamber on the opposite side of the beam pipe where they crea te secondary electrons which are again accelerated by the next bunch. For a large secondary emission yield the above mechanism leads to an exponential growth of the electron cloud which is limited by space charge forces. The simulations use a two-dimensional mesh for the space charge calculations and include the effect of image charges on the vacuum chamber wall. Depending on the quantum yield for the production of photoelectrons, the secondary emission yield and the reflectivity, the heat load can vary from 0.1 W/m to more than 15 W/m.

  7. Focused ion beam induced deflections of freestanding thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.-R.; Chen, P.; Aziz, M. J.; Branton, D.; Vlassak, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prominent deflections are shown to occur in freestanding silicon nitride thin membranes when exposed to a 50 keV gallium focused ion beam for ion doses between 10 14 and 10 17 ions/cm 2 . Atomic force microscope topographs were used to quantify elevations on the irradiated side and corresponding depressions of comparable magnitude on the back side, thus indicating that what at first appeared to be protrusions are actually the result of membrane deflections. The shape in high-stress silicon nitride is remarkably flat-topped and differs from that in low-stress silicon nitride. Ion beam induced biaxial compressive stress generation, which is a known deformation mechanism for other amorphous materials at higher ion energies, is hypothesized to be the origin of the deflection. A continuum mechanical model based on this assumption convincingly reproduces the profiles for both low-stress and high-stress membranes and provides a family of unusual shapes that can be created by deflection of freestanding thin films under beam irradiation

  8. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A A; Gonon, P; Jamieson, D N [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  11. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  12. Transverse resonance-radiation pressure on atomic beams and the influence of fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Ashkin, A.; Pearson, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated that a beam of neutral sodium atoms can be focused to a spot diameter of approx. 50 μ using the transverse dipole resonance-radiation pressure exerted by a 40 mW laser beam. Simple analysis shows that in some cases the spot sizes are limited by the random fluctuations of the spontaneous radiation pressure; with 1 W of laser power, spot sizes less than 10 μ should be attainable. The effects of heating by spontaneous scattering can have important detrimental effects in other applications of resonance - radiation pressure on atoms, such as the slowing or guiding of atoms. Consideration of heating effects is of paramount importance in the design of optical traps for neutral atoms. (KBE)

  13. Pressure-induced phenomena in U intermetallics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sechovský, V.; Honda, F.; Prokeš, K.; Syshchenko, O.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Kamarád, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2003), s. 1377-1386 ISSN 0587-4254. [International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 02). Cracow, 10.07.2002-13.07.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914; CEZ:MSM 113200002 Keywords : pressure effect * intermetallics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2003

  14. Generalized melting criterion for beam-induced amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, Paul R.

    1993-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the mean-square static atomic displacements provide a generic measure of the enthalpy stored in the lattice in the form of chemical and topological disorder, and that the effect of the displacements on the softening of shear elastic constants is identical to that of heating. This finding lends support to a generalized form of the Lindemann phenomenological melting criterion and leads to a natural interpretion of crystalline-to-amorphous transformations as defect-induced melting of metastable crystals driven beyond a critical state of disorder where the melting temperature falls below the glass-transition temperature. Application of the generalized Lindemann criterion to both the crystalline and amorphous phases indicates that the enthalpies of the two phases become identical when their shear moduli become equal. This thermo-elastic rule provides a basis for predicting the relative susceptibility of compounds to amorphization in terms of their elastic properties as measured by Debye temperatures. The present approach can explain many of the basic findings on beam-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds as well as amorphous phase formation associated with ion implantation, ion-beam mixing and other solid-state processes

  15. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10 −4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains

  16. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  17. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10-4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (˜pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  18. Thermally induced pressure locking of gate valves: A survey of valve bonnet pressurization rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezekoye, L.I.; Moore, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Closed, water filled gate valves run the risk of becoming pressurized due to heat input from the environment or from adjacent connected piping. Thermal pressurization of gate valve bonnets may lead to the valves failing to open on demand and can even induce structural failure of valves. This paper presents an analytical prediction of the pressurization rate of a closed pressure vessel subject to uniform heating which may be considered as an upper bound to the pressurization rate that may occur in the field. Then actual valve experiences described in the literature are reviewed to determine the expected pressurization rate in existing hardware designs. A statistical approach is applied to reconcile the differing pressurization rates reported in the literature and determine a rate that can be applied in valve evaluations. The limitations of the reconciled rate are discussed

  19. Candesartan restores pressure-induced vasodilation and prevents skin pressure ulcer formation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigo, Aurore; Nasser, Mohamad; Bessaguet, Flavien; Javellaud, James; Oudart, Nicole; Achard, Jean-Michel; Demiot, Claire

    2015-02-18

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockers have beneficial effects on neurovascular complications in diabetes and in organ's protection against ischemic episodes. The present study examines whether the AT1R blocker candesartan (1) has a beneficial effect on diabetes-induced alteration of pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV, a cutaneous physiological neurovascular mechanism which could delay the occurrence of tissue ischemia), and (2) could be protective against skin pressure ulcer formation. Male Swiss mice aged 5-6 weeks were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. In two groups, diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg.kg(-1)). After 6 weeks, control and STZ mice received either no treatment or candesartan (1 mg/kg-daily in drinking water) during 2 weeks. At the end of treatment (8 weeks of diabetes duration), C-fiber mediated nociception threshold, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV were assessed. Pressure ulcers (PUs) were then induced by pinching the dorsal skin between two magnetic plates for three hours. Skin ulcer area development was assessed during three days, and histological examination of the depth of the skin lesion was performed at day three. After 8 weeks of diabetes, the skin neurovascular functions (C-fiber nociception, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV) were markedly altered in STZ-treated mice, but were fully restored by treatment with candesartan. Whereas in diabetes mice exposure of the skin to pressure induced wide and deep necrotic lesions, treatment with candersartan restored their ability to resist to pressure-induced ulceration as efficiently as the control mice. Candesartan decreases the vulnerability to pressure-induced ulceration and restores skin neurovascular functions in mice with STZ-induced established diabetes.

  20. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-15

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  1. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  2. CATS, a low pressure multiwire proportional chamber for secondary beam tracking at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Ottini-Hustache, S; Auger, F; Musumarra, A; Alamanos, N; Cahan, B; Gillibert, A; Lagoyannis, A; Maillard, O; Pollacco, E; Sida, J L; Riallot, M

    1999-01-01

    A beam detector system, CATS (Chambre A Trajectoires de Saclay), was designed to provide event-by-event particle tracking in experiments with radioactive beams at GANIL. It consists of two low pressure multiwire proportional chambers with one plane of anode wires placed between two cathode planes (active area: 70x70 mm sup 2), respectively segmented into 28 vertical or horizontal strips (2.54 mm wide). The anode wires deliver a time signal allowing a time of flight measurement with an accuracy between 440 ps and 1.2 ns, depending on the energy loss of incident particles in the detector. The cathode strips are individually read out and the position of incoming particles is reconstructed using a charge centroid finding algorithm. A spatial resolution of 400 mu m (700 mu m) was achieved during in beam experiment, with a counting rate of 1.5x10 sup 5 (10 sup 6) particles per second. (author)

  3. An optimized nanoparticle separator enabled by electron beam induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowlkes, J D; Rack, P D; Doktycz, M J

    2010-01-01

    Size-based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct-write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism for depositing/etching nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam-interaction region. Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub-50 nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular-sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects) and (2) preserved the fidelity of the spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size-based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  4. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Paul M.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Yoon, Heayoung P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Gaury, Benoit [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  5. An optimized nanoparticle separator enabled by electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, J. D.; Doktycz, M. J.; Rack, P. D.

    2010-04-01

    Size-based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct-write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism for depositing/etching nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam-interaction region. Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub-50 nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular-sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects) and (2) preserved the fidelity of the spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size-based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of ion beam induced secondary electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, U., E-mail: uhuh@vols.utk.edu [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Cho, W. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Joy, D.C. [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Science, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Ion induced secondary electrons (iSE) can produce high-resolution images ranging from a few eV to 100 keV over a wide range of materials. The interpretation of such images requires knowledge of the secondary electron yields (iSE δ) for each of the elements and materials present and as a function of the incident beam energy. Experimental data for helium ions are currently limited to 40 elements and six compounds while other ions are not well represented. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple procedure based on the comprehensive work of Berger et al. Here we show that between the energy range of 10–100 keV the Berger et al. data for elements and compounds can be accurately represented by a single universal curve. The agreement between the limited experimental data that is available and the predictive model is good, and has been found to provide reliable yield data for a wide range of elements and compounds. - Highlights: • The Universal ASTAR Yield Curve was derived from data recently published by NIST. • IONiSE incorporated with the Curve will predict iSE yield for elements and compounds. • This approach can also handle other ion beams by changing basic scattering profile.

  7. Polymeric reaction of polymer-monomer system for pressure sensitive adhesives by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiguchi, R.; Uryu, T.

    1985-01-01

    Application of low-energy electron beam to non-solvent type pressure sensitive adhesives is investigated. The adhesive properties such as peel strength and holding time (dead-load strength) were closely related to the reaction of acrylate polymer-monomer systems. The reaction behavior is elucidated by combining the measurement of gel fraction, infrared spectrum of gel, and the molecular weight distribution detected by gel permeation chromatography. It was important for the production of pressure sensitive adhesives by electron beam that the adhesive with high peel strength and long holding time is composed of a proper combination of three factors, that is, about 35% gel fraction, 25% monomer units in gel, and 15% graft efficiency by irradiating the polymer-monomer system containing low molecular weight poly (butyl acrylate). (author)

  8. Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

  9. Effect of tackifier and crosslinkers on electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Singh, Anil; Singh Mehra, Dayal; Kumar Niyogi, Utpal; Sabharwal, Sunil; Kumar Khandal, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethane based pressure sensitive adhesive using monofunctional urethane acrylate and difunctional urethane acrylate has been made using electron beam irradiation. The effect of varying electron beam doses on the adhesion properties viz., peel adhesion, shear adhesion and initial tack has been studied. Effect of tackifier and crosslinkers viz., polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocynate, carbodiimide modified methylene diphenyl diisocynate and triallyl cynurate on adhesion properties as well as on moisture vapor transmission rate and gel content of the polyurethane based pressure sensitive adhesive has also been studied. It was found that with increasing dose, tackifier and crosslinkers concentration, all the adhesion properties viz., peel adhesion, shear adhesion strength and initial tack were increased upto a certain dose, concentration of tackifier and crosslinkers, reached a plateau and then levelled off with further increasing the dose, tackifier and crosslinkers concentration. Similarly, moisture vapor transmission rate was decreased and the gel content increased with increasing dose of electron beam. - Highlights: ► The optimized e-beam dose was 20 kGy. ► Optimized concentration of tackifier was 15% while PMDI, CMDI 6% and TAC 4%. ► CMDI has highest while TAC has lowest adhesion properties. ► Tackifier has highest while TAC has lowest MVTR. ► TAC has highest while tackifier has lowest gel content.

  10. Model of Structural Fragmentation Induced by High Pressure Torsion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, J.; Kružík, Martin; Sedláček, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2010), s. 88-98 ISSN 1606-5131 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : High-pressure torsion * intergranular glide * homogeneous deformation mode Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/MTR/kruzik-model of structural fragmentation induced by high pressure torsion.pdf

  11. Application of electron beam welding to large size pressure vessels made of thick low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuri, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Aoki, S.; Kimura, M.; Nayama, M.; Takano, G.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the results of studies for application of the electron beam welding to the large size pressure vessels made of thick low alloy steel (ASME A533 Gr.B cl.2 and A533 Gr.A cl.1). Two major problems for applying the EBW, the poor toughness of weld metal and the equipment to weld huge pressure vessels are focused on. For the first problem, the effects of Ni content of weld metal, welding conditions and post weld heat treatment are investigated. For the second problem, an applicability of the local vacuum EBW to a large size pressure vessel made of thick plate is qualified by the construction of a 120 mm thick, 2350 mm outside diameter cylindrical model. The model was electron beam welded using local vacuum chamber and the performance of the weld joint is investigated. Based on these results, the electron beam welding has been applied to the production of a steam generator for a PWR. (author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  12. The controlled fabrication of nanopores by focused electron-beam-induced etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yemini, M; Ashkenasy, N; Hadad, B; Goldner, A; Liebes, Y

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of nanometric holes within thin silicon-based membranes is of great importance for various nanotechnology applications. The preparation of such holes with accurate control over their size and shape is, thus, gaining a lot of interest. In this work we demonstrate the use of a focused electron-beam-induced etching (FEBIE) process as a promising tool for the fabrication of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes and study the process parameters. The reduction of silicon nitride by the electron beam followed by chemical etching of the residual elemental silicon results in a linear dependence of pore diameter on electron beam exposure time, enabling accurate control of nanopore size in the range of 17-200 nm in diameter. An optimal pressure of 5.3 x 10 -6 Torr for the production of smaller pores with faster process rates, as a result of mass transport effects, was found. The pore formation process is also shown to be dependent on the details of the pulsed process cycle, which control the rate of the pore extension, and its minimal and maximal size. Our results suggest that the FEBIE process may play a key role in the fabrication of nanopores for future devices both in sensing and nano-electronics applications.

  13. A laser beam quality definition based on induced temperature rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harold C

    2012-12-17

    Laser beam quality metrics like M(2) can be used to describe the spot sizes and propagation behavior of a wide variety of non-ideal laser beams. However, for beams that have been diffracted by limiting apertures in the near-field, or those with unusual near-field profiles, the conventional metrics can lead to an inconsistent or incomplete description of far-field performance. This paper motivates an alternative laser beam quality definition that can be used with any beam. The approach uses a consideration of the intrinsic ability of a laser beam profile to heat a material. Comparisons are made with conventional beam quality metrics. An analysis on an asymmetric Gaussian beam is used to establish a connection with the invariant beam propagation ratio.

  14. Pressure induced anomalies in an As-Al-Te glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Murali; Giridhar, A.; Mahadevan, Sudha

    1995-01-01

    The pressure and temperature dependences of the electrical resistance of As 34.4 Al 4 Te 61.6 and As 16.67 Al 16.67 Te 66.66 glasses have been investigated using an opposed anvil setup. The resistance of the glasses exhibit ∼ 10 6 fold decrease with increasing pressure up to 7 GPa at 300 K. This behaviour can be traced to the corresponding changes with pressure of the activation energy for electrical conduction, ΔE(p). The As 34.4 Al 4 Te 61.6 glass exhibits pressure induced anomalies at 2 GPa in the pressure variation of ΔE(p) and the pressure coefficient of electrical resistance. Such an anomaly is not seen for the As 16.67 Al 16.67 Te 66.66 glass. The anomalies point to a pressure induced morphological structural transformation in the As 34.4 Al 4 Te 61.6 glass. (author)

  15. Light-pressure-induced nonlinear dispersion of a laser field interacting with an atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, R.; Mlynek, J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on detailed studies of the effect of resonant light pressure on the optical response of an atomic gas to a single monochromatic laser field. In this very elementary situation of laser spectroscopy, the redistribution of atomic velocities that is induced by spontaneous light pressure leads to a novel contribution to the optical dispersion curve of the medium. This light-pressure-induced dispersion phenomenon displays a pronounced nonlinear dependence on the laser intensity. Moreover, for a given intensity, its strength is closely related to the laser beam diameter. As most important feature, this light-pressure-induced dispersion displays an even symmetry with respect to the optical detuning from line center. As a result, the total Doppler-broadened dispersion curve of the gas can become asymmetric, and a significant shift of the dispersion line center can occur. In addition to a detailed theoretical description of the phenomenon, we report on its experimental investigation on the λ=555.6 nm 1 S 0 - 3 P 1 transition in atomic ytterbium vapor with the use of frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The experimental findings are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions

  16. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  17. A critical discussion of the vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heera, V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization of silicon including divacancy formation is developed. The model reproduces some of the experimental findings, as e.g. the dose rate dependence of the crystallization rate. However, the measured activation energy of the ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization cannot be accounted for by vacancy diffusion alone. (author)

  18. Nucleation mechanisms in high energy ion beam induced dewetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Michael; Garmatter, Daniel; Ferhati, Redi; Amirthapandian, Sankarakumar; Bolse, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Solid coatings, when heated above their melting points, often break up by forming small round holes, which then grow, coalesce and finally turn the initially contiguous film into a pattern of isolated droplets. Such dewetting has been intensively studied using thin polymer films on Si. Three different hole nucleation mechanisms were discovered: homogeneous (spontaneous) nucleation, heterogeneous nucleation at defects, and spinodal dewetting by self-amplifying capillary waves. We have recently found that swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of thin oxide films on Si results in similar dewetting patterns, even though the films were kept far below their melting points. Using our new in-situ SEM at the UNILAC accelerator of GSI, we were now able to identify the mechanisms behind this SHI induced dewetting phenomenon. By varying the film thickness and introducing defects at the interface, we can directly address the hole nucleation processes. Besides homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, we also found a process, which very much resembles the spinodal mechanism found for liquid polymers, although in the present case the instable wavy surface is not generated by capillary waves, but by ion beam induced stresses.

  19. Beam-induced temperature changes in HVEM irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Thomas, L.E.; Gelles, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The peak value of the temperature distribution induced by energy loss of 1.0 MeV electrons in traversing a typical HVEM irradiation specimen can be very substantial. The origin and various features of this distribution were analyzed for a variety of specimen geometries. The major parametric dependencies are shown to be relatively independent of specimen geometry, however, and allow the definition of a scaling relationship that can be employed to predict temperature rises in materials that cannot be measured directly. The use of this scaling relationship requires that the experimenter minimize perturbations of the heat flow due to proximity of the central hole in the specimen. An experimental method of determining directly the magnitude and distribution of beam-induced temperature profiles was developed which utilizes the order-disorder transformation in Fe 3 Al and Cu 3 Au. Scaling of experimentally determined temperature changes leads to more realistic estimates of the total temperature rise than are currently available in various literature tabulations. The factors which determine the optimum selection of irradiation parameters for a given experiment are also discussed

  20. High performance experiments on high pressure supersonic molecular beam injection in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lianghua; Dong Jiafu; Zhou Yan; Feng Beibing; Cao Jianyong; Li Wei; Feng Zhen; Zhang Jiquan; Hong Wenyu; Cui Zhengying; Wang Enyao; Liu Yong

    2004-01-01

    Supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was first proposed and demonstrated on the HL-1 tokamak and was successfully developed and used on HL-1M. Recently, new results of SMBI experiments were obtained by increasing the gas pressure from 0.5 to over 1.0 MPa. A stair-shaped density increment was obtained with high-pressure multi-pulse SMBI that was similar to the density evolution behaviour during multi-pellet injection. This demonstrated the effectiveness of SMBI as a promising fuelling tool for steady-state operation. The penetration depth and injection speed of the high-pressure SMBI were roughly measured from the contour plot of the Hα emission intensity. It was shown that injected particles could penetrate into the core region of the plasma. The penetration speed of high-pressure SMBI particles in the plasma was estimated to be about 1200 m s -1 . In addition, clusters within the beam may play an important role in the deeper injection. (author)

  1. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH

  2. Prediction of propeller-induced hull-pressure fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijngaarden, H.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The cavitating propeller often forms the primary source of noise and vibration on board ships. The propeller induces hydroacoustic pressure fluctuations due to the passing blades and, more importantly, the dynamic activity of cavities in the propeller’s immediate vicinity. The accurate prediction of

  3. Pressure-induced reduction of shielding for improving sonochemical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, van M.M.; Manacker, van den J.P.A.J.; Benes, N.E.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on chem. reactions induced by 20 kHz ultrasound has been studied using three different methods: the oxidn. of potassium iodide, bubble cloud visualization studies, and sound attenuation measurements. The latter two have demonstrated that shielding of the ultrasonic

  4. Transport and interaction of a relativistic electron beam in low pressure neutral gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyyengar, S.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical study of the transport of a 0.27-MeV, 6.6-kA, 40-ns relativistic electron beam in argon and hydrogen in the pressure range of 0.01--1.0 Torr taking into account charge and current neutralization effects is presented. Ionization by avalanching and by beam and plasma electrons is included in the calculation of plasma density buildup. Plasma heating resulting from return current heating and two-stream instability is taken into account. The computed results of charge transport, net current, and breakdown time are compared with experimental results obtained in this laboratory. The results are in reasonable agreement with the experiment and show a maximum charge transport of 75% at the optimum pressure of 0.1 and 0.6 Torr in argon and hydrogen, respectively. The calculations indicate beam-generated plasma parameters of 10 19 --10 20 m -3 density and 1--5 eV electron temperature

  5. Pressure-induced magnetic transition in CeP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Mori, N.; Okayama, Y.; Haga, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    1997-01-01

    Pressure dependence of magnetization in CeP is investigated up to 2 GPa. Multi-step transitions are induced by pressure. An antiferromagnetic transition at T N =11 K below 0.1 GPa develops into two (magnetic) transitions at T L and T H in the region of 0.1 L , T H and T d above 1.3 GPa. For decreasing temperature an abrupt increase of magnetization, M(T), has been observed below T H and a round maximum of magnetization appears at T L for P≥0.4 GPa. Above 1.3 GPa, an anomalous decrease of M(T) begins at T d =10 K. Using previously reported 31 P-NMR shift data it is shown that the pressure dependence of a characteristic temperature, which is proportional to the crystal field splitting in the paramagnetic temperature region, decreases rapidly with increasing pressure. (orig.)

  6. Beams of fast neutral atoms and molecules in low-pressure gas-discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metel, A. S., E-mail: ametel@stankin.ru [Moscow State University of Technology ' Stankin,' (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Fast neutral atom and molecule beams have been studied, the beams being produced in a vacuum chamber at nitrogen, argon, or helium pressure of 0.1-10 Pa due to charge-exchange collisions of ions accelerated in the sheath between the glow discharge plasma and a negative grid immersed therein. From a flat grid, two broad beams of molecules with continuous distribution of their energy from zero up to e(U + U{sub c}) (where U is voltage between the grid and the vacuum chamber and U{sub c} is cathode fall of the discharge) are propagating in opposite directions. The beam propagating from the concave surface of a 0.2-m-diameter grid is focused within a 10-mm-diameter spot on the target surface. When a 0.2-m-diameter 0.2-m-high cylindrical grid covered by end disks and composed of parallel 1.5-mm-diameter knitting needles spaced by 4.5 mm is immersed in the plasma, the accelerated ions pass through the gaps between the needles, turn inside the grid into fast atoms or molecules, and escape from the grid through the gaps on its opposite side. The Doppler shift of spectral lines allows for measuring the fast atom energy, which corresponds to the potential difference between the plasma inside the chamber and the plasma produced as a result of charge-exchange collisions inside the cylindrical grid.

  7. Breathability studies of electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive for bio-medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar; Sabharwal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) commonly used in surgical dressing has been made by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. In contact with biological substrate like skin, PSAs generally lose their adhesive strength due to very low moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR). In the present study, effects of varying e-beam dose and different crosslinkers on the MVTR of the PU-PSA have been investigated. A comparative study of effects of different crosslinkers showed that PU-PSA with IPDI has the least while that with TAC has the highest gel content and crystallinity and a reverse trend was observed for the MVTR. - Highlights: • On increasing e-beam dose from 5 kGy to 60 kGy the MVTR decreased continuously. • Increasing crosslinker concentration from 2% to10% resulted in decrease of MVTR. • IPDI has the highest and TAC has the least MVTR in PU-PSA system among the crosslinkers. • MVTR/peel adhesion/shear adhesion/initial tack: IPDI>MDI>CMDI>PMDI>TAIC>TAC. • Gel content/T g /crystallinity: TAC>TAIC>PMDI>CMDI>MDI>IPDI

  8. Multiple pathways in pressure-induced phase transition of coesite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, Changsong; Miranda, Caetano R.; Scandolo, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction method with precise control of hydrostatic conditions, typically with helium or neon as the pressure-transmitting medium, has significantly changed our view on what happens with low-density silica phases under pressure. Coesite is a prototype material for pressure-induced amorphization. However, it was found to transform into a high-pressure octahedral (HPO) phase, or coesite-II and coesite-III. Given that the pressure is believed to be hydrostatic in two recent experiments, the different transformation pathways are striking. Based on molecular dynamic simulations with an ab initio parameterized potential, we reproduced all of the above experiments in three transformation pathways, including the one leading to an HPO phase. This octahedral phase has an oxygen hcp sublattice featuring 2 × 2 zigzag octahedral edge-sharing chains, however with some broken points (i.e., point defects). It transforms into α-PbO2 phase when it is relaxed under further compression. We show that the HPO phase forms through a continuous rearrangement of the oxygen sublattice toward hcp arrangement. The high-pressure amorphous phases can be described by an fcc and hcp sublattice mixture. PMID:29162690

  9. submitter Triggering of a pressurized spark gap by a laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsch, F

    1968-01-01

    A delay line was discharged into a terminating resistor by a spark gap of coaxial design. The spark gap was triggered by a focused laser beam, introduced along the axis; a Q-switched ruby laser giving pulses of 20 ns duration and up to 50 MW power was used. The range of operation of the gap, formative time of the breakdown and jitter were investigated for different gases at pressures above atmospheric, gap widths of 4-10 mm and voltages of up to 120 kv. Mixtures of argon and nitrogen were found to have certain advantages, such as a low threshold for ionization by the laser beam, sufficient dielectric strength, low values of the formative-time jitter and chemical inertness. Formative times of down to about 1 ns and jitters below 1 ns were found. The laser power can be relatively low (0centerdot5-5 MW). An explanation for the breakdown mechanism is proposed.

  10. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10 19 W/cm 2 . 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10 20 W/cm 2 .

  11. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams from nanofoil targets: the leaky light-sail regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, B; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Dromey, B; Geissler, M; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the "leaky light sail," is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10¹⁹  W/cm². 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2 × 10²⁰  W/cm².

  12. [Effects of pressure induced retinal ischemia on ERG in rabbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G; Yang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhang, D

    2001-12-01

    To observe the effects of pressure induced retinal ischemia on electroretinogram(ERG) in rabbit. Retinal ischemia was induced in rabbits by increasing intraocular pressure at 30 mmHg, 60 mmHg, 90 mmHg, 120 mmHg for 45 minutes, and retinal function was monitored by eletroretinography. There was no difference on ERG before or after the experiment both in 30 mmHg group and control one. In 60 mmHg pressure induced ischemia eyes, the amplitudes of the b-wave and OPs wave reduced significantly. Four hours after reperfusion, they were totally recovered. After an ischemic insult of 90 mmHg or 120 mmHg for 45 minutes, there was no response of ERG. Four hours later, the amplitudes of the b-wave and OPs wave were 66.912 +/- 20.157 and 16.423 +/- 3.965 the former, 38.852 +/- 23.438 and 8.610 +/- 12.090 the latter, respectively. These results suggest that higher intraocular pressure causes more severe retina ischemic damage, and less recovery ability.

  13. Tunable atom-light beam splitter using electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Wen, Rong; Chen, J. F.

    2018-06-01

    With electromagnetically induced transmission (EIT), an optical field can be converted into collective atomic excitation and stored in the atomic medium through switching off the strong-coupling field adiabatically. By varying the power of the coupling pulse, we can control the ratio between the transmitted optical field and the stored atomic mode. We use a cloud of cold 85Rb atoms prepared in magneto-optical trap as the experimental platform. Based on a model of EIT dark-state polariton, we consider the real case where the atomic medium has a finite length. The theoretical calculation gives numerical results that agree well with the experimental data. The results show that the ratio can be changed approximately from 0 to 100%, when the maximum power of the coupling pulse (the pulse length is 100 ns) varies from 0 to 20 mW, in the cold atomic ensemble with an optical depth of 40. This process can be used to achieve an atom-light hybrid beam splitter with tunable splitting ratio and thus find potential application in interferometric measurement and quantum information processing.

  14. Development of a laser-induced plasma probe to measure gas phase plasma signals at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gounder, J.D.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for on line simultaneous measurement of elemental concentrations has led to its application in a wide number of processes. The simplicity of the technique allows its application to harsh environments such as present in boilers, furnaces and gasifiers. This paper presents the design of a probe using a custom optic which transforms a round beam into a ring (Donut) beam, which is used for forming a plasma in an atmosphere of nitrogen at high pressure (20 bar) and temperature (200 °C). The LIBS experiments were performed using a high pressure cell to characterize and test the effectiveness of the donut beam transmitted through the LIBS probe and collect plasma signal in back scatter mode. The first tests used the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, pulse width 7 ns, to form a plasma in nitrogen gas at five different pressures (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar) and three different gas temperatures (25, 100 and 200 °C). The uniqueness of this probe is the custom made optic used for reshaping the round laser beam into a ring (Donut) shaped laser beam, which is fed into the probe and focused to form a plasma at the measurement point. The plasma signal is collected and collimated using the laser focusing lens and is reflected from the laser beam axis onto an achromatic lens by a high reflection mirror mounted in the center section of the donut laser beam. The effect of gas pressure and temperature on N(I) lines in the high pressure cell experiment shows that the line intensity decreases with pressure and increases with temperature. Mean plasma temperature was calculated using the ratios of N(I) line intensities ranging from 7400 K to 8900 K at 1 bar and 2400 K to 3200 K at 20 bar for the three different gas temperatures. The results show that as a proof of principle the donut beam optics in combination with the LIBS probe can be used for performing extensive LIBS measurements in well controlled laboratory

  15. Development of a laser-induced plasma probe to measure gas phase plasma signals at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gounder, J.D., E-mail: James.Gounder@dlr.de; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.

    2012-08-15

    The ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for on line simultaneous measurement of elemental concentrations has led to its application in a wide number of processes. The simplicity of the technique allows its application to harsh environments such as present in boilers, furnaces and gasifiers. This paper presents the design of a probe using a custom optic which transforms a round beam into a ring (Donut) beam, which is used for forming a plasma in an atmosphere of nitrogen at high pressure (20 bar) and temperature (200 Degree-Sign C). The LIBS experiments were performed using a high pressure cell to characterize and test the effectiveness of the donut beam transmitted through the LIBS probe and collect plasma signal in back scatter mode. The first tests used the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, pulse width 7 ns, to form a plasma in nitrogen gas at five different pressures (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar) and three different gas temperatures (25, 100 and 200 Degree-Sign C). The uniqueness of this probe is the custom made optic used for reshaping the round laser beam into a ring (Donut) shaped laser beam, which is fed into the probe and focused to form a plasma at the measurement point. The plasma signal is collected and collimated using the laser focusing lens and is reflected from the laser beam axis onto an achromatic lens by a high reflection mirror mounted in the center section of the donut laser beam. The effect of gas pressure and temperature on N(I) lines in the high pressure cell experiment shows that the line intensity decreases with pressure and increases with temperature. Mean plasma temperature was calculated using the ratios of N(I) line intensities ranging from 7400 K to 8900 K at 1 bar and 2400 K to 3200 K at 20 bar for the three different gas temperatures. The results show that as a proof of principle the donut beam optics in combination with the LIBS probe can be used for performing extensive LIBS measurements in well controlled

  16. The influence of beam divergence on ion-beam induced surface patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kree, R.; Yasseri, T.; Hartmann, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    We present a continuum theory and a Monte Carlo model of self-organized surface pattern formation by ion-beam sputtering including effects of beam profiles. Recently, it has turned out that such secondary ion-beam parameters may have a strong influence on the types of emerging patterns. We first discuss several cases, for which beam profiles lead to random parameters in the theory of pattern formation. Subsequently we study the evolution of the averaged height profile in continuum theory and find that the typical Bradley-Harper scenario of dependence of ripple patterns on the angle of incidence can be changed qualitatively. Beam profiles are implemented in Monte Carlo simulations, where we find generic effects on pattern formation. Finally, we demonstrate that realistic beam profiles, taken from experiments, may lead to qualitative changes of surface patterns.

  17. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  18. Chemical and Hydrostatic Pressure in Natrolites: Pressure Induced Hydration of an Aluminogermanate Natrolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.; Kao, C.; Seoung, D.H.; Bai, J.; Kao, C.C.; Parise, J.B.; Vogt, T.

    2010-01-01

    The ambient structure and pressure-induced structural changes of a synthetic sodium aluminogermanate with a natrolite (NAT) framework topology (Na-AlGe-NAT) were characterized by using Rietveld refinements of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data at ambient and high pressures. Unlike a previously established model for Na 8 Al 8 Ge 12 O 40 · 8H 2 O based on a single-crystal study, the ambient structure of the Na-AlGe-NAT is found to adopt a monoclinic space group Cc (or Fd) with a ca. 6% expanded unit cell. The refined ambient structure of Na 8 Al 8 Ge 12 O 40 · 12H 2 O indicates an increased water content of 50%, compared to the single-crystal structure. The unit-cell volume and water-content relationships observed between the two Na-AlGe-NAT structures at ambient conditions with 8 and 12 H 2 O respectively seem to mirror the ones found under hydrostatic pressure between the Na 8 Al 8 Ge 12 O 40 · 8H 2 O and the parantrolite phase Na 8 Al 8 Ge 12 O 40 · 12H 2 O. Under hydrostatic pressures mediated by a pore-penetrating alcohol and water mixture, the monoclinic Na-AlGe-NAT exhibits a gradual decrease of the unit-cell volume up to ca. 2.0 GPa, where the unit-cell volume then contracts abruptly by ca. 4.6%. This is in marked contrast to what is observed in the Na-AlSi-NAT and Na-GaSi-NAT systems, where one observes a pressure-induced hydration and volume expansion due to the auxetic nature of the frameworks. Above 2 GPa, the monoclinic phase of Na-AlGe-NAT transforms into a tetragonal structure with the unit-cell composition of Na 8 Al 8 Ge 12 O 40 · 16H 2 O, revealing pressure-induced hydration and a unit cell volume contraction. Unlike in the Na-Al,Si-paranatrolite phase, however, the sodium cations in the Na-AlGe-NAT maintain a 6-fold coordination in the monoclinic structure and only become 7-fold coordinated at higher pressures in the tetragonal structure. When comparing the pressure-induced hydration in the observed natrolite

  19. Pressure Fluctuations Induced by a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a spatially-developed Mach 5.86 turbulent boundary layer. The unsteady pressure field is analyzed at multiple wall-normal locations, including those at the wall, within the boundary layer (including inner layer, the log layer, and the outer layer), and in the free stream. The statistical and structural variations of pressure fluctuations as a function of wall-normal distance are highlighted. Computational predictions for mean velocity pro les and surface pressure spectrum are in good agreement with experimental measurements, providing a first ever comparison of this type at hypersonic Mach numbers. The simulation shows that the dominant frequency of boundary-layer-induced pressure fluctuations shifts to lower frequencies as the location of interest moves away from the wall. The pressure wave propagates with a speed nearly equal to the local mean velocity within the boundary layer (except in the immediate vicinity of the wall) while the propagation speed deviates from the Taylor's hypothesis in the free stream. Compared with the surface pressure fluctuations, which are primarily vortical, the acoustic pressure fluctuations in the free stream exhibit a significantly lower dominant frequency, a greater spatial extent, and a smaller bulk propagation speed. The freestream pressure structures are found to have similar Lagrangian time and spatial scales as the acoustic sources near the wall. As the Mach number increases, the freestream acoustic fluctuations exhibit increased radiation intensity, enhanced energy content at high frequencies, shallower orientation of wave fronts with respect to the flow direction, and larger propagation velocity.

  20. Vortex phase-induced changes of the statistical properties of a partially coherent radially polarized beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lina; Chen, Yahong; Liu, Xianlong; Liu, Lin; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-06-27

    Partially coherent radially polarized (PCRP) beam was introduced and generated in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the statistical properties of a PCRP beam embedded with a vortex phase (i.e., PCRP vortex beam). We derive the analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of a PCRP vortex beam propagating through a paraxial ABCD optical system and analyze the statistical properties of a PCRP vortex beam focused by a thin lens. It is found that the statistical properties of a PCRP vortex beam on propagation are much different from those of a PCRP beam. The vortex phase induces not only the rotation of the beam spot, but also the changes of the beam shape, the degree of polarization and the state of polarization. We also find that the vortex phase plays a role of resisting the coherence-induced degradation of the intensity distribution and the coherence-induced depolarization. Furthermore, we report experimental generation of a PCRP vortex beam for the first time. Our results will be useful for trapping and rotating particles, free-space optical communications and detection of phase object.

  1. Sensitivity of Spores of Eight Bacillus Cereus Strains to Pressure-Induced Germination by Moderate Hydrostatic Pressure, Time and Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalchayanand, Norasak; Ray, Bibek; Dunne, C. P; Sikes, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    The spores of eight Bacillus cereus strains were pressurized at 138 to 483 MPa for 5 to 20 min at 25 to 70 C in order to determine the sensitive and the resistant strains to pressure-induced germination...

  2. Mitigation technologies for damage induced by pressure waves in high-power mercury spallation neutron sources (1). Material surface improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Wakui, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Shoubu, Takahisa; Takeuchi, Hirotsugu; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed in the world. Proton beams will be used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by microjets and/or shock waves that are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. Bubble collapse behavior was observed by using a high-speed video camera, as well as simulated numerically. Localized impact due to cavitation bubble collapse was quantitatively estimated through comparison between numerical simulation and experiment. A novel surface treatment technique that consists of carburizing and nitriding processes was developed and the treatment condition was optimized to mitigate the pitting damage due to localized impacts. (author)

  3. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comins, J.D.; Amolo, G.O.; Derry, T.E.; Connell, S.H.; Erasmus, R.M.; Witcomb, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I 3 - structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I 3 - and I 5 - aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 x 10 15 to 250 x 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  4. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comins, J. D.; Amolo, G. O.; Derry, T. E.; Connell, S. H.; Erasmus, R. M.; Witcomb, M. J.

    2009-08-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I3- structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I3- and I5- aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 × 10 15 to 250 × 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  5. Enhanced efficiency of plasma acceleration in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badziak, J; Rosiński, M; Jabłoński, S; Pisarczyk, T; Chodukowski, T; Parys, P; Rączka, P; Krousky, E; Ullschmied, J; Liska, R; Kucharik, M

    2015-01-01

    Among various methods for the acceleration of dense plasmas the mechanism called laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) is capable of achieving the highest energetic efficiency. In the LICPA scheme, a projectile placed in a cavity is accelerated along a guiding channel by the laser-induced thermal plasma pressure or by the radiation pressure of an intense laser radiation trapped in the cavity. This arrangement leads to a significant enhancement of the hydrodynamic or electromagnetic forces driving the projectile, relative to standard laser acceleration schemes. The aim of this paper is to review recent experimental and numerical works on LICPA with the emphasis on the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles and dense ion beams. The main experimental part concerns the research carried out at the kilojoule sub-nanosecond PALS laser facility in Prague. Our measurements performed at this facility, supported by advanced two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, have demonstrated that the LICPA accelerator working in the long-pulse hydrodynamic regime can be a highly efficient tool for the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles to hyper-velocities and the generation of ultra-high-pressure (>100 Mbar) shocks through the collision of the macroparticle with a solid target. The energetic efficiency of the macroparticle acceleration and the shock generation has been found to be significantly higher than that for other laser-based methods used so far. Using particle-in-cell simulations it is shown that the LICPA scheme is highly efficient also in the short-pulse high-intensity regime and, in particular, may be used for production of intense ion beams of multi-MeV to GeV ion energies with the energetic efficiency of tens of per cent, much higher than for conventional laser acceleration schemes. (paper)

  6. Beam tests of 'SPACAL' type modules for a high pressure gas calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V.F.; Krasnokutskij, R.N.; Shuvalov, R.S.; Solodkov, A.A.; Starchenko, E.A.; Sushkov, V.V.; Zajtsev, A.M.; Dzhelyadin, R.I.; Kopikov, S.V.; Solov'yanov, O.V.

    1993-01-01

    High-pressure gas modules with cylindrical ionization chambers for a Very Forward Calorimeter are constructed and tested in the IHEP U-70 electron beam. The amplifiers are used in a remote mode (3 m long cables). The module performance at small angles is tested in the energy range of 10-30 GeV using different gas mixtures like Ar + CH 4 , Ar + CF 4 and pure CF 4 at the pressure of 20-40 Atm. The best value of energy resolution equal to 18% is reached at the angle of 5.7 deg for 30 GeV electrons. The design is found to be adequate for future use in ATLAS/LHC. 24 refs., 10 figs

  7. Electron-cloud instabilities and beam-induced multipacting in the LHC and in the VLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1997-10-01

    In the beam pipe of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), photoemission and secondary emission give rise to a quasi-stationary electron cloud, which is established after a few buncn passages. The response of this electron cloud to a transversely displaced bunch resembles a short-range wakefield and can cause a fast instability. In additoin, beam-induced multipacting of the electrons may lead to an enhanced gas desorption and an associated pressure increase. In this paper the authors report preliminary simulation results of the electron-cloud build-up both in a dipole magnet and in a straight section of the LHC at top energy. The effective wakefield created by the electron cloud translates into an instability rise time of about 40 ms horizontally and 500 ms vertically. This rise time is not much larger than that of the resistive-wall instability at injection energy. Similar simulation studies show that the instability rise time for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is about 3--4 s in both trasnverse planes. The smaller growth rate in the VLHC, as compared with the LHC, is primarily due to the much lower bunch population

  8. Diagnostics and modeling of high pressure streamer induced discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marode, E.; Dessante, P.; Deschamps, N.; Deniset, C.

    2001-01-01

    A great variety of diagnostic has been applied to gain information on basic parameter governing high pressure nonthermal filamentary plasmas (and namely streamer induced filamentary discharges). Apart from electrical diagnostics, gas discharge, in contrast with solid state physics, can greatly benefit from all optical techniques owing to its ''transparent'' state. Emission and absorption spectroscopy, as well as LIF or CARS (talk are given during this meeting on these two techniques) are among such specific possibilities. The figures gained from these diagnostic measurements has generally no meaning by itself. They must be worked out, by means of calibrated former results, and/or by using them as input in high pressure plasma modeling. Mixing experimental and modeling approach is necessary for reaching relevant physical knowledge of the high pressure filamentary discharges processes. It is shown that diffusion, and thermal space and time distribution, must fully be taken into account

  9. Radiation pressure induced difference-sideband generation beyond linearized description

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Hao; Fan, Y. W.; Yang, X.; Wu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate radiation-pressure induced generation of the frequency components at the difference-sideband in an optomechanical system, which beyond the conventional linearized description of optomechanical interactions between cavity fields and the mechanical oscillation. We analytically calculate amplitudes of these signals, and identify a simple square-root law for both the upper and lower difference-sideband generation which can describe the dependence of the intensities of these signals...

  10. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rennert, Robert C; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Whitmore, Arnetha J; Walmsley, Graham G; Galvez, Michael G; Whittam, Alexander J; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2015-01-06

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation.

  11. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  12. Beam-induced heat loads on the beam screens of the inner triplets for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Skripka, Galina; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    The expected heat load induced on the beam screens has been evaluated for the triplet assemblies in the four experimental Insertion Regions (IRs) of the HL-LHC. The contribution from electron cloud effects has been estimated using PyECLOUD macroparticle simulations. The presence of a surface treatment for the reduction of the Secondary Electron Yield has been taken into account. The contribution from the impedance of the beam screen has been evaluated taking into account the impact of the temperature and of the magnetic field on the resistivity of the surface.

  13. The status and new trends of ion beam induced charge technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Rongrong; Qiu Huiyuan; Zhu Dezhang

    2002-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge technique (IBIC) with low beam current (fA level) and high efficiency is a new development of nuclear microscopy. It has been widely applied to the fields of semiconductor and microelectronic materials. The principle and the experimental method of the IBIC technique were described and reviewed its status and new trends were reviewed

  14. Electron beam induced fluorescence measurements of the degree of hydrogen dissociation in hydrogen plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.; Brussaard, G.J.H.; de Beer, E.C.M.; Schram, D.C.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of dissociation of hydrogen in a hydrogen plasma has been measured using electron beam induced fluorescence. A 20 kV, 1 mA electron beam excites both the ground state H atom and H2 molecule into atomic hydrogen in an excited state. From the resulting fluorescence the degree of

  15. A proposal for study of ion-beam induced chemical reactions using JAERI tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Problems in ion-beam induced chemical reactions using JAERI Tandem Accelerator were discussed. Research philosophy, some proposed experiments which are based on measurements during ion-beam bombardment, and main features of the experimental apparatus are briefly described in this report. (author)

  16. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Ju-hyuk

    2011-06-01

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (strätlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acoustic Pressure Oscillations Induced in I-Burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kiyoshi

    Iwama et al. invented the I-burner to investigate acoustic combustion instability in solid-propellant rockets (Proceedings of ICT Conference, 1994, pp. 26-1 26-14). Longitudinal pressure oscillations were induced in the combustion chamber of a thick-walled rocket by combustion of a stepped-perforation grain (I-burner). These oscillations were studied here experimentally. Two I-burners with an internal diameter of 80 mm and a length of 1208 mm or 2240 mm were made. The grain had stepped perforations (20 and 42 mm in diameter and 657 and 160 mm in length, respectively). Longitudinal pressure oscillations always occur in two stages when an HTPB (hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene)/AP (ammonium perchlorate)/aluminum-powder propellant burns (54 tests; the highest average pressure in the combustion chamber was 9.5 29 MPa), but no oscillations occur when an HTPB/AP propellant burns (29 tests). The pressure oscillations are essentially linear, but dissipation adds a nonlinear nature to them. In the first stage, the amplitudes are small and the first wave group predominates. In the next stage, the amplitudes are large and many wave groups are present. The change in the grain form accompanying the combustion affects the pressure oscillations.

  18. Underling modification in ion beam induced Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Chini, T.K.; Sanyal, M.K.; Grenzer, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface (amorphous-crystalline interface) structure of keV ion beam modified Si(001) wafers was studied for the first time using non-destructive technique and compared with that of the top one. Ion-beam modifications of the Si samples were done using state-of-art high-current ion implanter facility at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics by changing energy, dose and angle of incidence of the Ar + ion beam. To bring out the underlying modification depth-resolved x-ray grazing incidence diffraction has been carried out using synchrotron radiation facility, while the structure of the top surface was studied through atomic force microscopy

  19. Pressure-anisotropy-induced nonlinearities in the kinetic magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Quataert, E.; Kunz, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    In collisionless and weakly collisional plasmas, such as hot accretion flows onto compact objects, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can differ significantly from the standard (collisional) MRI. In particular, pressure anisotropy with respect to the local magnetic-field direction can both change the linear MRI dispersion relation and cause nonlinear modifications to the mode structure and growth rate, even when the field and flow perturbations are very small. This work studies these pressure-anisotropy-induced nonlinearities in the weakly nonlinear, high-ion-beta regime, before the MRI saturates into strong turbulence. Our goal is to better understand how the saturation of the MRI in a low-collisionality plasma might differ from that in the collisional regime. We focus on two key effects: (i) the direct impact of self-induced pressure-anisotropy nonlinearities on the evolution of an MRI mode, and (ii) the influence of pressure anisotropy on the `parasitic instabilities' that are suspected to cause the mode to break up into turbulence. Our main conclusions are: (i) The mirror instability regulates the pressure anisotropy in such a way that the linear MRI in a collisionless plasma is an approximate nonlinear solution once the mode amplitude becomes larger than the background field (just as in magnetohyrodynamics). This implies that differences between the collisionless and collisional MRI become unimportant at large amplitudes. (ii) The break up of large-amplitude MRI modes into turbulence via parasitic instabilities is similar in collisionless and collisional plasmas. Together, these conclusions suggest that the route to magnetorotational turbulence in a collisionless plasma may well be similar to that in a collisional plasma, as suggested by recent kinetic simulations. As a supplement to these findings, we offer guidance for the design of future kinetic simulations of magnetorotational turbulence.

  20. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  1. Transverse Space-Charge Field-Induced Plasma Dynamics for Ultraintense Electron-Beam Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tarkeshian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Similarly to laser or x-ray beams, the interaction of sufficiently intense particle beams with neutral gases will result in the creation of plasma. In contrast to photon-based ionization, the strong unipolar field of a particle beam can generate a plasma where the electron population receives a large initial momentum kick and escapes, leaving behind unshielded ions. Measuring the properties of the ensuing Coulomb exploding ions—such as their kinetic energy distribution, yield, and spatial distribution—can provide information about the peak electric fields that are achieved in the electron beams. Particle-in-cell simulations and analytical models are presented for high-brightness electron beams of a few femtoseconds or even hundreds of attoseconds, and transverse beam sizes on the micron scale, as generated by today’s free electron lasers. Different density regimes for the utilization as a potential diagnostics are explored, and the fundamental differences in plasma dynamical behavior for e-beam or photon-based ionization are highlighted. By measuring the dynamics of field-induced ions for different gas and beam densities, a lower bound on the beam charge density can be obtained in a single shot and in a noninvasive way. The exponential dependency of the ionization yield on the beam properties can provide unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, at the submicrometer and subfemtosecond scales, respectively, offering a practical and powerful approach to characterizing beams from accelerators at the frontiers of performance.

  2. Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure by coherent Raman scattering of laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Mueller, Sarah; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure environments based on electric-field induced Raman scattering are applied to repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges. The results have revealed that the peak electric field near the centre of the gap is almost independent of the applied voltage. Minimum sustainable voltage measurements suggests that, at each discharge pulse, charged particles that remain from the previous pulse serve as discharge seeds and play an important role for generation of uniform glow-like discharges.

  3. Temporal pore pressure induced stress changes during injection and depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Birgit; Heidbach, Oliver; Schilling, Frank; Fuchs, Karl; Röckel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Induced seismicity is observed during injection of fluids in oil, gas or geothermal wells as a rather immediate response close to the injection wells due to the often high-rate pressurization. It was recognized even earlier in connection with more moderate rate injection of fluid waste on a longer time frame but higher induced event magnitudes. Today, injection-related induced seismicity significantly increased the number of events with M>3 in the Mid U.S. However, induced seismicity is also observed during production of fluids and gas, even years after the onset of production. E.g. in the Groningen gas field production was required to be reduced due to the increase in felt and damaging seismicity after more than 50 years of exploitation of that field. Thus, injection and production induced seismicity can cause severe impact in terms of hazard but also on economic measures. In order to understand the different onset times of induced seismicity we built a generic model to quantify the role of poro-elasticity processes with special emphasis on the factors time, regional crustal stress conditions and fault parameters for three case studies (injection into a low permeable crystalline rock, hydrothermal circulation and production of fluids). With this approach we consider the spatial and temporal variation of reservoir stress paths, the "early" injection-related induced events during stimulation and the "late" production induced ones. Furthermore, in dependence of the undisturbed in situ stress field conditions the stress tensor can change significantly due to injection and long-term production with changes of the tectonic stress regime in which previously not critically stressed faults could turn to be optimally oriented for fault reactivation.

  4. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  5. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Jiang, Jian; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Chang; Wei, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  6. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A A; Jamieson, D N; Prawer, S; Allen, M G [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  7. Analysis of mutagenic effects induced by carbon beams at different LET in a red yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Haining; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Lu Dong; Wu Xin; Li Wenjian

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate inactive and mutagenic effects of carbon beam at different LET, the inactivation cross section and mutation cross section induced by carbon beams of different LET values were investigated in a red yeast strain Rhodotorula glutinis AY 91015. It was found that the maximum inactivation cross section of 4.37μm 2 , which was very close to the average nucleus cross section, was at LET of 120.0 keV/μm. The maximum mutation cross section was at LET of 96.0 keV/μm. Meanwhile, the highest mutagenicity of carbon ion was found around 58.2 keV/μm. It implied that the most efficient LET to induce mutation in survival yeasts was 58.2 keV/μm, which corresponded to energy of 35 MeV/u carbon beam. The most effective carbon beam to induce inactivation and mutation located at different energy region. (authors)

  8. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  9. Study on THz wave generation from air plasma induced by quasi-square Airy beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shijing; Zhang, Liangliang; Jiang, Guangtong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhao, Yuejin

    2018-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) wave has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential applications. The intense THz waves generated from air plasma induced by two-color femtosecond laser are widely used due to its high generation efficiency and broad frequency bandwidth. The parameters of the laser change the distribution of the air plasma, and then affect the generation of THz wave. In this research, we investigate the THz wave generation from air plasma induced by quasi-square Airy beam. Unlike the common Gauss beam, the quasi-square Airy beam has ability to autofocus and to increase the maximum intensity at the focus. By using the spatial light modulator (SLM), we can change the parameters of phase map to control the shape of the Airy beam. We obtain the two-color laser field by a 100-um-thick BBO crystal, then use a Golay detector to record THz wave energy. By comparing terahertz generation at different modulation depths, we find that terahertz energy produced by quasi-square Airy beam is up to 3.1 times stronger than that of Gauss beam with identical laser energy. In order to understand the influence of quasi-square Airy beam on the BBO crystal, we record THz wave energy by changing the azimuthal angle of BBO crystal with Gauss beam and Airy beam at different modulation depths. We find that the trend of terahertz energy with respect to the azimuthal angle of the BBO crystal keeps the same for different laser beams. We believe that the quasi-square Airy beam or other auto focusing beam can significantly improve the efficiency of terahertz wave generation and pave the way for its applications.

  10. Radiation Dosimetry of the Pressure Vessel Internals of the High Flux Beam Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E.; Reciniello, Richard N.; Hu, Jih-Perng; Rorer, David C.

    2003-06-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex™ polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rates, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup.

  11. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.P.; RORER, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex(trademark) polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup

  12. Temperature--pressure compensation for a linear accelerator electron beam dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrejsa, A.F.; Soen, J.; Jankowiak, P.

    1985-01-01

    Routine weekly calibration of a Siemens Mevatron 20 linear accelerator with 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, 15-, and 18-MeV electron energies demonstrated fluctuations in dose/monitor unit for the electron beam on the order of 3%--6%. Evaluations and study of the problem demonstrated that the electron chamber, which is open to atmosphere, was undergoing significant temperature changes during the course of a treatment day. The inability of the chamber to compensate for these changes in temperature and pressure led to the addition of a compensating circuit by the manufacturer. The results of the addition of this circuit were evaluated for several extended periods throughout the year, and it was found that the changes in dose/monitor were reduced to approximately +- 0.5%

  13. Marangoni flows induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berendsen, C W J; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Kroesen, G M W; Darhuber, A A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the interaction of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets of Ar or air with liquid films of an aliphatic hydrocarbon on moving solid substrates. The hydrodynamic jet-liquid interaction induces a track of lower film thickness. The chemical plasma-surface interaction oxidizes the liquid, leading to a local increase of the surface tension and a self-organized redistribution of the liquid film. We developed a numerical model that qualitatively reproduces the formation, instability and coarsening of the flow patterns observed in the experiments. Monitoring the liquid flow has potential as an in-situ, spatially and temporally resolved, diagnostic tool for the plasma-liquid surface interaction. (paper)

  14. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  15. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  16. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  17. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  18. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in atomic beams of radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebel, H.; Schatz, G.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the resonant scattering of light from CW tunable dye lasers, by a well collimated atomic beam, enable hyperfine splittings and optical isotope shifts to be determined with high precision and high sensitivity. Recent off-line atomic beam experiments with minute samples, comprising measurements with stable and unstable Ba, Ca and Pb isotopes are reviewed. The experimental methods and the analysis of the data are discussed. Information on the variation of the rms charge radii and on electromagnetic moments of nuclei in long isotopic chains is presented. (orig.) [de

  19. Impact of large beam-induced heat loads on the transient operation of the beam screens and the cryogenic plants of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Rodrigues, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) under study at CERN will produce 50-TeV high-energy proton beams. The high-energy particle beams are bent by 16-T superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K and distributed over a circumference of 80 km. The circulating beams induce 5 MW of dynamic heat loads by several processes such as synchrotron radiation, resistive dissipation of beam image currents and electron clouds. These beam-induced heat loads will be intercepted by beam screens operating between 40 and 60 K and induce transients during beam injection. Energy ramp-up and beam dumping on the distributed beam-screen cooling loops, the sector cryogenic plants and the dedicated circulators. Based on the current baseline parameters, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the cryogenic distribution system during a beam operation cycle were performed. The effects of the thermal inertia of the headers on the helium flow temperature at the cryogenic plant inlet as well as the temperature gradient experienced by the beam screen has been assessed. Additionally, this work enabled a thorough exergetic analysis of different cryogenic plant configurations and laid the building-block for establishing design specification of cold and warm circulators.

  20. Observation of helium flow induced beam orbit oscillations at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bonati, R.; Brennan, J.M.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Ganetis, G.; He, P.; Hirzel, W.; Jia, L.X.; Koello, P.; Louie, W.; McIntyre, G.; Nicoletti, A.; Rank, J.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Schmalzle, J.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Sondericker, J.; Tallerico, T.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal beam orbit jitter at frequencies around 10 Hz has been observed at RHIC for several years. The distinct frequencies of this jitter have been found at superconducting low-beta quadrupole triplet magnets around the ring, where they coincide with mechanical vibration modes of the cold masses. Recently, we have identified liquid helium flow as the driving force of these oscillations

  1. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083092; Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  2. Laser beam shaping for studying thermally induced damage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available into a flat-top beam profile by using a diffractive optical element as a phase element in conjunction with a Fourier transforming lens. In this paper, they have successfully demonstrated temperature profiles across the diamond tool surface using two laser...

  3. Pressure induced Amorphization of Ln1/3(Nb,Ta)O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchior, A.; Noked, O.; Sterer, E.; Shuker, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research focuses on the phenomenon of pressure induced amorphization (PIA) in Ln1/3MO3, Ln - La,Pr,Nd and M-Nb,Ta. In most pressure induced phase transitions the material changes from a crystalline phase to another crystalline phase. However, if this transition is kinetically hindered, the increased free energy due to the applied pressure will result in a structural collapse to an amorphous intermediate phase. This phenomenon is known as pressure induced amorphization

  4. Summary and presentation of the international workshop on beam induced energy deposition (issues, concerns, solutions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soundranayagam, R.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses: energy deposition and radiation shielding in antriproton source at FNAL; radiation issues/problems at RHIC; radiation damage to polymers; radiation effects on optical fibre in the SSC tunnel; capabilities of the Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility; the SSC interaction region; the FLUKA code system, modifications, recent extension and experimental verification; energy particle transport calculations and comparisons with experimental data; Los Alamos High Energy Transport code system; MCNP features and applications; intercomparison of Monte Carlo codes designed for simulation of high energy hadronic cascades; event generator, DTUJET-90 and DTUNUC; Preliminary hydrodynamic calculations of beam energy deposition; MESA code calculations of material response to explosive energy deposition; Smooth particle hydrodynamic; hydrodynamic effects and mass depletion phenomena in targets; beam dump: Beam sweeping and spoilers; Design considerations to mitigate effects of accidental beam dump; SSC beam abort and absorbed; beam abort system of SSC options; unconventional scheme for beam spoilers; low β quadrupoles: Energy deposition and radioactivation; beam induces energy deposition in the SSC components; extension of SSC-SR-1033 approach to radioactivation in LHC and SSC detectors; energy deposition in the SSC low-β IR-quads; beam losses and collimation in the LHC; and radiation shielding around scrapers

  5. Active control of annular flow-induced vibration of axisymmetric elastic beam by the local gap width control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Shintani, Atsuhiko; Ito, Tomohiro; Fujita, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration may occur in the structures such as elastic beams subjected to annular flow in the narrow passage. Once the flow-induced vibration occurs, vibration amplitude becomes larger, consequently it causes a lot of troubles such as fatigue or failure in mechanical structures. In this paper, for the purpose to avoid these troubles, the active control of vibration of an axisymmetric elastic beam subjected to annular flow is investigated. An air-pressured actuator is attached on the surface of the circular cylinder for the vibrational control. As the shape of the actuator changes by control, the gap width in narrow passage changes, which causes the change of the fluid pressure. Therefore, the vibration of the fluid-structure coupled system can be suppressed. The fluid-structure coupled equation based on the Euler-Bernoulli type of partial differential equation and the Navier-Stokes equations is analytically derived including control terms. By applying the optimal control law to the coupled system, the unstable behavior is stabilized. The stability of the coupled system is investigated by eigenvalue analyses of controlled coupled equations. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the efficiency of the proposed control method. (author)

  6. Pressure-induced transformations in computer simulations of glassy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Glassy water occurs in at least two broad categories: low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid water. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the transformations of glassy water using the ST2 model. Specifically, we study the known (i) compression-induced LDA-to-HDA, (ii) decompression-induced HDA-to-LDA, and (iii) compression-induced hexagonal ice-to-HDA transformations. We study each transformation for a broad range of compression/decompression temperatures, enabling us to construct a "P-T phase diagram" for glassy water. The resulting phase diagram shows the same qualitative features reported from experiments. While many simulations have probed the liquid-state phase behavior, comparatively little work has examined the transitions of glassy water. We examine how the glass transformations relate to the (first-order) liquid-liquid phase transition previously reported for this model. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that the liquid-liquid spinodal lines, between a low-density and high-density liquid, are extensions of the LDA-HDA transformation lines in the limit of slow compression. Extending decompression runs to negative pressures, we locate the sublimation lines for both LDA and hyperquenched glassy water (HGW), and find that HGW is relatively more stable to the vapor. Additionally, we observe spontaneous crystallization of HDA at high pressure to ice VII. Experiments have also seen crystallization of HDA, but to ice XII. Finally, we contrast the structure of LDA and HDA for the ST2 model with experiments. We find that while the radial distribution functions (RDFs) of LDA are similar to those observed in experiments, considerable differences exist between the HDA RDFs of ST2 water and experiment. The differences in HDA structure, as well as the formation of ice VII (a tetrahedral crystal), are a consequence of ST2 overemphasizing the tetrahedral character of water.

  7. Investigation of the spatial variability and possible origins of wind-induced air pressure fluctuations responsible for pressure pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Manuel; Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Zeeman, Matthias; Longdoz, Bernard; Schindler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The exchange of greenhouse gases between the soil and the atmosphere is highly relevant for the climate of the Earth. Recent research suggests that wind-induced air pressure fluctuations can alter the soil gas transport and therefore soil gas efflux significantly. Using a newly developed method, we measured soil gas transport in situ in a well aerated forest soil. Results from these measurements showed that the commonly used soil gas diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 30% during periods of strong wind-induced air pressure fluctuations. The air pressure fluctuations above the forest floor are only induced at high above-canopy wind speeds (> 5 m s-1) and lie in the frequency range 0.01-0.1 Hz. Moreover, the amplitudes of air pressure fluctuations in this frequency range show a clear quadratic dependence on mean above-canopy wind speed. However, the origin of these wind-induced pressure fluctuations is still unclear. Airflow measurements and high-precision air pressure measurements were conducted at three different vegetation-covered sites (conifer forest, deciduous forest, grassland) to investigate the spatial variability of dominant air pressure fluctuations, their origin and vegetation-dependent characteristics. At the conifer forest site, a vertical profile of air pressure fluctuations was measured and an array consisting of five pressure sensors were installed at the forest floor. At the grassland site, the air pressure measurements were compared with wind observations made by ground-based LIDAR and spatial temperature observations from a fibre-optic sensing network (ScaleX Campaign 2016). Preliminary results show that at all sites the amplitudes of relevant air pressure fluctuations increase with increasing wind speed. Data from the array measurements reveal that there are no time lags between the air pressure signals of different heights, but a time lag existed between the air pressure signals of the sensors distributed laterally on the forest floor

  8. Ion beam induced surface graphitization of CVD diamond for x-ray beam position monitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chian; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wen, L.; Melendres, C.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at ANL is a third-generation synchrotron facility that generates powerful x-ray beams on its undulator beamlines. It is important to know the position and angle of the x- ray beam during experiments. Due to very high heat flux levels, several patented x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) exploiting chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have been developed. These XBPMs have a thin layer of low-atomic-mass metallic coating so that photoemission from the x rays generate a minute but measurable current for position determination. Graphitization of the CVD diamond surface creates a very thin, intrinsic and conducting layer that can stand much higher temperatures and minimal x-ray transmission losses compared to the coated metallic layers. In this paper, a laboratory sputter ion source was used to transform selected surfaces of a CVD diamond substrate into graphite. The effect of 1-5 keV argon ion bombardment on CVD diamond surfaces at various target temperatures from 200 to 500 C was studied using Auger electron spectroscopy and in-situ electrical resistivity measurements. Graphitization after the ion bombardment has been confirmed and optimum conditions for graphitization studied. Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the overall diamond structure in the bulk of CVD diamond substrate after the ion bombardments. It was found that target temperature plays an important role in stability and electrical conductivity of the irradiated CVD diamonds

  9. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiljeva, I.V.; Mjakin, S.V.; Makarov, A.V.; Krasovsky, A.N.; Varlamov, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy)

  10. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiljeva, I.V. [Technology Center RADIANT, 10, Kurchatova Str., 194223 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: radiant@skylink.spb.ru; Mjakin, S.V. [Technology Center RADIANT, 10, Kurchatova Str., 194223 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Makarov, A.V. [St.-Petersburg State University of Cinema and Television, 13, ul. Pravdy, 191126 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Krasovsky, A.N. [St.-Petersburg State University of Cinema and Television, 13, ul. Pravdy, 191126 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Varlamov, A.V. [St.-Petersburg State University of Cinema and Television, 13, ul. Pravdy, 191126 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-15

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy)

  11. Orbital angular momentum mode of Gaussian beam induced by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Yan, Xu; Dong, Kangjun

    2018-02-01

    Superposition theory of the spiral harmonics is employed to numerical study the transmission property of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode of Gaussian beam induced by atmospheric turbulence. Results show that Gauss beam does not carry OAM at the source, but various OAM modes appear after affected by atmospheric turbulence. With the increase of atmospheric turbulence strength, the smaller order OAM modes appear firstly, followed by larger order OAM modes. The beam spreading of Gauss beams in the atmosphere enhance with the increasing topological charge of the OAM modes caused by atmospheric turbulence. The mode probability density of the OAM generated by atmospheric turbulence decreases, and peak position gradually deviate from the Gauss beam spot center with the increase of the topological charge. Our results may be useful for improving the performance of long distance laser digital spiral imaging system.

  12. Photorefractive Axicon: Study of Light-induced Effect by Bessel Beam in Photorefractive Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, T A; Gesualdi, M R R; Zamboni-Rached, M; Muramatsu, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the theoretical and computational study of the original analysis of the light-induced effects by Bessel beams in photorefractive crystals. Modern applications of these beams as: metrological, alignment of optical systems, optical tweezers, non linear optics, optical communication, and others, becoming a very interesting substitute for a Gaussian beam when this is subject to diffraction and dispersion effects to large distance propagation. On the other hand, the photorefractive crystals are very important materials for applications in non-linear optics, holographic storage, interferometry and optical information processing. We perform an analysis of the index refraction modulation generated by Bessel beam in photorefractive medium discussing the possibility this optical material to control and generation of Bessel beam properties.

  13. Ultrafast Melting of Carbon Induced by Intense Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, A.; Guenther, M. M.; Harres, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.; Gregori, G.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Heathcote, R.; Li, B.; Neely, D.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Mithen, J.; Schaumann, G.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-produced proton beams have been used to achieve ultrafast volumetric heating of carbon samples at solid density. The isochoric melting of carbon was probed by a scattering of x rays from a secondary laser-produced plasma. From the scattering signal, we have deduced the fraction of the material that was melted by the inhomogeneous heating. The results are compared to different theoretical approaches for the equation of state which suggests modifications from standard models.

  14. Beam diagnostics for Laser-induced proton generation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Heun; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae; Chan, Young Ho; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yoo, Byeong Duk

    2005-01-01

    With an advent of femto-second lasers, a laseraccelerated ion generation has been world-widely studied for medical and nuclear applications. It is known that protons with the energy from several tens MeV to a few hundreds MeV require for a cancer therapy and nuclear reaction. Even though, up to present, the maximum energy of laser-accelerated proton is about 60 MeV, it is expected that the energy of protons generated can be obtained at least up to 150 MeV. According to theoretical and experimental works, it turns out the energy distribution and the flux of ions strongly depends on the intensity of a fs laser at a target. However, physics on laser-plasma interaction is still not clear. The precise measurements of parameters of a fs laser and ions are important to figure out the physics and develop the theoretical interpretation. Typically, beam diagnostic system includes measurements and/or monitoring of the temporal and spatial profiles of lasers at the target as well as the energy spectrum and density profile of protons, which are critical for the analysis of mechanism and the characterization of protons generated. We fabricated and installed the target chamber for laser-accelerated proton generation and are now integrating beam diagnostic system. For laser diagnostics, beam monitoring and alignment system has been installed. For a charged particle, CR-39 detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and Si charged particle detectors are installed for density profile and energy spectrum. In this paper, we discuss the laser beam monitoring and alignment system. We also estimates expected spectrum of protons from Thomson parabola spectrometer, depending on the parameters of protons

  15. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J.; Sbarra, C.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed

  16. Behavioral changes induced by single and multiple electron beam pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, V.P.; McNulty, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single, and low-dose, high-dose-rate and multiple electron beam pulses on passive avoidance behavior in mice were studied. Passive avoidance was measured by recording the time that an animal took to enter a chamber from a narrow platform. There were four conditions in the experiment: (1) no shock no radiation-control, (2) radiation only, (3) shock only, and (4) radiation plus shock. Forty animals were run for each data point. Dose rate was held constant at 9 x 10/sup 7/ rads/sec. Average doses for the two single pulses were 7.18 and 8.72 rads. The average total dose for a 25 pulse per second condition was 324.0 rads. The differences between the single versus multiple pulse radiation-only conditions were significant with longer avoidance latencies in the multiple pulse condition. Avoidance latencies were also significantly longer in the shock plus radiation condition for the multiple beam pulse than the single pulse. It is concluded that single and multiple electron beam pulses significantly effect behavior, in this case producing avoidance

  17. Electrical Characterisation of electron beam exposure induced Defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danga, Helga T., E-mail: helga.danga@up.ac.za; Auret, Francois D.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2016-01-01

    The defects introduced in epitaxially grown p-type silicon (Si) during electron beam exposure were electrically characterised using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high resolution Laplace-DLTS. In this process, Si samples were first exposed to the conditions of electron beam deposition (EBD) without metal deposition. This is called electron beam exposure (EBE) herein. After 50 minutes of EBE, nickel (Ni) Schottky contacts were fabricated using the resistive deposition method. The defect level observed using the Ni contacts had an activation energy of H(0.55). This defect has an activation energy similar to that of the I-defect. The defect level is similar to that of the HB4, a boron related defect. DLTS depth profiling revealed that H(0.55) could be detected up to a depth of 0.8 μm below the junction. We found that exposing the samples to EBD conditions without metal deposition introduced a defect which was not introduced by the EBD method. We also observed that the damage caused by EBE extended deeper into the material compared to that caused by EBD.

  18. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P. [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F. [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada); Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  19. Nano-electron beam induced current and hole charge dynamics through uncapped Ge nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M. [Laboratoire de Recherche en Nanosciences, Bat. 6, case no 15, UFR Sciences, Universite de Reims Champagne Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Amiard, G.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint Jerome - Case 142, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2012-04-16

    Dynamics of hole storage in spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process on an oxide layer grown on an n-doped <001> silicon substrate is studied using a nano-electron beam induced current technique. Carrier generation is produced by an electron beam irradiation. The generated current is collected by an atomic force microscope--tip in contact mode at a fixed position away from the beam spot of about 0.5 {mu}m. This distance represents the effective diffusion length of holes. The time constants of holes charging are determined and the effect of the NC size is underlined.

  20. Beam energy spread in FERMI(at)elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI(at)elettra electron gun

  1. Radiation pressure induced difference-sideband generation beyond linearized description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Hao, E-mail: haoxiong1217@gmail.com; Fan, Yu-Wan; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying, E-mail: yingwu2@126.com [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-08-08

    We investigate radiation-pressure induced generation of the frequency components at the difference-sideband in an optomechanical system, which beyond the conventional linearized description of optomechanical interactions between cavity fields and the mechanical oscillation. We analytically calculate amplitudes of these signals, and identify a simple square-root law for both the upper and lower difference-sideband generation which can describe the dependence of the intensities of these signals on the pump power. Further calculation shows that difference-sideband generation can be greatly enhanced via achieving the matching conditions. The effect of difference-sideband generation, which may have potential application for manipulation of light, is especially suited for on-chip optomechanical devices, where nonlinear optomechanical interaction in the weak coupling regime is within current experimental reach.

  2. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X-ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivero, P.; Manfredotti, C.; Vittone, E.; Fizzotti, F.; Paolini, C.; Lo Giudice, A.; Barrett, R.; Tucoulou, R.

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the large hadron collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of 'detector grade' artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitative study of the inhomogeneity of the charge transport parameter defined as the product of mobility and lifetime for both electron and holes. XBIL represents a technique complementary to ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL), which has already been used by our group, since X-ray energy loss profile in the material is different from that of MeV ions. X-ray induced luminescence maps have been performed simultaneously with induced photocurrent maps, to correlate charge transport and induced luminescence properties of diamond. Simultaneous XBICC and XBIL maps exhibit features of partial complementarity that have been interpreted on the basis of considerations on radiative and non-radiative recombination processes which compete with charge transport efficiency

  3. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  4. Pressure-induced polyamorphism in lanthanide-solute metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangliang; Li, Renfeng; Liu, Haozhe [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Center for High Pressure Science Technology Advanced Research, Changchun (China); Wang, Luhong [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Qu, Dongdong [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Zhao, Haiyan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, University of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The electronic structure inheritance of lanthanide-solvent atoms in lanthanide-based metallic glasses has been proposed. Is a polyamorphism possible in lanthanide-solute metallic glasses? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in metallic glass containing lanthanide have been observed only in lanthanide-solvent metallic glasses. Here, a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous states, accompanied by a 7% volume collapse at ambient pressure, was observed in La{sub 43.4}Pr{sub 18.6}Al{sub 14}Cu{sub 24} metallic glass, with low lanthanide content, by using in situ X-ray total scattering method. The transformation also indicated by changes in short range and medium range order. Thus, it is proposed that the lanthanide-solute metallic glasses also inherit 4f electronic transition from pure lanthanide element in polyamorphic transition. This discovery offers a supplement to research on lanthanide-based metallic glasses, which further provides a new perspective of the polyamorphic transformation in metallic glasses containing lanthanide element. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  6. Electron beam generated in low pressure noble gas atmosphere – Compact device construction and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawada, A.; Konarski, P.

    2013-01-01

    During the process of low vacuum electron beam welding the energy of electrons is lower than the energy of electrons in the classical electron beam welding equipment. The classical electron beam welding can not always be used to weld of small work-piece details. Sometimes it’s impossible to reduce the electron beam energy because of poor focusing in the conventional electron beam welding machines. Low vacuum electron beam welding technique is well suitable to several niche products, such as thermocouples or aluminium seals. It also allows to treat the surface of dielectric materials, which is not possible using classical electron beam welding technique. The costs of low vacuum electron beam welding process are very low. (authors)

  7. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  8. Development of a new light collection and detection system optimized for ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Mi, Zhaohong; Koh, Long Cheng; Tao, Ye; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy is a new imaging technique which has the potential to achieve sub-50 nm spatial resolution fluorescence images. Currently the resolution of the technique has been limited to around 150 nm mainly because of inefficient collection and detection of emitted photons from the sample. To overcome this limitation, a new light collection system based on a custom made parabolic mirror is employed to enhance the fluorescence collection. The custom made mirror is designed so as to obtain both structural (scanning transmission ion microscopy) and ion beam induced fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The design and characterization of the parabolic mirror is discussed in detail

  9. Intraocular Pressure Induced Retinal Changes Identified Using Synchrotron Infrared Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Shen

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR spectroscopy has been used to quantify chemical and structural characteristics of a wide range of materials including biological tissues. In this study, we examined spatial changes in the chemical characteristics of rat retina in response to intraocular pressure (IOP elevation using synchrotron infrared microscopy (SIRM, a non-destructive imaging approach. IOP elevation was induced by placing a suture around the eye of anaesthetised rats. Retinal sections were collected onto transparent CaF2 slides 10 days following IOP elevation. Using combined SIRM spectra and chemical mapping approaches it was possible to quantify IOP induced changes in protein conformation and chemical distribution in various layers of the rat retina. We showed that 10 days following IOP elevation there was an increase in lipid and protein levels in the inner nuclear layer (INL and ganglion cell layer (GCL. IOP elevation also resulted in an increase in nucleic acids in the INL. Analysis of SIRM spectra revealed a shift in amide peaks to lower vibrational frequencies with a more prominent second shoulder, which is consistent with the presence of cell death in specific layers of the retina. These changes were more substantial in the INL and GCL layers compared with those occurring in the outer nuclear layer. These outcomes demonstrate the utility of SIRM to quantify the effect of IOP elevation on specific layers of the retina. Thus SIRM may be a useful tool for the study of localised tissue changes in glaucoma and other eye diseases.

  10. One arm exercise induces significant interarm diastolic blood pressure difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dezhi; Wang, Jiwei; Su, Hai; Xu, Jingsong; Liu, Yanna; Peng, Qiang; Wang, Lijuan

    2011-06-01

    This study is designed to investigate the inducing effect of one arm exercise on interarm difference (IAD) in the blood pressure (BP). Fifty healthy young participants were included in the study. Three-minute exercises of the right arm elbow flexion and extension were performed. The bilateral brachial BP was simultaneously measured with two automatic BP measurement devices before (basic) and immediately 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 min after exercise. The absolute difference in the systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) between the left and right BP of at least 10 mmHg was recognized as sIAD and dIAD. The baseline data of the SBP and DBP in left and right arms revealed no significant difference (SBP: 110 ± 10 vs. 111 ± 11 mmHg; DBP: 66 ± 8 vs. 66 ± 9 mmHg, both not significant). The prevalence of dIAD was 2% at the baseline. However, this prevalence increased to 80% at 0 min, as right arm exercise induced the right DBP decrease and left DBP increase, and then the prevalence decreased gradually within a 30-min recovery period. The prevalence of sIAD was zero at the baseline and the maximal prevalence was 8% during the 20-min postexercise period. One arm exercise can lead to a significant IAD in DBP. Any arm exercise should be avoided before BP measurement.

  11. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, S D; Wong, F G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes

  12. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes

  13. Observation of intense beam in low pressure from IPR Plasma Focus facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Shyam, A.; Chaturvedi, S.; Lathi, D.; Sarkar, Partha; Chaudhari, V.; Verma, R.; Shukla, R.; Debnath, K.; Sonara, J.; Shah, K.; Adhikary, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Plasma focus (PF) is a powerful source of various ionizing radiation such as charged particles beam (ions and electrons), X-ray, neutrons etc. This device can operate from energy level of 50J to 1MJ. Plasma Focus is relatively small, simple and cheap in comparison with other radiation sources based on isotopes, accelerators and fusion reactors. Radiation pulse from PF is strong and very short. Now with the new pulsed power technology this device can be operated repeatedly with enhanced lifetime. All these features make plasma focus a versatile device for academic as well as industrial interest such as hot plasma physics and plasma collective processes, equation of state of matter under extreme conditions, material science including material characterization, dynamic equation control, and surface modification and destruction test. Intense burst of neutrons have been observed from a low energy (3.6 kJ) Mather type plasma focus device operated in 0.4 Torr pressure of deuterium medium at IPR. The emitted neutrons (10 9 /shot), that are accompanied by a strong hard X-ray pulse, were found to be having energy up to 3.26 MeV in the axial direction of the device

  14. High-pressure pair distribution function (PDF) measurement using high-energy focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Xinguo, E-mail: xhong@bnl.gov; Weidner, Donald J. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Duffy, Thomas S. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, we report recent development of the high-pressure pair distribution function (HP-PDF) measurement technique using a focused high-energy X-ray beam coupled with a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The focusing optics consist of a sagittally bent Laue monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez (K–B) mirrors. This combination provides a clean high-energy X-ray beam suitable for HP-PDF research. Demonstration of the HP-PDF technique for nanocrystalline platinum under quasi-hydrostatic condition above 30 GPa is presented.

  15. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  16. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam

  17. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  18. Renal Nerve Stimulation-Induced Blood Pressure Changes Predict Ambulatory Blood Pressure Response After Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Mark R; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Gal, Pim; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Persu, Alexandre; Staessen, Jan A; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Elvan, Arif

    2016-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) response to renal denervation (RDN) is highly variable and its effectiveness debated. A procedural end point for RDN may improve consistency of response. The objective of the current analysis was to look for the association between renal nerve stimulation (RNS)-induced BP increase before and after RDN and changes in ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) after RDN. Fourteen patients with drug-resistant hypertension referred for RDN were included. RNS was performed under general anesthesia at 4 sites in the right and left renal arteries, both before and immediately after RDN. RNS-induced BP changes were monitored and correlated to changes in ambulatory BP at a follow-up of 3 to 6 months after RDN. RNS resulted in a systolic BP increase of 50±27 mm Hg before RDN and systolic BP increase of 13±16 mm Hg after RDN (Pefficacy of RDN and predict BP response to RDN. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Measurement scheme of kicker impedances via beam-induced voltages of coaxial cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro, E-mail: yoshihiro.shobuda@j-parc.jp [J-PARC Center, JAEA and KEK, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Irie, Yoshiro [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Toyama, Takeshi; Kamiya, Junichiro [J-PARC Center, JAEA and KEK, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Watanabe, Masao [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

    2013-06-11

    A new theory, which satisfies the causality condition, is developed to describe impedances of kicker magnets with coaxial cables. The theoretical results well describe measurement results, which are obtained by standard wire methods. On the other hand, when beams pass through the kicker, voltages are induced at the terminals of coaxial cables. In other words, by analyzing the voltages, the kicker impedance for the beams can be obtained. The observed impedances are consistent with the theoretical results. The theory describes the impedance for non-relativistic beams, as well. The theoretical, simulation and measurement results indicate that the horizontal kicker impedance is drastically reduced by the non-relativistic effect. -- Highlights: ► We develop an innovative method to measure kicker impedance including power cable. ► By analyzing voltages at the ends of coaxial cables, the impedance is derived. ► The horizontal impedance is reduced as the beam becomes non-relativistic.

  20. Experiments on the margin of beam induced quenches a superconducting quadrupole magnet in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Bednarek, M J; Nebot Del Busto, E; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    Protection of LHC equipment relies on a complex system of collimators to capture injected and circulating beam in case of LHC kicker magnet failures. However, for specific failures of the injection kickers, the beam can graze the injection protection collimators and induce quenches of downstream superconducting magnets. This occurred twice during 2011 operation and cannot be excluded during future operation. Tests were performed during Machine Development periods of the LHC to assess the quench margin of the quadrupole located just downstream of the last injection protection collimator in point 8. In addition to the existing Quench Protection System, a special monitoring instrumentation was installed at this magnet to detect any resistance increase below the quench limit. The correlation between the magnet and Beam Loss Monitor signals was analysed for different beam intensities and magnet currents. The results of the experiments are presented.

  1. Electronic transitions in quantum dots and rings induced by inhomogeneous off-centered light beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G F; Lucero, A O; Tamborenea, P I

    2010-12-22

    We theoretically investigate the effect of inhomogeneous light beams with (twisted light) and without (plane-wave light) orbital angular momentum on semiconductor-based nanostructures, when the symmetry axes of the beam and the nanostructure are displaced parallel to each other. Exact analytical results are obtained by expanding the off-centered light field in terms of the appropriate light modes centered around the nanostructure. We demonstrate how electronic transitions involving the transfer of different amounts of orbital angular momentum are switched on and off as a function of the separation between the axes of the beam and the system. In particular, we show that even off-centered plane-wave beams induce transitions such that the angular momenta of the initial and final states are different.

  2. Compositional changes in industrial hemp biomass (Cannabis sativa L.) induced by electron beam irradiation Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Yong Joo [Department of Biobased Materials, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Soo-Jeong [Department of Wood and Paper Science, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical decomposition of industrial hemp biomass were evaluated at doses of 150, 300, and 450 kGy. The quantity of decomposed components was indirectly estimated by measuring changes in alkaline extraction. The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation doses resulted in larger amounts of alkaline extract. Carbohydrate compositional analysis using {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the polysaccharides of the industrial hemp. The xylose peak intensity in the NMR spectra decreased with increasing electron irradiation dose, indicating that xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose. -- Highlights: {yields} The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation. {yields} Carbohydrate analysis was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the industrial hemp. {yields} Xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose.

  3. Compositional changes in industrial hemp biomass (Cannabis sativa L.) induced by electron beam irradiation Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Yong Joo; Shin, Soo-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical decomposition of industrial hemp biomass were evaluated at doses of 150, 300, and 450 kGy. The quantity of decomposed components was indirectly estimated by measuring changes in alkaline extraction. The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation doses resulted in larger amounts of alkaline extract. Carbohydrate compositional analysis using 1 H-NMR spectroscopy was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the polysaccharides of the industrial hemp. The xylose peak intensity in the NMR spectra decreased with increasing electron irradiation dose, indicating that xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose. -- Highlights: → The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation. → Carbohydrate analysis was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the industrial hemp. → Xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose.

  4. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  5. Modeling of Low Frequency MHD Induced Beam Ion Transport In NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Medley, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    Beam ion transport in the presence of low frequency MHD activity in National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) plasma is modeled numerically and analyzed theoretically in order to understand basic underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed fast ion redistribution and losses. Numerical modeling of the beam ions flux into the NPA in NSTX shows that after the onset of low frequency MHD activity high energy part of beam ion distribution, E b > 40keV, is redistributed radially due to stochastic diffusion. Such diffusion is caused by high order harmonics of the transit frequency resonance overlap in the phase space. Large drift orbit radial width induces such high order resonances. Characteristic confinement time is deduced from the measured NPA energy spectrum and is typically ∼ 4msec. Considered MHD activity may induce losses on the order of 10% at the internal magnetic field perturbation (delta)B/B = Ο (10 -3 ), which is comparable to the prompt orbit losses

  6. Radioprotective efficacy of bisarylidene cyclopentanone on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darshan Raj, C.G.; Sarojini, B.K.; Musthafa Khaleel, V.; Ramesh, S.R.; Ramakrishna, M.K.; Narayana, B.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Present study was carried out for evaluating the radioprotective effect of bischalcone (2E, 5E) - 2,5-bis (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzylidene) cyclopentanone (curcumin analog (CA)), on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster adults. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants included superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The oxidative stress was induced at 1.5 Gy. (author)

  7. Further insights into blood pressure induced premature beats: Transient depolarizations are associated with fast myocardial deformation upon pressure decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemers, Peter; Sutherland, George; Cikes, Maja; Jakus, Nina; Holemans, Patricia; Sipido, Karin R; Willems, Rik; Claus, Piet

    2015-11-01

    An acute increase in blood pressure is associated with the occurrence of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs). We aimed to study the timing of these PVCs with respect to afterload-induced changes in myocardial deformation in a controlled, preclinically relevant, novel closed-chest pig model. An acute left ventricular (LV) afterload challenge was induced by partial balloon inflation in the descending aorta, lasting 5-10 heartbeats (8 pigs; 396 inflations). Balloon inflation enhanced the reflected wave (augmentation index 30% ± 8% vs 59% ± 6%; P blood pressure by 35% ± 4%. This challenge resulted in a more abrupt LV pressure decline, which was delayed beyond ventricular repolarization (rate of pressure decline 0.16 ± 0.01 mm Hg/s vs 0.27 ± 0.04 mm Hg/ms; P pressure 1 ± 12 ms vs 36 ± 9 ms; P = .008), during which the velocity of myocardial shortening at the basal septum increased abruptly (ie, postsystolic shortening) (peak strain rate -0.6 ± 0.5 s(-1) vs -2.5 ± 0.8 s(-1); P pressure decline, with increased postsystolic shortening, and not at peak pressure, that PVCs occur (22% of inflations). These PVCs preferentially occurred at the basal and apical segments. In the same regions, monophasic action potentials demonstrated the appearance of delayed afterdepolarization-like transient depolarizations as origin of PVCs. An acute blood pressure increase results in a more abrupt LV pressure decline, which is delayed after ventricular repolarization. This has a profound effect on myocardial mechanics with enhanced postsystolic shortening. Coincidence with induced transient depolarizations and PVCs provides support for the mechanoelectrical origin of pressure-induced premature beats. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of morphological changes in platinum-containing nanostructures created by electron-beam-induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, A.; Hesselberth, M.; Mulders, J.J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Focused electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) allows the rapid fabrication of three-dimensional nanodevices and metallic wiring of nanostructures, and is a promising technique for many applications in nanoresearch. The authors present two topics on platinum-containing nanostructures created by

  9. Crosslinking of oriented polyethylene by electron beam radiation. Influence of morphology induced by drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Crevecoeur, G.; Lemstra, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of drawing on the crosslinking efficiency for electron beam radiation is reported for solution-crystallized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. A maximum in crosslinking efficiency is found at a draw ratio of approximately five, indicating an optimum morphology for inducing crosslinks during the hot-drawing process. (author)

  10. Beam deflection induced by E×B near a linear filament cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huashun; Jiang, Jiasheng

    2017-02-21

    Beam deflection induced by E×B near a linear filament cathode in a two grid electron gun is presented theoretically and experimentally. The experimental results are consistent with the calculation based on the theoretical equations. The influences upon performance and design of electron gun with linear filament cathode, which is used broadly in electrocurtain accelerators, are discussed in detail.

  11. The rational design of a Au(I) precursor for focused electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marashdeh, Ali; Tiesma, Thiadrik; van Velzen, Niels J. C.; Harder, Sjoerd; Havenith, Remco W. A.; De Hosson, Jeff T. M.; van Dorp, Willem F.

    2017-01-01

    Au(I) complexes are studied as precursors for focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP). FEBIP is an advanced direct-write technique for nanometer-scale chemical synthesis. The stability and volatility of the complexes are characterized to design an improved precursor for pure Au deposition.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source

  13. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  14. Towards high purity nanostructures from electron beam induced deposition of platinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, A.P.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) is a novel nanofabrication technique allowing the rapid prototyping of three-dimensional nanodevices and the metallic wiring of nanostructures, and is a promising technique for many applications in nanoresearch. EBID is a process wherein a precursor molecule

  15. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing: the effect of substrate thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F; Lazic, Ivan; Beyer, André

    2011-01-01

    It is often suggested that the growth in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is caused not only by primary electrons, but also (and even predominantly) by secondary electrons (SEs). If that is true, the growth rate for FEBIP can be changed by modifying the SE yield. Results from our ...

  16. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  17. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  18. Ion beam induced luminescence of germano-silicate optical fiber preform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunkyu; Kim, Jongyeol; Lee, Namho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngwoong; Han, Wontaek [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Markovic, Nikola; Jaksic, Milko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagred (Croatia)

    2014-05-15

    When an optical fiber is exposed to radiation, the attenuation (RIA, Radiation Induced Attenuation) in the optical fiber (OF) is increased because of the color centers which deteriorate the transmission property and generate the absorption loss. In order to understand the radiation induced defect, Ion Beam induced luminescence (IBIL) was introduced to investigate it. IBIL technique is to analyze IR/VIS/UV luminescence related to ion beam interaction with outer shell electrons involved in chemical bonds and structure defects of target atoms. So IBIL is sensitive to its chemical composition and has been used in analysis of material characterization, geological samples and cultural heritage objects. In silica material, four O atoms are surrounding one Si atom in tetrahedral coordination. In this study, the influence of Copper (Cu) and Cerium (Ce) dopants to germano silica core optical fibers were investigated under proton irradiation at RBI using Ion Beam induced luminescence (IBIL) method. To understand the radiation induced defect of optical fibers, IBIL were tested to a germano-silica core fiber under 2 MeV proton irradiation. Although a Cu or Ce dopant was not detected by IBIL technique, the relation between the amount of radiation and luminescence can be established. This experiment showed a potential technique of studying the effects and behavior of additive elements for silica core fiber. To increase the radiation resistance of optical fibers, further investigations are needed, i. e. the proper additives and its contents and an interaction mechanism between Ge-related defects and additives.

  19. Ion-beam-induced reactions in metal-thin-film-/BP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Kumashiro, Y.; Revesz, P.; Mayer, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Ion-beam-induced reactions in Ni thin films on BP(100) have been investigated and compared with the results of the thermal reaction. The full reaction of Ni layer with BP induced by energetic heavy ion bombardments (600 keV Xe) was observed at 200degC and the formation of the crystalline phase corresponding to a composition of Ni 4 BP was observed. Amorphous layer with the same composition was formed by the bombardments below RT. For thermally annealed samples the reaction of the Ni layer on BP started at temperatures between 350degC and 400degC and full reaction was observed at 450degC. Metal-rich ternary phase or mixed binary phase is thought to be the first crystalline phase formed both in the ion-beam-induced and in the thermally induced reactions. The crystalline phase has the same composition and X-ray diffraction pattern both for ion-beam-induced and thermal reactions. Linear dependence of the reacted thickness on the ion fluence was also observed. The authors would like to express their sincere gratitude to Jian Li and Shi-Qing Wang for X-ray diffraction measurements at Cornell University. One of the authors (N.K.) acknowledge the Agency of Science and Technology of Japan for the financial support of his stay at Cornell. We also acknowledge Dr. H. Tanoue at ETL for his help in ion bombardment experiments. (author)

  20. Ion beam induced luminescence of germano-silicate optical fiber preform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyunkyu; Kim, Jongyeol; Lee, Namho; Kim, Youngwoong; Han, Wontaek; Markovic, Nikola; Jaksic, Milko

    2014-01-01

    When an optical fiber is exposed to radiation, the attenuation (RIA, Radiation Induced Attenuation) in the optical fiber (OF) is increased because of the color centers which deteriorate the transmission property and generate the absorption loss. In order to understand the radiation induced defect, Ion Beam induced luminescence (IBIL) was introduced to investigate it. IBIL technique is to analyze IR/VIS/UV luminescence related to ion beam interaction with outer shell electrons involved in chemical bonds and structure defects of target atoms. So IBIL is sensitive to its chemical composition and has been used in analysis of material characterization, geological samples and cultural heritage objects. In silica material, four O atoms are surrounding one Si atom in tetrahedral coordination. In this study, the influence of Copper (Cu) and Cerium (Ce) dopants to germano silica core optical fibers were investigated under proton irradiation at RBI using Ion Beam induced luminescence (IBIL) method. To understand the radiation induced defect of optical fibers, IBIL were tested to a germano-silica core fiber under 2 MeV proton irradiation. Although a Cu or Ce dopant was not detected by IBIL technique, the relation between the amount of radiation and luminescence can be established. This experiment showed a potential technique of studying the effects and behavior of additive elements for silica core fiber. To increase the radiation resistance of optical fibers, further investigations are needed, i. e. the proper additives and its contents and an interaction mechanism between Ge-related defects and additives

  1. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O.S.; Abraham, N.L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B.S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D.L.; Adelman, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β * are studied.

  2. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces; Untersuchungen zu ionenstrahlinduzierter Desorption von kryogenen Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-07-03

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  3. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  4. Site control technique for quantum dots using electron beam induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Kanji; Jung, JaeHun; Yokota, Hiroshi [Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro, Minami-saitama, Saitama 3458501 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    To develop simple and high throughput sit definition technique for quantum dots (QDs), the electron beam induced deposition (EBID) method was used as desorption guide of phosphorus atoms form InP substrate. As the results one or a few indium (In) droplets (DLs) were created in the carbon grid pattern by thermal annealing at a temperature of 450°C for 10 min in the ultra high vacuum condition. The size of In DLs was larger than QDs, but arsenide DLs by molecular beam in growth chamber emitted wavelength of 1.028μm at 50K by photoluminescence measurement.

  5. Site control technique for quantum dots using electron beam induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Kanji; Jung, JaeHun; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    To develop simple and high throughput sit definition technique for quantum dots (QDs), the electron beam induced deposition (EBID) method was used as desorption guide of phosphorus atoms form InP substrate. As the results one or a few indium (In) droplets (DLs) were created in the carbon grid pattern by thermal annealing at a temperature of 450°C for 10 min in the ultra high vacuum condition. The size of In DLs was larger than QDs, but arsenide DLs by molecular beam in growth chamber emitted wavelength of 1.028μm at 50K by photoluminescence measurement

  6. Setup for fission and evaporation cross-section measurements in reactions induced by secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.A.; Luk'yanov, S.M.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Skobelev, N.K.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Dlouhy, Z.; Radnev, S.; Poroshin, N.V.

    2002-01-01

    A setup for studying reactions induced by secondary radioactive beams has been constructed. It allows simultaneous measurement of α-particle and fission fragment energy spectra. By measuring the α-particles, identification of evaporation residues is achieved. A set of three targets can be used so as to ensure sufficient statistics. Two silicon detectors, located at 90 degrees to the secondary beam direction, face each target, thus covering 30% of the solid angle. This experimental setup is to be used to obtain excitation functions of fusion-fission reactions and of reactions leading to evaporation residue production

  7. Multi-bunch energy spread induced by beam loading in standing wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction of a relativistic beam with the modes of the TM 010 pass-band of a multicell cavity does not cause any problem: although all the modes are excited by the RF (radiofrequency) generator, resulting in different cell excitations during the cavity filling and the beam pulse, the net accelerating field exhibits negligible fluctuations from bunch to bunch. However, when the beam is not fully relativistic, this is no more true. The phase slippage occurring in the first cells, between the non relativistic beam and the lower pass-band modes, produces an effective enhancement of the shunt impedances, which is usually negligible for a relativistic beam in a well tuned cavity. Moreover, the voltage jumps (amplitude and phase) occurring at each bunch passage, as well as the beam detuning caused by the off-crest bunches, vary from cell to cell. These effects enhance dramatically the fluctuation of the accelerating voltage, with a dominant beating provided by the pass-band mode nearest to the pi-mode. The induced beam energy spread has been estimated by the help of two distinct codes, developed at Frascati (Italy) and (Saclay), with results in good agreement. While an interaction integral is computed at each bunch passage, the cavity refilling is calculated by solving coupled differential equations of the modes of the pass-band, driven by a generator linked to one end-cell. It is shown also that the intermode coupling arises from the external Q of the drive end-cell, and not from the wall losses. For illustration, the authors applied the method to the beam-loading problem in the SC capture cavity of the low charge injector of the TESLA test facility installed at DESY

  8. Linear acoustic waves induced in a cylindrical solid target by particle beam in e--e+ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeyemi, Olufemi Segun

    2015-06-01

    A future high energy lepton collider will demand high luminosities to achieve its physics goals. For the electron-positron linear collider, the generation of the desired amount of positrons is a non-trivial problem: the positron production target has to survive huge amounts of energy deposited by the bombardment of intense beams of electrons or photons. This causes a rapid increase of the temperature in the target within a very short time period. The resulting deformation due to the induced pressure waves can substantially shorten the operating life-span of the target material. In this work, we study linear effects of induced stress in a solid target through pressure acoustic waves using continuum mechanics. We derived analytical solutions for different cases and imposed different boundary conditions. The application of the model to the SLC positron target gave us the results which are in agreement with the existing literature. In a similar manner, we investigated the effect of single and multiple photon bunches on the conversion target for ILC.

  9. Development of high pressure deuterium gas targets for the generation of intense mono-energetic fast neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzek, J.; Richardson, K.; Franklyn, C.B.; Waites, A.; McMurray, W.R.; Watterson, J.I.W.; Tapper, U.A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Two different technical solutions to the problem of generation of mono-energetic fast neutron beams on the gaseous targets are presented here. A simple and cost-effective design of a cooled windowed gas target system is described in the first part of this paper. It utilises a thin metallic foil window and circulating deuterium gas cooled down to 100 K. The ultimate beam handling capability of such target is determined by the properties of the window. Reliable performance of this gas target system was achieved at 1 bar of deuterium gas, when exposed to a 45 μA beam of 5 MeV deuterons, for periods in excess of 6 h. Cooling of the target gas resulted in increased fast neutron output and improved neutron to gamma-ray ratio. The second part of this paper discusses the design of a high pressure, windowless gas target for use with pulsed, low duty cycle accelerators. A rotating seal concept was applied to reduce the gas load in a differentially pumped system. This allows operation at 1.23 bar of deuterium gas pressure in the gas cell region. Such a gas target system is free from the limitations of the windowed target but special attention has to be paid to the heat dissipation capability of the beam dump, due to the use of a thin target. The rotating seal concept is particularly suitable for use with accelerators such as radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs that operate with a very high peak current at low duty cycle. The performance of both target systems was comprehensively characterized using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique. This demonstrated that very good quality mono-energetic fast neutron beams were produced with the slow neutron and gamma-ray component below 10% of the total target output

  10. Nonlinear propagation of a spatially incoherent laser beam: self-induced smoothing and reduction of scattering instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximov, A.V.; Ourdev, I.G.; Rozmus, W.; Capjack, C.E.; Mounaix, Ph.; Huller, S.; Pesme, D.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Divol, L.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that plasma-induced angular spreading and spectral broadening of a spatially incoherent laser beam correspond to increased spatial and temporal incoherence of the laser light. The spatial incoherence is characterized by an effective beam f-number, decreasing in space along the direction of light propagation. Plasma-induced beam smoothing can influence laser-plasma interaction physics. In particular, decreasing the correlation time of the propagating laser light may dramatically reduce the levels of backward stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering inside the plasma. Also, the decrease of the laser beam effective f-number reduces the reflectivity of backward stimulated Brillouin scattering. (authors)

  11. Chromosome aberrations induced by 135 MeV of carbon and neon beams by PRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Minamihisamatu, Masako; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Itsukaichi, Hiromi; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Yatagai, Fumio; Sato, Kohki.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome aberration can be an indicator of the radiation lesions in irradiated cells. Many studies on chromosome aberration induced by X-ray and γ - ray have indicated that the dose response of the aberration can be fitted to a quadratic equation, Y = αD + βD 2 , and it becomes linear as the LET of beams increases. The main subject of this study was some quantification of chromosomal aberration induced by 135 MeV/n carbon and neon beams produced by the RRC, the operation of which increasingly became useful for the studies on heavy ion biology. The results will meet with some of the radiobiological features connected to the specific action of charged particles. The materials used, the experimental method and the results are reported. Four curves of the dose response for the production of dicentric and ring types of aberration induced by carbon and neon beams and four different dose average LETs are given. Aberration production rate became higher as LET increased. Chromosome aberration can be quantified as an indicator of radiation lesions in the case of high LET particle radiation. (K.I.)

  12. Threshold stoichiometry for beam induced nitrogen depletion of SiN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmers, H.; Weijers, T.D.M.; Elliman, R.G.; Uribasterra, J.; Whitlow, H.J.; Sarwe, E.-L.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the stoichiometry of silicon nitride films as a function of the number of incident ions using heavy ion elastic recoil detection (ERD) show that beam-induced nitrogen depletion depends on the projectile species, the beam energy, and the initial stoichiometry. A threshold stoichiometry exists in the range 1.3>N/Si≥1, below which the films are stable against nitrogen depletion. Above this threshold, depletion is essentially linear with incident fluence. The depletion rate correlates non-linearly with the electronic energy loss of the projectile ion in the film. Sufficiently long exposure of nitrogen-rich films renders the mechanism, which prevents depletion of nitrogen-poor films, ineffective. Compromising depth-resolution, nitrogen depletion from SiN films during ERD analysis can be reduced significantly by using projectile beams with low atomic numbers

  13. Pressure-mediated reduction of ultrasonically induced cell lysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaravino, V.E.; Miller, M.W.; Carstensen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chinese hamster V-79 cells, exposed in polystyrene tubes for 5 min to 1-MHz continuous-wave ultrasound, were lysed more by a 10 than a 5 W/cm 2 intensity. Higher atmospheric pressure was needed to eliminate lysis with the former relative to the latter intensity, but lysis by 10 W/cm 2 was completely climinated with 2 atm of hydrostatic pressure. The reduction in lysis per unit increase in atmospheric pressure was comparable for both ultrasound intensities

  14. Pressure sensor based on MEMS nano-cantilever beam structure as a heterodielectric gate electrode of dopingless TFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gagan; Raman, Ashish

    2016-12-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has enticed numerous scientists since recent decades particularly in the field of miniaturized-sensors and actuators. Pressure sensor is pivotal component in both of the forerunning fields. The pursuance of a pressure sensor is exigently relying upon its different physical properties i.e. Piezo-resistive, Piezoelectric, Capacitive, Magnetic and Electrostatic. This article presents an outline and scrutiny of the Doping-less Cantilever Based Pressure Sensor using tunnel field effect transistor technology. The propounded pressure sensor based on the principle of capacitive gate coupling, due to which the tunneling current is modified. Additionally, to enhance the affectability of pressure sensor, the work function of metal gate electrode is amended using gas molecule diffusion. Simulation uncovers a phenomenal relationship amongst hypothetical and practical accepts of configuration. The pressure sensor is composed at Silvaco Atlas tool utilizing 40 nm technologies. The performance results exhibit that the proposed model consumes ≤1 mW power and 250 μA tunneling current per nm bending of cantilever beam structure. The inclusive length of the proposed device is 100 nm.

  15. Beam induced heat loads on the beam-screens of the twin-bore magnets in the IRs of the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The expected heat load induced on the beam screens has been evaluated for all the twin-bore magnets in the Insertion Regions (IRs) of the HL-LHC. The contribution from the impedance of the beam screen has been evaluated taking into account the presence of a longitudinal weld in the beam screen and the impact of the temperature and of the magnetic field on the resistivity of the surface. The contribution coming from electron cloud effects has been evaluated for different values of the Secondary Electron Yield of the surface based PyECLOUD build-up simulations.

  16. Electron-beam induced deposition and autocatalytic decomposition of Co(CO3NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Vollnhals

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The autocatalytic growth of arbitrarily shaped nanostructures fabricated by electron beam-induced deposition (EBID and electron beam-induced surface activation (EBISA is studied for two precursors: iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO5, and cobalt tricarbonyl nitrosyl, Co(CO3NO. Different deposits are prepared on silicon nitride membranes and silicon wafers under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, and are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM, including near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectroscopy. It has previously been shown that Fe(CO5 decomposes autocatalytically on Fe seed layers (EBID and on certain electron beam-activated surfaces, yielding high purity, polycrystalline Fe nanostructures. In this contribution, we investigate the growth of structures from Co(CO3NO and compare it to results obtained from Fe(CO5. Co(CO3NO exhibits autocatalytic growth on Co-containing seed layers prepared by EBID using the same precursor. The growth yields granular, oxygen-, carbon- and nitrogen-containing deposits. In contrast to Fe(CO5 no decomposition on electron beam-activated surfaces is observed. In addition, we show that the autocatalytic growth of nanostructures from Co(CO3NO can also be initiated by an Fe seed layer, which presents a novel approach to the fabrication of layered nanostructures.

  17. Radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Gilardoni, S S; Köster, U

    2003-01-01

    The production rates of neutron-rich fission products for the next-generation radioactive beam facility EURISOL are mainly limited by the maximum amount of power deposited by protons in the target. An alternative approach is to use neutron beams to induce fission in actinide targets. This has the advantage of reducing: the energy deposited by the proton beam in the target; contamination from neutron-deficient isobars that would be produced by spallation; and mechanical stress on the target. At ISOLDE CERN, tests have been made on standard ISOLDE actinide targets using fast neutron bunches produced by bombarding thick, high-Z metal converters with 1 and 1.4 GeV proton pulses. This paper reviews the first applications of converters used at ISOLDE. It highlights the different geometries and the techniques used to compare fission yields produced by the proton beam directly on the target with neutron-induced fission. Results from the six targets already tested, namely UC2/graphite and ThO2 targets with tungsten an...

  18. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongliang; Qin Guangyong; Huo Yuping; Tian Shuangqi; Tang Jihua

    2009-01-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism. (ion beam bioengineering)

  19. Decomposition of organic pollutants in industrial Effluent induced by advanced oxidation process with Electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, C.L.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Rela, P.R.; Oikawa, H.; Silveira, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) by electron beam irradiation induce the decomposition of pollutants in industrial effluent. Experiments were conducted using a Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1.5 MeV energy and 37 Kew power. Experiments were conducted using samples from a Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) that receives about 20% of industrial wastewater, with the objective of use the electrons beam technology to destroy the refractory organic pollutants. Samples from WTP main Industrial Receiver Unit influent (IRU), Coarse Bar Screens effluent (CBS), Medium Bar Screens effluent (MBS), Primary Sedimentation effluent (PS) and Final Effluent (FE), were collected and irradiated in the electron beam accelerator in a batch system. The delivered doses were 5.0kGy, 10.0kGy and 20.0kGy. The electron beam irradiation showed be efficient on destroying the organic compounds delivered in these effluents mainly chloroform, dichloroethane, methyl isobutyl ketone, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol. The necessary dose to remove 90% of the most organic compounds from industry effluent was 20 kGy. The removal of organic compounds from this complex mixture were described by the destruction G value (Gd) that were obtained for those compounds in different initial concentration and compared with literature

  20. Novel Programmable Shape Memory Polystyrene Film: A Thermally Induced Beam-power Splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Han, Yu; Wang, Wenxin; Liu, Yanju; Jin, Peng; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-03-09

    Micro/nanophotonic structures that are capable of optical wave-front shaping are implemented in optical waveguides and passive optical devices to alter the phase of the light propagating through them. The beam division directions and beam power distribution depend on the design of the micro/nanostructures. The ultimate potential of advanced micro/nanophotonic structures is limited by their structurally rigid, functional singleness and not tunable against external impact. Here, we propose a thermally induced optical beam-power splitter concept based on a shape memory polystyrene film with programmable micropatterns. The smooth film exhibits excellent transparency with a transmittance of 95% in the visible spectrum and optical stability during a continuous heating process up to 90 °C. By patterning double sided shape memory polystyrene film into erasable and switchable micro-groove gratings, the transmission light switches from one designed light divided directions and beam-power distribution to another because of the optical diffraction effect of the shape changing micro gratings during the whole thermal activated recovery process. The experimental and theoretical results demonstrate a proof-of-principle of the beam-power splitter. Our results can be adapted to further extend the applications of micro/nanophotonic devices and implement new features in the nanophotonics.

  1. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  2. Beam-induced damage to the Tevatron components and what has been done about it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Czarapata, P.C.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Still, D.A.; Samulyak, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    A beam-induced damage to the Tevatron collimators happened in December 2003 was induced by a failure in the CDF Roman Pot detector positioning during the collider run. Possible scenarios of this failure resulted in an excessive halo generation and superconducting magnet quench have been studied via realistic simulations using the STRUCT and MARS14 codes. It is shown that the interaction of a misbehaved proton beam with the collimators result in a rapid local heating and a possible damage. A detailed consideration is given to the ablation process for the collimator material taking place in high vacuum. It is shown that ablation of tungsten (primary collimator) and stainless steel (secondary collimator) jaws results in creation of a groove in the jaw surface as was observed after the December's accident. The actions undertaken to avoid such an accident in future are described in detail. (author)

  3. Beam-induced damage to the Tevatron components and what has been done about it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Czarapata, P.C.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Still, D.A.; Samulyak, R.V.

    2006-01-01

    A beam-induced damage to the Tevatron collimators happened in December 2003 was induced by a failure in the CDF Roman Pot detector positioning during the collider run. Possible scenarios of this failure resulted in an excessive halo generation and superconducting magnet quench have been studied via realistic simulations using the STRUCT and MARS14 codes. It is shown that the interaction of a misbehaved proton beam with the collimators result in a rapid local heating and a possible damage. A detailed consideration is given to the ablation process for the collimator material taking place in high vacuum. It is shown that ablation of tungsten (primary collimator) and stainless steel (secondary collimator) jaws results in creation of a groove in the jaw surface as was observed after the December's accident. The actions undertaken to avoid such an accident in future are described in detail

  4. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Wu Xin; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Liu Qingfang; He Jinyu; Jing Xigang; Ding Nan; Dai Zhongying; Zhou Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  5. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong; Li, Wenjian; Wu, Xin; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Shuang; Liu, Qingfang; He, Jinyu; Jing, Xigang; Ding, Nan; Dai, Zhongying; Zhou, Jianping

    2010-12-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20Ne10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  6. Role of pressure in angiotensin II-induced renal injury: chronic servo-control of renal perfusion pressure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takefumi; Cowley, Allen W

    2004-04-01

    Renal perfusion pressure was servo-controlled chronically in rats to quantify the relative contribution of elevated arterial pressure versus angiotensin II (Ang II) on the induction of renal injury in Ang II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a 4% salt diet were administered Ang II for 14 days (25 ng/kg per minute IV; saline only for sham rats), and the renal perfusion pressure to the left kidney was continuously servo-controlled to maintain a normal pressure in that kidney throughout the period of hypertension. An aortic occluder was implanted around the aorta between the two renal arteries and carotid and femoral arterial pressure were measured continuously throughout the experiment to determine uncontrolled and controlled renal perfusion pressure, respectively. Renal perfusion pressure of uncontrolled, controlled, and sham kidneys over the period of Ang II or saline infusion averaged 152.6+/-7.0, 117.4+/-3.5, and 110.7+/-2.2 mm Hg, respectively. The high-pressure uncontrolled kidneys exhibited tubular necrosis and interstitial fibrosis, especially prominent in the outer medullary region. Regional glomerular sclerosis and interlobular artery injury were also pronounced. Controlled kidneys were significantly protected from interlobular artery injury, juxtamedullary glomeruli injury, tubular necrosis, and interstitial fibrosis as determined by comparing the level of injury. Glomerular injury was not prevented in the outer cortex. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and active NF-kappaB proteins determined by immunohistochemistry were colocalized in the uncontrolled kidney in regions of interstitial fibrosis. We conclude that the preferential juxtamedullary injury found in Ang II hypertension is largely induced by pressure and is probably mediated through the TGF-beta and NF-kappaB pathway.

  7. Advanced ion beam analysis of materials using ion-induced fast electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Ishihara, Toyoyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    1997-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-energy shadowing effect using ion-induced electron spectroscopy is reported with emphasis on a possibility of determination of local electronic structure in solids, which has been a difficult problem to approach with other experimental techniques. We demonstrate real-space determination of covalent-bond electron distribution in Si crystal. The analysis technique may provide a new field of ion beam analysis of solids. (author)

  8. Effects of fuelling by using high-pressure supersonic molecular beam in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lianghua; Feng Beibin; Feng Zhen; Dong Jiafu; Li Wenzhong; Xu Deming; Hong Wenyu

    2002-01-01

    Supersonic molecular beam (SMB), as a new fuelling method, has been successfully developed and used in HL-1M tokamak and HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The hydrogen clusters have been found in the beam produced by high working-gas pressure in recent experiments. With a penetration depth of hydrogen particles greater than 17 cm, the rate of increase of electron density for SMB injection, dn e -bar/dt, approaches that of the small ice pellet injection. The plasma density increases step by step after multi-pulse SMB injection, just as multi-pellet fuelling. Comparison of fuelling effects was made between SMB and ice pellet injection on the same shot of ohmic discharge in HL-1M

  9. Unusual neurological syndrome induced by atmospheric pressure change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Judy A; Yazinski, Nancy A; Block, Clay A; Buckey, Jay C

    2013-05-01

    We describe a case of a 46-yr-old female who developed hypertension, tachycardia, dysarthria, and leg weakness provoked by pressure changes associated with flying. Typically during the landing phase of flight, she would feel dizzy and note that she had difficulty with speech and leg weakness. After the flight the leg weakness persisted for several days. The symptoms were mitigated when she took a combined alpha-beta blocker (labetalol) prior to the flight. To determine if these symptoms were related to atmospheric pressure change, she was referred for testing in a hyperbaric chamber. She was exposed to elevated atmospheric pressure (maximum 1.2 ATA) while her heart rate and blood pressure were monitored. Within 1 min she developed tachycardia and hypertension. She also quickly developed slurred speech, left arm and leg weakness, and sensory changes in her left leg. She was returned to sea level pressure and her symptoms gradually improved. A full neurological workup has revealed no explanation for these findings. She has no air collections, cysts, or other anatomic findings that could be sensitive to atmospheric pressure change. The pattern is most consistent with a vascular event stimulated by altitude exposure. This case suggests that atmospheric pressure change can produce neurological symptoms, although the mechanism is unknown.

  10. Pressure-induced phase transformation of HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arashi, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the pressure dependence of the Raman spectra of HfO 2 that was measured by a micro-Raman technique using a single-crystal specimen in the pressure range from 0 to 10 GPa at room temperature. The symmetry assignment of Raman bands of the monoclinic phase was experimentally accomplished from the polarization measurements for the single crystal. With increased pressure, a phase transformation for the monoclinic phase took place at 4.3 ± 0.3 GPa. Nineteen Raman bands were observed for the high-pressure phase. The spectral structure of the Raman bands for the high-pressure phase was similar with those reported previously for ZrO 2 . The space group for the high pressure phase of HfO 2 was determined as Pbcm, which was the same as that of the high-pressure phase for ZrO 2 on the basis of the number and the spectral structure of the Raman bands

  11. Micromechanics of pressure-induced grain crushing in porous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wong, Teng-Fong; Davis, Daniel M.

    1990-01-01

    The hydrostatic compaction behavior of a suite of porous sandstones was investigated at confining pressures up to 600 MPa and constant pore pressures ranging up to 50 MPa. These five sandstones (Boise, Kayenta, St. Peter, Berea, and Weber) were selected because of their wide range of porosity (5-35%) and grain size (60-460 μm). We tested the law of effective stress for the porosity change as a function of pressure. Except for Weber sandstone (which has the lowest porosity and smallest grain size), the hydrostat of each sandstone shows an inflection point corresponding to a critical effective pressure beyond which an accelerated, irrecoverable compaction occurs. Our microstructural observations show that brittle grain crushing initiates at this critical pressure. We also observed distributed cleavage cracking in calcite and intensive kinking in mica. The critical pressures for grain crushing in our sandstones range from 75 to 380 MPa. In general, a sandstone with higher porosity and larger grain size has a critical pressure which is lower than that of a sandstone with lower porosity and smaller grain size. We formulate a Hertzian fracture model to analyze the micromechanics of grain crushing. Assuming that the solid grains have preexisting microcracks with dimensions which scale with grain size, we derive an expression for the critical pressure which depends on the porosity, grain size, and fracture toughness of the solid matrix. The theoretical prediction is in reasonable agreement with our experimental data as well as other data from soil and rock mechanics studies for which the critical pressures range over 3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Electrical, structural, and bonding changes induced in silicon by H, Ar, and Kr ion-beam etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Fonash, S.J.; Ashok, S.; Caplan, P.; Shappirio, J.; Hage-Ali, M.; Ponpon, J.

    1983-01-01

    A study to elucidate the role of processing-induced changes in Si, subjected to ion-beam etching has been made. It is shown that these changes can be related to the primary ion beam used in ion-beam etching. Using ESR, trivalently bonded Si has been shown to be present. Fe and Cr have been found to be the main contaminants. An annealing study revealed that the damage can be annealed out at relatively high temperatures

  13. Pressure-induced phase transformations in L-alanine crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Gerward, Leif; Freire, P.T.C.

    2008-01-01

    Raman scattering and synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate the high-pressure behavior of L-alanine. This study has confirmed a structural phase transition observed by Raman scattering at 2.3 GPa and identified it as a change from orthorhombic to tetragonal structure. Another...... phase transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic structure has been observed at about 9 GPa. From the equation of state, the zero-pressure bulk modulus and its pressure derivative have been determined as (31.5 +/- 1.4) GPa and 4.4 +/- 0.4, respectively....

  14. Pressure-induced amorphization of La1/3TaO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noked, O.; Melchior, A.; Shuker, R.; Livneh, T.; Steininger, R.; Kennedy, B.J.; Sterer, E.

    2013-01-01

    La 1/3 TaO 3 , an A-site cation deficient perovskite, has been studied under pressure by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It undergoes irreversible pressure induced amorphization at P=18.5 GPa. An almost linear unit cell volume decrease vs. pressure is observed from ambient pressure up to the phase transition. The Raman spectroscopy also shows amorphization at the same pressure, with positive shifts of all modes as a function of pressure. The pressure dependence of the E g and A 1g Raman modes arising from the octahedral oxygen network is discussed. - Graphical abstract: La 1/3 Tao 3 exhibits linear pressure–volume relation until irreversible pressure induced amorphization at 18.5 Gpa. - Highlights: • La 1/3 TaO 3 has been studied under pressure by synchrotron XRD and Raman spectroscopy. • La 1/3 TaO 3 undergoes irreversible pressure induced amorphization around 18.5 GPa. • The transition is manifested in both XRD and Raman measurements. • A linear P–V relation is observed from ambient pressure up to the phase transition

  15. Capillary Pressure-induced Lung Injury: Fact or Fiction?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-07

    May 7, 2003 ... ing severe exercise, thus causing significant capillary hyper- tension. Pulmonary ... sponses evoked by high-pressure stress. To clarify the .... by an increased release of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and thromboxane A2.

  16. White-Beam X-ray Diffraction and Radiography Studies on High-Boron Containing Borosilicate Glass at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Kathryn; Vohra, Yogesh; Kono, Yoshio; Wereszczak, Andrew; Patel, Parimal

    Multi-angle energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction studies and white-beam x-ray radiography were conducted with a cylindrically shaped (1 mm diameter and 0.7 mm high) high-boron content borosilicate glass sample (17.6% B2O3) to a pressure of 13.7 GPa using a Paris-Edinburgh (PE) press at Beamline 16-BM-B, HPCAT of the Advanced Photon Source. The measured structure factor S(q) to large q = 19 Å-1, is used to determine information about the internuclear bond distances between various species of atoms within the glass sample. Sample pressure was determined with gold as a pressure standard. The sample height as measured by radiography showed an overall uniaxial compression of 22.5 % at 13.7 GPa with 10.6% permanent compaction after decompression to ambient conditions. The reduced pair distribution function G(r) was extracted and Si-O, O-O, and Si-Si bond distances were measured as a function of pressure. Raman spectroscopy of pressure recovered sample as compared to starting material showed blue-shift and changes in intensity and widths of Raman bands associated with silicate and B3O6 boroxol rings. US Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0614.

  17. Gap Dependent Bifurcation Behavior of a Nano-Beam Subjected to a Nonlinear Electrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fathalilou

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the gap dependent bifurcation behavior of an electro statically-actuated nano-beam. The sizedependent behavior of the beam was taken into account by applying the couple stress theory. Two small and large gap distance regimes have been considered in which the intermolecular vdW and Casimir forces are dominant, respectively. It has been shown that changing the gap size can affect the fundamental frequency of the beam. The bifurcation diagrams for small gap distance revealed that by changing the gap size, the number and type of the fixed points can change. However, for large gap regime, where the Casimir force is the dominant intermolecular force, changing the gap size does not affect the quality of the bifurcation behavior.

  18. Beam-induced depolarisation at the HERMES transversely polarised hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, P.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the polarised hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY in Hamburg. The HERMES target is based on hyperfine-splitting of hydrogen in an external magnetic field and provides nuclear-polarised hydrogen for the HERMES experiment. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenon of beam-induced depolarisation. The HERA electron beam consists of short bunches which produce a high-frequency magnetic field. A Fourier analysis of these bunches leads to a series of harmonics, based on the fundamental frequency of roughly 10.4 MHz, which can cause a transition between hyperfine states of the target atoms. Only through careful setting of the external magnetic field is it possible to avoid these transitions and the resulting depolarisation of the target gas. Measurements of these resonances were made during the first HERMES run 1995-2000. The target region was modified in 2001 to allow HERMES to use hydrogen polarised perpendicularly to the direction of the electron beam. This modification gave HERMES access to the so-called 'Transversity' distribution for the first time, but also allows additional resonances in the target, which were previously forbidden by selection rules. The measurement and minimisation of these 'Sigma resonances' are presented. A distinctive feature of the HERMES experiment is its novel storage cell which allows target atoms to make multiple passes of the HERA beam. An exact description of beam-induced depolarisation must therefore consider the geometry of the storage cell and the distribution of the magnetic field throughout the cell. Calculations of the depolarisation can be made by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation using first-order perturbation theory. A simple analytical model and a molecular-flow Monte-Carlo are used to predict the exact shape of the resonances. The first measurements of the resonances with a transverse magnetic holding field are presented and compared with the simulations. (orig.)

  19. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arduini, Gianluigi; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muskinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palm, Marcus; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-05-20

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was obse...

  20. Anatomy of a pressure-induced, ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, Stuart A.; Egli, Ramon; Hochleitner, Rupert; Roud, Sophie C.; Volk, Michael W. R.; Le Goff, Maxime; de Wit, Maarten

    2011-10-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multidomain and single-domain pyrrhotite under nonhydrostatic pressure. Magnetic remanence in single-domain pyrrhotite is largely insensitive to pressure until 2 GPa, whereas the remanence of multidomain pyrrhotite increases 50% over that of initial conditions by 2 GPa, and then decreases until only 33% of the original remanence remains by 4.5 GPa. In contrast, magnetic coercivity increases with increasing pressure to 4.5 GPa. Below ˜1.5 GPa, multidomain pyrrhotite obeys Néel theory with a positive correlation between coercivity and remanence; above ˜1.5 GPa, it behaves single domain-like yet distinctly different from uncompressed single-domain pyrrhotite. The ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Owing to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamonds experience a confining pressure at Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used.

  1. Pressure-induced transition in the grain boundary of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Tang, L.; Ma, C.; Fan, D.; Yang, B.; Chu, Q.; Yang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Equation of state of diamond powder with different average grain sizes was investigated using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Comparison of compression curves was made for two samples with average grain size of 50nm and 100nm. The two specimens were pre-pressed into pellets and loaded in the sample pressure chamber of the DAC separately to minimized differences of possible systematic errors for the two samples. Neon gas was used as pressure medium and ruby spheres as pressure calibrant. Experiments were conducted at room temperature and high pressures up to 50 GPa. Fitting the compression data in the full pressure range into the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yields bulk modulus (K) and its pressure derivative (K') of 392 GPa and 5.3 for 50nm sample and 398GPa and 4.5 for 100nm sample respectively. Using a simplified core-shell grain model, this result indicates that the grain boundary has an effective bulk modulus of 54 GPa. This value is similar to that observed for carbon nanotube[1] validating the recent theoretical diamond surface modeling[2]. Differential analysis of the compression cures demonstrates clear relative compressibility change at the pressure about 20 GPa. When fit the compression data below and above this pressure separately, the effect of grain size on bulk modulus reverses in the pressure range above 20 GPa. This observation indicates a possible transition of grain boundary structure, likely from sp2 hybridization at the surface[2] towards sp3like orbital structure which behaves alike the inner crystal. [1] Jie Tang, Lu-Chang Qin, Taizo Sasaki, Masako Yudasaka, Akiyuki Matsushita, and Sumio Iijima, Compressibility and Polygonization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes under Hydrostatic Pressure, Physical Review Letters, 85(9), 1187-1198, 2000. [2] Shaohua Lu, Yanchao Wang, Hanyu Liu, Mao-sheng Miao, and Yanming Ma, Self-assembled ultrathin nanotubes on diamond (100) surface, Nature

  2. Pressure-induced metal-insulator transition in spinel compound CuV2S4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, H.; Koyama, K.; Hedo, M.; Uwatoko, Y.; Watanabe, K.

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the pressure effect on electrical properties of CuV 2 S 4 , we performed the electrical resistivity measurements under high pressures up to 8 GPa for a high-quality polycrystalline sample. The charge density wave (CDW) transition temperatures increase with increasing pressure. The residual resistivity rapidly increases with increasing pressure over 4 GPa, and the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity at 8 GPa exhibits a semiconducting behavior below about 150 K, indicating that a pressure-induced metal-insulator transition occurs in CuV 2 S 4 at 8 GPa

  3. Exact analytical solution of shear-induced flexural vibration of functionally graded piezoelectric beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Pankaj, E-mail: psharma@rtu.ac.in; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar, E-mail: parashar2@yahoo.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Rajasthan Technical University, Kota (India)

    2016-05-06

    The priority of this paper is to obtain the exact analytical solution for free flexural vibration of FGPM beam actuated using the d{sub 15} effect. In piezoelectric actuators, the potential use of d{sub 15} effect has been of particular interest for engineering applications since shear piezoelectric coefficient d15 is much higher than the other piezoelectric coupling constants d{sub 31} and d{sub 33}. The applications of shear actuators are to induce and control the flexural vibrations of beams and plates. In this study, a modified Timoshenko beam theory is used where electric potential is assumed to vary sinusoidaly along the thickness direction. The material properties are assumed to be graded across the thickness in accordance with power law distribution. Hamilton's principle is employed to obtain the equations of motion along with the associated boundary conditions for FGPM beams. Exact analytical solution is derived thus obtained equations of motion. Results for clamped-clamped and clamped-free boundary conditions are presented. The presented result and method shell serve as benchmark for comparing the results obtained from the other approximate methods.

  4. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wongkham, W. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90112 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-06-15

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  5. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  6. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongliang; Tang, Jihua; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping; Tian, Shuangqi

    2009-08-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism.

  7. In-beam PET measurement of $^{7}Li^{3+}$ irradiation induced $\\beta^+}$-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Priegnitz, M; Parodi, K; Sommerer, F; Fiedler, F; Enghardt, W

    2008-01-01

    At present positron emission tomography (PET) is the only feasible method of an in situ and non-invasive monitoring of patient irradiation with ions. At the experimental carbon ion treatment facility of the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt an in-beam PET scanner has been integrated into the treatment site and lead to a considerable quality improvement of the therapy. Since ions other than carbon are expected to come into operation in future patient treatment facilities, it is highly desirable to extend in-beam PET also to other therapeutic relevant ions, e.g. 7Li. Therefore, by means of the in-beam PET scanner at GSI the β+-activity induced by 7Li3+ ions has been investigated for the first time. Targets of PMMA, water, graphite and polyethylene were irradiated with monoenergetic, pencil-like beams of 7Li3+ with energies between 129.1 A MeV and 205.3 A MeV and intensities ranging from 3.0 × 107 to 1.9 × 108 ions s−1. This paper presents the measured β+-activity profiles as well as d...

  8. Electron backscatter diffraction studies of focused ion beam induced phase transformation in cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.G., E-mail: helen.jones@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd, Claremont House, High St, Lydney GL15 5DX (United Kingdom); Cox, D.C. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A focused ion beam microscope was used to induce cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in a cobalt alloy, of similar composition to that of the binder phase in a hardmetal, in a controlled manner at 0°, 45° and 80° ion incident angles. The cobalt had an average grain size of ~ 20 μm, allowing multiple orientations to be studied, exposed to a range of doses between 6 × 10{sup 7} and 2 × 10{sup 10} ions/μm{sup 2}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to determine the original and induced phase orientations, and area fractions, before and after the ion beam exposure. On average, less phase transformation was observed at higher incident angles and after lower ion doses. However there was an orientation effect where grains with an orientation close to (111) planes were most susceptible to phase transformation, and (101) the least, where grains partially and fully transformed at varying ion doses. - Highlights: •Ion-induced phase change in FCC cobalt was observed at multiple incidence angles. •EBSD was used to study the relationship between grain orientation and transformation. •Custom software analysed ion dose and phase change with respect to grain orientation. •A predictive capability of ion-induced phase change in cobalt was enabled.

  9. Electric Field Induced Strain in Electrostrictive Polymers Under High Hydrostatic Pressure - System Development and Material Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Q

    2000-01-01

    ... of (i) developing a high performance piezo-bimorph based dilatometer which can be used to characterize the electric field induced strain response in polymer films under high hydrostatic pressure, (ii...

  10. Pressure-induced antiferromagnetic superconductivity in CeNiGe3: A Ge73-NQR study under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Mukuda, H.; Kitaoka, Y.; Thamizhavel, A.; Okuda, Y.; Settai, R.; Onuki, Y.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E.; Harima, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report on antiferromagnetic (AF) properties of pressure-induced superconductivity in CeNiGe 3 via the Ge73 nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR) measurements under pressure (P). The NQR-spectrum measurements have revealed that the incommensurate antiferromagnetic ordering is robust against increasing P with the increase of ordered moment and ordering temperature. Nevertheless the measurements of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T 1 ) have pointed to the onset of superconductivity as a consequence of Ce-4f electrons delocalized by applying P. The emergence of superconductivity under the development of AF order suggests that a novel type of superconducting mechanism works in this compound

  11. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  12. Thermally induced coloration of KBr at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arveson, Sarah M.; Kiefer, Boris; Deng, Jie; Liu, Zhenxian; Lee, Kanani K. M.

    2018-03-01

    Laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (LHDAC) experiments reveal electronic changes in KBr at pressures between ˜13 -81 GPa when heated to high temperatures that cause runaway heating to temperatures in excess of ˜5000 K . The drastic changes in absorption behavior of KBr are interpreted as rapid formation of high-pressure F-center defects. The defects are localized to the heated region and thus do not change the long-range crystalline order of KBr. The results have significant consequences for temperature measurements in LHDAC experiments and extend the persistence of F centers in alkali halides to at least 81 GPa.

  13. High hydrostatic pressure treatment of porcine oocytes induces parthenogenetic activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Pribenszky, Csaba; Molnár, Miklós

    2010-01-01

    An innovative technique called high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment has recently been reported to improve the cryosurvival of gametes and embryos in certain mammalian species, including the mouse, pig, and cattle. In the present study the parthenogenetic activation (PA) of pig oocytes caused...... by HHP treatment was investigated in different holding media with or without Ca(2+). The efficiency of activation was tested at different pressure levels and media including T2 (HEPES-buffered TCM-199 containing 2% cattle serum), and mannitol-PVA fusion medium with (MPVA + Ca(2+)) or without Ca(2...

  14. Flexible Piezoelectric-Induced Pressure Sensors for Static Measurements Based on Nanowires/Graphene Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zefeng; Wang, Zhao; Li, Xinming; Lin, Yuxuan; Luo, Ningqi; Long, Mingzhu; Zhao, Ni; Xu, Jian-Bin

    2017-05-23

    The piezoelectric effect is widely applied in pressure sensors for the detection of dynamic signals. However, these piezoelectric-induced pressure sensors have challenges in measuring static signals that are based on the transient flow of electrons in an external load as driven by the piezopotential arisen from dynamic stress. Here, we present a pressure sensor with nanowires/graphene heterostructures for static measurements based on the synergistic mechanisms between strain-induced polarization charges in piezoelectric nanowires and the caused change of carrier scattering in graphene. Compared to the conventional piezoelectric nanowire or graphene pressure sensors, this sensor is capable of measuring static pressures with a sensitivity of up to 9.4 × 10 -3 kPa -1 and a fast response time down to 5-7 ms. This demonstration of pressure sensors shows great potential in the applications of electronic skin and wearable devices.

  15. Pressure induced superconductivity in the antiferromagnetic Dirac material BaMnBi2

    OpenAIRE

    Huimin Chen; Lin Li; Qinqing Zhu; Jinhu Yang; Bin Chen; Qianhui Mao; Jianhua Du; Hangdong Wang; Minghu Fang

    2017-01-01

    The so-called Dirac materials such as graphene and topological insulators are a new class of matter different from conventional metals and (doped) semiconductors. Superconductivity induced by doing or applying pressure in these systems may be unconventional, or host mysterious Majorana fermions. Here, we report a successfully observation of pressure-induced superconductivity in an antiferromagnetic Dirac material BaMnBi2 with T c of ~4?K at 2.6?GPa. Both the higher upper critical field, ? 0 H...

  16. Colorectal perforation by self-induced hydrostatic pressure: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pyong Wha

    2013-02-01

    Most iatrogenic colorectal perforations occur as a result of endoscopic or fluoroscopic studies. Accidents associated with hydrostatic pressure-induced perforation are rarely reported, and self-induced hydrostatic pressure is an extremely rare cause of perforation because the anal sphincter complex may provide a protective barrier against perianal hydrostatic pressure. We present two cases of rectosigmoid colon perforation secondary to self-induced hydrostatic pressure. A 61-year-old man and a 45-year-old man presented with abdominal pain after forceful entry of tap water into the rectum, during rinsing of the anus after defecation in the first case, and during self-administered enema in the second case. Emergency operations were performed with the suspicion of hydrostatic pressure-induced rectal injury, and showed rectosigmoid mesenteric perforation in both cases. Resection of the diseased segment and end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure) was performed in the first case, and primary resection and anastomosis in the second case. The pathologic results showed abrupt loss of the colonic wall in the mesenteric border, without evidence of other inflammatory disease; these findings were consistent with acute mechanical colon injury. The postoperative course in both cases was uneventful. These cases put forth an unusual type of colorectal injury, caused specifically by hydrostatic pressure, thus adding to the available literature on hydrostatic pressure-induced injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative analysis of chromium concentration in nickel based alloys by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy at atmospheric pressure using a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.P.; Suri, B.M.; Verma, A.; Sundararaman, M.; Unnikrishnan, V.K.; Alti, K.; Kartha, V.B.; Santhosh, C.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been well recognized as a simple, fast and direct analytical technique of elemental analysis of multi-element materials by a number of research groups all over the world. It is based on the focusing of a high-power pulsed laser beam with a power density > 100 MW/cm 2 onto a sample surface followed by optical emission spectroscopy of the plasma produced over the surface. In the present work, they have carried out the quantitative analysis of chromium in nickel-based-alloys using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in air at atmospheric pressure. In the present work the quantitative analysis of chromium in nickel-based-alloys using laser-induced break-down spectroscopy (LIBS) in air at atmospheric pressure has been carried out

  18. Hydrostatic-pressure induced phase transition of phonons in single-walled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Peng; Meng Qingchao

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on the phonons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a magnetic field. We calculate the magnetic moments of the phonons using a functional integral technique, and find that the phonons in SWNTs undergo a pressure-induced phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the diamagnetic phase under hydrostatic pressure 2 GPa. We explain the mechanism of generating this phase transition.

  19. A computational study of pressure-induced structural transition in ThSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinadh, Ch.U.M.; Rajagopalan, M.; Natarajan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The pressure induced phase transition from NaCl-type to CsCl-type structure in ThSb was studied using total energy calculations by tight-binding linear muffin tin orbital (TBLMTO) method within atomic sphere approximation (ASA). The density of states (DOS) at ambient pressure was compared with resonant photoemission studies (PES). The variation in interatomic distances during the transition was found to be in agreement with high pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD) studies. (author)

  20. Pressure broadening of atomic oxygen two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinov, D.; Drag, C.; Blondel, C.; Guaitella, O.; Golda, J.; Klarenaar, B.L.M.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, considered to be a determining reactant in plasma applications at ambient pressure, is routinely detected by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Here, pressure broadening of the (2p 4 3 P 2  →  3p 3 P J=0,1,2) two-photon transition in oxygen atoms was

  1. Pressure-induced structural change in liquid GaIn eutectic alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Q.; Ahmad, A. S.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction reveals a pressure induced crystallization at about 3.4 GPa and a polymorphic transition near 10.3 GPa when compressed a liquid GaIn eutectic alloy up to ~13 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell. Upon decompression, the high pressure crystalline phase...

  2. Utilizing High Pressure Processing to Induce Structural Changes in Dairy and Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlien, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    High pressure (HP) is capable of modifying the functional properties of milk and meat proteins by pressure-induced changes of the molecular structure. Therefore, HP treatment of milk and meat has been extensively investigated to understand, clarify, and utilize HP processing in the food industry....

  3. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Draeger, E.; White, C. G. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  4. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (strätlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt

  5. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  6. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  7. Prediction of fluctuating pressure environments associated with plume-induced separated flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The separated flow environment induced by underexpanded rocket plumes during boost phase of rocket vehicles has been investigated. A simple semi-empirical model for predicting the extent of separation was developed. This model offers considerable computational economy as compared to other schemes reported in the literature, and has been shown to be in good agreement with limited flight data. The unsteady pressure field in plume-induced separated regions was investigated. It was found that fluctuations differed from those for a rigid flare only at low frequencies. The major difference between plume-induced separation and flare-induced separation was shown to be an increase in shock oscillation distance for the plume case. The prediction schemes were applied to PRR shuttle launch configuration. It was found that fluctuating pressures from plume-induced separation are not as severe as for other fluctuating environments at the critical flight condition of maximum dynamic pressure.

  8. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett B. Lewis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IVMe3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  9. Pulsed ion-beam induced nucleation and growth of Ge nanocrystals on SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepina, N. P.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Armbrister, V. A.; Kesler, V. G.; Novikov, P. L.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Kirienko, V. V.; Smagina, Zh. V.; Groetzschel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed low-energy (200 eV) ion-beam induced nucleation during Ge deposition on thin SiO 2 film was used to form dense homogeneous arrays of Ge nanocrystals. The ion-beam action is shown to stimulate the nucleation of Ge nanocrystals when being applied after thin Ge layer deposition. Temperature and flux variation was used to optimize the nanocrystal size and array density required for memory device. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation shows that ion impacts open an additional channel of atom displacement from a nanocrystal onto SiO 2 surface. This results both in a decrease in the average nanocrystal size and in an increase in nanocrystal density

  10. Optimization of laser-plasma injector via beam loading effects using ionization-induced injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P.; Maynard, G.; Audet, T. L.; Cros, B.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.

    2018-05-01

    Simulations of ionization-induced injection in a laser driven plasma wakefield show that high-quality electron injectors in the 50-200 MeV range can be achieved in a gas cell with a tailored density profile. Using the PIC code Warp with parameters close to existing experimental conditions, we show that the concentration of N2 in a hydrogen plasma with a tailored density profile is an efficient parameter to tune electron beam properties through the control of the interplay between beam loading effects and varying accelerating field in the density profile. For a given laser plasma configuration, with moderate normalized laser amplitude, a0=1.6 and maximum electron plasma density, ne 0=4 ×1018 cm-3 , the optimum concentration results in a robust configuration to generate electrons at 150 MeV with a rms energy spread of 4% and a spectral charge density of 1.8 pC /MeV .

  11. Electron Beam Induced Radiation Damage of the Semiconductor Radiation Detector based on Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Yong Kyun; Park, Se Hwan; Haa, Jang Ho; Kang, Sang Mook; Chung, Chong Eun; Cho, Seung Yeon; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Tae Hyung

    2005-01-01

    A Silicon Surface Barrier (SSB) semiconductor detector which is generally used to detect a charged particle such as an alpha particle was developed. The performance of the developed SSB semiconductor detector was measured with an I-V curve and an alpha spectrum. The response for an alpha particle was measured by Pu-238 sources. A SSB semiconductor detector was irradiated firstly at 30sec, at 30μA and secondly 40sec, 40μA with a 2MeV pulsed electron beam generator in KAERI. And the electron beam induced radiation damage of a homemade SSB detector and the commercially available PIN photodiode were investigated. An annealing effect of the damaged SSB and PIN diode detector were also investigated using a Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). This data may assist in designing the silicon based semiconductor radiation detector when it is operated in a high radiation field such as space or a nuclear power plant

  12. Effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene non-woven fabric induced by electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Young; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun [Radiation Research Dvision for Industry and Environment, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we fabricated effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric induced by electron beam. The electron beam irradiations on PP non-woven fabric were carried out over a range of irradiation doses from 25 to 100 kGy to make free radicals on fabric surface. The radical measurement was established by electron spin resonance (ESR) for confirming the changes of the alkyl radical and peroxy radical according to effect of storage time, storage temperature and atmosphere. It was observed that the free radicals were increased with irradiation dose and decreased with storage time due to the continuous oxidation. However, the radical extinction was significantly delayed due to reduced mobility of radicals at extremely low temperature. The degree of graft based on the analysis of ESR was investigated. The conditions of graft reaction were set at a temperature: 60 degrees Celcius, reaction time: 6 hours and styrene monomer concentration: 20 wt%.

  13. Ferroelectric properties of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films under ion-beam induced strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kun; Nastasi, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The influence of an ion-beam induced biaxial stress on the ferroelectric and dielectric properties of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) films is investigated using the ion beam process as a novel approach to control external stress. Tensile stress is observed to decrease the polarization, permittivity, and ferroelectric fatigue resistance of the PZT films whose structure is monoclinic. However, a compressive stress increases all of them in monoclinic PZT films. The dependence of the permittivity on stress is found not to follow the phenomenological theory relating external forces to intrinsic properties of ferroelectric materials. Changes in the ferroelectric and dielectric properties indicate that the application of a biaxial stress modulates both extrinsic and intrinsic properties of PZT films. Different degrees of dielectric non-linearity suggests the density and mobility of non-180o domain walls, and the domain switching can be controlled by an applied biaxial stress and thereby influence the ferroelectric and dielectric properties.

  14. Electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of amorphous solid phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Wu, Liangcai; Wen, Lin; Ma, Liya; Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Song, Zhitang

    2018-04-01

    The electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of phase change materials in a nano sized area was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Amorphous phase change materials changed to a polycrystalline state after being irradiated with a 200 kV electron beam for a long time. The results indicate that the crystallization temperature strongly depends on the difference in the heteronuclear bond enthalpy of the phase change materials. The selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that Ge2Sb2Te5 is a nucleation-dominated material, when Si2Sb2Te3 and Ti0.5Sb2Te3 are growth-dominated materials.

  15. Xe ion beam induced rippled structures on differently oriented single-crystalline Si surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg; Facsko, Stefan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, PO Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich, E-mail: A.Hanisch@fzd.d [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2010-03-24

    We report on Xe{sup +} induced ripple formation at medium energy on single-crystalline silicon surfaces of different orientations using substrates with an intentional miscut from the [0 0 1] direction and a [1 1 1] oriented wafer. The ion beam incidence angle with respect to the surface normal was kept fixed at 65{sup 0} and the ion beam projection was parallel or perpendicular to the [1 1 0] direction. By a combination of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy we found that the features of the surface and subsurface rippled structures such as ripple wavelength and amplitude and the degree of order do not depend on the surface orientation as assumed in recent models of pattern formation for semiconductor surfaces. (fast track communication)

  16. Analysis of art objects by means of ion beam induced luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, A; Dran, J C; Salomon, J; Pivin, J C; Vomiero, A; Tonezzer, M; Maggioni, G; Carturan, S; Mea, G Della

    2006-01-01

    The impact of energetic ions on solid samples gives rise to the emission of visible light owing to the electronic excitation of intrinsic defects or extrinsic impurities. The intensity and position of the emission features provide information on the nature of the luminescence centers and on their chemical environments. This makes ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) a useful complement to other ion beam analyses, like PIXE, in the cultural heritage field in characterizing the composition and the provenience of art objects. In the present paper, IBIL measurements have been performed on inorganic pigments for underlying the complementary role played by IBIL in the analysis of artistic works. Some blue and red pigment has been presented as case study

  17. DNA damage and chromosome aberration induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kahoru; Funada, Aya; Aoki, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human cells (human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells and GM05389 human normal fibroblasts) irradiated with heavy ion beams on the basis of linear energy transfer (LET) values. The LET dependences of cell death were observed for the both cells by the method of colony assay. The LET dependences of the chromosomal aberrations, breaks and gaps, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were also observed for the both cells using the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. From these results it is suggested that exchange formation is essential for the cell death caused by heavy ion beam irradiation. It is suspected that the densely ionizing track structure of hight LET heavy ions inhibits the effective repair in the chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks and finally induce much exchange in the cells, which should be essential cause of cell death. (author)

  18. PPARγ ligands decrease hydrostatic pressure-induced platelet aggregation and proinflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Rao

    Full Text Available Hypertension is known to be associated with platelet overactivity, but the direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on platelet function remain unclear. The present study sought to investigate whether elevated hydrostatic pressure is responsible for platelet activation and to address the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ. We observed that hypertensive patients had significantly higher platelet volume and rate of ADP-induced platelets aggregation compared to the controls. In vitro, Primary human platelets were cultured under standard (0 mmHg or increased (120, 180, 240 mmHg hydrostatic pressure for 18 h. Exposure to elevated pressure was associated with morphological changes in platelets. Platelet aggregation and PAC-1 (the active confirmation of GPIIb/IIIa binding were increased, CD40L was translocated from cytoplasm to the surface of platelet and soluble CD40L (sCD40L was released into the medium in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure (180 and 240 mmHg. The PPARγ activity was up-regulated as the pressure was increased from 120 mmHg to 180 mmHg. Pressure-induced platelet aggregation, PAC-1 binding, and translocation and release of CD40L were all attenuated by the PPARγ agonist Thiazolidinediones (TZDs. These results demonstrate that platelet activation and aggregation are increased by exposure to elevated pressure and that PPARγ may modulate platelet activation induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

  19. PPARγ ligands decrease hydrostatic pressure-induced platelet aggregation and proinflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fang; Yang, Ren-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Shu; Xu, Jin-Song; Fu, Hui-Min; Su, Hai; Wang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is known to be associated with platelet overactivity, but the direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on platelet function remain unclear. The present study sought to investigate whether elevated hydrostatic pressure is responsible for platelet activation and to address the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). We observed that hypertensive patients had significantly higher platelet volume and rate of ADP-induced platelets aggregation compared to the controls. In vitro, Primary human platelets were cultured under standard (0 mmHg) or increased (120, 180, 240 mmHg) hydrostatic pressure for 18 h. Exposure to elevated pressure was associated with morphological changes in platelets. Platelet aggregation and PAC-1 (the active confirmation of GPIIb/IIIa) binding were increased, CD40L was translocated from cytoplasm to the surface of platelet and soluble CD40L (sCD40L) was released into the medium in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure (180 and 240 mmHg). The PPARγ activity was up-regulated as the pressure was increased from 120 mmHg to 180 mmHg. Pressure-induced platelet aggregation, PAC-1 binding, and translocation and release of CD40L were all attenuated by the PPARγ agonist Thiazolidinediones (TZDs). These results demonstrate that platelet activation and aggregation are increased by exposure to elevated pressure and that PPARγ may modulate platelet activation induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

  20. Physicochemical properties of natural actomyosin from threadfin bream (Nemipterus spp.) induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aimei; Lin, Liying; Liang, Yan; Benjakul, Soottawat; Shi, Xiaoling; Liu, Xin

    2014-08-01

    Changes of physicochemical properties in natural actomyosin (NAM) from threadfin bream (Nemipterus spp.) induced by high hydrostatic pressure (200, 400, 600MPa for 10, 30, 50min) were studied. The increase in turbidity of NAM was coincidental with the decrease in protein solubility with increasing pressure and time, suggesting the formation of protein aggregates. SDS-PAGE showed that polymerisation and degradation of myosin heavy chain were induced by high pressure. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of NAM treated by high pressure was lost, suggesting the denaturation of myosin and the dissociation of actomyosin complex. Surface hydrophobicity of NAM increased when the pressure and pressurization time increased, indicating that the exposed hydrophobic residues increased upon application of high pressure. Decrease in total sulfhydryl content and increase in surface-reactive sulfhydryl content of NAM samples were observed with the extension of pressurizing time, indicating the formation of disulphide bonds through oxidation of SH groups or disulphide interchanges. The above changes of physicochemical properties suggested conformational changes of NAM from muscle of threadfin bream induced by high hydrostatic pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper.

  2. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium; Ionenstrahlinduzierte Strukturmodifikationen in amorphem Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-05-03

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy {epsilon}{sub n} deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 {mu}m thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of {epsilon}{sub e}{sup HRF}=(10.5{+-}1.0) kev nm{sup -1} was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation {epsilon}{sub e}{sup S{sub a}}=(12{+-}2) keV nm{sup -1} for the first

  3. The difference in endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure elevation induced by isoproterenol between the ampulla and the cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Ryuhei; Miyashita, Takenori; Matsubara, Ai; Hoshikawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Nozomu

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the difference in the responses of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure to isoproterenol, β-adrenergic receptor agonist, between pars superior and pars inferior. The hydrostatic pressure of endolymph and perilymph and endolymphatic potential in the ampulla and the cochlea during the intravenous administration of isoproterenol were recorded using a servo-null system in guinea pigs. The hydrostatic pressure of endolymph and perilymph in the ampulla and cochlea was similar in magnitude. Isoproterenol significantly increased hydrostatic pressure of ampullar and cochlear endolymph and perilymph with no change in the ampullar endolymphatic potential and endocochlear potential, respectively. The isoproterenol-induced maximum change of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure in ampulla was significantly (phydrostatic pressure in the ampulla disappeared like that in the cochlea. Isoproterenol elevates endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure in different manner between the vestibule and the cochlea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Streitz, Frederick H.

    2004-01-01

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized

  5. Pressure-induced phase transition of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [bmim][PF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekiyo, Takahiro; Hatano, Naohiro; Imai, Yusuke; Abe, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the pressure-induced Raman spectral change of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) using Raman spectroscopy. The relative Raman intensity at 590 cm-1 of the CH2 rocking band assigned to the gauche conformer of the NCCC dihedral angle of the butyl group in the [bmim]+ cation increases when the pressure-induced liquid-crystalline phase transition occurs, while that at 610 cm-1 assigned to the trans conformer decreases. Our results show that the high-pressure phase transition of [bmim][PF6] causes the increase of the gauche conformer of the [bmim]+ cation.

  6. Balancing food and predator pressure induces chronic stress in songbirds.

    OpenAIRE

    Clinchy, Michael; Zanette, Liana; Boonstra, Rudy; Wingfield, John C.; Smith, James N. M.

    2004-01-01

    The never-ending tension between finding food and avoiding predators may be the most universal natural stressor wild animals experience. The 'chronic stress' hypothesis predicts: (i) an animal's stress profile will be a simultaneous function of food and predator pressures given the aforesaid tension; and (ii) these inseparable effects on physiology will produce inseparable effects on demography because of the resulting adverse health effects. This hypothesis was originally proposed to explain...

  7. High hydrostatic pressure induces pro-osteoarthritic changes in cartilage precursor cells: A transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Kevin; Onuma, Yasuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Aiki, Yasuhiko; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Ushida, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high water content of cartilage, hydrostatic pressure is likely one of the main physical stimuli sensed by chondrocytes. Whereas, in the physiological range (0 to around 10 MPa), hydrostatic pressure exerts mostly pro-chondrogenic effects in chondrocyte models, excessive pressures have been reported to induce detrimental effects on cartilage, such as increased apoptosis and inflammation, and decreased cartilage marker expression. Though some genes modulated by high pressure have been identified, the effects of high pressure on the global gene expression pattern have still not been investigated. In this study, using microarray technology and real-time PCR validation, we analyzed the transcriptome of ATDC5 chondrocyte progenitors submitted to a continuous pressure of 25 MPa for up to 24 h. Several hundreds of genes were found to be modulated by pressure, including some not previously known to be mechano-sensitive. High pressure markedly increased the expression of stress-related genes, apoptosis-related genes and decreased that of cartilage matrix genes. Furthermore, a large set of genes involved in the progression of osteoarthritis were also induced by high pressure, suggesting that hydrostatic pressure could partly mimic in vitro some of the genetic alterations occurring in osteoarthritis.

  8. Pressure cycling induced modification of a cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beste, U.; Engqvist, H.; Jacobson, S.

    2001-01-01

    The wear of cemented carbide rock drill buttons is due to a complex mixture of mechanisms. One important of such mechanism is the surface fatigue that occurs due to the percussive conditions of rock drilling. To isolate the effects of this mechanism, a mechanical pressure cycling test has been performed on a cemented carbide with 11 % Co and 2 μm WC grain size. The test was ended after 60000 pressure cycles. No signs of fatigue crack nucleation were found. The changes in hardness, fracture toughness, erosion resistance, magnetical coercivity and thermal shock resistance were measured. The microstructure of the sample was investigated with x-ray diffraction, plus scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The fracture toughness decreased 14 % due to the pressure cycling while the hardness did not change. In addition, the thermal shock resistance and the erosion resistance decreased. The magnetical coercivity increased 90 % indicating significant phase transformations or high defect density in the Co binder phase. The TEM revealed no deformation of the WC phase, but important alterations of the Co phase. The Co phase was transformed from fcc into a new unidentified phase, characterized by atomic inter planar distance present in fcc and hcp plus an unfamiliar distance of 2.35 Aa. This phase is suggested to be due to a more complex stacking sequence of the close-packed planes than in hcp or fcc. (author)

  9. Hydrostatic pressure enhances mitomycin C induced apoptosis in urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Kuan; Chung, Chih-Ang; Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Chi-Jung; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Chen, Wen-Yih; Li, Chuan; Tsao, Chia-Wen; Hu, Wei-Wen; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is the second most common cancer of the genitourinary system. Clinical UC treatment usually involves transurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by adjuvant intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy to prevent recurrence. Intravesical chemotherapy induces fewer side effects than immunotherapy but is less effective at preventing tumor recurrence. Improvement to intravesical chemotherapy is, therefore, needed. Cellular effects of mitomycin C (MMC) and hydrostatic pressure on UC BFTC905 cells were assessed. The viability of the UC cells was determined using cellular proliferation assay. Changes in apoptotic function were evaluated by caspase 3/7 activities, expression of FasL, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Reduced cell viability was associated with increasing hydrostatic pressure. Caspase 3/7 activities were increased following treatment of the UC cells with MMC or hydrostatic pressure. In combination with 10 kPa hydrostatic pressure, MMC treatment induced increasing FasL expression. The mitochondria of UC cells displayed increasingly impaired membrane potentials following a combined treatment with 10 μg/ml MMC and 10 kPa hydrostatic pressure. Both MMC and hydrostatic pressure can induce apoptosis in UC cells through an extrinsic pathway. Hydrostatic pressure specifically increases MMC-induced apoptosis and might minimize the side effects of the chemotherapy by reducing the concentration of the chemical agent. This study provides a new and alternative approach for treatment of patients with UC following transurethral resection of the bladder tumor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pressure-induced referred pain areas are more expansive in individuals with a recovered fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doménech-García, Víctor; Skuli Palsson, Thorvaldur; Boudreau, Shellie Ann

    2018-01-01

    the shoulder region was induced by a 60-s pressure stimulation (PPT+20%) at the infraspinatus muscle and recorded on an electronic body chart. Following Day-0 assessments, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was induced to challenge the pain systems by exercising the external rotators of the recovered...... a shoulder fracture and 20 age/gender matched controls participated in two experimental sessions (Day-0, Day-1) separated by 24 hours. On both days, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured bilaterally at infraspinatus, supraspinatus, trapezius, and gastrocnemius muscles. Referred pain towards....../dominant shoulder. The size of pressure-induced pain referral on Day-0 did not differ between groups although there was a tendency for a smaller referred pain area in recovered group. PPTs at the infraspinatus muscle on the DOMS side was reduced on Day-1 in both groups (P=0.03). An expansion of pressure...

  11. Improved single particle potential for transport model simulations of nuclear reactions induced by rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account more accurately the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the in-medium many-body force term of the Gogny effective interaction, new expressions for the single-nucleon potential and the symmetry energy are derived. Effects of both the spin (isospin) and the density dependence of nuclear effective interactions on the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy are examined. It is shown that they both play a crucial role in determining the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities. The improved single-nucleon potential will be useful for more accurate simulation of nuclear reactions induced by rare-isotope beams within transport models.

  12. Ion desorption induced by charged particle beams: mechanisms and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, E.F. da; Schweikert, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis, through desorption, induced by fast particles, is presented and discussed. The stopping of projectils is essentially made by collisions with the target electrons. The desorbed particles are generally emmited with kinetic energy from 0.1 to 20 eV. Mass, charge, velocity and emission angle give information about the surface components, its structure as well as beam-solid interaction processes. Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of desorbed ions, determine the mass of organic macromolecules and biomolecules. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  13. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoene, H.; Walsh, D.S.; Sexton, F.W.; Doyle, B.L.; Aurand, J.F.; Dodd, P.E.; Flores, R.S.; Wing, N.

    1998-01-01

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth

  14. Impurity mapping in sulphide minerals using Time-resolved Ion Beam Induced Current imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Johnson, Brett C.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kandasamy, Sasikaran; Davidson, Garry; Borg, Stacey; Ryan, Chris G.

    2010-01-01

    The semiconducting properties and charge transport within natural minerals like pyrite are postulated to drive certain geochemical processes which can lead to precious metal ore genesis. In this paper we outline electrical measurements on mineral samples and present spatio-temporally resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge or Current studies on a Schottky pyrite junction. Au-Schottky contacts were fabricated in regions selected by thermoelectric and 4-point probe resistivity measurements. The complexity in charge transport due to impurity variations results in imaging contrast which is deemed important for fluid electrochemistry. The relevance of understanding charge collection in pyrite in the context of complex geochemical processes is briefly discussed.

  15. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  16. Electron beam induced electronic transport in alkyl amine-intercalated VOx nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dwyer, C.; Lavayen, V.; Clavijo-Cedeno, C.; Torres, C.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The electron beam induced electronic transport in primary alkyl amine-intercalated V 2 O 5 nanotubes is investigated where the organic amine molecules are employed as molecular conductive wires to an aminosilanized substrate surface and contacted to Au interdigitated electrode contacts. The results demonstrate that the high conductivity of the nanotubes is related to the non-resonant tunnelling through the amine molecules and a reduced polaron hopping conduction through the vanadium oxide itself. Both nanotube networks and individual nanotubes exhibit similarly high conductivities where the minority carrier transport is bias dependent and nanotube diameter invariant. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Pressure-Induced Polyamorphic Transition in Nanoscale TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, Varghese; Muddle, Barry C.

    2009-01-01

    The detection and characterization of pressure-induced amorphization in 20 GPa and ambient temperature is documented. The characterization employed in situ high-pressure angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in diamond-anvil cells. Comparative Raman spectroscopy allows the local structures of the high-density amorphous (HDA) form obtained at high pressures and its low-pressure (<10-15 GPa) low-density amorphous (LDA) analogue to be related to the baddeleyite-TiO2 and TiO2-II structures, respectively. The pressure-induced amorphization and the HDA-LDA transition in nanoscale TiO2 bear broad similarities to transitions in the Si and H2O systems.

  18. Electron beam curing of dimer acid-based urethane acrylates for pressure sensitive adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takashi; Takeda, Satoe; Shiraishi, Katsutoshi.

    1995-01-01

    Polyester urethane diacrylate prepolymers prepared from dimer acids (DUA) were cured with low energy electron beams to investigate adhesive properties of cured films. Among various type monomers added, monofunctional methacrylates such as isobornyl methacrylate (IBXMA) were effective for higher peel strength cured films although the dose-to-cure for the mixtures increased to 100 kGy or more. The increase in the molecular weight of prepolymers resulted in lower curing rates but higher peel strength. Aging tests up to 80degC for four weeks proved good stability in peel strength of the stored products. (author)

  19. Evaluation of flaws or service induced cracks in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardella, P.C.; Copeland, J.F.; Gilman, J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the ASME flaw evaluation procedures for nuclear pressure vessels is presented, with emphasis on fatigue crack growth evaluations. Environmental and load-rate effects are further considered with respect to new crack growth data and a time-dependent crack growth model. This new crack growth model is applied to evaluate feedwater nozzle cracking in boiling water reactors and is compared to current and past ASME crack growth curves. The time-dependent model bounds the observed cracking and indicates that more detailed consideration of material susceptibility, in terms of sulfur content and product form, is needed

  20. The detection of electron-beam-induced current in junctionless semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Chee Chin; Ong, Vincent K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope is a versatile tool and its electron beam techniques have been widely used in semiconductor material and device characterizations. One of these electron beam techniques is the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. One of the limitations of the conventional EBIC technique is that it requires charge collecting junctions which may not be readily available in junctionless samples such as bare substrates unless some special sample preparation procedure such as the fabrication of a diffused junction is done on the junctionless sample. In this paper, the technique of detecting EBIC current in junctionless samples with the use of a two-point probe is presented. It is found that the EBIC current is independent from its physical parameter when the sample thickness is greater than 4L; the width to the right of probe 2 and the width to the left of probe 1 are greater than 2L and 8L, respectively. The parameters affecting this technique of detecting the EBIC current such as the depth of the generation volume, probe spacing, and the applied bias are also discussed in this paper. A commercially available two-dimensional device simulator was used to verify this technique.

  1. Microstructural changes in silicon induced by patterning with focused ion beams of Ga, Si and Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chee, See Wee; Kammler, Martin; Balasubramanian, Prabhu; Reuter, Mark C.; Hull, Robert; Ross, Frances M.

    2013-01-01

    We use focused beams of Ga + , Au + and Si ++ ions to induce local microstructural changes in single crystal silicon. The ions were delivered as single spot pulses into thin Si membranes that could subsequently be imaged and annealed in situ in a transmission electron microscope. For each ion, the focused ion beam implantation created an array of amorphous regions in the crystalline membrane. Annealing causes solid phase epitaxial regrowth to take place, but we show that the resulting microstructure depends on the ion species. For Ga + and Au + , precipitates remain after recrystallization, while for Si ++ , dislocation loops form around the periphery of each implanted spot. We attribute these loops to defects formed during solid phase epitaxial regrowth, with controlled placement of the loops possible. - Highlights: ► Ga + , Au + and Si ++ were implanted into thin membranes of Si. ► Samples were imaged and annealed in situ in a transmission electron microscope. ► Focused ion beam implantation created an array of amorphous spots. ► After recrystallization, precipitates form for Ga + and Au + , dislocation loops for Si ++ . ► Controlled placement of the dislocation loops possible

  2. Investigation of the extraction of short diffusion lengths from simulated electron-beam induced current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, D.; Parish, G.; Nener, B. [Microelectronics Research Group, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, 6009 Crawley (Perth) (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports on the investigations via 2-D simulation into the accuracy of diffusion length extraction from scanning electron-beam induced current measurements when the diffusion length, L is very short. L is extracted by using the direct method proposed by Chan et al.[1] and later refined by Kurniawan and Ong[2] to take finite junction depth into account. The 2-D simulations were undertaken using Synopsys {sup registered} Sentaurus TCAD and a realistic electron-hole pair generation volume was created using CASINO v2.42[3], a Monte Carlo Scanning Electron Microscope interaction simulation software, and imported into Sentaurus. The voltage and diameter of the electron beam and diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of the semiconductor materials were varied in the simulations to determine the errors in the diffusion length extracted from the EBIC signals as a function of these parameters. The results of the simulation show that the accuracy of the method proposed in[1] is reasonably accurate and that the beam voltage and spot size do not have significant effects on the accuracy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Investigation of the extraction of short diffusion lengths from simulated electron-beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, D.; Parish, G.; Nener, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the investigations via 2-D simulation into the accuracy of diffusion length extraction from scanning electron-beam induced current measurements when the diffusion length, L is very short. L is extracted by using the direct method proposed by Chan et al.[1] and later refined by Kurniawan and Ong[2] to take finite junction depth into account. The 2-D simulations were undertaken using Synopsys registered Sentaurus TCAD and a realistic electron-hole pair generation volume was created using CASINO v2.42[3], a Monte Carlo Scanning Electron Microscope interaction simulation software, and imported into Sentaurus. The voltage and diameter of the electron beam and diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of the semiconductor materials were varied in the simulations to determine the errors in the diffusion length extracted from the EBIC signals as a function of these parameters. The results of the simulation show that the accuracy of the method proposed in[1] is reasonably accurate and that the beam voltage and spot size do not have significant effects on the accuracy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. High energy Xe{sup +} ion beam induced ripple structures on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg; Facsko, Stefan; Winkler, Ingolf [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute for Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Grigorian, Souren; Pietsch, Ullrich [University of Siegen (Germany). Institute of Physics

    2008-07-01

    Ion beam bombardment on semiconductor surfaces leads to well-defined morphological structures in the nanoscale range. Due to the impact of ions a self-organized wave-like surface structure develops. Ion bombardment causes an amorphization of a surface-adjacent layer of several nanometers and creates a periodical structure on the surface as well as at the amorphous-crystalline interface. We investigate the dependence of the periodicity on the crystallography of (100) silicon bombarded with Xe{sup +} ions, the ion beam incidence and the azimutal angle of the sample surface. So far we found that the ripple wavelength scales with the ion energy in a range of 5 to 70 keV. In order to understand the initiation of the ripple formation we also ask the question which role the initial surface structure plays. Therefore we investigate the formation of ripples on pre-structured and rough surfaces such as wafers with an intentional miscut. Therefore, we not only introduce a certain initial roughness but also vary the orientation of the (100) lattice plane in respect to the surface. We distinguish between ion beam induced surface effects (sputter erosion) and the influence of the crystalline Si lattice (strain) on the ripple formation.

  5. Beam-induced heating / bunch length / RF and lessons for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metral, E.

    2012-01-01

    Beam-induced heating has been observed here and there during the 2011 run when the bunch/beam intensity was increased and/or the bunch length was reduced. These observations are first reviewed before mentioning the recent news/work performed during the shutdown. In fact, several possible sources of heating exist and only the RF heating (i.e. coming from the real part of the longitudinal impedance of the machine components) is discussed in some detail in the present paper: 1) comparing the case of a Broad-Band (BB) vs. a Narrow-Band (NB) impedance; 2) discussing the beam spectrum; 3) reminding the usual solutions to avoid/minimize the RF heating; 4) reviewing the different heat transfer mechanisms; 5) mentioning that the synchronous phase shift is a measurement of the power loss and effective impedance. The three current 'hot' topics for the LHC performance, which are the VMTSA, TDI and MKI, are then analyzed in detail and some lessons for 2012 (and after) are finally drawn

  6. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-01-01

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm 2 and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO 2 lasers

  7. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-10-18

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm{sup 2} and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO{sub 2} lasers.

  8. Involvement of Smad3 pathway in atrial fibrosis induced by elevated hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Rao, Fang; Liu, Fangzhou; Xue, Yumei; Deng, Chunyu; Wang, Zhaoyu; Zhu, Jiening; Yang, Hui; Li, Xin; Zhang, Mengzhen; Fu, Yongheng; Zhu, Wensi; Shan, Zhixin; Wu, Shulin

    2018-06-01

    Hypertension is a main risk factor for atrial fibrillation, but the direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on the atrial fibrosis are still unknown. The present study investigated whether hydrostatic pressure is responsible for atrial fibrosis, and addressed a potential role of the Smad pathway in this pathology. Biochemical assays were used to study regulation and expression of fibrotic factors in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar rats, and in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) cultured under standard (0 mmHg) and elevated (20, 40 mmHg) hydrostatic pressure. Levels of atrial fibrosis and protein expression of fibrotic factors Col-1A1/-3A1, TGF-β1, and MMP-2 in SHRs' left atrial tissues were higher than those in Wistar rats. Exposure to elevated pressure was associated with the proliferation of CFs. The protein expression of Col-1A1/-3A1, TGF-β1, and MMP-2 in CFs was also up-regulated in a pressure-dependent manner. The proliferation of CFs and increased expressions of fibrotic markers induced by elevated hydrostatic pressure could be reversed by the Smad3 inhibitor naringenin. The activation of Smad3 pathway was also stimulated by elevated hydrostatic pressure. These results demonstrate that CF secretory function and proliferation can be up-regulated by exposure to elevated pressure, and that Smad3 may modulate CF activation induced by high hydrostatic pressure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Pressure-induced polymerization of P(CN){sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Huiyang, E-mail: hgou@ciw.edu, E-mail: tstrobel@ciw.edu; Kim, Duck Young; Strobel, Timothy A., E-mail: hgou@ciw.edu, E-mail: tstrobel@ciw.edu [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Yonke, Brendan L. [NRC Postdoctoral Associate, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Epshteyn, Albert [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Smith, Jesse S. [High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Motivated to explore the formation of novel extended carbon-nitrogen solids via well-defined molecular precursor pathways, we studied the chemical reactivity of highly pure phosphorous tricyanide, P(CN){sub 3}, under conditions of high pressure at room temperature. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopic measurements reveal a series of phase transformations below 10 GPa, and several low-frequency vibrational modes are reported for the first time. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measurements taken during compression show that molecular P(CN){sub 3} is highly compressible, with a bulk modulus of 10.0 ± 0.3 GPa, and polymerizes into an amorphous solid above ∼10.0 GPa. Raman and IR spectra, together with first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations, show that the amorphization transition is associated with polymerization of the cyanide groups into CN bonds with predominantly sp{sup 2} character, similar to known carbon nitrides, resulting in a novel phosphorous carbon nitride (PCN) polymeric phase, which is recoverable to ambient pressure.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Induced Sterilization and Chemical Neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Eusebio; Evans, Kirk; Gornostaeva, Olga; Alexeff, Igor; Lock Kang, Weng; Wood, Thomas K.

    1998-11-01

    We are studying chemical neutralization and surface decontamination using atmospheric pressure plasma discharges. The plasma is produced by corona discharge from an array of pins and a ground plane. The array is constructed so that various gases, like argon or helium, can be flowed past the pins where the discharge is initiated. The pin array can be biased using either DC, AC or pulsed discharges. Results indicate that the atmospheric plasma is effective in sterilizing surfaces with biological contaminants like E-coli and bacillus subtilus cells. Exposure times of less than four minutes in an air plasma result in a decrease in live colony counts by six orders of magnitude. Greater exposure times result in a decrease of live colony counts of up to ten orders of magnitude. The atmospheric pressure discharge is also effective in decomposing organic phosphate compounds that are simulants for chemical warfare agents. Details of the decomposition chemistry, by-product formation, and electrical energy consumption of the system will be discussed.

  11. Pressure induced phase transition in HfTiO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, A.K.; Garg, Nandini; Sharma, Surinder M.; Panneerselvam, G.

    2012-01-01

    Hafnium titanate is a low thermal expansion ceramic with a very good absorption cross section for thermal neutrons and a high refractoriness, thus making it a desirable nuclear material. At ambient conditions it crystallizes with the orthorhombic structure (space group Pbcn). The material properties of this ceramic have been studied as a function of temperature. However, apart from a lone shock study several decades ago there is no study at static high pressure on this compound. Since this ceramic is used as control rods in nuclear reactors it is important to understand its phase stability at different thermodynamic conditions. Therefore to understand the high pressure behaviour of hafnium titanate we have carried out diamond anvil cell based X-ray diffraction studies up to ∼20 GPa. The studies on this ceramic show that its structure is stable till 11 GPa. However, at ∼11.7 GPa appearance of new diffraction peaks indicate that it undergoes a structural phase transition to a low symmetry structure

  12. Reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by $^{8}$B beam close to the barrier

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of the proposed experiment is to investigate the reaction dynamics of proton-halo induced collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier where coupling to continuum effects are expected to be important. We propose to measure the $^{8}$B + $^{64}$Zn elastic scattering angular distribution together with the measurement, for the first time, of p - $^{7}$Be coincidences coming from transfer and/or break-up of $^{8}$B. The latter will allow a better understanding of the relative contribution of elastic $\\textit{vs}$ non-elastic break-up in reactions induced by extremely weakly-bound nuclei. We believe that with the availability of the post accelerated $^{8}$B beam at REX-ISOLDE we will be able to collect for the first time high quality data for the study of such an important topic.

  13. Effects of a laser beam profile on Zeeman electromagnetically induced transparency in the Rb buffer gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolić, S N; Radonjić, M; Krmpot, A J; Lučić, N M; Zlatković, B V; Jelenković, B M

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) due to Zeeman coherences in the Rb buffer gas cell is studied for different laser beam profiles, laser beam radii and intensities from 0.1 to 10 mW cm −2 . EIT line shapes can be approximated by the Lorentzian for wide Gaussian laser beam (6.5 mm in diameter) if laser intensity is weak and for a Π laser beam profile of the same diameter. Line shapes of EIT become non-Lorentzian for the Gaussian laser beam if it is narrow (1.3 mm in diameter) or if it has a higher intensity. EIT amplitudes and linewidths, for both laser beam profiles of the same diameter, have very similar behaviour regarding laser intensity and Rb cell temperature. EIT amplitudes are maximal at a certain laser beam intensity and this intensity is higher for narrower laser beams. The EIT linewidth estimated at zero laser intensity is about 50 nT or 0.7 kHz, which refers to 1.5 ms relaxation times of Zeeman coherences in 87 Rb atoms in our buffer gas cell. Blocking of the centre of the wide Gaussian laser beam in front of the photo detector yields Lorentzian profiles with a much better contrast to the linewidth ratio for EIT at higher intensities, above ∼2 mW cm −2 . (paper)

  14. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  15. Pressure-induced structural change from hexagonal to fcc metal lattice in scandium trihydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, A.; Machida, A.; Watanuki, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakano, S.; Takemura, K.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized scandium hydrides by hydrogenation of a scandium foil with hydrogen fluid under high pressure at ambient temperature. Scandium dihydride (ScH 2 ) and trihydride (ScH 3 ) were prepared near 4 and 5 GPa, respectively. The hydrogenation process and pressure-induced structural changes in ScH 3 were investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements up to 54.7 GPa. A structural transition from hexagonal to the fcc lattice began at 30 GPa and was completed at 46 GPa via an intermediate state similar to those reported for other hexagonal trihydrides. The intermediate state was not interpreted in terms of a coexisting state for the low-pressure hexagonal and the high-pressure fcc structures. The onset transition pressure of ScH 3 supported the previously proposed relation that the hexagonal-fcc transition pressure is inversely proportional to the ionic radius of the trihydride

  16. Numerical study of ambient pressure for laser-induced bubble near a rigid boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, BeiBei; Zhang, HongChao; Han, Bing; Lu, Jian

    2012-07-01

    The dynamics of the laser-induced bubble at different ambient pressures was numerically studied by Finite Volume Method (FVM). The velocity of the bubble wall, the liquid jet velocity at collapse, and the pressure of the water hammer while the liquid jet impacting onto the boundary are found to increase nonlinearly with increasing ambient pressure. The collapse time and the formation time of the liquid jet are found to decrease nonlinearly with increasing ambient pressure. The ratios of the jet formation time to the collapse time, and the displacement of the bubble center to the maximal radius while the jet formation stay invariant when ambient pressure changes. These ratios are independent of ambient pressure.

  17. Electron beam chemistry in solid films of poly(vinyl alcohol): Exposures under vacuum and under N2 at atmospheric pressure; irradiation monitored by using infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacansky, J.; Schneider, S.

    1990-01-01

    Thin films of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were exposed to a 25-kV electron beam under high vacuum conditions and to a 175-kV electron beam at atmospheric pressures of N 2 . The decomposition of PVA by the electron beam sequentially formed materials that had polyketone- and polyethylene-like structures, respectively. Contrary to previous reports we show that the ketone groups formed as a result of the electron beam exposure are not due to an oxidation step by molecular oxygen. Damage cross sections for the electron beam decomposition (at 25 kV) were determined for PVA and the polyketone, and G values were determined for decomposition of -OH groups and formation of ketone functional groups

  18. Study of the thermal effect on silicon surface induced by ion beam from plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Z., E-mail: pscientific5@aec.org.sy [Scientific Service Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Ahmad, M. [IBA Laboratory, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2017-04-01

    Structural modifications in form of ripples and cracks are induced by nitrogen ions from plasma focus on silicon surface. The investigation of such structures reveals correlation between ripples and cracks formation in peripheral region of the melt spot. The reason of such correlation and structure formation is explained as result of thermal effect. Melting and resolidification of the center of irradiated area occur within one micro second of time. This is supported by a numerical simulation used to investigate the thermal effect induced by the plasma focus ion beams on the silicon surface. This simulation provides information about the temperature profile as well as the dynamic of the thermal propagation in depth and lateral directions. In accordance with the experimental observations, that ripples are formed in latter stage after the arrival of last ion, the simulation shows that the thermal relaxation takes place in few microseconds after the end of the ion beam arrival. Additionally, the dependency of thermal propagation and relaxation on the distance of the silicon surface from the anode is presented.

  19. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Weirich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID. It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt–C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me3. For W(CO6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques.

  20. Microscopic kinetic analysis of space-charge induced optical microbunching in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Marinelli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal space-charge forces from density fluctuations generated by shot noise can be a major source of microbunching instability in relativistic high brightness electron beams. The gain in microbunching due to this effect is broadband, extending at least up to optical frequencies, where the induced structure on the beam distribution gives rise to effects such as coherent optical transition radiation. In the high-frequency regime, theoretical and computational analyses of microbunching formation require a full three-dimensional treatment. In this paper we address the problem of space-charge induced optical microbunching formation in the high-frequency limit when transverse thermal motion due to finite emittance is included for the first time. We derive an analytical description of this process based on the beam’s plasma dielectric function. We discuss the effect of transverse temperature on the angular distribution of microbunching gain and its connection to the physics of Landau damping in longitudinal plasma oscillations. Application of the theory to a relevant experimental scenario is discussed. The analytical results obtained are then compared to the predictions arising from high resolution three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Nonlinear thermally induced distortions of a laser beam in a cryogenic disk amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyatkin, A G; Khazanov, Efim A

    2009-01-01

    Taking into account the temperature dependences of the heat conductivity, the refractive index, and the thermal expansion coefficient, we calculated the temperature, elastic stresses, a thermally induced lens and depolarisation of a beam in a cryogenic disk amplifier (an Yb:YAG disk placed between a copper cylinder and a sapphire disk cooled by liquid nitrogen). When the active element (the thickness is 0.6 mm, the orientation is [001], the atomic concentration of Yb is 10%) is pumped by radiation from a diode laser (the beam diameter is 6 mm), the temperature does not exceed 140 K for the heat release power of 100 W. In this case, elastic stresses in the active element are six times lower than the maximum permissible value. The focal distance of the thermally induced lens is 5.5 m and the depolarisation rate is 0.038% per two passes through the active element. Although the heat conductivity of the active element rapidly decreases with temperature, the thermal load can be increased by 1.5-2 times when the dimensions of the active element remain constant. (active media)

  2. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-22

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  3. Pressure induced valence transitions in the Anderson lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, B.H.; Coqblin, B.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the equation of motion method to the Anderson lattice model, which describes the physical properties of heavy fermion compounds. In particular, we focus here on the variation of the number of f electrons with pressure, associated to the crossover from the Kondo regime to the intermediate valence regime. We treat here the non-magnetic case and introduce an improved approximation, which consists of an alloy analogy based decoupling for the Anderson lattice model. It is implemented by partial incorporation of the spatial correlations contained in higher-order Green's functions involved in the problem that have been formerly neglected. As it has been verified in the framework of the Hubbard model, the alloy analogy avoids the breakdown of sum rules and is more appropriate to explore the asymmetric case of the periodic Anderson Hamiltonian. The densities of states for a simple cubic lattice are calculated for various values of the model parameters V, t, E f , and U.

  4. A new method to induce transitions in muonic atoms using a high-power tunable dye laser coupled to a stopping muon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, A; Duclos, J; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gorini, G; Neri, G; Picard, J; Pitzurra, O; Placci, A; Polacco, E; Stefanini, G; Torelli, G; Vitale, A; Zavattini, E

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which a ruby-pumped dye laser is used to induce transitions from the 2S to the 2P levels of the muonic ion ( mu He)/sup +/. The dye laser supplies infra-red radiation pulses in the wavelengths (8040-8180) AA, at typical repetition rates of 1 pulse every 4 s, with an energy release per pulse of 300 mJ for 1.2 J pumping energy. A special synchronization procedure is followed to trigger the laser in close coupling with the incoming muon beam which is stopped in a helium target at pressures between 40 and 50 atm. The other performances of the device are fully discussed with reference both to the laser facility and to the special high-pressure helium target. (23 refs).

  5. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  6. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  7. Experimental investigation of dynamic pressure in a cryosorbing beam tube exposed to synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Malyshev, O.B.; Osipov, V.N.; Maslennikov, I.L.; Turner, W.C.

    1994-06-01

    Results of photodesorption experiments on a 4.2-K beam tube irradiated with synchrotron radiation from the VEPP-2M storage ring are being reported. The experiments have been performed on SSC1 and SSC2 beamlines. Synchrotron radiation parameters of the SSC1 beamline are the same as the SSCL 20 TeV proton collider; critical energy = 284 eV, photon intensity 1·10 16 photons/m/s. Photon intensity of the SSC2 beamline is eight times higher than intensity of the SSC1 beamline. We have used two experimental configurations to observe the density increase due to: (1) photodesorption of tightly bound molecules not previously desorbed and (2) photodesorption of weakly bound cryosorbed molecules. The two configurations used were a simple 4.2-K beam tube and a 4.2-K tube with a coaxial perforated liner. The photo-desorption coefficient of tightly bound H 2 measured on the SSC1 beamline was observed to decrease monotonically with photon exposure, reaching η4·10 -4 molecules per photon at the end of exposure (∼1·10 22 photons/m). The same experiment on the SSC2 beamline gave a similar result at photon dose 3.5·10 22 photons/m. The photodesorption coefficient of cryosorbed H 2 increased with increasing H 2 surface density, reaching η'σ w ∼7 molecules/photon at one monolayer surface density (s m ∼3·10 15 H 2 /cm 2 ), where σ w is the sticking coefficient. The liner was shown to effectively shield cryosorbed molecules from synchrotron radiation

  8. Prediction of residual stresses and distortions due to laser beam welding of butt joints in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraitis, G.A.; Labeas, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    A two-level three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed to predict keyhole formation and thermo-mechanical response during Laser Beam Welding (LBW) of steel and aluminium pressure vessel or pipe butt-joints. A very detailed and localized (level-1) non-linear three-dimensional transient thermal model is initially developed, which simulates the mechanisms of keyhole formation, calculates the temperature distribution in the local weld area and predicts the keyhole size and shape. Subsequently, using a laser beam heat source model based on keyhole assumptions, a global (level-2) thermo-mechanical analysis of the LBW butt-joint is performed, from which the joint residual stresses and distortions are calculated. All the major physical phenomena associated to LBW, such as laser heat input via radiation, heat losses through convection and radiation, as well as latent heat are accounted for in the numerical model. Material properties and particularly enthalpy, which is very important due to significant material phase changes, are introduced as temperature-dependent functions. The main advantages of the developed model are its efficiency, flexibility and applicability to a wide range of LBW problems (e.g. welding for pressure vessel or pipework construction, welding of automotive, marine or aircraft components, etc). The model efficiency arises from the two-scale approach applied. Minimal or no experimental data are required for the keyhole size and shape computation by the level-1 model, while the thermo-mechanical response calculation by the level-2 model requires only process and material data. Therefore, it becomes possible to efficiently apply the developed simulation model to different material types and varying welding parameters (i.e. welding speed, heat source power, joint geometry, etc.) in order to control residual stresses and distortions within the welded structure

  9. Loads on reactor pressure vessel internals induced by low-pressure waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkert, J.; Mika, C.; Stegemann, D.; Valero, M.

    1978-02-01

    Departing from the conservation theorems for mass and impulse the computer code DRUWE has been developed which allows to calculate loads on the core shell with simplifying assumptions for the first period just after the rupture has opened. It can be supposed that the whole rupture cross section is set free within 15 msec. The calculation progresses in a way that for a core shell the local, timely pressure- and load development, respectively, the total dynamic load as well as the moments acting on the fixing of the core shell, can be calculated. The required input data are merely geometric data on the concept of the pressure vessel and its components as well as the effective subcooling of the fluid. By means of some parameters the programm development can be controlled in a way that the results are available in form of listings or diagrams, respectively, as well as in form of card decks for following investigations, e.g. solidity calculations. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Structural changes induced by high-pressure processing in micellar casein and milk protein concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadesky, Lee; Walkling-Ribeiro, Markus; Kriner, Kyle T; Karwe, Mukund V; Moraru, Carmen I

    2017-09-01

    Reconstituted micellar casein concentrates and milk protein concentrates of 2.5 and 10% (wt/vol) protein concentration were subjected to high-pressure processing at pressures from 150 to 450 MPa, for 15 min, at ambient temperature. The structural changes induced in milk proteins by high-pressure processing were investigated using a range of physical, physicochemical, and chemical methods, including dynamic light scattering, rheology, mid-infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, proteomics, and soluble mineral analyses. The experimental data clearly indicate pressure-induced changes of casein micelles, as well as denaturation of serum proteins. Calcium-binding α S1 - and α S2 -casein levels increased in the soluble phase after all pressure treatments. Pressurization up to 350 MPa also increased levels of soluble calcium and phosphorus, in all samples and concentrations, whereas treatment at 450 MPa reduced the levels of soluble Ca and P. Experimental data suggest dissociation of calcium phosphate and subsequent casein micelle destabilization as a result of pressure treatment. Treatment of 10% micellar casein concentrate and 10% milk protein concentrate samples at 450 MPa resulted in weak, physical gels, which featured aggregates of uniformly distributed, casein substructures of 15 to 20 nm in diameter. Serum proteins were significantly denatured by pressures above 250 MPa. These results provide information on pressure-induced changes in high-concentration protein systems, and may inform the development on new milk protein-based foods with novel textures and potentially high nutritional quality, of particular interest being the soft gel structures formed at high pressure levels. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  11. ERK activation is required for hydrostatic pressure induced-tensile changes in engineered articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, G D; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the ERK 1/2 involvement in the changes in compressive and tensile mechanical properties associated with hydrostatic pressure treatment of self-assembled cartilage constructs. In study 1, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblot following application of hydrostatic pressure (1 hour of static 10MPa) applied at day 10-14 of self-assembly culture. In study 2, ERK 1/2 activation was blocked during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14. With pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway by the MEK1/ERK inhibitor U0126 during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14, the increase in Young’s modulus induced by hydrostatic pressure was blocked. Furthermore, this reduction in Young’s modulus with U0126 treatment during hydrostatic pressure application corresponded with a decrease in total collagen expression. However, U0126 did not inhibit the increase in aggregate modulus or GAG induced by hydrostatic pressure. These findings demonstrate a link between hydrostatic pressure application, ERK signaling, and changes in biomechanical properties of a tissue engineered construct. PMID:23255524

  12. ERK activation is required for hydrostatic pressure-induced tensile changes in engineered articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, G D; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify ERK 1/2 involvement in the changes in compressive and tensile mechanical properties associated with hydrostatic pressure treatment of self-assembled cartilage constructs. In study 1, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblot, following application of hydrostatic pressure (1 h of static 10 MPa) applied at days 10-14 of self-assembly culture. In study 2, ERK 1/2 activation was blocked during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14. With pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway by the MEK1/ERK inhibitor U0126 during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14, the increase in Young's modulus induced by hydrostatic pressure was blocked. Furthermore, this reduction in Young's modulus with U0126 treatment during hydrostatic pressure application corresponded to a decrease in total collagen expression. However, U0126 did not inhibit the increase in aggregate modulus or GAG induced by hydrostatic pressure. These findings demonstrate a link between hydrostatic pressure application, ERK signalling and changes in the biomechanical properties of a tissue-engineered construct. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mechanisms of lower body negative pressure-induced syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davrath, Linda Ruble

    Although extensively investigated, the mechanisms of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance have not been elucidated. The working hypothesis was that a markedly reduced left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) would be achieved during progressive, presyncopal-limited LBNP and would cause bradycardia and a fall in blood pressure, thus triggering syncope. Eight healthy men, age 25.1 ± 1.3 years, volunteered for the study. Subjects were exposed to graded levels of LBNP on two separate occasions. Changes in left ventricular end-diastolic volume and LVESV were measured, using two-dimensional echocardiography, at each stage of LBNP from rest to presyncope. Plasma venous blood samples were withdrawn at the end of each stage of the LBNP protocol for the measurement of plasma venous catecholamines and plasma renin activity (PRA). Catecholamines were analyzed by HPLC with electro-chemical detection, and PRA was determined by radioimmunoassay. All subjects reached presyncope during the LBNP. LVESV decreased by 28% at presyncope with no evidence of ventricular cavity obliteration. Norepinephrine (NE) increased by 44% from rest to presyncope, but no epinephrine surge was detected (35% increase from rest to presyncope). These data indicate that it is possible to initiate syncope with only a 28% decrease in LVESV, and that sympatho-inhibition and bradycardia are not required elements for syncope to occur. To investigate the effect of moderate sodium restriction on cardiovascular hemodynamics and orthostatic tolerance, presyncopal LBNP testing was performed. Urinary sodium excretion was significantly higher on the normal-sodium diet when compared with the sodium-restricted diet, but urinary potassium was not different. Cumulative stress index (655 ± 460 on normal-sodium diet vs. 639 ± 388 on sodium-restricted diet) scores were not different. Cardiac volumes, blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were not different at any stage of the LBNP between the diets, nor

  14. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho-Lopez, Santiago; Evans, Rodger; Escobar-Alarcon, Luis; Camacho-Lopez, Miguel A.; Camacho-Lopez, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO 2 in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance

  15. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Lopez, Santiago [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico)], E-mail: camachol@cicese.mx; Evans, Rodger [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, Luis [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Miguel A. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n, esq. Jesus Carranza, Toluca, Estado de Mexico 50120 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO{sub 2} in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance.

  16. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil-Hah, E-mail: khkim@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii. - Highlights: > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal development of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal reproduction of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. > Electron beam irradiation induced p53 stability.

  17. Pressure-induced transformations in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcez, K. M. S., E-mail: kmgarcez@ufma.br [Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65700-000 Bacabal, Maranhão (Brazil); Antonelli, A., E-mail: aantone@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-02-14

    We study the transformations between amorphous phases of Si through molecular simulations using the environment dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) for Si. Our results show that upon pressure, the material undergoes a transformation from the low density amorphous (LDA) Si to the high density amorphous (HDA) Si. This transformation can be reversed by decompressing the material. This process, however, exhibits clear hysteresis, suggesting that the transformation LDA ↔ HDA is first-order like. The HDA phase is predominantly five-fold coordinated, whereas the LDA phase is the normal tetrahedrally bonded amorphous Si. The HDA phase at 400 K and 20 GPa was submitted to an isobaric annealing up to 800 K, resulting in a denser amorphous phase, which is structurally distinct from the HDA phase. Our results also show that the atomic volume and structure of this new amorphous phase are identical to those of the glass obtained by an isobaric quenching of the liquid in equilibrium at 2000 K and 20 GPa down to 400 K. The similarities between our results and those for amorphous ices suggest that this new phase is the very high density amorphous Si.

  18. Pressure-induced transformations in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, K. M. S.; Antonelli, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the transformations between amorphous phases of Si through molecular simulations using the environment dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) for Si. Our results show that upon pressure, the material undergoes a transformation from the low density amorphous (LDA) Si to the high density amorphous (HDA) Si. This transformation can be reversed by decompressing the material. This process, however, exhibits clear hysteresis, suggesting that the transformation LDA ↔ HDA is first-order like. The HDA phase is predominantly five-fold coordinated, whereas the LDA phase is the normal tetrahedrally bonded amorphous Si. The HDA phase at 400 K and 20 GPa was submitted to an isobaric annealing up to 800 K, resulting in a denser amorphous phase, which is structurally distinct from the HDA phase. Our results also show that the atomic volume and structure of this new amorphous phase are identical to those of the glass obtained by an isobaric quenching of the liquid in equilibrium at 2000 K and 20 GPa down to 400 K. The similarities between our results and those for amorphous ices suggest that this new phase is the very high density amorphous Si.

  19. Non-Newtonian Flow-Induced Deformation From Pressurized Cavities in Absorbing Porous Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aftab; Siddique, Javed

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of a spherical cavity in a soft biological tissue modeled as a deformable porous material during an injection of non-Newtonian fluid that follows a power law model. Fluid flows into the neighboring tissue due to high cavity pressure where it is absorbed by capillaries and lymphatics at a rate proportional to the local pressure. Power law fluid pressure and displacement of solid in the tissue are computed as function of radial distance and time. Numerical solutions indicate that shear thickening fluids exhibit less fluid pressure and induce small solid deformation as compared to shear thinning fluids. The absorption in the biological tissue increases as a consequence of flow induced deformation for power law fluids. In most cases non-Newtonian results are compared with viscous fluid case to magnify the differences.

  20. Pressure-induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transformation in porous PZT95/5 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, T.; Dong, X.L.; Chen, X.F.; Yao, C.H.; He, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrostatic pressure-induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric (FE-AFE) phase transformation of PZT95/5 ceramics was investigated as a function of porosity, pore shape and pore size. FE-AFE phase transformations were more diffuse and occurred at lower hydrostatic pressures with increasing porosity. The porous PZT95/5 ceramics with spherical pores exhibited higher transformation pressures than those with irregular pores. Moreover, FE-AFE phase transformations of porous PZT95/5 ceramics with polydisperse irregular pores were more diffuse than those of porous PZT95/5 ceramics with monodisperse irregular pores. The relation between pore structure and hydrostatic pressure-induced FE-AFE transformation was established according to stress concentration theory. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Pressure controlled transition into a self-induced topological superconducting surface state

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Ab-initio calculations show a pressure induced trivial-nontrivial-trivial topological phase transition in the normal state of 1T-TiSe2. The pressure range in which the nontrivial phase emerges overlaps with that of the superconducting ground state. Thus, topological superconductivity can be induced in protected surface states by the proximity effect of superconducting bulk states. This kind of self-induced topological surface superconductivity is promising for a realization of Majorana fermions due to the absence of lattice and chemical potential mismatches. For appropriate electron doping, the formation of the topological superconducting surface state in 1T-TiSe 2 becomes accessible to experiments as it can be controlled by pressure.

  2. Pressure controlled transition into a self-induced topological superconducting surface state

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2014-02-07

    Ab-initio calculations show a pressure induced trivial-nontrivial-trivial topological phase transition in the normal state of 1T-TiSe2. The pressure range in which the nontrivial phase emerges overlaps with that of the superconducting ground state. Thus, topological superconductivity can be induced in protected surface states by the proximity effect of superconducting bulk states. This kind of self-induced topological surface superconductivity is promising for a realization of Majorana fermions due to the absence of lattice and chemical potential mismatches. For appropriate electron doping, the formation of the topological superconducting surface state in 1T-TiSe 2 becomes accessible to experiments as it can be controlled by pressure.

  3. Assessment of electron beam-induced abnormal development and DNA damage in Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Seung- Hwan; Lee, Seon-Woo; Koo, Hyun-Na; Kim, Gil- Hah

    2014-01-01

    The armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) is a polyphagous and important agricultural pest worldwide. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages, reproduction, and DNA damage of S. litura. Eggs (0–24 h old), larvae (3rd instar), pupae (3 days old after pupation), and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with electron beam irradiation of six levels between 30 and 250 Gy. When eggs were irradiated with 100 Gy, egg hatching was completely inhibited. When the larvae were irradiated, the larval period was significantly delayed, depending on the doses applied. At 150 Gy, the fecundity of adults that developed from irradiated pupae was entirely inhibited. However, electron beam irradiation did not induce the instantaneous death of S. litura adults. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated moths demonstrated that females were more radiosensitive than males. We also conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over the following 5 days period. Severe DNA fragmentation in S. litura cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. However, at more than 100 Gy, DNA damage was not fully recovered. - Highlights: • Electron beam irradiation induced abnormal development of the cutworm. • Electron beam irradiation induced the sterility of the cutworm. • Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. • DNA damage by high irradiation exposure was not completely repaired

  4. Cell killing and chromosomal aberration induced by heavy-ion beams in cultured human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, K.; Funada, A.; Mohri, M.; Lee, R.; Aoki, M.; Furusawa, Y.; Gotoh, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human tumor cells irradaited with heavy-ion beams. The analyses were carried out on the basis of the linear energy transfer (LET) values of heavy ion beams as radiation source. Exponentially growing human tumor cells, Human Salivary Gland Tumor cells (HSG cells), were irradiated with various high energy heavy ions, such as 13 keV/micrometer carbon (C) ions as low LET charged particle radiation source, 120 keV/ micrometer carbon (C) ions and 440 keV/micrometer iron (Fe) ions as high LET charged particle radiation sources.The cell death was analysed by the colony formation method, and the chromosomal aberration and its repairing kinetics was analysed by prematurely chromosome condensation method (PCC method) using calyculin A. Chromatid-type breaks, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were scored for the samples from the cells keeping with various incubation time after irradiation. The LET dependence of the cell death was similar to that of the chromosome exchange formation after 12 hours incubation. A maximum peak was around 120 keV/micrometer. However it was not similar to the LET dependence of isochromatid breaks or chromatid breaks after 12 hours incubation. These results suggest that the exchanges formed in chromosome after irradiation should be one of essential causes to lead the cell death. The different quality of induced chromosome damage between high-LET and low-LET radiation was also shown. About 89 % and 88 % chromatid breaks induced by X rays and 13 keV/micrometer C ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation, though only 71% and 58 % of chromatid breaks induced by 120 keV/micrometer C ions and 440 keV/micrometer Fe ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation

  5. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema after Reversing Rocuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Blockade by Sugammadex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzo Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a rare complication that accompanies general anesthesia, especially after extubation. We experienced a case of negative pressure pulmonary edema after tracheal extubation following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex. In this case, the contribution of residual muscular block on the upper airway muscle as well as large inspiratory forces created by the respiratory muscle which has a low response to muscle relaxants, is suspected as the cause.

  6. Unexpected pressure induced ductileness tuning in sulfur doped polycrystalline nickel metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The sulfur induced embrittlement of polycrystalline nickel (Ni metal has been a long-standing mystery. It is suggested that sulfur impurity makes ductile Ni metal brittle in many industry applications due to various mechanisms, such as impurity segregation and disorder-induced melting etc. Here we report an observation that the most ductile measurement occurs at a critical sulfur doping concentration, 14 at.% at pressure from 14 GPa up to 29 GPa through texture evolution analysis. The synchrotron-based high pressure texturing measurements using radial diamond anvil cell (rDAC X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques reveal that the activities of slip systems in the polycrystalline nickel metal are affected by sulfur impurities and external pressures, giving rise to the changes in the plastic deformation of the nickel metal. Dislocation dynamics (DD simulation on dislocation density and velocity further confirms the pressure induced ductilization changes in S doped Ni metal. This observation and simulation suggests that the ductilization of the doped polycrystalline nickel metal can be optimized by engineering the sulfur concentration under pressure, shedding a light on tuning the mechanical properties of this material for better high pressure applications.

  7. Unexpected pressure induced ductileness tuning in sulfur doped polycrystalline nickel metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cheng; Yang, Yan; Tan, Liuxi; Lei, Jialin; Guo, Shengmin; Chen, Bin; Yan, Jinyuan; Yang, Shizhong

    2018-02-01

    The sulfur induced embrittlement of polycrystalline nickel (Ni) metal has been a long-standing mystery. It is suggested that sulfur impurity makes ductile Ni metal brittle in many industry applications due to various mechanisms, such as impurity segregation and disorder-induced melting etc. Here we report an observation that the most ductile measurement occurs at a critical sulfur doping concentration, 14 at.% at pressure from 14 GPa up to 29 GPa through texture evolution analysis. The synchrotron-based high pressure texturing measurements using radial diamond anvil cell (rDAC) X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques reveal that the activities of slip systems in the polycrystalline nickel metal are affected by sulfur impurities and external pressures, giving rise to the changes in the plastic deformation of the nickel metal. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulation on dislocation density and velocity further confirms the pressure induced ductilization changes in S doped Ni metal. This observation and simulation suggests that the ductilization of the doped polycrystalline nickel metal can be optimized by engineering the sulfur concentration under pressure, shedding a light on tuning the mechanical properties of this material for better high pressure applications.

  8. Pressure-induced phase transitions in single-crystalline Cu4Bi4S9 nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jing-Yu; Li Jing; Zhao Qing; Shi Li-Jie; Zou Bing-Suo; Zhang Si-Jia; Zhao Hao-Fei; Zhang Qing-Hua; Yao Yuan; Zhu Ke; Liu Yu-Long; Jin Chang-Qing; Yu Ri-Cheng; Li Yan-Chun; Li Xiao-Dong; Liu Jing

    2013-01-01

    In situ angle dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements under pressure are employed to study the structural evolution of Cu 4 Bi 4 S 9 nanoribbons, which are fabricated by using a facile solvothermal method. Both experiments show that a structural phase transition occurs near 14.5 GPa, and there is a pressure-induced reversible amorphization at about 25.6 GPa. The electrical transport property of a single Cu 4 Bi 4 S 9 nanoribbon under different pressures is also investigated

  9. Comparative study of pressure-induced polymerization in C60 nanorods and single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Yuanyuan; Liu Bingbing; Wang Lin; Yu Shidan; Yao Mingguang; Chen Ao; Liu Dedi; Zou Yonggang; Li Zepeng; Zou Bo; Cui Tian; Zou Guangtian; Iwasiewicz-Wabnig, Agnieszka; Sundqvist, Bertil

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report a comparative study of pressure-induced polymerization in C 60 nanorods and bulk single crystals, treated simultaneously under various pressures and temperatures in the same experiment. For both materials, orthorhombic, tetragonal and rhombohedral phases have been produced under high pressure and high temperature. The structures have been identified and compared between the two sample types by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. There are differences between the Raman and photoluminescence spectra from the two types of materials for all polymeric phases, but especially for the tetragonal phase. From the comparison between nanorods and bulk samples, we tentatively assign photoluminescence peaks for various polymeric phases

  10. Pressure-induced preferential growth of nanocrystals in amorphous Nd9Fe85B6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; Li Wei; Sun Hongyu; Li Hui; Zhang Xiangyi; Li Xiaohong; Liu Baoting

    2008-01-01

    Control over the growth and crystallographic orientation of nanocrystals in amorphous alloys is of particular importance for the development of advanced nanocrystalline materials. In the present study, Nd 2 Fe 14 B nanocrystals with a strong crystallographic texture along the [410] direction have been produced in Nd-lean amorphous Nd 9 Fe 85 B 6 under a high pressure of 6 GPa at 923 K. This is attributed to the high pressure inducing the preferential growth of Nd 2 Fe 14 B nanocrystals in the alloy. The present study demonstrates the potential application of high-pressure technology in controlling nanocrystalline orientation in amorphous alloys

  11. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... structure i.e. no additional filter layers were applied. For both experiments, high-speed video recordings were synchronised with the pressure measurements for a detailed investigation of the coupling between the run-up and run-down flow processes and the measured pressure variations. Outward directed...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  12. Pressure-induced drastic structural change in liquid CdTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Hattori, T.; Narushima, T.; Tsuji, K.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the structure of liquid CdTe at pressures up to 6 GPa by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The structure factor, S(Q), and the pair distribution function, g(r), change drastically within a small pressure interval of about 1 GPa (between 1.8 and 3 GPa). The S(Q),g(r), and other structural parameters, such as the average coordination number, CN, and the ratios of peak positions in S(Q) or g(r), reveal that the change originates from the pressure-induced modification in the local structure from the zinc-blende-like form into the rocksaltlike one. The liquid CdTe shows a high-pressure behavior similar to that in the crystalline counterpart in terms of the sharpness of the structural change and the high-pressure sequence in the local structure

  13. Abnormal albuminuria and blood pressure rise in incipient diabetic nephropathy induced by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of light to moderate dynamic work (450 kpm/min followed by 600 kpm/min during 20 min each) on the blood pressure and renal protein handling in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (D3) (elevated baseline albumin excretion...... diastolic blood pressure was elevated [92.1 mm Hg +/- 6.0 (mean +/- SD)] compared to D2 (80.9 mm Hg +/- 4.8, 2P = 0.003%) and C (79.5 mm Hg +/- 12.4, 2P = 1.2%). Baseline systolic blood pressure was not significantly different in the three groups, but systolic blood pressure was more elevated at 600 kpm...... blood pressure and maximal exercise induced albumin excretion was demonstrable in D3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  14. High pressure and temperature induced structural and elastic properties of lutetium chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriya, S.; Kinge, R.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2018-04-01

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and pressure as well temperature induced elastic properties of rock salt to CsCl structures in semiconducting LuX (X = S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides compound have been performed using effective interionic interaction potential with emphasis on charge transfer interactions and covalent contribution. Estimated values of phase transition pressure and the volume discontinuity in pressure-volume phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. From the investigations of elastic constants the pressure (temperature) dependent volume collapse/expansion, melting temperature TM, Hardness (HV), and young modulus (E) the LuX lattice infers mechanical stiffening, and thermal softening.

  15. Gradual pressure-induced change in the magnetic structure of the noncollinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, A. S.; Singh, Sanjay; Caron, L.; Hansen, Th.; Hoser, A.; Kumar, V.; Borrmann, H.; Fitch, A.; Devi, P.; Manna, K.; Felser, C.; Inosov, D. S.

    2018-06-01

    By means of powder neutron diffraction we investigate changes in the magnetic structure of the coplanar noncollinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge caused by an application of hydrostatic pressure up to 5 GPa. At ambient conditions the kagomé layers of Mn atoms in Mn3Ge order in a triangular 120∘ spin structure. Under high pressure the spins acquire a uniform out-of-plane canting, gradually transforming the magnetic texture to a noncoplanar configuration. With increasing pressure the canted structure fully transforms into the collinear ferromagnetic one. We observed that magnetic order is accompanied by a noticeable magnetoelastic effect, namely, spontaneous magnetostriction. The latter induces an in-plane magnetostrain of the hexagonal unit cell at ambient pressure and flips to an out-of-plane strain at high pressures in accordance with the change of the magnetic structure.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  17. The pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the composition and size of casein micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengjie; Jin, Shaoming; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-04-15

    The effects of lactose on the changes in the composition and size of casein micelles induced by high-pressure treatment and the related mechanism of action were investigated. Dispersions of ultracentrifuged casein micelle pellets with 0-10% (w/v) lactose were subjected to high pressure (400 MPa) at 20 °C for 40 min. The results indicated that the level of non-sedimentable caseins was positively related to the amount of lactose added prior to pressure treatment, and negatively correlated to the size. A mechanism for the pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the casein micelles is proposed. Lactose inhibits the hydrophobic interactions between the micellar fragments during or after pressure release, through the hydrophilic layer formed by their hydrogen bonds around the micellar fragments. In addition, lactose does not favour the association between calcium and the casein aggregates after pressure release. Due to these two functions, lactose inhibited the formation of larger micelles after pressure treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spontaneous and stimulated emission induced by an electron, electron bunch, and electron beam in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzelev, M V; Rukhadze, A A

    2008-01-01

    Two fundamental mechanisms - the Cherenkov effect and anomalous Doppler effect - underlying the emission by an electron during its superluminal motion in medium are considered. Cherenkov emission induced by a single electron and a small electron bunch is spontaneous. In the course of spontaneous Cherenkov emission, the translational motion of an electron is slowed down and the radiation energy grows linearly with time. As the number of radiating electrons increases, Cherenkov emission becomes stimulated. Stimulated Cherenkov emission represents a resonance beam instability. This emission process is accompanied by longitudinal electron bunching in the beam or by the breaking of an electron bunch into smaller bunches, in which case the radiation energy grows exponentially with time. In terms of the longitudinal size L e of the electron bunch there is a transition region λ e 0 -1 between the spontaneous and stimulated Cherenkov effects, where λ is the average radiation wavelength, and δ 0 is the dimensionless (in units of the radiation frequency) growth rate of the Cherenkov beam instability. The range to the left of this region is dominated by spontaneous emission, whereas the range to the right of this region is dominated by stimulated emission. In contrast to the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect, the anomalous Doppler effect should always (even for a single electron) be considered as stimulated, because it can only be explained by accounting for the reverse action of the radiation field on the moving electron. During stimulated emission in conditions where anomalous Doppler effect shows itself, an electron is slowed down and spins up; in this case, the radiation energy grows exponentially with time. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. 6 MeV pulsed electron beam induced surface and structural changes in polyimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathakari, Narendra L.; Bhoraskar, Vasant N. [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, Maharashtra (India); Dhole, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-04-15

    Thin films of polyimide (PMDA-ODA, Kapton) having 50 mum thickness were irradiated with 6 MeV pulsed electron beam. The bulk and surface properties of pristine and irradiated samples were characterized by several techniques such as stress-strain measurements, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, contact angle, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and profilometry. The tensile strength, percentage elongation and strain energy show an enhancement from pristine value of 73-89 MPa, 10-22% and 4.75-14.2 MJ/m{sup 3} respectively at the maximum fluence of 4 x 10{sup 15} electrons/cm{sup 2}. This signifies that polyimide being an excessively aromatic polymer is crosslinked due to high-energy electron irradiation. In surface properties, the contact angle shows a significant decrease from 59 deg. to 32 deg. indicating enhancement in hydrophilicity. This mainly attributes to surface roughening, which is due to the electron beam induced sputtering. The surface roughening is confirmed in AFM and profilometry measurements. The AFM images clearly show that surface roughness increases after electron irradiation. Moreover, the roughness average (R{sub a}) as measured from surface profilograms is found to increase from 0.06 to 0.1. The FTIR and UV-vis spectra do not show noticeable changes as regards to scissioning of bonds and the oxidation. This work leads to a definite conclusion that 6 MeV pulsed electron beam can be used to bring about desired changes in surface as well as bulk properties of polyimide, which is considered to be a high performance space quality polymer.

  20. Localized surface grafting reactions on carbon nanofibers induced by gamma and e-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evora, M.C., E-mail: cecilia@ieav.cta.br [Institute for Advanced Studies-IEAV/DCTA, Av. Cel Jose Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1-Putim, 12228-001 São Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Araujo, J.R., E-mail: jraraujo@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, E.H.M. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Strohmeier, B.R. [Thermo Fisher Scientific, 5225 Verona Road, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Silva, L.G.A., E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research- IPEN, Av. Prof lineu Prestes, 2242- Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 SP (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Methodology for the functionalization of carbon nanofibers was investigated. • Two radiation sources were used to promote grafting reactions: gamma and electron beam. • We report the optimum inhibitor concentration to achieve the functionalization. • Surface of carbon nanofibers showed an increase of oxygen content after irradiation. • The radiation-induced graphitization did not damage the overall sp{sup 2} structure. - Abstract: Electron beam and gamma-ray irradiation have potential application to modify the carbon fiber nanostructures in order to produce useful defects in the graphitic structure and create reactive sites. In this study, the methodology to functionalize carbon nanofiber (CNF), via a radiation process and using acrylic acid as a source of oxygen functional groups, was investigated. The samples were submitted to a direct grafting radiation process with electron beam and gamma-ray source. Several parameters were changed such as: acrylic acid concentration, radiation dose and percentage of inhibitor necessary to achieve functionalization, with higher percentage of oxygen functional groups on CNF surface, and better dispersion. The better results achieved were when mixing CNF in a solution of acrylic acid with 6% of inhibitor (FeSO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O) and irradiated at 100 kGy. The samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface composition (atomic%) showed a significant increase of oxygen content for the samples after irradiation. Also, the dispersion of the functionalized CNF in water was stable during months which may be a good indication that the functionalization process of CNF via ionizing radiation was successful.

  1. Localized surface grafting reactions on carbon nanofibers induced by gamma and e-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, M.C.; Araujo, J.R.; Ferreira, E.H.M.; Strohmeier, B.R.; Silva, L.G.A.; Achete, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Methodology for the functionalization of carbon nanofibers was investigated. • Two radiation sources were used to promote grafting reactions: gamma and electron beam. • We report the optimum inhibitor concentration to achieve the functionalization. • Surface of carbon nanofibers showed an increase of oxygen content after irradiation. • The radiation-induced graphitization did not damage the overall sp 2 structure. - Abstract: Electron beam and gamma-ray irradiation have potential application to modify the carbon fiber nanostructures in order to produce useful defects in the graphitic structure and create reactive sites. In this study, the methodology to functionalize carbon nanofiber (CNF), via a radiation process and using acrylic acid as a source of oxygen functional groups, was investigated. The samples were submitted to a direct grafting radiation process with electron beam and gamma-ray source. Several parameters were changed such as: acrylic acid concentration, radiation dose and percentage of inhibitor necessary to achieve functionalization, with higher percentage of oxygen functional groups on CNF surface, and better dispersion. The better results achieved were when mixing CNF in a solution of acrylic acid with 6% of inhibitor (FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O) and irradiated at 100 kGy. The samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface composition (atomic%) showed a significant increase of oxygen content for the samples after irradiation. Also, the dispersion of the functionalized CNF in water was stable during months which may be a good indication that the functionalization process of CNF via ionizing radiation was successful

  2. Purity and resistivity improvements for electron-beam-induced deposition of Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulders, J.J.L. [FEI Company, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of platinum is used by many researchers. Its main application is the formation of a protective layer and the ''welding material'' for making a TEM lamella with a focused ion beam thinning process. For this application, the actual composition of the deposition is less relevant, and in practice, both the mechanical strength and the conductivity are sufficient. Another important application is the creation of an electrical connection to nanoscale structures such as nano-wires and graphene. To serve as an electrical contact, the resistivity of the Pt deposited structure has to be sufficiently low. Using the commonly used precursor MeCpPtMe{sub 3} for deposition, the resistivity as created by the basic process is 10{sup +5}-10{sup +6} higher than the value for bulk Pt, which is 10.6 μΩ cm. The reason for this is the high abundance of carbon in the deposition. To improve the deposition process, much attention has been given by the research community to parameter optimization, to ex situ or in situ removal of carbon by anneal steps, to prevention of carbon deposition by use of a carbon-free precursor, to electron beam irradiation under a high flux of oxygen and to the combination with other techniques such as atomic layer deposition (ALD). In the latter technique, the EBID structures are used as a 1-nm-thick seed layer only, while the ALD is used to selectively add pure Pt. These techniques have resulted in a low resistivity, today approaching the 10-150 μΩ cm, while the size and shape of the structure are preserved. Therefore, now, the technique is ready for application in the field of contacting nano-wires. (orig.)

  3. Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP) for emerging applications in carbon nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, Andrei G.; Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-01

    Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP), a resist-free additive nanomanufacturing technique, is an actively researched method for ''direct-write'' processing of a wide range of structural and functional nanomaterials, with high degree of spatial and time-domain control. This article attempts to critically assess the FEBIP capabilities and unique value proposition in the context of processing of electronics materials, with a particular emphasis on emerging carbon (i.e., based on graphene and carbon nanotubes) devices and interconnect structures. One of the major hurdles in advancing the carbon-based electronic materials and device fabrication is a disjoint nature of various processing steps involved in making a functional device from the precursor graphene/CNT materials. Not only this multi-step sequence severely limits the throughput and increases the cost, but also dramatically reduces the processing reproducibility and negatively impacts the quality because of possible between-the-step contamination, especially for impurity-susceptible materials such as graphene. The FEBIP provides a unique opportunity to address many challenges of carbon nanoelectronics, especially when it is employed as part of an integrated processing environment based on multiple ''beams'' of energetic particles, including electrons, photons, and molecules. This avenue is promising from the applications' prospective, as such a multi-functional (electron/photon/molecule beam) enables one to define shapes (patterning), form structures (deposition/etching), and modify (cleaning/doping/annealing) properties with locally resolved control on nanoscale using the same tool without ever changing the processing environment. It thus will have a direct positive impact on enhancing functionality, improving quality and reducing fabrication costs for electronic devices, based on both conventional CMOS and emerging carbon (CNT/graphene) materials. (orig.)

  4. Electron beam-induced Fries rearrangement of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Jun; Yuasa, Kanako; Yamashita, Takashi; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    Electron beam (EB)-induced reactions of organic crystals containing a carbonyl or a sulfonyl group have been investigated. The EB irradiation of benzenesulfonanilide (BSA) in the crystalline state induced the Fries rearrangement to yield o- and p-aminodiphenylsulfones as the major and minor products, respectively. Several BSA derivatives also had the same reactivity, while benzanilide as the corresponding carbonyl compound did not rearrange under the same conditions. These results showed that the S-N bond could be cleaved selectively by EB irradiation but the C-N bond couldn't, which could take place only by the use of EB. The EB irradiation of phenyl p-toluenesulfonate (PTS) crystals gave not only Fries-type products but also the oxidation product. By comparing with the reactivity of liquid phenyl benzenesulfonate, the EB-induced Fries rearrangement was suggested to proceed under crystalline lattice restrictions. The G-values of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates were in the range of ca. 1-2 molecules per 100 eV of absorbed energy. This is the first Fries rearrangement via direct excitation by EB irradiation. (author)

  5. Focused-ion-beam induced interfacial intermixing of magnetic bilayers for nanoscale control of magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, D M; Atkinson, D; Hase, T P A

    2014-01-01

    Modification of the magnetic properties in a thin-film ferromagnetic/non-magnetic bilayer system by low-dose focused ion-beam (FIB) induced intermixing is demonstrated. The highly localized capability of FIB may be used to locally control magnetic behaviour at the nanoscale. The magnetic, electronic and structural properties of NiFe/Au bilayers were investigated as a function of the interfacial structure that was actively modified using focused Ga + ion irradiation. Experimental work used MOKE, SQUID, XMCD as well as magnetoresistance measurements to determine the magnetic behavior and grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity to elucidate the interfacial structure. Interfacial intermixing, induced by low-dose irradiation, is shown to lead to complex changes in the magnetic behavior that are associated with monotonic structural evolution of the interface. This behavior may be explained by changes in the local atomic environment within the interface region resulting in a combination of processes including the loss of moment on Ni and Fe, an induced moment on Au and modifications to the spin-orbit coupling between Au and NiFe. (paper)

  6. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  7. An electron beam induced current study of gallium nitride and diamond materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropper, A.D.; Moore, D.J.; Scott, C.S.; Green, R.

    1995-01-01

    The continual need for microelectronic devices that operate under severe electronic and environmental conditions (high temperature, high frequency, high power, and radiation tolerance) has sustained research in wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The properties suggest these wide-bandgap semiconductor materials have tremendous potential for military and commercial applications. High frequency bipolar transistors and field effect transistors, diodes, and short wavelength optical devices have been proposed using these materials. Although research efforts involving the study of transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond have made significant advances, much work is still needed to improve the material quality so that the electrophysical behavior of device structures can be further understood and exploited. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements can provide a method of understanding the transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond. This technique basically consists of measuring the current or voltage transient response to the drift and diffusion of carriers created by a short-duration pulse of radiation. This method differs from other experimental techniques because it is based on a fast transient electron beam probe created from a high speed, laser pulsed photoemission system

  8. La Substitution and Pressure Studies on CeCoSi: A Possible Antiferroquadrupolar Ordering Induced by Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Hiroshi; Muro, Yuji; Matsumura, Takeshi

    2018-02-01

    The La-substitution and pressure effects on antiferromagnet CeCoSi with a tetragonal crystal structure were investigated in order to clarify the origin of the pressure induced ordered phase (PIOP) with an enormously high transition temperature of T0 ˜ 38 K. By substituting Ce with La, the PIOP shifts to high pressures, and the maximum value of T0 is suppressed, indicating that the PIOP originates from a Ce-Ce interaction. At T0, the magnetic susceptibility exhibits not a cusp, but an increase with decreasing temperature, as is frequently observed in antiferroquadrupolar (AFQ) ordering. Based on these results, we propose that a possible origin of the PIOP is an AFQ ordered phase of Ce-4f electron. Due to the lack of local inversion symmetry at the Ce sites, the AFQ order could be accompanied by odd parity multipolar moments. Since there is no clear evidence of successive transitions below T0, the remaining Kramers degeneracy could be lifted by the Kondo coupling.

  9. Kinetic theory of beam-induced plasmas generalised to sophisticated atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyraud-Cuenca, Nelly

    1987-01-01

    We present an analytic kinetic model available for all particle-beam-induced atomic plasmas, without any restriction on the distribution of electronic levels. The method is an iteration of the already known solution available only for the distribution of atomic levels as in the rare gases. We recall a universal atomic kinetic model which, independently of its applications to the study of efficient laser systems, might be a first step in the analytic investigation of molecular problems. Then, the iteration is systematically applied to all possible atomic structures whose number is increased by the non-local character of inelastic processes. We deduce a general analytic representation of the 'tail' of the electron distribution function as a ratio between non-local source terms and a combination of inelastic cross sections, from which we exhibit a physical interpretation and essential scaling laws. The theory is applied to sodium which is an important element in the research of efficient laser systems. (author)

  10. Electron-beam-induced current study of small-angle grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Sekiguchi, T.; Xie, R.; Ahmet, P.; Chikyo, T.; Yang, D.; Ito, S.; Yin, F.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination activity of small-angle grain boundaries (SA GBs) in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) was studied by means of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. In the as-grown mc-Si, the EBIC contrasts of special Σ and random GBs were weak at both 300 and 100 K, whereas those of SA GBs were weak (<3%) at 300 K and strong (30-40%) at 100 K. In the contaminated mc-Si, SA GBs showed stronger EBIC contrast than Σ and R GBs at 300 K. It is indicated that SA GBs possess high density of shallow levels and are easily contaminated with Fe compared to other GBs

  11. Tunable atomic force microscopy bias lithography on electron beam induced carbonaceous platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kurra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tunable local electrochemical and physical modifications on the carbonaceous platforms are achieved using Atomic force microscope (AFM bias lithography. These carbonaceous platforms are produced on Si substrate by the technique called electron beam induced carbonaceous deposition (EBICD. EBICD is composed of functionalized carbon species, confirmed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis. AFM bias lithography in tapping mode with a positive tip bias resulted in the nucleation of attoliter water on the EBICD surface under moderate humidity conditions (45%. While the lithography in the contact mode with a negative tip bias caused the electrochemical modifications such as anodic oxidation and etching of the EBICD under moderate (45% and higher (60% humidity conditions respectively. Finally, reversible charge patterns are created on these EBICD surfaces under low (30% humidity conditions and investigated by means of electrostatic force microscopy (EFM.

  12. The role of electron-stimulated desorption in focused electron beam induced deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of our study about the deposition rate of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) as a function of the substrate temperature with the substrate being an electron-transparent amorphous carbon membrane. When W(CO)6 is used as a precursor it is observed that the growt......, the majority desorbs from the surface rather than dissociates to contribute to the deposit. It is important to take this into account during FEBIP experiments, for instance when determining fundamental process parameters such as the activation energy for desorption....... experiments compared to literature values is consistent with earlier findings by other authors. The discrepancy is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption, which is known to occur during electron irradiation. The data suggest that, of the W(CO)6 molecules that are affected by the electron irradiation...

  13. Field effect transistors and photodetectors based on nanocrystalline graphene derived from electron beam induced carbonaceous patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurra, Narendra; Bhadram, Venkata Srinu; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Kulkarni, G U

    2012-01-01

    We describe a transfer-free method for the fabrication of nanocrystalline graphene (nc-graphene) on SiO 2 substrates directly from patterned carbonaceous deposits. The deposits were produced from the residual hydrocarbons present in the vacuum chamber without any external source by using an electron beam induced carbonaceous deposition (EBICD) process. Thermal treatment under vacuum conditions in the presence of Ni catalyst transformed the EBIC deposit into nc-graphene patterns, confirmed using Raman and TEM analysis. The nc-graphene patterns have been employed as an active p-type channel material in a field effect transistor (FET) which showed a hole mobility of ∼90 cm 2 V −1 s −1 . The nc-graphene also proved to be suitable material for IR detection. (paper)

  14. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  15. Effects of focused ion beam induced damage on the plasticity of micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Awady, Jaafar A.; Woodward, Christopher; Dimiduk, Dennis M.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2009-01-01

    The hardening effects of focused ion beam (FIB) induced damage produced during the fabrication of micropillars are examined by introducing a surface layer of nanosized obstacles into a dislocation dynamics simulation. The influence of the depth and strength of the obstacles as a function of pillar diameter is assessed parametrically. We show that for a selected set of sample sizes between 0.5 and 1.0 μm, the flow strength can increase by 10-20 %, for an obstacle strength of 750 MPa, and damage depth of 100 nm. On the other hand, for sizes larger and smaller than this range, the effect of damage is negligible. Results show that the obstacles formed during the FIB milling may be expected to alter the microstructure of micropillars, however, they have a negligible effect on the observed size-strength scaling laws.

  16. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly......Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer...... and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti-γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region...

  17. Effects on cuytoskeleton system in pollen tube of pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunce; Liang Qiuxia; Li Guopin

    2008-01-01

    The damage of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen and the pollen tube of Pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation were researched. The results showed that the disorganization of the micro-tubules in the pollen tube was produced by N + implantation. The abnormal states of the pollen tube in morphology were very correlative with the abnormality of the cytoskeleton system. N + implantation was responsible for morphological abnormalities in the pollen tubes. There was a distinct correlation between the damage effects and the ion implantation dose. The add of dose caused more obvious damage effects. Furthermore, the state of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen tube was influenced by the ion implantation. The impact grade depended also on the ion implantation dose. (authors)

  18. Radiation-Induced Graft Polymerization: Gamma Radiation and Electron Beam Technology for Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Cabalar, Patrick Jay; Lopez, Girlie Eunice; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of functional hybrid materials by attaching polymer chains with advantageous tailored properties to the surface of a base polymer with desirable bulk character is an attractive application of graft copolymerization. Radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) has been a popular approach for surface modification of polymers because of its merits over conventional chemical processes. RIGP, which proceeds primarily via free radical polymerization process, has the advantages such as simplicity, low cost, control over process and adjustment of the materials composition and structure. RIGP can be performed using either electron beam or gamma radiation and it can be applied to both synthetic and natural polymers. These merits make RIGP a popular research topic worldwide. Moreover, the materials synthesized and produced via RIGP has found applications, and were proposed to produce continuous impact, in the fields of medicine, agriculture, pollution remediation, rare earth and valuable metals recovery, fuel cell membrane synthesis and catalysis to name a few. From 2012 our group has performed electron beam and gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of various monomers onto polymers of natural and synthetic origins (e.g. monomers - glycidyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylonitrile, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate; base polymers – polyethylene/polypropylene nonwoven fabric, polypropylene nonwoven fabric pineapple fibers, cellulose nonwoven fabric microcrystalline cellulose). We tested these grafted materials for heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu) and organic molecule removal from aqueous solutions and E. coli activity (using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer RAFT mediated grafting). The results clearly showed the success of materials modified via FIGP in these applications. Currently, we are studying the applications of grafted materials on treatment of waste waters from tanning industry, value addition to abaca nonwoven fabrics cell sheet

  19. Analysis of Pressure Pulsation Induced by Rotor-Stator Interaction in Nuclear Reactor Coolant Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal flow of reactor coolant pump (RCP is much more complex than the flow of a general mixed-flow pump due to high temperature, high pressure, and large flow rate. The pressure pulsation that is induced by rotor-stator interaction (RSI has significant effects on the performance of pump; therefore, it is necessary to figure out the distribution and propagation characteristics of pressure pulsation in the pump. The study uses CFD method to calculate the behavior of the flow. Results show that the amplitudes of pressure pulsation get the maximum between the rotor and stator, and the dissipation rate of pressure pulsation in impellers passage is larger than that in guide vanes passage. The behavior is associated with the frequency of pressure wave in different regions. The flow rate distribution is influenced by the operating conditions. The study finds that, at nominal flow, the flow rate distribution in guide vanes is relatively uniform and the pressure pulsation amplitude is the smallest. Besides, the vortex shedding or backflow from the impeller blade exit has the same frequency as pressure pulsation but there are phase differences, and it has been confirmed that the absolute value of phase differences reflects the vorticity intensity.

  20. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional...

  1. Positron annihilation and pressure-induced electronic s-d transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, A.K.; Skriver, H.L.

    1985-06-01

    The polycrystalline, partial annihilation rates for positrons in compressed cesium have been calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method. These results suggest that the pressure-induced electronic s-d transition in Cs should be directly observable by momentum sensitive positron annihilation experiments

  2. Vitamin D attenuates pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Yan, Xiao; Zhang, Yun-Long; Bai, Jie; Hidru, Tesfaldet Habtemariam; Wang, Qing-Shan; Li, Hui-Hua

    2018-04-01

    Vitamin D (VD) and its analogues play critical roles in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that VD exerts a protective role in cardiovascular diseases. However, the beneficial effect of VD on pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction and its underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. In this study, cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophic remodeling in mice were induced by pressure overload. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography, and myocardial histology was detected by H&E and Masson's trichrome staining. Cardiomyocyte size was detected by wheat germ agglutinin staining. The protein levels of signaling mediators were examined by western blotting while mRNA expression of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers was examined by qPCR analysis. Oxidative stress was detected by dihydroethidine staining. Our results showed that administration of VD3 significantly ameliorates pressure overload-induced contractile dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and inflammation in mice. In addition, VD3 treatment also markedly inhibited cardiac oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, protein levels of calcineurin A, ERK1/2, AKT, TGF-β, GRP78, cATF6, and CHOP were significantly reduced whereas SERCA2 level was upregulated in the VD3-treated hearts compared with control. These results suggest that VD3 attenuates cardiac remodeling and dysfunction induced by pressure overload, and this protective effect is associated with inhibition of multiple signaling pathways. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of pressure on photo-induced expansion of As0.2Se0.8 layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnovych, S.; Kokenyesi, S.; Erdelyi, G.; Csik, A.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Amorphous chalcogenide glasses are well known as materials where different kinds of structure-related transformations, like amorphysation-crystallization, volume and chemical stability changes take place under certain external influences (heat-, light-, and electric field). In spite of a rather long history of investigations and even some important applications in memory devices the mechanism of these effects is not completely clear, since besides the necessary condition of light interaction with glass and charge generation of the mass transport, shift or diffusion of atoms must occur. Unfortunately, we have only very little information about the light induced atomic transport processes in amorphous chalcogenides. Recent investigations on light-induced expansion, and holographic recording in chalcogenide glasses show that As 0.2 Se 0.8 composition reveals giant photo-expansion and photoplasticity effects. We selected this material for more detailed investigations of the direct relief formation process. In this work we investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on photo-stimulated surface relief formation in As 0.2 Se 0.8 thin films. 1 μm tick layers were evaporated from bulk glassy materials. Silica glass plates were used as substrate for films. The thickness of the layers were measured with profilometer type Ambios XP-I. The samples were illuminated with red laser beam (633 nm, output power P=7.5mW) through a copper grid, which resulted to an imprint picture on the surface of the film with interference fringes at the edges. In this way surface relief with different heights were formed after the given exposure according to the distribution of light intensity. The measurements were carried out at room temperature in a large-volume (1 cm 3 ) optical cell having sapphire windows. The hydrostatic pressure was generated by means of a 3-stage gas compressor. We used profilometer as well as scanning electron- and atomic force

  4. The mouse beam walking assay offers improved sensitivity over the mouse rotarod in determining motor coordination deficits induced by benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Joanna L; Lincoln, Rachael J; Brown, Terry A; McDonald, Louise M; Dawson, Gerard R; Reynolds, David S

    2005-05-01

    The mouse rotarod test of motor coordination/sedation is commonly used to predict clinical sedation caused by novel drugs. However, past experience suggests that it lacks the desired degree of sensitivity to be predictive of effects in humans. For example, the benzodiazepine, bretazenil, showed little impairment of mouse rotarod performance, but marked sedation in humans. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the mouse beam walking assay demonstrates: (i) an increased sensitivity over the rotarod and (ii) an increased ability to predict clinically sedative doses of benzodiazepines. The study compared the effects of the full benzodiazepine agonists, diazepam and lorazepam, and the partial agonist, bretazenil, on the mouse rotarod and beam walking assays. Diazepam and lorazepam significantly impaired rotarod performance, although relatively high GABA-A receptor occupancy was required (72% and 93%, respectively), whereas beam walking performance was significantly affected at approximately 30% receptor occupancy. Bretazenil produced significant deficits at 90% and 53% receptor occupancy on the rotarod and beam walking assays, respectively. The results suggest that the mouse beam walking assay is a more sensitive tool for determining benzodiazepine-induced motor coordination deficits than the rotarod. Furthermore, the GABA-A receptor occupancy values at which significant deficits were determined in the beam walking assay are comparable with those observed in clinical positron emission tomography studies using sedative doses of benzodiazepines. These data suggest that the beam walking assay may be able to more accurately predict the clinically sedative doses of novel benzodiazepine-like drugs.

  5. Germination and Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Spores Induced by Moderate Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Skapska, Sylwia; Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Niezgoda, Jolanta; Porebska, Izabela; Dekowska, Agnieszka; Rzoska, Sylwester J

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of spoilage caused by Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris for the fruit juice industry, the objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores induced by moderate hydrostatic pressure. Hydrostatic pressure treatment can induce the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores. At low pH, spore germination of up to 3.59-3.75 log and inactivation of 1.85-2.04 log was observed in a low pressure window (200-300 MPa) applied at 50 degrees C for 20 min. Neutral pH suppressed inactivation, the number of spores inactivated at pH 7.0 was only 0.24-1.06 log. The pressurization temperature significantly affected spore germination and inactivation. The degree of germination in apple juice after pressurization for 30 min with 200 MPa at 20 degrees C was 2.04 log, with only 0.61 log of spores being inactivated, while at 70 degrees C spore germination was 5.94 log and inactivation 4.72 log. This temperature strongly stimulated germination and inactivation under higher (500 MPa) than lower (200 MPa) pressure. When the oscillatory mode was used, the degree of germination and inactivation was slightly higher than at continuous mode. The degree of germination and inactivation was inversely proportional to the soluble solids content and was lowest in concentrated apple juice.

  6. Antigenotoxic potential of Asparagus racemosus root extract against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandary, B. Satheesh Kumar; Sharmila, K.P.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Bhat, Vadish S.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of Asparagus Racemosus Root ethanolic extract (ARE) against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation in Swiss albino mice. Micronucleus assay was performed in the bone marrow of Swiss albino mice according to the method of Hosseinimehr et al., 2003. The experimental animals were orally administered 200 mg/kg body weight of ARE once daily for 15 consecutive days. At the end of experimental period, the animals were euthanized and the bone marrow was collected from the femur. Control (C), Radiation control (RC) and drug control (DC) group was also maintained. The number of radiation induced Micronucleated Polychromatic Erythrocytes (MnPCE) and Micronucleated Normochromatic Erythrocytes were decreased in the ARE treated mice which was statistically significant (p<0.05) compared to radiation control group. Present findings demonstrate the antigenotoxic potential of ARE against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation which may be attributed to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals

  7. Shock-wave induced mechanoluminescence: A new technique for studying effects of shock pressure on crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, B.P.; Parganiha, S.; Sonwane, V.D. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010, Chhattisgarh (India); Chandra, V.K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Shivaji Nagar, Kolihapuri, Durg 491001, Chhattisgarh (India); Jha, Piyush, E-mail: piyushjha22@rediffmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Raipur Institute of Technology, Chhatauna, Mandir Hasuad, Raipur 492101, Chhattisgarh (India); Baghel, R.N. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010, Chhattisgarh (India)

    2016-10-15

    The impact of a projectile propelled to velocities in the range of 0.5–2.5 km/s on to a target (X-cut quartz crystal) produces shock waves travelling at velocity of nearly 10 km/s in target, in which intense mechanoluminescence (ML) pulses of microsecond duration are produced, both in compression and post-compression conditions. The piezoelectric field produced due to surface charges of fractured target, causes band bending and subsequently, the free charge carriers are generated in the respective bands and the emission of ML occurs. The ML appears after a delay time t{sub th} whose value decreases with increasing value of the shock pressure. Initially, the ML intensity increases with the shock pressure because of the creation of more surfaces; however, for higher values of the shock pressure, the ML intensity tends to attain a saturation value because of the hardening of the crystals due to the creation of small crystallites in which the creation of new surfaces becomes difficult. The ratio between peak ML intensity in the uncompressed region and the maximum ML intensity in the compressed region decreases with increasing shock pressure because more defects produced at high pressure generate higher barrier for the relaxation of blocked cracks under compression. The expressions derived for characteristics of shock-induced ML are able to explain satisfactorily the experimental results. Shock-wave velocity, shock pressure, transit time, lifetime of electrons in conduction band, etc. can be determined by the shock-induced ML.As such, the shock-induced ML provides a new optical technique for the studies of materials under shock pressure.

  8. Effect of Topical Calcium Channel Blockers on Intraocular Pressure in Steroid-induced Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganekal, Sunil; Dorairaj, Syril; Jhanji, Vishal; Kudlu, Krishnaprasad

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 0.125% verapamil and 0.5% diltiazem eye drops on intraocular pressure (IOP) in steroid-induced glaucoma in rabbit eyes. A total of 18 rabbits with steroid-induced glaucoma were divided into three groups (A, B and C; n = 6 each). Right eyes in groups A, B and C received 0.5% diltiazem, 0.125% verapamil and 0.5% timolol eye drops twice daily for 12 days, respectively; whereas, left eyes received distilled water. IOP was measured with Tono-pen XL at baseline, day 4, day 8, and day 12 of treatment. Both 0.5% diltiazem and 0.125% verapamil eye drops significantly reduced IOP compared to control eyes (p cite this article: Ganekal S, Dorairaj S, Jhanji V, Kudlu K. Effect of Topical Calcium Channel Blockers on Intraocular Pressure in Steroid-induced Glaucoma. J Current Glau Prac 2014;8(1):15-19.

  9. Pressure-Induced Polymerization of Acetylene: Structure-Directed Stereoselectivity and a Possible Route to Graphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangman; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Yajie; Li, Kuo; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Lijuan; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Molaison, Jamie J; Lin, Xiaohuan; Meng, Yufei; Jin, Changqing; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2017-06-01

    Geometric isomerism in polyacetylene is a basic concept in chemistry textbooks. Polymerization to cis-isomer is kinetically preferred at low temperature, not only in the classic catalytic reaction in solution but also, unexpectedly, in the crystalline phase when it is driven by external pressure without a catalyst. Until now, no perfect reaction route has been proposed for this pressure-induced polymerization. Using in situ neutron diffraction and meta-dynamic simulation, we discovered that under high pressure, acetylene molecules react along a specific crystallographic direction that is perpendicular to those previously proposed. Following this route produces a pure cis-isomer and more surprisingly, predicts that graphane is the final product. Experimentally, polycyclic polymers with a layered structure were identified in the recovered product by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron pair distribution functions, which indicates the possibility of synthesizing graphane under high pressure. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Modelling the pressurization induced by solar radiation on above ground installations of LPG pipeline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporini, M.; Terenzi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giacchetta, G.; Polonara, F.; Corvaro, F.; Cocci Grifoni, R.

    2017-11-01

    Pipelining Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) is a mode of LPG transportation more environmentally-friendly than others due to the lower energy consumption and exhaust emissions. Worldwide, there are over 20000 kilometers of LPG pipelines. There are a number of codes