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Sample records for beam induced luminescence

  1. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it; Salomon, J. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, CNRS UMR 171, rue des Pyramides, 75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.C. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, CNRS UMR 171, rue des Pyramides, 75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Tonezzer, M. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Della Mea, G. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields.

  2. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Salomon, J.; Dran, J. C.; Tonezzer, M.; Della Mea, G.

    2007-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields.

  4. Ion beam induced luminescence of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R

    2001-01-01

    luminescence dead zone at the domain walls. Neodymium-yttrium-aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) was examined and the spectra measured as a function of temperature to show the evolution of intensity of the narrow line emission from the Nd rare earth. Shifts and changes in the intrinsic UV band in the YAG material were also apparent. Thin films of alumina grown on silica on a silicon substrate, along with some that contained copper nanoclusters were also examined. TRIM software was used to model the rate of excitation within the different layers of the material for the various implant energies and to identify the source of the luminescence profile observed in each case. Evidence of thin film interference fringes was apparent in the spectra by fringe patterns modulated onto the luminescence signal as a function of wavelength and film thickness. Analysis of an alkali feldspar material using IBL, and combined with work done using RL and CL experiments, showed a shift towards lower wavelengths of the main red/IR band with ...

  5. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H+ beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO

  7. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J. C.; Salomon, J.; Tonezzer, M.; Scian, C.; Beck, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Della Mea, G.

    2008-05-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H+ beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO.

  8. Ion beam induced luminescence of germano-silicate optical fiber preform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an optical fiber is exposed to radiation, the attenuation (RIA, Radiation Induced Attenuation) in the optical fiber (OF) is increased because of the color centers which deteriorate the transmission property and generate the absorption loss. In order to understand the radiation induced defect, Ion Beam induced luminescence (IBIL) was introduced to investigate it. IBIL technique is to analyze IR/VIS/UV luminescence related to ion beam interaction with outer shell electrons involved in chemical bonds and structure defects of target atoms. So IBIL is sensitive to its chemical composition and has been used in analysis of material characterization, geological samples and cultural heritage objects. In silica material, four O atoms are surrounding one Si atom in tetrahedral coordination. In this study, the influence of Copper (Cu) and Cerium (Ce) dopants to germano silica core optical fibers were investigated under proton irradiation at RBI using Ion Beam induced luminescence (IBIL) method. To understand the radiation induced defect of optical fibers, IBIL were tested to a germano-silica core fiber under 2 MeV proton irradiation. Although a Cu or Ce dopant was not detected by IBIL technique, the relation between the amount of radiation and luminescence can be established. This experiment showed a potential technique of studying the effects and behavior of additive elements for silica core fiber. To increase the radiation resistance of optical fibers, further investigations are needed, i. e. the proper additives and its contents and an interaction mechanism between Ge-related defects and additives

  9. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of defect evolution in lithium fluoride under proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Valotto, G.; Piccinini, M.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) spectra of pure LiF under irradiation by a 2 MeV proton beam were analyzed as a function of the dose in order to deepen the kinetic mechanisms underlying the formation of luminescent point defects. The intensity evolution with dose at several emission wavelengths has been studied within a wide spectral interval, from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR), and their different change rates have been correlated to the electronic defect formation processes. The intensity at few selected wavelengths was analyzed with a multiple linear regression (MLR) method in order to demonstrate that a linear calibration curve can be obtained and that an on-line optical dose monitor for ion beams can be realized.

  10. Analysis of art objects by means of ion beam induced luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J. C.; Salomon, J.; Pivin, J. C.; Vomiero, A.; Tonezzer, M.; Maggioni, G.; Carturan, S.; Della Mea, G.

    2006-05-01

    The impact of energetic ions on solid samples gives rise to the emission of visible light owing to the electronic excitation of intrinsic defects or extrinsic impurities. The intensity and position of the emission features provide information on the nature of the luminescence centers and on their chemical environments. This makes ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) a useful complement to other ion beam analyses, like PIXE, in the cultural heritage field in characterizing the composition and the provenience of art objects. In the present paper, IBIL measurements have been performed on inorganic pigments for underlying the complementary role played by IBIL in the analysis of artistic works. Some blue and red pigment has been presented as case study.

  11. Analysis of art objects by means of ion beam induced luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of energetic ions on solid samples gives rise to the emission of visible light owing to the electronic excitation of intrinsic defects or extrinsic impurities. The intensity and position of the emission features provide information on the nature of the luminescence centers and on their chemical environments. This makes ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) a useful complement to other ion beam analyses, like PIXE, in the cultural heritage field in characterizing the composition and the provenience of art objects. In the present paper, IBIL measurements have been performed on inorganic pigments for underlying the complementary role played by IBIL in the analysis of artistic works. Some blue and red pigment has been presented as case study

  12. Proton beam induced luminescence of silicon dioxide implanted with silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light emission from a silicon dioxide layer enriched with silicon has been studied. Samples used had structures made on thermally oxidized silicon substrate wafers. Excess silicon atoms were introduced into a 250-nm-thick silicon dioxide layer via implantation of 60 keV Si+ ions up to a fluence of 2 x 1017 cm-2. A 15-nm-thick Au layer was used as a top semitransparent electrode. Continuous blue light emission was observed under DC polarization of the structure at 8-12 MV/cm. The blue light emission from the structures was also observed in an ionoluminescence experiment, in which the light emission was caused by irradiation with a H2+ ion beam of energy between 22 and 100 keV. In the case of H2+, on entering the material the ions dissociated into two protons, each carrying on average half of the incident ion energy. The spectra of the emitted light and the dependence of ionoluminescence on proton energy were analyzed and the results were correlated with the concentration profile of implanted silicon atoms.

  13. Proton beam induced luminescence of silicon dioxide implanted with silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawlik, Grzegorz [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland)], E-mail: grzegorz.gawlik@itme.edu.pl; Jagielski, Jacek [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock/Swierk (Poland); Stonert, Anna; Ratajczak, Renata [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock/Swierk (Poland)

    2009-08-15

    Light emission from a silicon dioxide layer enriched with silicon has been studied. Samples used had structures made on thermally oxidized silicon substrate wafers. Excess silicon atoms were introduced into a 250-nm-thick silicon dioxide layer via implantation of 60 keV Si{sup +} ions up to a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. A 15-nm-thick Au layer was used as a top semitransparent electrode. Continuous blue light emission was observed under DC polarization of the structure at 8-12 MV/cm. The blue light emission from the structures was also observed in an ionoluminescence experiment, in which the light emission was caused by irradiation with a H{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam of energy between 22 and 100 keV. In the case of H{sub 2}{sup +}, on entering the material the ions dissociated into two protons, each carrying on average half of the incident ion energy. The spectra of the emitted light and the dependence of ionoluminescence on proton energy were analyzed and the results were correlated with the concentration profile of implanted silicon atoms.

  14. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  15. Fast reconstruction of a bounded ultrasonic beam using acoustically induced piezo-luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersemans, Mathias, E-mail: Mathias.Kersemans@UGent.be; Lammens, Nicolas; Degrieck, Joris; Van Paepegem, Wim [Mechanics of Materials and Structures MMS, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Smet, Philippe F. [LumiLab, Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2015-12-07

    We report on the conversion of ultrasound into light by the process of piezo-luminescence in epoxy with embedded BaSi{sub 2}O{sub 2}N{sub 2}:Eu as active component. We exploit this acoustically induced piezo-luminescence to visualize several cross-sectional slices of the radiation field of an ultrasonic piston transducer (f = 3.3 MHz) in both the near-field and the far-field. Simply combining multiple slices then leads to a fast representation of the 3D spatial radiation field. We have confronted the luminescent results with both scanning hydrophone experiments and digital acoustic holography results, and obtained a good correlation between the different approaches.

  16. Preliminary results on time-resolved ion beam induced luminescence applied to the provenance study of lapis lazuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czelusniak, C.; Palla, L.; Massi, M.; Carraresi, L.; Giuntini, L.; Re, A.; Lo Giudice, A.; Pratesi, G.; Mazzinghi, A.; Ruberto, C.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Liccioli, L.; Gueli, A.; Mandò, P. A.; Taccetti, F.

    2016-03-01

    This work will present preliminary results concerning the use of time-resolved ion beam induced luminescence applied to provenance studies of lapis lazuli. Measurements were performed at the pulsed beam facility at LABEC laboratory in Florence. Lapis lazuli is a semi-precious gemstone, used as ornament since the early civilizations that can be found in few places on Earth. The importance of this work lies in understanding the origin of various samples of lapis lazuli, from which it may be possible to gain insight into trade routes from ancient times. The samples studied in this work originated from Chile, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Myanmar, and Siberia. The stones were irradiated with 3 MeV protons and the resulting luminescence was detected by a photomultiplier tube, whose output was acquired using a sampling digitizer VME module (CAEN/V1720). Wavelength discrimination was performed at 430 nm utilizing a range of beam currents. The results showed that, by changing the beam current intensity, one can study different features of lapis lazuli, and this may aid in distinguishing lapis lazuli from different provenances.

  17. In situ ion-beam-induced luminescence analysis for evaluating a micrometer-scale radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Shunsuke; Kada, Wataru; Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Matsubara, Yoshinori; Sakai, Makoto; Miura, Kenta; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Yamada, Naoto; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Hanaizumi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    Micrometer-scale responses of radio-photoluminescence (RPL) glass dosimeters to focused ionized particle radiation were evaluated by combining ion-beam-induced luminescence (IBIL) and proton beam writing (PBW) using a 3 MeV focused proton microbeam. RPL phosphate glass dosimeters doped with ionic Ag or Cu activators at concentrations of 0.2 and 0.1% were fabricated, and their scintillation intensities were evaluated by IBIL spectroscopy under a PBW micropatterning condition. Compared with the Ag-doped dosimeter, the Cu-doped dosimeter was more tolerant of the radiation, while the peak intensity of its luminescence was lower, under the precise dose control of the proton microprobe. Proton-irradiated areas were successfully recorded using these dosimeters and their RPL centers were visualized under 375 nm ultraviolet light. The reproduction of the irradiated region by post-RPL imaging suggests that precise estimation of irradiation dose using microdosimeters can be accomplished by optimizing RPL glass dosimeters for various proton microprobe applications in organic material analysis and in micrometer-scale material modifications.

  18. Ion beam-induced luminescence as method of characterization of radiation damage in polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, Iwona; Jagielski, Jacek; Gawlik, Grzegorz; Panczer, Gerard; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Ratajczak, Renata; Jozwik, Przemyslaw; Wajler, Anna; Sidorowicz, Agata; Thomé, Lionel

    2015-12-01

    The problem of information about damage build-up, intensively studied for single crystals, poses many difficulties for polycrystalline materials. The Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) technique could be applied for single crystals only, but its use is excluded in polycrystalline materials. Therefore the development of a quantitative method well suited for the evaluation of damage level in polycrystalline materials is a must, and still constitutes a major challenge in materials analysis. A comparative study of damage accumulation in magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) has been conducted using ionoluminescence (IL) and RBS/C techniques. The results obtained by both methods, demonstrate a two-step character of damage build-up process. The values of the cross-section on the damage creation in each case were estimated using MSDA model. The results presented here confirm the huge potential of the luminescence techniques for damage analysis in single- and polycrystalline samples, and ability of the IL method to perform fast, in situ analysis of damage accumulation process.

  19. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  20. Electron beam induced green luminescence and degradation study of CaS:Ce nanocrystalline phosphors for FED applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green luminescence and degradation of Ce3+ doped CaS nanocrystalline phosphors were studied with a 2 keV, 10 μA electron beam in an O2 environment. The nanophosphors were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Cubic CaS with an average particle size of 42 ± 2 nm was obtained. PL emission was observed at 507 nm and a shoulder at 560 nm with an excitation wavelength of 460 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy and Cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to monitor the changes in the surface composition of the CaS:Ce3+ nanocrystalline phosphors during electron bombardment in an O2 environment. The effect of different oxygen pressures ranging from 1 x 10-8 to 1 x 10-6 Torr on the CL intensity was also investigated. A CaSO4 layer was observed on the surface after the electron beam degradation. The CL intensity was found to decrease up to 30% of its original intensity at 1 x 10-6 Torr oxygen pressure after an electron dose of 50 C/cm2. The formation of oxygen defects during electron bombardment may also be responsible for the decrease in CL intensity.

  1. SPORT: A new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study swift heavy ion-beam induced luminescence - Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Gardés, E; Ban-d'Etat, B; Cassimi, A; Durantel, F; Grygiel, C; Madi, T; Monnet, I; Ramillon, J -M; Ropars, F; Lebius, H

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study the dynamics of UV-visible luminescence under high stopping power heavy ion irradiation. We applied our instrument, called SPORT, on a fast plastic scintillator (BC-400) irradiated with 27-MeV Ar ions having high mean electronic stopping power of 2.6 MeV/\\mu m. As a consequence of increasing permanent radiation damages with increasing ion fluence, our investigations reveal a degradation of scintillation intensity together with, thanks to the time-resolved measurement, a decrease in the decay constant of the scintillator. This combination indicates that luminescence degradation processes by both dynamic and static quenching, the latter mechanism being predominant. Under such high density excitation, the scintillation deterioration of BC-400 is significantly enhanced compared to that observed in previous investigations, mainly performed using light ions. The observed non-linear behaviour implies that the dose at which luminescence starts deteri...

  2. Fabrication of luminescent nanostructures by electron-beam direct writing of PMMA resist

    OpenAIRE

    Angulo Barrios, Carlos; Carrasco, S; Canalejas Tejero, Victor; López-Romero Moraleda, David; Navarro Villoslada, Fernando; Moreno-Bondi, M.C.; García Fierro, José Luis; Capel Sánchez, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the conversion of non-luminescent conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA)-based electron-beam resists into luminescent materials when used as negative-tone resists, that is, when exposed to high electron irradiation doses. Raman spectroscopy reveals the chemical transformation induced by electron irradiation which is responsible for the observed luminescence in the visible (blue) region. The emission intensity from exposed PMMA-based patterns can be controlled by the electro...

  3. Photo-induced luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Catalá Icardo, Mónica; Martínez Calatayud, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper is a critical review dealing with the characteristics, reaction mechanisms and photoproducts, instrumentation and analytical applications of the photo-induced either chemiluminescence or fluorescence. Special attention is paid to the determination of pesticides by continuous-flow methodologies. The paper is divided into several sections covering the most relevant published papers.

  4. Towards the differentiation of non-treated and treated corundum minerals by ion-beam-induced luminescence and other complementary techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo del Castillo, H; Deprez, N; Dupuis, T; Mathis, F; Deneckere, A; Vandenabeele, P; Calderón, T; Strivay, D

    2009-06-01

    Differentiation of treated and non-treated gemstones is a chief concern for major jewellery import companies. Low-quality corundum specimens coming from Asia appear to be often treated with heat, BeO or flux in order to enhance their properties as precious minerals. A set of corundum samples, rubies and sapphires from different origins, both treated and non-treated has been analysed at the Centre Européen d'Archéométrie, with ion-beam-induced luminescence (IBIL) and other complementary techniques such as Raman, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE). IBIL, also known as ionoluminescence, has been used before to detect impurities or defects inside synthetic materials and natural minerals; its use for the discrimination of gemstone simulants or synthetic analogues has been elsewhere discussed (Cavenago-Bignami Moneta, Gemología, Tomo I Piedras preciosas, perlas, corales, marfil. Ediciones Omega, Barcelona, 1991). PIXE has been frequently applied in the archaeometric field for material characterisation and provenance studies of minerals (Hughes, Ruby & sapphire. RWH Publishing, Fallbrook, 1997; Calvo del Castillo et al., Anal Bioanal Chem 387:869-878, 2007; Calligaro et al., NIM-B 189:320-327, 2002) and PIGE complements the elemental analysis by detecting light elements in these materials such as-and lighter than-sodium that cannot be identified with the PIXE technique (Sanchez et al., NIM-B 130:682-686, 1997; Emmett et al., Gems Gemology 39:84-135, 2003). The micro-Raman technique has also been used complementarily to ion beam analysis techniques for mineral characterisation (Novak et al., Appl Surf Sci 231-232:917-920, 2004). The aim of this study is to provide new means for systematic analysis of corundum gemstone-quality mineral, alternative to the traditional gemmologic methods; for this purpose, a Spanish jewellery import company supplied us with a number of natural corundum samples coming from different places

  5. In situ variations of carrier decay and proton induced luminescence characteristics in polycrystalline CdS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaubas, E., E-mail: eugenijus.gaubas@ff.vu.lt; Ceponis, T.; Jasiunas, A.; Kalesinskas, V.; Meskauskaite, D.; Pavlov, J.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tekorius, A. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Vilnius LT-10222 (Lithuania); Brytavskyi, I. [Odessa I.I.Mechnikov National University, Odessa 65082 (Ukraine); Kovalevskij, V.; Remeikis, V. [Centre for Physical Sciences and Technology, Vilnius LT-02300 (Lithuania)

    2014-06-28

    Evolution of the microwave-probed photoconductivity transients and of the proton induced luminescence has simultaneously been examined in polycrystalline CdS layers evaporated in vacuum during exposure to a 1.6 MeV proton beam. The decrease of the intensity of luminescence peaked at 510 and 709 nm wavelengths and of values of the effective carrier lifetime has been correlated in dependence of proton irradiation fluence. The defect introduction rate has been evaluated by the comparative analysis of the laser and proton beam induced luminescence. The difference of a carrier pair generation mechanism inherent for light and for a proton beam has been revealed.

  6. Luminescence characterization and electron beam induced chemical changes on the surface of ZnAl2O4:Mn nanocrystalline phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence characteristics and surface chemical changes of nanocrystalline Mn2+ doped ZnAl2O4 powder phosphors are presented. Stable green cathodoluminescence (CL) or photoluminescence (PL) with a maximum at ∼512 nm was observed when the powders were irradiated with a beam of high energy electrons or a monochromatic xenon lamp at room temperature. This green emission can be attributed to the 4T1 → 6A1 transitions of the Mn2+ ion. Deconvoluted CL spectra resulted in two additional emission peaks at 539 and 573 nm that may be attributed to vibronic sideband and Mn4+ emission, respectively. The luminescence decay of the Mn2+ 512 nm emission under 457 nm excitation is single exponential with a lifetime of 5.20 ± 0.11 ms. Chemical changes on the surface of the ZnAl2O4:Mn2+ phosphor during prolonged electron beam exposure were monitored using Auger electron spectroscopy. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the chemical composition of the possible compounds formed on the surface as a result of the prolonged electron beam exposure. The XPS data suggest that the thermodynamically stable Al2O3 layer was formed on the surface and is possibly contributing to the CL stability of ZnAl2O4:Mn phosphor.

  7. Ion beam characterization of advanced luminescent materials for application in radiation effects microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branson, J.V., E-mail: jvbrans@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1056, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1056 (United States); Hattar, K. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1056, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1056 (United States); Rossi, P. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1056, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1056 (United States); Department of Physics of the University of Padua and INFN, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padua (Italy); Vizkelethy, G.; Powell, C.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1056, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1056 (United States); Hernandez-Sanchez, B. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1349, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1349 (United States); Doyle, B.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1056, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1056 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The ion photon emission microscope (IPEM) is a technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to study radiation effects in integrated circuits with high energy, heavy ions, such as those produced by the 88' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In this method, an ion-luminescent film is used to produce photons from the point of ion impact. The photons emitted due to an ion impact are imaged on a position-sensitive detector to determine the location of a single event effect (SEE). Due to stringent resolution, intensity, wavelength, decay time, and radiation tolerance demands, an engineered material with very specific properties is required to act as the luminescent film. The requirements for this material are extensive. It must produce a high enough induced luminescent intensity so at least one photon is detected per ion hit. The emission wavelength must match the sensitivity of the detector used, and the luminescent decay time must be short enough to limit accidental coincidences. In addition, the material must be easy to handle and its luminescent properties must be tolerant to radiation damage. Materials studied for this application include plastic scintillators, GaN and GaN/InGaN quantum well structures, and lanthanide-activated ceramic phosphors. Results from characterization studies on these materials will be presented; including photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, ion beam induced luminescence, luminescent decay times, and radiation damage. Results indicate that the ceramic phosphors are currently proving to be the ideal material for IPEM investigations.

  8. Proton induced luminescence of minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo del Castillo, H.; Millan, A.; Calderon, T. [Depto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra. Colmenar, km. 15, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Beneitez, P. [Departamento Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ruvalcaba S, J.L. [lFUNAM, Circuito de la lnvestigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of Ionoluminescence (IL) for several minerals commonly found in jewellery pieces and/or artefacts of historical interest. Samples including silicates and non-silicates (native elements, halide, oxide, carbonate and phosphate groups) have been excited with a 1.8 MeV proton beam, and IL spectra in the range of 200- 900 nm have been collected for each one using a fiber optic coupled spectrometer. Light emissions have been related to Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Pr{sup 3+} ions, as well as intrinsic defects in these minerals. Results show the potential of IL for impurity characterization with high detection limits, local symmetry studies, and the study of the origin of minerals. (Author)

  9. Mechanically Induced Multicolor Change of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhijian; Teng, Mingjun; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2015-06-22

    Mechanofluorochromic or piezochromic fluorescence chemistry involves the switching and tuning of the luminescent properties of solid-state materials induced by exogenous forces, such as grinding, shearing, compression, tension, and so forth. Up until now, most reported mechanochromic systems, including liquid crystals, organic molecules, organometallic compounds, polymers, and dye-doped polymers, have displayed reversible two-color changes, which arise from either supramolecular or chemical structure transformations. However, fluorescent materials that undergo mechanically induced multicolor changes remain rare; this Minireview is focused on such materials. Topics are categorized according to the different applied forces that are required to induce the multicolor change, including mechanical control of either the supramolecular structures or the chemical structures, and mechanical control of both the supramolecular structures and chemical structures. PMID:25965783

  10. Mechanically induced luminescence changes in molecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Kato, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    Altering the shape and properties of a material through external factors such as heat, light, pressure, pH, electric or magnetic fields, or the introduction of a guest molecule, is an attractive prospect. In this Perspective, piezochromic luminescent materials - which change the colour of their luminescence in response to mechanical stimuli - are described. Such piezochromism has been observed for a few molecular materials that contain luminescent cores in liquid-crystalline and crystalline solid states, as well as for polymeric materials doped with dyes. These changes in photoluminescent colour can be activated by various types of mechanical pressure such as shearing, grinding or elongation, which can trigger different mechanisms of producing the colour. Such stimuli-responsive materials have potential for various applications, including sensors, memory and displays. PMID:21378953

  11. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  12. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy

  13. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  14. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping, E-mail: zhusp2009@gmail.com; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  15. Aggregation-induced emission molecules in layered matrices for two-color luminescence films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Jun; Zhou, Wenjuan; Lu, Chao

    2014-10-14

    We fabricated two-color luminescence ultrathin films (UTFs) composed of the layered double hydroxide host-aggregation-induced emission guests by LBL assembly. The fabricated UTFs were simple, tunable, controllable and highly luminescent. Moreover, reversible thermochromic luminescence further exhibited their potential in practical applications. PMID:25154856

  16. Beta-induced luminescence of some crystalline inorganic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beta-particle-induced luminescence spectra of a number of crystalline solids have been recorded using a single-photon -counting spectrometer in the search for high-stability u.v. light sources for use in analytical instrumentation. Of particular interest are the emissions from CaF2,sapphire and spinel, all of which produce useful emission intensities below 300 nm. The kinetic behaviour of the emissions from 1:1 and 1.8:1 spinels have been studied in some detail, and it is found that the noise level of the emitted light is significantly reduced by the 'smoothing' action of a long luminescence decay time. The results are consistent with the view that the spinel emission is associated with the recombination of electrons trapped on [AL]+sub(Mg) with holes trapped on [Mg]-sub(Al) centres. (author)

  17. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  18. GCR-Induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the Moon has a ubiquitous photon luminescence induced by Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), using the Monte Carlo particle-physics program FLUKA. Both the fluence and the flux of the radiation can be determined by this method, but only the fluence will be presented here. This is in addition to thermal radiation emitted due to the Moon s internal temperature and radioactivity. This study is a follow-up to an earlier discussion [1] that addressed several misconceptions regarding Moonshine in the Earth-Moon system (Figure 1) and predicted this effect. There also exists a related x-ray fluorescence induced by solar energetic particles (SEPs, <350 MeV) and solar photons at lower x-ray energies, although this latter fluorescence was studied on Apollo 15 and 16 [2- 5], Lunar Prospector [6], and even EGRET [7].

  19. Study of the liquid water luminescence induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many observations suggested that liquid water (with impurities) could give a luminescence output when irradiated with charged particles. We investigate theoretical and practical possibility of detecting such luminescence. Preliminary results on this possibility are presented, and a layout of the device proposed for measuring luminescence is given. (authors)

  20. LUMINESCENCE BEAM PROFILE MONITOR FOR THE RHIC POLARIZED HYDROGEN JET POLARIMETER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUCIANO, N.; NASS, A.; MAKDISI, Y.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; ZELENSKI, A.

    2005-05-16

    A new polarized hydrogen jet target was used to provide improved beam polarization measurements during the second polarized proton m in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitations was also used to test the feasibility of a new beam profile monitor for RFPIC based on the detection of the emitted light. Lenses, a view-port and a sensitive CCD camera were added to the system to record the optical signals from the interaction chamber. The first very promising results are reported here. The same system with an additional optical spectrometer or optical filter system may be used in the future to detect impurities in the jet, such as oxygen molecules, which affect the accuracy of the polarization measurements.

  1. Hairpin DNA probes based on target-induced in situ generation of luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Wu, Zhengjun; Wong, Kwok-Yin; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-05-14

    Novel hairpin DNA probes are designed and constructed based on target-induced in situ generation of luminescent silver nanoclusters. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and low cost. PMID:24686790

  2. Radiation induced luminescence processes in c-BN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Berzina, B.; Benabdesselam, M.;

    2004-01-01

    Spectral properties of cubic boron nitride have been studied using methods of photoluminescence (PL), X-ray excited luminescence (XL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that emission of cubic boron nitride is presented by 4 subbands, their relative yield...

  3. Luminescence and superradiance in electron-beam-excited Al{sub x}Ga{1-sub x}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.; Malin, T. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 13, Lavrentieva av., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhuravlev, K. S.; Osinnykh, I. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 13, Lavrentieva av., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Str., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Solomonov, V. I.; Spirina, A. V. [Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 106, Amundsen str., Ekaterinburg 620016 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-21

    Luminescence and superradiance characteristics of 0.5–1.2-μm thick Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on sapphire substrates were studied under excitation of the films with low-energy (<20 keV) and high-energy (170 keV) electron beams. In both cases, the luminescence spectra looked quite similarly; they exhibited a band-edge luminescence with x-dependent wavelength ranging from 365 nm to 310 nm and a broadband emission taking over the whole visible spectral region. Superradiance within the broad band was obtained by pumping the samples with powerful an electron beam in the form of an open-discharge-generated filament.

  4. Luminescence from pigments and resins for oil paintings induced by laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Ilaria; Fantoni, Roberta; Flamini, Chiara; Di Palma, Tonia M.; Giardini Guidoni, Anna; Mele, Aldo

    1998-05-01

    The present work reports results of an extensive study of laser induced luminescence by tripled Nd:YAG laser ( λ=355 nm) of a few most common painting materials, namely, natural and synthetic pigments and resins. The luminescence spectra have been analyzed by an Optical Multichannel Analyzer (OMA III). Luminescence time decay has been measured by a Streak camera or by the OMA III. Pigments and resins show characteristic emission spectra with bands peaking in the visible. The decay ranges from less than 1 ns up to 700 μs for pigments and for resins. The mechanism of excitation and relaxation leading to luminescence is discussed for the various materials. Oil colour specimens have been irradiated by a UV KrF laser ( λ=248 nm). Luminescence photographs have been detected by an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera at different time delays.

  5. Tunneling electron induced luminescence from porphyrin molecules on monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using epitaxially grown graphene on Ru(0001) as a decoupling layer, we investigate the evolution of tunneling electron induced luminescence from different number of layers of porphyrin molecules. Light emission spectra and photon maps, acquired via a combined optical setup with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), indicate that the electronic decoupling effect of a monolayer (ML) graphene alone is still insufficient for generating molecule-specific emission from both the 1st- and 2nd-layer porphyrin molecules. Nevertheless, interestingly, the plasmonic emission is enhanced for the 1st-layer but suppressed for the 2nd-layer in comparison with the plasmonic emission on the monolayer graphene. Intrinsic intramolecular molecular fluorescence occurs at the 3rd-layer porphyrin. Such molecular thickness is about two MLs thinner than previous reports where molecules were adsorbed directly on metals. These observations suggest that the monolayer graphene does weaken the interaction between molecule and metal substrate and contribute to the reduction of nonradiative decay rates. - Highlights: • Showing molecularly resolved photon maps of graphene and porphyrins on it. • Revealing the influence of spacer thickness on molecular electroluminescence. • Graphene does weaken the interaction between molecules and metal substrate

  6. Tunneling electron induced luminescence from porphyrin molecules on monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Feng; Kuang, Yanmin; Yu, Yunjie; Liao, Yuan; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Zhenchao, E-mail: zcdong@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-15

    Using epitaxially grown graphene on Ru(0001) as a decoupling layer, we investigate the evolution of tunneling electron induced luminescence from different number of layers of porphyrin molecules. Light emission spectra and photon maps, acquired via a combined optical setup with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), indicate that the electronic decoupling effect of a monolayer (ML) graphene alone is still insufficient for generating molecule-specific emission from both the 1st- and 2nd-layer porphyrin molecules. Nevertheless, interestingly, the plasmonic emission is enhanced for the 1st-layer but suppressed for the 2nd-layer in comparison with the plasmonic emission on the monolayer graphene. Intrinsic intramolecular molecular fluorescence occurs at the 3rd-layer porphyrin. Such molecular thickness is about two MLs thinner than previous reports where molecules were adsorbed directly on metals. These observations suggest that the monolayer graphene does weaken the interaction between molecule and metal substrate and contribute to the reduction of nonradiative decay rates. - Highlights: • Showing molecularly resolved photon maps of graphene and porphyrins on it. • Revealing the influence of spacer thickness on molecular electroluminescence. • Graphene does weaken the interaction between molecules and metal substrate.

  7. Nano-scale distribution of ZnO free exciton luminescence in ZnO:Zn microcrystals and its modification under electron beam excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependences of cathodoluminescence (CL) from ZnO:Zn phosphor powder upon local space, accelerating voltage and beam current have been investigated at room temperature. Ultraviolet (UV) luminescence, which is hard to be observed in photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature, has been clearly observed in CL as well as green luminescence. The intensity ratio of the UV luminescence to the green one varies from point to point. From the comparison with PL, the UV luminescence is attributed to the recombination of ZnO free excitons. The UV luminescence is little observed at low accelerating voltage where, similar to the excitation light for PL measurement, the electron beam penetrates into only the surface depletion layer where free excitons are unstable due to the surface electric field. However, the UV luminescence from the depletion layer becomes observable at large beam current because of the suppression of the electric field in the depletion layer caused by injected electrons

  8. Laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles as a source of excitation of dye luminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Zelensky, S

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of pulsed YAG-Nd sup 3 sup + laser radiation with submicron light-absorbing particles suspended in an aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G is investigated experimentally. The experiments demonstrate that the laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles excites the luminescence of the dissolved dye molecules. The mechanism of the luminescence excitation consists in the reabsorption of the thermal radiation within the volume of the sample cell. On the ground of this mechanism of excitation, a method of measurement of the luminescence quantum yield is proposed and realized. The method requires the knowledge of the geometrical parameters of the cell and does not require the use of reference samples.

  9. Photomultiplier nonlinear response in time-domain laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro José Bossy Schip

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure to find the limiting range of the photomultiplier linear response of a low-cost, digital oscilloscope-based time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectrometer (TRLS, is presented. A systematic investigation on the instrument response function with different signal input terminations, and the relationship between the luminescence intensity reaching the photomultiplier and the measured decay time are described. These investigations establish that setting the maximum intensity of the luminescence signal below 0.3V guarantees, for signal input terminations equal or higher than 99.7 ohm, a linear photomultiplier response.

  10. Study on Water-Induced Ultra-Weak Luminescence Value of Wheat Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitao Liang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The wheat kernels were processed by moistened in water. The spontaneous and water-induced luminescence data (photon counts were noted with an ultra-weak luminescence (UWL detector. The following was the features of the data analyzed by the statistical parameters of the spontaneous luminescence and the fitting curves of the water-induced luminescence. The results show that the UWL intensity rises with the moistened time prolonged. It is concluded that the intensity depends on the moistened time mainly. If the moistened kernels owned a more porous structure, in the initial phase of imbibition, a higher UWL emission would be noted. Consequently, the further quantitative research of the relevant could lead a novel testing method about the wheat’s activity and quality.  

  11. Real-time optical-fibre luminescence dosimetry for radiotherapy: physical characteristics and applications in photon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M.C.; Andersen, C.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.;

    2004-01-01

    A new optical-fibre radiation dosimeter system, based on radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence from carbon-doped aluminium oxide, was developed and tested in clinical photon beams. This prototype offers several features, such as a small detector (1 x 1 x 2 mm), high sensitivity,...

  12. Color imaging of radiation-induced luminescence from natural minerals and construction of automatically measuring system for luminescence (TL/OSL) dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two dimensional color patterns of radiation-induced luminescence, including after-glow color images (AGCI) and thermoluminescence ones (TLCI), have been conveniently photographed for some rock slices by means of a commercially available negative color film after the irradiation of X- or γ-rays. Both color images (AGCI and TLCI) offered very interesting images; the constituent minerals showed distinctly separable color patterns in which the same minerals were giving different stripe patterns of luminescence intensities in each other and even within the one mineral grain. In the case of quartz grains, pure red TL images from volcanic origins have been initially found in addition to the well-known blue TL quartzes. It was assumed that the conditions of crystal formation and subsequent metamorphosis should be greatly affected on these luminescence images. The present simplified luminescence images are considered to be preferable for the practical application of luminescence phenomena onto the material sciences, geological fields, nuclear and archaeological sciences, and so on. Some recent applications of the luminescence have been described from aspects of utilization of accumulated dosimeter. Subsequently, a construction of an automatic luminescence measuring system incorporated a small X-ray generator, involving both TL and OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence), is also described. (author)

  13. Luminescence of insulating crystals induced by an XUV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsky, A.N. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Optics and Spectroscopy; Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Univ. de Bordeaux 1, Talence (France); Kamenskikh, I.A. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Optics and Spectroscopy; Sebban, S. [Lab. de Spectroscopie Atomique et Ionique, Orsay (France); LOA, ENSTA, Palaiseau (France); Jaegle, P.; Jamelot, G.; Carillon, A.; Klisnick, A.; Zeitoun, P.; Albert, F.; Ros, D. [Lab. de Spectroscopie Atomique et Ionique, Orsay (France); Rus, B. [Dept. of Gas Lasers, Inst. of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Martin, P. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Univ. de Bordeaux 1, Talence (France); Pedrini, C. [Lab. de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    Results of the study of CsI luminescence excited by 58.5 eV photons of the XUV laser of LULI are presented. The energy of the exciting photons was sufficient for the creation of core holes at the 4d-iodine level. Following a single laser pulse luminescence spectra in the range 200 - 900 nm were detected. Using foil filters the density of excitation was varied from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 13} photons/cm{sup 2}. The luminescence spectra measured following the laser pulse were substantially different from those measured using synchrotron radiation of the same energy or with X-rays. The following effect observed is discussed: manifestation of a new band attributed to the creation of complex defects (550 nm). (orig.)

  14. Orbital angular momentum induced beam shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Hermosa N.; Merano M.; Aiello A.; Woerdman J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We present experiments on Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) induced beam shifts in optical reflection. Specifically, we observe the spatial Goos-H\\"anchen shift in which the beam is displaced parallel to the plane of incidence and the angular Imbert-Fedorov shift which is a transverse angular deviation from the geometric optics prediction. Experimental results agree well with our theoretical predictions. Both beam shifts increase with the OAM of the beam; we have measured these for OAM indices u...

  15. Photostimulated luminescence in alkali halides induced by excitation with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photostimulated luminescence (PSL) phenomenon induced in copper-doped sodium chloride (NaCl : Cu) and europium-doped potassium chloride (KCl : Eu) phosphor crystals by excitation with ionizing radiation such as X-rays is studied. The emission mechanism of the PSL in both phosphor crystals is discussed in terms of the recombination of electrons optically stimulated from the radiation-induced F centers with the luminescence centers such as Cu2+ in NaCl and Eu3+ ions in KCl. The potentiality of both phosphor crystals as a material for two-dimensional X-ray imaging sensors utilizing the PSL phenomenon is also discussed. ((orig.))

  16. Magnetic field induced luminescence spectra in a quantum cascade laser

    OpenAIRE

    Apalkov, V. M.; Chakraborty, T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on our study of the luminescence spectra of a quantum cascade laser in the presence of an external magnetic field tilted from the direction perpendicular to the electron plane. The effect of the tilted field is to allow novel optical transitions because of the coupling of intersubband-cyclotron energies. We find that by tuning the applied field, one can get optical transitions at different energies that are as sharp as the zero-field transitions.

  17. Changes in ultraweak luminescence from living fish induced by three chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraweak luminescence is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, which differs from bioluminescence of luciferin-luciferase. This low-intensity emission is inherently associated with the following important process such as oxidative metabolism, cell division, carcinogenesis, photosynthesis, and cell death. In general, ultraweak luminescence may be classified as two kinds, namely spontaneous and induced. Zebra fish is a recommended specimen for toxicity and toxicological test. The purpose of this, the changes before and after the treatment with three chemicals: uranium oxides, sodium azide or cyclophosphamide and their correlations between the dose and effect

  18. Radiation-induced luminescence in magnesium aluminate spinel crystals and ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyna, V. T.; Kazarinov, Yu. G.; Kobyakov, V. A.; Reimanis, I. E.

    2006-09-01

    Radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) in spinel crystals and ceramics were investigated to elucidate the radiation-induced electronic processes in single crystals grown by Verneuil and Czochralski methods as well as transparent and translucent ceramics. Both RL and TL spectra demonstrate a UV-band related to electron-hole recombination luminescence at intrinsic defects; green and red luminescence are identified with emission of Mn 2+- and Cr 3+-ions, respectively. The kinetics of growth of different RL luminescence bands depending on dose at the prolonged X-irradiation shows the competitive character of charge and energy transfer between defects and impurity ions. The dependence of RL intensity on the temperature of the sample was measured in the range of 300-750 K and compared with TL for different emission bands. The variety of maxima in the temperature dependence of RL and in the glow curves of TL measured for different luminescence bands in spinels of different origins and crystalline forms is used to show that charge carrier traps and luminescence centers are not isolated defects but are complexes of defects and impurities. The formation, structure and properties of these complexes depend on the processing conditions.

  19. Radiation-induced luminescence in magnesium aluminate spinel crystals and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsyna, V.T. [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svoboda Sq. 4, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine)]. E-mail: gritsyna@htuni.kharkov.ua; Kazarinov, Yu.G. [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svoboda Sq. 4, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kobyakov, V.A. [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svoboda Sq. 4, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Reimanis, I.E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) in spinel crystals and ceramics were investigated to elucidate the radiation-induced electronic processes in single crystals grown by Verneuil and Czochralski methods as well as transparent and translucent ceramics. Both RL and TL spectra demonstrate a UV-band related to electron-hole recombination luminescence at intrinsic defects; green and red luminescence are identified with emission of Mn{sup 2+}- and Cr{sup 3+}-ions, respectively. The kinetics of growth of different RL luminescence bands depending on dose at the prolonged X-irradiation shows the competitive character of charge and energy transfer between defects and impurity ions. The dependence of RL intensity on the temperature of the sample was measured in the range of 300-750 K and compared with TL for different emission bands. The variety of maxima in the temperature dependence of RL and in the glow curves of TL measured for different luminescence bands in spinels of different origins and crystalline forms is used to show that charge carrier traps and luminescence centers are not isolated defects but are complexes of defects and impurities. The formation, structure and properties of these complexes depend on the processing conditions.

  20. Radiation-induced luminescence in magnesium aluminate spinel crystals and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) in spinel crystals and ceramics were investigated to elucidate the radiation-induced electronic processes in single crystals grown by Verneuil and Czochralski methods as well as transparent and translucent ceramics. Both RL and TL spectra demonstrate a UV-band related to electron-hole recombination luminescence at intrinsic defects; green and red luminescence are identified with emission of Mn2+- and Cr3+-ions, respectively. The kinetics of growth of different RL luminescence bands depending on dose at the prolonged X-irradiation shows the competitive character of charge and energy transfer between defects and impurity ions. The dependence of RL intensity on the temperature of the sample was measured in the range of 300-750 K and compared with TL for different emission bands. The variety of maxima in the temperature dependence of RL and in the glow curves of TL measured for different luminescence bands in spinels of different origins and crystalline forms is used to show that charge carrier traps and luminescence centers are not isolated defects but are complexes of defects and impurities. The formation, structure and properties of these complexes depend on the processing conditions

  1. Radiation-induced transformations of luminescence centers in anion-defective alumina crystals under high-dose irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Alumina crystals (Al2O3:C) were studied after exposures with doses up to 106 Gy. •PL and PLE spectra of alumina crystals were measured after exposure to high-dose. •New wide emission band was found in the PL spectra of irradiated crystals. •High dose irradiations give rise to charged aggregate F2-type centers. •Aggregate centers are responsible for the change in PL spectra and TL yield. -- Abstract: Luminescent spectroscopy is used to show formation of new trapping centers of charge carriers in anion-defective alumina crystals at radiation-induced transformations of F and F+-centers created by oxygen vacancies when exposed to high-dose gamma-radiation. A new wide band in the range 440–700 nm was registered in the photoluminescence spectrum at excitations with UV photons. High-dose irradiation of the crystals leads to appearance of F2-type aggregate centers in different charged states. These centers are additional traps of charge carriers. The new traps increase a luminescent yield at high-dose irradiation with gamma-rays and an electron beam

  2. In situ measurement of photo-stimulated luminescence from BaFBr:Eu2+ irradiated by He+ ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) from BaFBr:Eu2+ used for an imaging plate have been studied with various radiation sources in these years. In situ measurements of both afterglow and PSL emission from the imaging plate have been carried out with 1 MeV He+ ion beam irradiation in this report. Prompt luminescence and afterglow emission peaked at 400 nm in wavelength under and just after ion beam irradiation have been observed, and the PSL has been observed after the irradiation by the excitation with 500 or 600 nm light source. We have elucidated various characteristics of the PSL of the imaging plate by the ion beam irradiation as follows. (1) The emission just after the ion beam irradiation includes the PSL and afterglow emission. (2) The behavior of the time dependence of the PSL is different from that of the afterglow emission. Fading decay time of the PSL is longer than that of the afterglow emission. (3) The spectrum of the PSL is composed of more than four transition levels

  3. Luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate doubly activated by europium and/or terbium under X-ray and electron beam excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O4 activated by rare earth ions such as Eu3+ and Tb3+. The influence of these rare earth ions on the luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Under these excitations, the emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu3+,Tb3+) were found to contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Changing the mol concentration of the incorporated activators resulted in a broad variation of visible photoluminescence. Color cathodoluminescence images showed clearly the dependence of chromaticity on the different activators. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing a broad variation of visible photoluminescence from blue to red. - Highlights: ► The Y(Ta,Nb)O4 phosphors were activated by rare earth ions such as Eu3+ and Tb3+. ► The phosphors were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. ► The emission centers contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. ► Changing the concentration of the activators resulted in a broad luminescence.

  4. Modelling of electron beam induced nanowire attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Lucas A.; Speich, Claudia; Schäfer, David; Erni, Daniel; Prost, Werner; Tegude, Franz J.; Benson, Niels; Schmechel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) induced nanowire (NW) attraction or bundling is a well known effect, which is mainly ascribed to structural or material dependent properties. However, there have also been recent reports of electron beam induced nanowire bending by SEM imaging, which is not fully explained by the current models, especially when considering the electro-dynamic interaction between NWs. In this article, we contribute to the understanding of this phenomenon, by introducing an electro-dynamic model based on capacitor and Lorentz force interaction, where the active NW bending is stimulated by an electromagnetic force between individual wires. The model includes geometrical, electrical, and mechanical NW parameters, as well as the influence of the electron beam source parameters and is validated using in-situ observations of electron beam induced GaAs nanowire (NW) bending by SEM imaging.

  5. Multistimuli-Responsive Luminescence of Naphthalazine Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Xiang; Ru, Jia-Xi; Xu, Cong; Liu, Ya-Ming; Dou, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Guo-lin; Liu, Wei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive luminescent materials, which are dependent on changes in physical molecular packing modes, have attracted more and more interest over the past ten years. In this study, 2,2-dihydroxy-1,1-naphthalazine was synthesized and shown to exhibit different fluorescence emission in solution and solid states with characteristic aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties. A remarkable change in the fluorescence of 2,2-dihydroxy-1,1-naphthalazine occurred upon mechanical grinding, he...

  6. Beam induced RF cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency (RF) cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ωr of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω0. The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(jhω0t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting RF cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kind of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  7. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  8. Laser-induced time-resolved spectroscopy of visible broad luminescence bands in zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work examines the luminescence of zircon studied by laser-induced time-resolved methods. This method allows the differentiation between luminescence centers of similar emission wavelengths, but different decay times. Samples include a suite of natural zircons, nominally pure synthetic ZrSiO4, and ZrSiO4 artificially doped by Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Co, Pb, Sb, Ti, Ta, V, Sc, U, U-P, and Th-P. In addition, pure ZrSiO4 samples irradiated by thermal neutrons have been studied. We have clarified the nature of several luminescence bands reported previously from time independent studies, and suggest the following as the causes of luminescence in zircon systems: 1) the yellow band with peak wavelength (λmax) = 575 nm, peak half-width (Δ) = 120-130 nm, and decay time (τ) = 30-35 μs is connected with neutron and alpha irradiation, 2) the green band with λmax 505 nm, and vibrational structure is linked to the presence of the uranyl ion, but it is only observed in artificial samples with co-doping by U and P, 3) the red band with λmax = 750 nm, Δ =110-120 nm and τ 3-5 ms is connected with Fe3+. We have also identified new luminescence bands, obscured by stronger emissions. These are: emission a) with λmax 480 nm, Δ = 70-80 nm and τ = 300-325 μs, emission b) with λmax = 515 nm, Δ = 90-100 nm and τ 500-520 gs, emission c) with λmax = 605 nm, Δ = 110-125 nm and τ = 8-10 μs. These emissions have not been detected in synthetic doped zircons and their interpretation remains the subject of further investigation. (author)

  9. Plasmon-induced enhancement of yellow-red luminescence in InGaN/Au nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, K. G., E-mail: belyaev.kirill@mail.ioffe.ru; Usikova, A. A.; Jmerik, V. N.; Kop’ev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. V.; Toropov, A. A.; Brunkov, P. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    A significant (by up to a factor of 7) increase in the internal quantum efficiency of luminescence is achieved at room temperature in semiconductor-metal-insulator hybrid structures fabricated by the successive deposition of gold and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} over an array of InGaN nanoblocks, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The observed effect can be accounted for by the resonant interaction of excitons localized in InGaN nanoblocks with localized surface-plasmon modes in gold intrusions embedded into InGaN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  10. Beam Induced Pressure Rise at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Y; Bai, Mei; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Gullotta, Justin; He, Ping; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Peggs, Steve; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smart, Loralie; Snydstrup, Louis; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Zeno, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Beam induced pressure rise in RHIC warm sections is currently one of the machine intensity and luminosity limits. This pressure rise is mainly due to electron cloud effects. The RHIC warm section electron cloud is associated with longer bunch spacings compared with other machines, and is distributed non-uniformly around the ring. In addition to the countermeasures for normal electron cloud, such as the NEG coated pipe, solenoids, beam scrubbing, bunch gaps, and larger bunch spacing, other studies and beam tests toward the understanding and counteracting RHIC warm electron cloud are of interest. These include the ion desorption studies and the test of anti-grazing ridges. For high bunch intensities and the shortest bunch spacings, pressure rises at certain locations in the cryogenic region have been observed during the past two runs. Beam studies are planned for the current 2005 run and the results will be reported.

  11. Internal photoradiation effect. Radiation-induced luminescence and its influence on radiation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of radiation-induced luminescence on stabilization and reactions of intermediate charged particles in polymers in course of radiolysis is experimentally and theoretically investigated. The subjects of inquiry are polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol films. Irradiation was carried out by 60Co γ-quanta in liquid nitrogen up to 5-10 kGy, the dose rate being approximately 5 Gy/s. It is stated that polymer luminescence results in decrease of concentration of stabilized charged particles, determines inequality of their distribution with respect to polymer volume and causes photochemical reactions. Contribution of photoradiation processes to radiation changes of material properties is defined by molecule properties, irradiation conditions, form and size of irradiated sample

  12. The application of visible-induced luminescence imaging to the examination of museum objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, G.

    2009-07-01

    Visible-induced luminescence imaging in the near infrared range (800-1700 nm) can play a key role in the spatial characterization of certain historical blue pigments (principally Egyptian blue, Han blue and Han purple). All three of these pigments show a very strong infrared emission when excited across the visible range. The setup required for this type of measurement comprises a recording device with some sensitivity to near infrared radiation and an excitation source in the visible range. Inexpensive and widely available excitation radiation sources that can be used for this application include fluorescent lamps and LEDs. While visible LEDs do not usually emit infrared radiation, commercially available fluorescent tubes may emit some stray infrared radiation. Although the presence of such stray infrared radiation may in some cases be considered beneficial, allowing the user easily to locate the presence of the pigments under investigation within the composition of the piece, it can be easily removed using a simple subtraction method. This method, based on the measurement of the reflective properties of the surface under investigation in the emission range of the luminescent pigments, is described. The emission results obtained for Egyptian blue, Han blue and Han purple are compared to those of a set of representative historical and modern blue pigments, including manganese blue, which was the only other pigment found to show detectable luminescence properties. Examples of the application of visible-induced luminescence imaging to archaeological objects of the Antonine period (AD 100-200) in the collections of the British Museum are also presented.

  13. Induced focusing and conversion of a Gaussian beam into an elliptic Gaussian beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Mishra; Swapan Konar

    2005-09-01

    We have presented an investigation of the induced focusing in Kerr media of two laser beams, the pump beam and the probe beam, which could be either Gaussian or elliptic Gaussian or a combination of the two. We have used variational formalism to derive relevant beam-width equations. Among several important findings, the finding that a very week probe beam can be guided and focused when power of both beams are well below their individual threshold for self-focusing, is a noteworthy one. It has been found that induced focusing is not possible for laser beams of any wavelength and beam radius. In case both beams are elliptic Gaussian, we have shown that when power of both beams is above a certain threshold value then the effective radius of both beams collapses and collapse distance depends on power. Moreover, it has been found that induced focusing can be employed to convert a circular Gaussian beam into an elliptic Gaussian beam.

  14. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols

  15. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, A. C.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  16. Beam-induced tensor pressure tokamak equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D-shaped tensor pressure tokamak equilibria induced by neutral-beam injection are computed. The beam pressure components are evaluated from the moments of a distribution function that is a solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in which the pitch-angle scattering operator is ignored. The level-psub(perpendicular) contours undergo a significant shift away from the outer edge of the device with respect to the flux surfaces for perpendicular beam injection into broad-pressure-profile equilibria. The psub(parallel) contours undergo a somewhat smaller inward shift with respect to the flux surfaces for both parallel and perpendicular injection into broad-pressure-profile equilibria. For peaked-pressure-profile equilibria, the level pressure contours nearly co-incide with the flux surfaces. (author)

  17. Enhanced upconversion luminescence from ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures induced on a Zn foil by femtosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Li, Xian-Feng; Xiang, Jin; Tie, Shao-Long; Lan, Sheng

    2015-11-16

    ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures including nanowires and nanonets were induced on a Zn foil by using 400-nm femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with a low repetition rate of 1 kHz and duration of 100 fs. The laser fluence was chosen to be slightly above the ablation threshold of Zn. The luminescence of the formed ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures was examined by using fs laser pulses with a high repetition rate of 76 MHz and duration of ~130 fs through both single-photon and multiphoton excitation. While the luminescence spectrum under the single-photon excitation exhibited a single peak at ~480 nm, a broadband upconversion luminescence with many ripples was observed under the multiphoton excitation. More interestingly, the upconversion luminescence of the ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures was significantly enhanced by the underlying Zn nanostructures which induced strongly localized electric field. The enhancement of the upconversion luminescence was verified by the short lifetime of only ~79 ps observed for the ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures, which is nearly one order of magnitude smaller as compared with the luminescence lifetime of the ZnO nanorods synthesized by using the chemical coprecipitation method. The localization of electric field in the ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures was confirmed by the numerical simulations based the finite-difference time-domain technique. PMID:26698492

  18. Enhanced ultraviolet-visible cathodoluminescence from Ar+ beam-induced nano-patterned silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) of 60 keV Ar ion beam-induced ripple patterned Si in a high resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM) shows strong room temperature (RT) luminescence bands compared to a nonpatterned or patterned recrystallized Si. Site-specific CL spectroscopy and imaging data indicate while the top and front surface of ripples contribute predominantly to the red and near infra-red (IR) emission at ∼650 and 750 nm respectively, the back surface contributes mostly to ultraviolet (UV) emission at ∼365nm. When the patterned sample is recrystallized after high temperature annealing, one observes a blue shift of the red peak to a yellow peak at ∼575nm. Nanostructured Si of varying sizes (∼0.2-5nm) located around amorphous/crystalline (a/c)-interface and beyond it appears to be probable origin of luminescence observed in the present study. - Highlights: → Cathodoluminescence (CL) of Ar ion-induced ripple patterned porous Si in a high resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM). → Patterned amorphous Si strongly luminescent compared to its non-patterned amorphous or patterned recrystallized form. → Crest and front slope region of ripples contributes predominantly to the visible and near IR emission. → Rear slope region contributes mostly to UV emission.

  19. Application of laser-induced luminescence technique to the analysis of ultratrace levels of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced luminescence technique with a compact nitrogen laser as an excitation source has been successfully applied to the determination of ultratrace quantities of uranium. The alteration in emission spectra, intensity, and lifetime produced by the addition of chemical enhancers is examined. The intensity of the emission is linear with respect to the concentration of the uranium in samples. The detection limits are better than those obtained with conventional methods, ranging from 30 to 0.5 parts per trillion. Analytical data using this method are presented for environmental and biological samples containing parts-per-billion of uranium

  20. Real-time optical-fibre luminescence dosimetry for radiotherapy: physical characteristics and applications in photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, Marianne C [Radiation Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E [Radiation Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Boetter-Jensen, Lars [Radiation Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Baeck, Sven A J [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Mattsson, Soeren [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming [Department of Radiation Physics, Rigshospitalet, National University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Medin, Joakim [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2004-05-07

    A new optical-fibre radiation dosimeter system, based on radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence from carbon-doped aluminium oxide, was developed and tested in clinical photon beams. This prototype offers several features, such as a small detector (1 x 1 x 2 mm{sup 3}), high sensitivity, real-time read-out and the ability to measure both dose rate and absorbed dose. The measurements describing reproducibility and output dependence on dose rate, field size and energy all had standard deviations smaller than 1%. The signal variation with the angle of incidence was smaller than 2% (1 SD). Measurements performed in clinical situations suggest the potential of using this real-time system for in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  1. GCR-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon: The Moon as a CR Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kerry; Andersen, Vic

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results of a preliminary study of the GCR-induced photon luminescence of the Moon using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence when there is no sunshine or Earthshine. From the photon fluence we derive the energy spectrum which can be utilized to design an orbiting optical instrument for measuring the GCR-induced luminescence. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of its radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior. Also, we investigate transient optical flashes from high-energy CRs impacting the lunar surface (boulders and regolith). The goal is to determine to what extent the Moon could be used as a rudimentary CR detector. Meteor impacts on the Moon have been observed for centuries to generate such flashes, so why not CRs?

  2. Assembly-Induced Enhancement of Cu Nanoclusters Luminescence with Mechanochromic Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhennan; Liu, Jiale; Gao, Yang; Liu, Huiwen; Li, Tingting; Zou, Haoyang; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2015-10-14

    Metal nanoclusters (NCs) as a new class of phosphors have attracted a great deal of interest owing to their unique electronic structure and subsequently molecule-like optical properties. However, limited successes have been achieved in producing the NCs with excellent luminescent performance. In this paper, we demonstrate the significant luminescence intensity enhancement of 1-dodecanethiol (DT)-capped Cu NCs via self-assembly strategy. By forming compact and ordered assemblies, the original nonluminescent Cu NCs exhibit strong emission. The flexibility of self-assembly allows to further control the polymorphism of Cu NCs assemblies, and hence the emission properties. Comparative structural and optical analysis of the polymorphic NCs assemblies permits to establish a relationship between the compactness of assemblies and the emission. First, high compactness reinforces the cuprophilic Cu(I)···Cu(I) interaction of inter- and intra-NCs, and meanwhile, suppresses intramolecular vibration and rotation of the capping ligand of DT, thus enhancing the emission intensity of Cu NCs. Second, as to the emission energy that depends on the distance of Cu(I)···Cu(I), the improved compactness increases average Cu(I)···Cu(I) distance by inducing additional inter-NCs cuprophilic interaction, and therewith leads to the blue shift of NCs emission. Attributing to the assembly mediated structural polymorphism, the NCs assemblies exhibit distinct mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescent properties. Metal NCs-based white light-emitting diodes are further fabricated by employing the NCs assemblies with blue-green, yellow, and red emissions as phosphors. PMID:26397821

  3. Sensitive detection of PDT-induced cell damages with luminescent oxygen nanosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Ru; Peng, Hong-shang; You, Fang-tian; Ping, Jian-tao; Zhou, Chao; Guo, Lan-ying

    2016-09-01

    In this work luminescent nanosensors specifically created for intracellular oxygen (ic-O2) were utilized to assess photodynamic therapy (PDT) -induced cell damages. Firstly, ic-O2 was demonstrated to be consumed much faster than extracellular O2 with respective O2 nanosensors. Using the ic-O2 nanosensors, PDT-treated cells with different degree of impairment were then resolved according to the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). The evolving trend of cytotoxicity derived from OCRs was in agreement with cell viability obtained from 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Moreover, the direct damage of PDT on cell mitochondria was successfully detected by monitoring respiration instantly after PDT treatment, which is actually beyond the scope of MTT assay. These results suggest that fluorescence sensing of ic-O2-associated cell respiration is promising and even may become a standardized method, complementary to MTT assay, to evaluate PDT-induced cytotoxicity.

  4. Optically stimulated luminescence for diagnostic and therapeutic low to medium energy X-Ray beams experimental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) using aluminium oxide crystals (Al2O3:C) is a dosimetry technique, already validated in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the OSL detectors in terms of energy dependence using monochromatic beams in the low-medium energy range (25-85 keV); and to evaluate their potential for experimental dosimetry in therapeutic applications at these energies. The OSL system is composed of a multichannel reader and alumina crystals (Al2O3:C, 0.09 mm3) that are remotely read by laser light. The OSL signal is directly linked to the absorbed dose. Irradiations in were performed at 8 energy points from 25 to 90 keV using a synchrotron source. Absolute OSL dose measurements were also performed at 80 keV at 2 cm depth in water equivalent phantoms (1-8 Gy range). The detectors have been read over 300 s to collect all the light available from the trapped electrons. The OSL detector show a lower energy dependence (≤ 10%) in the 25 to 50 keV range than at higher energies (∼ 45% from 50 to 90 keV). OSL is a reproducible absolute dosimetry technique at 80 keV (σ≤5 %). The field size has no other influence on the OSL signal than the one due to phantom scatter output factors. We demonstrated that the OSL energy dependence decreases with the beam energy. The conventional models of OSL response in function of beam energy and delivered dose were confronted to our results. The next step of this study is to use OSL for beam penumbra characterisation, where conventional detectors exhibit a severe energy dependence due to low energy spectra. In vivo dosimetry applications in low-medium energy radiotherapy are foreseen due to the good reproducibility in OSL signal for absolute dose measurements. (authors)

  5. Fabrication of aggregation induced emission active luminescent chitosan nanoparticles via a "one-pot" multicomponent reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qing; Liu, Meiying; Xu, Dazhuang; Mao, Liucheng; Tian, Jianwen; Huang, Hongye; Gao, Peng; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-11-01

    Chitosan based nanomaterials have been extensively examined for biomedical applications for their biodegradability, low toxicity, biological activity and low cost. In this work, a novel strategy for fabrication of luminescent polymeric nanoparticles (LPNs) based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) dye and water soluble chitosan (WS-Chitosan) were firstly developed via a highly efficient mercaptoacetic acid (MA) locking imine reaction. In this multicomponent reaction (MCR), MA serves as "lock" to connect 9,10-Bis(aldehydephenl)anthracene dye (An-CHO) and amino-containing WS-Chitosan under mild reaction conditions. The obtained WS-Chitosan@An-CHO LPNs show strong yellow emission and great water dispersibility. Biological evaluation results demonstrated that synthetic luminescent polymeric nanoparticles possess desirable cytocompatibility and distinct imaging properties. Therefore, we have developed a facile and useful method to fabricate AIE active nanoprobes with desirable properties for various biomedical applications. This strategy should be a general and easy handling tool to fabricate many other AIE dye based materials. PMID:27516264

  6. Defect-induced luminescence in sol-gel silica samples doped with Co(II) at different concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defect-induced luminescence properties of silica samples prepared by the sol-gel method and doped with Co(II) are reported. Silica monoliths doped with different concentrations of Co(II) were laser irradiated (He-Ne 632.8 nm) producing fluorescence. However, this fluorescence is exponentially reduced with the irradiation time, to practically disappear. The rate the fluorescence decays can be well modeled with a double exponential function of the irradiation time, containing two different relaxation times; a baseline is also required to take into account some residual fluorescence. The characteristic times involved in this luminescence quenching process are in the range of seconds. This luminescence suppression can be associated to the local heating produced by the laser irradiation when focused in a small area (2 μm in diameter) on the sample. This heating process reduces physical (grain boundaries, surface states) and chemical (oxygen vacancies produced by the dopant) defects in the sample

  7. Delayed luminescence induced by complex domains in water and in aqueous solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Colleoni, C; Grasso, R; Gulino, M; Musumeci, F; Romeli, D; Rosace, G; Salesi, G; Scordino, A

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies on water have conjectured a complex structure composed of hydrogen bonded low- and high-density domains. In this work the structure of pure water and aqueous solutions of silica gel (TEOS) has been investigated by using delayed luminescence, which previously have showed significant increase in aqueous salt solutions where low-density domain formation is expected. Photon emission shows an Arrhenius trend with an activation energy in water-TEOS solutions larger than in pure water and salt-water solutions. Moreover, delayed photon emission decay shows an intrinsic lifetime of about 5 microseconds both in solutions and in pure water that, along with secondary lifetimes induced by the presence of TEOS, could be related to the formation of different domains.

  8. Stress-induced waveguides in Nd:YAG by simultaneous double-beam irradiation with femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Gabriel R.; Romero, Carolina; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng; Varela, Óscar; García-García, Enrique; Méndez, Cruz; Camacho-López, Santiago; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of stress-induced waveguides in Nd:YAG (neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet, Nd:Y3Al5O12) by simultaneous double-beam irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. An interferometer was used to generate two femtosecond laser beams that, focused with certain lateral separation inside the crystal, produced two parallel damage tracks with a single scan. The propagation of the mechanical waves simultaneously created in both focal spots produced a highly symmetrical stress field that is clearly revealed in micro-luminescence maps. The optical properties of the double-beam waveguides are studied and compared to those of single-beam irradiation, showing relevant differences. The creation of more symmetric stress patterns and a slight reduction of propagation losses are explained in terms of the fact that simultaneous inscription allows for a drastic reduction in the magnitude of "incubation" effects related to the existence of pre-damaged states.

  9. Piezoelectrically-induced stress-luminescence phenomenon in CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yongbin [Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Wu, Zheng, E-mail: wuzheng@zjnu.cn [College of Geography and Environmental Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Jia, Yanmin, E-mail: ymjia@zjnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Liu, Yongsheng [Department of Physics, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Piezoelectrically-induced stress-luminescence in the CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} was investigated. Blue light that was visible to the naked eye could be observed in the dark when a pulse force of ∼7.7 kN was applied to the sample. The intensity of the stress-luminescence strongly depended on the magnitude of the applied force during a pulse cycle. The intensity decreased with repetitive application of pulse stress and was completely recovered after irradiation with ultraviolet light. It is suggested that the stress-luminescence effect in CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} arises from the piezoelectrically-induced de-trapping of the charge carriers. A CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} ceramic that exhibits a stress-luminescence effect has potential applications in smart stress optically-sensing devices. - Highlights: • The strong induced stress-luminescence in CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} was observed. • The stress-luminescent intensity strongly depends on the magnitude of force. • The stress-luminescence could be completely recovered after the UV irradiation. • The strong stress-luminescent effect is potential in stress-light sensors.

  10. Light emission from particle beam induced plasma - An overview

    CERN Document Server

    Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    Experiments to study the light emission from plasma produced by particle beams are presented. Fundamental aspects in comparison with discharge plasma formation are discussed. It is shown that the formation of excimer molecules is an important process. This paper summarizes various studies of particle beam induced light emission and presents first results of a direct comparison of light emission induced by electron- and ion beam excitation. Both high energy heavy ion beam and low energy electron beam experiments are described and an overview over applications in the form of light sources, lasers, and ionization devices is given.

  11. Beam induced damage - what is a safe beam?

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V; Brugger, M; Sapinski, M

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge of damage levels is vital to define protection schemes, beam loss monitor thresholds, safe beam limits for setting up the machines, etc. This talk will try to revisit our present knowledge and assumptions on damage levels in the LHC in terms of lost beam intensity, beam momentum and emittance. It is clear that with the LHC’s unprecedented energy reach, benchmark tests to cross-check energy deposition simulations for all possible energies before LHC start-up have not been possible. Also, the definition of when equipment is damaged is not always straight forward. In view of the obvious limitations to our knowledge of damage levels, operational commissioning and LHC running strategies will be re-discussed, open questions will be highlighted and proposals will be presented where possible.

  12. Electron-beam-induced conduction in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical conduction in polyethylene induced by the irradiation of the short-pulsed-electron-beam (100 nsec time width) consists of the fast and the slow components. The former is attributed to the carrier transport in the crystalline part and the latter to that in the amorphous part. Logarithmic plot (Scher-Montroll plot) of the slow part of the induced current vs. time gives a knee at time T sub(r), which is thought to be the transit time of the carrier front between electrodes. Simple calculation by the formula μ = L/T sub(r) E gives the apparent slow carrier mobility μ of 5.6 x 10-7 cm2/V.sec and 3.2 x 10-7 cm2/V.sec for the electron and the hole respectively at 343 K under the field E of 1.2 MV/cm for the sample thickness L of 12 μm. These apparent slow carrier mobilities are dependent on both the thickness and the field strength. These behavior are discussed in terms of Scher-Montroll theory on the transport in amorphous substances. The activation energy of the mobility is in good agreement with the apparent trap depth obtained from the TSC measurement. (author)

  13. Pressure- and light-induced luminescence of several aldehydes dissolved in polymer matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreger, Z.A.; Lang, J.M.; Drickamer, H.G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-03-14

    The pressure- and light-induced emissions of four aldehydes - benzaldehyde (BA), 4-(dimethylamino)-benzaldehyde (DMABA), 4-(dibutylamino)-benzaldehyde (DBABA), and 4-(dimethylamino)-1-naphthaldehyde (DMANA) - dissolved in solid polymers have been investigated. All compounds studied exhibit under pressure as well as under continuous irradiation a significant enhancement of the luminescence emission. In the case of substituted aldehydes, both the fluorescence and phosphorescence increase markedly when pressure increases. For BA only increasing phosphorescence is observed. These changes are explained in terms of a model which takes a mixing of the lowest triplet state character as a controlling factor of the pressure effect. Thus, the pressure-induced emission arises from a decrease of the n,{pi}{sup *} character of the lowest triplet state and as a result an increase of its radiative rate and decrease of the intersystem crossing. The lowest triplet state is also assumed to be a precursor for the light-induced effect. In this case, the emission is proposed to occur as a result of the triplet reactivity and consequently the creation of a light-emitting species. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  14. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other mater...

  15. WE-D-17A-06: Optically Stimulated Luminescence Detectors as ‘LET-Meters’ in Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate and evaluate the potential of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) for measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) in therapeutic proton beams. Methods: Batches of Al2O2:C OSLDs were irradiated with an absorbed dose of 0.2 Gy in un-modulated proton beams of varying LET (0.67 keV/μm to 2.58 keV/μm). The OSLDs were read using continuous wave (CW-OSL) and pulsed (P-OSL) stimulation modes. We parameterized and calibrated three characteristics of the OSL signals as functions of LET: CW-OSL curve shape, P-OSL curve shape and the ratio of the two OSL emission band intensities (ultraviolet/blue ratio). Calibration curves were created for each of these characteristics to describe their behaviors as functions of LET. The true LET values were determined using a validated Monte Carlo model of the proton therapy nozzle used to irradiate the OSLDs. We then irradiated batches of OSLDs with an absorbed dose of 0.2 Gy at various depths in two modulated proton beams (140 MeV, 4 cm wide spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) and 250 MeV, 10 cm wide SOBP). The LET values were calculated using the OSL response and the calibration curves. Finally, measured LET values were compared to the true values determined using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The CW-OSL curve shape, P-OSL curve shape and the ultraviolet/blue-ratio provided proton LET estimates within 12.4%, 5.7% and 30.9% of the true values, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that LET can be measured within 5.7% using Al2O3:C OSLDs in the therapeutic proton beams used in this investigation. From a single OSLD readout, it is possible to measure both the absorbed dose and LET. This has potential future applications in proton therapy quality assurance, particularly for treatment plans based on optimization of LET distributions. This research was partially supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

  16. Time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence of Al2O3:C for ion beam therapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukihara, Eduardo G; Doull, Brandon A; Ahmed, Md; Brons, Stephan; Tessonnier, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the time-resolved (TR) optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from Al2O3:C detectors and investigate methodologies to improve the accuracy of these detectors in ion beam therapy dosimetry, addressing the reduction in relative response to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles common to solid-state detectors. Al2O3:C OSL detectors (OSLDs) were exposed to proton, (4)He, (12)C and (16)O beams in 22 particle/energy combinations and read using a custom-built TR-OSL reader. The OSL response rOSL, relative to (60)Co gamma dose to water, and the ratio between the UV and blue OSL emission bands of Al2O3:C (UV/blue ratio) were determined as a function of the LET. Monte-Carlo simulations with the multi-purpose interaction and transport code FLUKA were used to estimate the absorbed doses and particle energy spectra in the different irradiation conditions. The OSL responses rOSL varied from 0.980 (0.73 keV μm(-1)) to 0.288 (120.8 keV μm(-1)). The OSL UV/blue ratio varied by a factor of two in the investigated LET range, but the variation for (12)C beams was only 11%. OSLDs were also irradiated at different depths of carbon ion spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs), where it was shown that doses could be obtained with an accuracy of ± 2.0% at the entrance channel and within the SOBP using correction factors calculated based on the OSL responses obtained in this study. The UV/blue ratio did not allow accurate estimation of the dose-averaged LET for (12)C SOBPs, although the values obtained can be explained with the data obtained in this study and the additional information provided by the Monte-Carlo simulations. The results demonstrate that accurate OSLD dosimetry can be performed in ion beam therapy using appropriate corrections for the OSL response. PMID:26270884

  17. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  18. Induced luminescence by charged particles on gaseous, liquid and solid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectral and a kinetic study of the scintillation induced by β and α particles in gaseous, liquid and solid argon have been made in the wavelength region comprised between 1100 and 3000A. The radiative lifetimes and some spectroscopic parameters of the lowest dimer states (1Σ+sub(u) and 3Σ+sub(u)) have been determined: tau0(1Σ+sub(u)) = 4.2ns; tau0(3Σ+sub(u)) = 3.1μs; ΔE(1Σ+sub(u)-3Σ+sub(u)) = 52 meV; hω = 230 cm-1. A non radiative de-excitation rate of the 3Σ+sub(u) state has been measured: approximately 2x10-17cm3s-1. By applying an electric field the contribution of the electron-ion recombination mechanism to the gaseous argon scintillation is studied. For condensed argon, the dependence of the ratio between the fluorescence and the phosphorescence intensities on the ionisation power of the impinging particle is verified. The continuum which extends from 1600 to 2900A and that is present only in the gas phase spectra, is ascribed to the radiative de-excitation of molecular ions. A time resolved study of the luminescence of high pressure (1-15atm) argon excited by a pulsed electric discharge has also been performed and is compared with that of the scintillation induced by nuclear particles

  19. Radiation-induced growth and isothermal decay of infrared-stimulated luminescence from feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guralnik, Benny; Li, Bo; Jain, Mayank;

    2015-01-01

    the growth and decay of laboratory-regenerated luminescence signals. Here we review a selection of common models describing the response of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) of feldspar to constant radiation and temperature as administered in the laboratory. We use this opportunity to introduce...

  20. Stimulated luminescence of AlN ceramics induced by ultraviolet radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Christensen, P.;

    2001-01-01

    Properties of thermally stimulated luminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of the ceramic material A1N-Y2O3 have been studied after exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The dosemeter material Al2O3 : C has been used for comparative measurements. The spectral sensitivity of...

  1. Transient luminescence induced by electrical refilling of charge carrier traps of dislocation network at hydrophilically bonded Si wafers interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dislocation network (DN) at hydrophilically bonded Si wafers interface is placed in space charge region (SCR) of a Schottky diode at a depth of about 150 nm from Schottky electrode for simultaneous investigation of its electrical and luminescent properties. Our recently proposed pulsed traps refilling enhanced luminescence (Pulsed-TREL) technique based on the effect of transient luminescence induced by refilling of charge carrier traps with electrical pulses is further developed and used as a tool to establish DN energy levels responsible for D1 band of dislocation-related luminescence in Si (DRL). In present work we do theoretical analysis and simulation of traps refilling kinetics dependence on refilling pulse magnitude (Vp) in two levels model: shallow and deep. The influence of initial charge state of deep level on shallow level occupation-Vp dependence is discussed. Characteristic features predicted by simulations are used for Pulsed-TREL experimental results interpretation. We conclude that only shallow (∼0.1 eV from conduction and valence band) energetic levels in the band gap participate in D1 DRL

  2. Deformation stimulated luminescence of polymer film induced by pulsed mechanical stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banishev, A.F., E-mail: banishev@mail.ru [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAS (ILIT RAS), Svyatoozerskaya Str. 1, 140700 Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Banishev, A.A. [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAS (ILIT RAS), Svyatoozerskaya Str. 1, 140700 Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-11

    The Letter investigates deformation stimulated luminescence of a polymer film deposited on a metallic substrate. It was found phenomenon of accumulation of light energy by a polymeric film in processes of photopolymerization and of stimulated emission of the accumulated energy under action of local mechanical stresses (or thermostresses). It has been established that the luminescence is a result of rearrangement of energy electronic levels in the process of relaxation of elastic deformation energy of the layer of polymer film contacting with the metallic substrate. A mechanism of excitation of polymer film deformation stimulated luminescence has been suggested. -- Highlights: → We find phenomenon of accumulation of light energy by a polymeric film. → We find luminescence of polymer film under action of mechanical stresses. → A mechanisms of accumulation of light energy by polymer film has been suggested. → A mechanisms of deformation stimulated luminescence been suggested.

  3. Electron beam induced modification of grafted polyamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that irradiation, when applied on its own or in combination with other physical and chemical treatments, can manifest in radiation damage to materials. Radiation processing technology focuses upon producing favourable modification of materials through use of relatively high dose and dose rates. Current interest is in modifying the thermal and electrical properties of textured polymers in an effort to improve safety and wear comfort of clothing. No less important is the production of textiles which are safe to use, both in homes and offices. Present investigations provide additional data in support of findings which show that polyamides, a particular class of textured polymer, are amenable to radiation processing. Accelerated electron beam irradiation of sheets of polyamide fibre results in induced grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acids. The degree of grafting is critically dependent upon irradiation dose and the extent of monomers dilution. Of particular importance is the high correlation which is found between degree of grafting and a decrease in the softening rate of the modified polyamide. A systematic modification of electrical conductivity is also observed. (author)

  4. Luminescence characterization of CdTe:In grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, F.; Tatarenko, S.; Saminadayar, K.; Bleuse, J.; Magnea, N.; Pautrat, J. L.

    1991-06-01

    We report on the incorporation of indium as a shallow donor in CdTe by molecular beam epitaxy. Using proper surface stoichiometry conditions, we demonstrate that it is possible to incorporate and activate up to 1018 cm-3 indium impurities. The doped layers have been characterized by secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage and Hall-effect measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) and resonant excitation of the PL clearly identify indium as the chemical dopant, acting as an effective mass donor with an energy of 14 meV. Incorrect stoichiometry conditions lead to a poor dopant activity and to complex centers formation.

  5. Laser-induced time-resolved luminescence of natural sillimanite Al2SiO5 and synthetic Al2SiO5 activated by chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence of natural sillimanite Al2SiO5 was studied by a laser-induced time-resolved technique combined with absorption spectroscopy. It was found that two red broad emission bands are connected to Fe3+ and Cr3+ luminescence centers. Chromium participation in luminescence was proved by the study of synthetic sillimanite activated by Cr. Several narrow emission lines have been found which were preliminary ascribed to Mn4+ and V2+ luminescence centers. - Highlights: ► We studied luminescence centers in natural sillimanite by time-resolved technique ► We proved Cr3+ emission by the study of artificial sillimanite activated by Cr ► We proved that broad red emission band with long decay is connected to Fe3+ ► We substantiate that narrow emission lines are connected to Mn4+ and V2+.

  6. Luminescence Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to instrumentation for stimulated luminescence studies, with special focus on luminescence dating using the natural dosimeters, quartz and feldspars. The chapter covers basic concepts in luminescence detection, and thermal and optical stimulation, and reference...

  7. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  8. Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Bassler, Niels;

    be seriously hampered by variations in detector efficiency (light output per energy imparted) due to high-LET effects and gradients along the physical size (~mm) of the detector crystals. Amorphous track models (ATMs) such as the Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach by Katz and co-workers or the ECLaT code by Geiß et...... assumptions in a variety of detectors. The library also includes simple particle transportation or can be interfaced to external transport codes. We applied our code to RL and OSL data from fiber-coupled Al2O3:C-detectors in a proton (nominal energies 10 MeV to 60 MeV) and a carbon beam (270 MeV/u). Results...

  9. Femtosecond Laser-Induced Upconversion Luminescence in Rare-Earth Ions by Nonresonant Multiphoton Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yunhua; Xu, Cheng; Zheng, Ye; Yang, Chengshuai; Liu, Pei; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong; Zhang, Shian

    2016-07-21

    The upconversion luminescence of rare-earth ions has attracted considerable interest because of its important applications in photoelectric conversion, color display, laser device, multiplexed biolabeling, and security printing. Previous studies mainly explored the upconversion luminescence generation through excited state absorption, energy transfer upconversion, and photon avalanche under the continuous wave laser excitation. Here, we focus on the upconversion luminescence generation through a nonresonant multiphoton absorption by using the intense femtosecond pulsed laser excitation and study the upconversion luminescence intensity control by varying the femtosecond laser phase and polarization. We show that the upconversion luminescence of rare-earth ions under the intense femtosecond laser field excitation is easy to be obtained due to the nonresonant multiphoton absorption through the nonlinear interaction between light and matter, which is not available by the continuous wave laser excitation in previous works. We also show that the upconversion luminescence intensity can be effectively controlled by varying the femtosecond pulsed laser phase and polarization, which can open a new technological opportunity to generate and control the upconversion luminescence of rare-earth ions and also can be further extended to the relevant application areas. PMID:27367751

  10. Self-assembly of α-6T Molecule on Ag(100) and Related STM Induced Luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-guo Chen; Chao Zhang; Rui Zhang; Zhen-chao Dong

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the self-assembly and light emission properties of organic αsexithiophene (α-6T) molecules on Ag(100) under different coverage by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM).At very low coverage,the α-6T molecules form a unique enantiomer by grouping four molecules into a windmill supermolecular structure.As the coverage is increased,α-6T molecules tend to pack side by side into a denser stripe structure.Further increase of the coverage will lead to the layer-by-layer growth of molecules on Ag(100)with the lower-layer stripe pattern serving as a template.Molecular fluorescence for α-6T molecules on Ag(100) at a coverage of five monolayers has been detected by light excitations,which indicates a well decoupled electronic states for the top-layer α-6T molecules.However,the STM induced luminescent spectra for the same sample reveal only plasmonic-like emission.The absence of intramolecular fluorescence in this case suggests that the electronic decoupling is not a sufficient condition for generating photon emission from molecules.For intramolecular fluorescence to occur,the orientation of the dynamic dipole moment of molecules and the energy-level alignment at the molecule-metal interface are also important so that molecules can be effectively excited through efficient dipolar coupling with local plasmons and by injecting holes into the molecules.

  11. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borglin, Johan [Biomedical Photonics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Guldbrand, Stina [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evenbratt, Hanne [Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemigården 4, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B., E-mail: marica.ericson@chem.gu.se [Biomedical Photonics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Grönbeck, Henrik [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 9, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  12. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region

  13. Sharpness changes of gaussian beams induced by spherically aberrated lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquero, G.; Mejías, P. M.; Martínez-Herrero, R.

    1994-04-01

    Sharpness changes of the spatial profile of a gaussian beam induced by spherically aberrated lenses are investigated in terms of the so-called kurtosis parameter. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally that, after a single aberrated lens, it is possible to get flatter and sharper beam intensity distributions than the input gaussian beam depending on the plane where the field is observed. Agreement between analytical and experimental results is discussed.

  14. Pile-up reduction by detector-induced beam suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of detector-induced beam suppression using a beam deflector and a high power pulse generator has been explored. The γ spectra of the 98Mo(α,xn) reactions are presented with and without beam suppression and it is seen that with the pile-up reduction system working, there is a considerable increase in the count rate in the 98Rn 653 keV peak, with almost the same background. (C.F.)

  15. Mechanistic studies of electron beam induced organic reactions for electron beam resist materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triphenylsulfonium methanesulfonate in the solid state was irradiated with an electron beam and the radiolytic products were characterized spectroscopically and chromatographically. The electron beam irradiation of the salt offered a new benzene-substituted sulfonium salt, together with methanesulfonic acids, diphenyl sulfides, and 2-, 3- and 4-phenylthiobyphenyls known as photoproducts of triphenylsulfonium salts. The formation of the salt appears to be due to the nature of electron beam induced reactions. (author)

  16. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  17. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Maas, D.; Sadeghian, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope(AFM) probes by He+beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the fina

  18. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Veldhoven, E. van; Maas, D.J.; Sadeghian Marnani, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope (AFM) probes by He+ beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+ beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the f

  19. Highly Nonlinear Luminescence Induced by Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Surfaces with Continuous-Wave Laser Illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    We report on highly nonlinear luminescence being observed from individual spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on a borosilicate glass surface and illuminated by continuous-wave (CW) lasers with relatively low power. The nonlinear luminescence shows optical super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit in three dimensions compared to the scatting of the excitation laser light. The luminescence intensity from most nanoparticles is proportional to the 5th--7th power of the excitation laser power and has wide excitation and emission spectra across the visible wavelength range. Strong nonlinear luminescence is only observed near the glass surface. High optical nonlinearity excited by low CW laser power is related to a long-lived dark state of the gold nanoparticles, where the excitation light is strongly absorbed. This phenomenon has potential biological applications in super-resolution and deep tissue imaging.

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  1. Luminescence-induced noise in single photon sources based on BBO crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machulka, Radek; Lemr, Karel; Haderka, Ondřej; Lamperti, Marco; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Single-photon sources based on the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion play a key role in various applied disciplines of quantum optics. We characterize the intrinsic luminescence of BBO crystals as a source of non-removable noise in quantum-optics experiments. By analysing its spectral and temporal properties together with its intensity, we evaluate the impact of luminescence on single-photon state preparation using spontaneous parametric down-conversion.

  2. Altering the luminescence properties of self-assembled quantum dots in GaAs by focused ion beam implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfuchs, Charlotte; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Greff, Markus K.; Wieck, Andreas D.; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-03-01

    Using quantum dots (QDs) as single-photon sources draws the attention in many quantum communication technologies. One pathway towards manufacturing single-photon sources is focused ion beam (FIB) implantation in molecular beam epitaxy-grown QD samples to disable all QDs around an intentional one for single photoluminescence (PL) emission. In this paper, we investigate the lattice disorders in the vicinity of InAs/GaAs QDs introduced by FIB implantation of gallium and indium ions. For high fluences, we achieve total elimination of the QDs photoluminescence. The impact of the different ion species and fluences is studied by low-temperature PL measurements. Furthermore, we deduce a simple model based on the trap-assisted recombination for the description of the degradation of the PL emission. It allows the determination of the fluences at which the PL emission is suppressed. Moreover, we identify the implantation-induced non-radiative defects by temperature-dependent PL measurements.

  3. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  4. In situ luminescence qualification of radiation damage in aluminas: F-aggregation and Al colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Correlation between IBIL and surface electrical degradation. •Potential to remotely monitor degradation of insulating materials. •Possibility for in situ recovery of the insulating properties by thermal annealing. -- Abstract: Recent work for in situ sequential measurement of ion beam induced luminescence and surface electrical conductivity has identified a correlation between surface electrical degradation and the luminescence for aluminas and sapphire during 45 keV He ion bombardment. Detailed measurements for the initial stages of degradation where rapid changes in the luminescence emission bands occur, have now identified processes related to oxygen vacancy (F centre) aggregation and aluminium colloid production as precursors to measurable surface electrical degradation in the irradiated region. This understanding enhances the possibility of using ion beam induced luminescence as a potential monitoring tool for material evolution and insulator surface degradation during irradiation, not only in ITER and future fusion devices, but also in present experimental reactor materials test programmes

  5. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  6. Ion beam induced alignment of semiconductor nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epitaxially grown GaAs nanowires were irradiated with different kinds of energetic ions. The growth substrates were GaAs, and the nanowires grow under an angle of 35 circle. A bending of the nanowires was observed under ion beam irradiation, where the direction and magnitude of the bending depends on the energy, the species, and fluence of the incident ions. By choosing suitable ion beam parameters the nanowires could be realigned towards the ion beam direction. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, computer simulations of the ion irradiation were done using a special version of TRIM which accounts for the geometry of the nanowires. The simulated distributions indicate vacancy and interstitial formation within the implantation cascade as the key mechanism for bending.

  7. Nitrite ion-induced fluorescence quenching of luminescent BSA-Au(25) nanoclusters: mechanism and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Wei, Shih-Chun; Chiu, Wei-Jane; Cang, Jinshun; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching is an interesting phenomenon which is highly useful in developing fluorescence based sensors. A thorough understanding of the fluorescence quenching mechanism is essential to develop efficient sensors. In this work, we investigate different aspects governing the nitrite ion-induced fluorescence quenching of luminescent bovine serum albumin stabilized gold nanoclusters (BSA-Au NCs) and their application for detection of nitrite in urine. The probable events leading to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by nitrite ions were discussed on the basis of the results obtained from ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fluorescence measurements, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies. These studies suggested that PL quenching mainly occurred through the oxidation of Au(0) atoms to Au(i) atoms in the core of BSA-Au NCs mediated by nitrite ions. The interference caused by certain species such as Hg(2+), Cu(2+), CN(-), S(2-), glutathione, cysteine, etc. during the nitrite determination by fluorescence quenching was eliminated by using masking agents and optimising the conditions. Based on these findings we proposed a BSA-Au NC-modified membrane based sensor which would be more convenient for the real life applications such as nitrite detection in urine samples. The BSA-Au NC-modified nitrocellulose membrane (NCM) enabled the detection of nitrite at a level as low as 100 nM in aqueous solutions. This Au NC-based paper probe was validated to exhibit good performance for nitrite analysis in environmental water and urine samples, which makes it useful in practical applications. PMID:24634911

  8. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  9. Relativistic-electron-beam-induced fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a focussed relativistic electron beam (REB) with a solid target has been investigated. The beam performance of the REB generator ''REIDEN III'' is 500 kV, 80 kA at a focal spot of 1.5 mm diameter, which gives 2X1012Wcm-2. High-temperature dense plasmas are produced at the focal point on the solid target. It expands radially along the target surface. The measured electron temperature (1-2 keV) and the ion energy (approximately 2 keV) endorse the existence of enhanced REB absorption in a dense plasma. The neutrons observed (approximately 109/shot, 2.45 MeV) in the case of a CD2 target are of thermonuclear origin and compatible with the plasma temperature. On the assumption that the electron beam of radius r is stopped at a length Λ and deposits its energy, the energy balance equation is approximately given by πr2Λn1kT=IVtau. On inserting beam current I, voltage V, pulse time tau and density n1, the energy deposition distance Λ can be estimated. For a fusion temperature of 1 keV, the distance Λ must be two orders of magnitude shorter than the simple classical stopping length, which seems to be due to non-linear coupling. A pellet implosion experiment of a multi-structure target has been performed. (author)

  10. Laser-induced luminescence of singlet molecular oxygen: generation by drugs and pigments of biological importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Sergei Y.; Krasnovsky, Alexander A., Jr.

    1991-05-01

    The photon counting technique and flashlaser excitation were applied to the timeresolved measurement of photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence in organic and aqueous media. The quantum yields for singlet oxygen generation have been measured in solutions of photosynthetic pigments synthetic and natural porphyrins porphyrins conjugated with monoclonal antibodies furocoumarins flavins fluorescein tetracycline and endogenous photosensitizers of human lens. The data obtained indicate that the measurement of the singlet oxygen luminescence is a reliable tool to study the photosensitizing activity of drugs and to elucidate primary mechanisms of photodynamic destruction. 1.

  11. Two-dimensional streaming flows induced by resonating, thin beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikalin, Tolga; Raman, Arvind; Garimella, Suresh V

    2003-10-01

    Miniaturized resonating slender beams are finding increased applications as fluidic actuators for portable electronics cooling. Piezoelectric and ultrasonic "fans" drive a flexural mode of the beam into resonance thus inducing a streaming flow, which can be used to cool microelectronic components. This paper presents analytical, computational, and experimental investigations of the incompressible two-dimensional streaming flows induced by resonating thin beams. Closed-form analytical streaming solutions are presented first for an infinite beam. These are used to motivate a computational scheme to predict the streaming flows from a baffled piezoelectric fan. Experiments are conducted to visualize the asymmetric streaming flows from a baffled piezoelectric fan and the experimental results are found to be in close agreement with the predicted results. The findings are expected to be of relevance in the optimal design and positioning of these solid-state devices in cooling applications. PMID:14587580

  12. Superconducting nanowires by electron-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Shamashis, E-mail: shamashis.sengupta@u-psud.fr [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3, UMR 8609, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); LPS, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Li, Chuan; Guéron, S.; Bouchiat, H. [LPS, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Baumier, Cedric; Fortuna, F. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3, UMR 8609, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Kasumov, Alik [LPS, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials, RAS, ac. Ossipyan, 6, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-26

    Superconducting nanowires can be fabricated by decomposition of an organometallic gas using a focused beam of Ga ions. However, physical damage and unintentional doping often result from the exposure to the ion beam, motivating the search for a means to achieve similar structures with a beam of electrons instead of ions. This has so far remained an experimental challenge. We report the fabrication of superconducting tungsten nanowires by electron-beam-induced-deposition, with critical temperature of 2.0 K and critical magnetic field of 3.7 T, and compare them with superconducting wires made with ions. This work is an important development for the template-free realization of nanoscale superconducting devices, without the requirement of an ion beam column.

  13. Superconducting nanowires by electron-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting nanowires can be fabricated by decomposition of an organometallic gas using a focused beam of Ga ions. However, physical damage and unintentional doping often result from the exposure to the ion beam, motivating the search for a means to achieve similar structures with a beam of electrons instead of ions. This has so far remained an experimental challenge. We report the fabrication of superconducting tungsten nanowires by electron-beam-induced-deposition, with critical temperature of 2.0 K and critical magnetic field of 3.7 T, and compare them with superconducting wires made with ions. This work is an important development for the template-free realization of nanoscale superconducting devices, without the requirement of an ion beam column

  14. Relaxation of Blazar Induced Pair Beams in Cosmic Voids

    OpenAIRE

    Miniati, Francesco; Elyiv, Andrii

    2012-01-01

    The stability properties of a low density ultra relativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could affect considerably the thermal history of the intergalactic medium and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar induced electromagnetic...

  15. Optical beam steering based on electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a scheme that provides all-optically-controlled steering of light beam. The system is based on steep dispersion of a coherently driven medium. Using the eikonal equation, we study the steering angle, the spread of the optical beam, and the limits set by residual absorption of the medium under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. Implementation of another scheme for ultrashort pulses is also discussed

  16. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm structures after 2013, as described by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), or can be used for rapid prototyping in research applications. The key point is to combine the throughp...

  17. Induced radioactivity of the IHEP proton synchrotron beam extraction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement results of induced radioactivity of the beam extraction equipment during 1972-1978 are presented. All the values are given to the moment of the accelerator stop. The experimental data permits to predict further possible variations of the induced radioactivity levels of the equipment. Given are the measures required for reduction of the accelerator equipment irradiation, which are the following: 1) compensation of residual distortion of a closed beam orbit in the course of the induction system operation; 2) limitation of the intensity of drop on the internal targets up to the 11 protons per target level over a cycle; 3) putting into operation the program control system for the duration of a current pulse of a linear accelerator to minimize the beam residues at the 70 GeV energy during physical experiments; 4) construction of the system of beam interception and cutting-off to ensure effective energy suppression of uncontrolled beam residues and localization of their radiation effect; 5) extraction of a high-energy beam out of the accelerator during the experiments (e.g., into the neutrino channel for apparatus adjusting) instead of its dropping on the interceptor-target; 6) beam orbit controlling in the case of multiturn injection into the accelerator

  18. Beam-Induced Damage Mechanisms and their Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid interaction of highly energetic particle beams with matter induces dynamic responses in the impacted component. If the beam pulse is sufficiently intense, extreme conditions can be reached, such as very high pressures, changes of material density, phase transitions, intense stress waves, material fragmentation and explosions. Even at lower intensities and longer time-scales, significant effects may be induced, such as vibrations, large oscillations, and permanent deformation of the impacted components. These lectures provide an introduction to the mechanisms that govern the thermomechanical phenomena induced by the interaction between particle beams and solids and to the analytical and numerical methods that are available for assessing the response of impacted components. An overview of the design principles of such devices is also provided, along with descriptions of material selection guidelines and the experimental tests that are required to validate materials and components exposed to interactio...

  19. Are laser-induced beams spin polarized?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buescher, Markus; Lehrach, Andreas; Raab, Natascha [Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics (JCHP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Engin, Ilhan; Hessan, Mohammad Aziz [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics (JCHP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Juelich Supercomputing Center (JSC), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institut fuer Laser-Plasma Physik (ILPP), Heinrich Heine Universitaet, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The physics of laser-plasma interactions has undergone dramatic developments in recent years, both experimentally and in the theoretical understanding of high-brightness light and particle sources. However, it is a yet untouched issue whether the laser-generated particle beams are or can be spin-polarized and, thus, whether laser-based polarized sources are conceivable. A first measurement of the degree of polarization of laser-accelerated protons have recently been carried out at the Duesseldorf Arcturus Laser Facility where proton beams of typically 3 MeV were produced in foil targets. The results have been analysed with the help of particle-in-cell simulations to follow the generation of static magnetic field gradients ({proportional_to}100s of Megagauss per micron) in thin foil targets. As a next step, measurements with unpolarized H{sub 2} (for proton acceleration) and {sup 3}He gas (for {sup 3}He ions) are planned and, finally, pre-polarized {sup 3}He will be used.

  20. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation in an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear contribution from ion-induced nucleation and consider this to be the first unambiguous observation of the ion-effect...... on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that...

  1. Relaxation of Blazar-induced Pair Beams in Cosmic Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, Francesco; Elyiv, Andrii

    2013-06-01

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  2. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miniati, Francesco [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Elyiv, Andrii, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  3. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  4. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ping; Salemink, Huub W M; Alkemade, Paul F A [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Veldhoven, Emile van; Maas, Diederik J [TNO Science and Industry, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Sanford, Colin A [Carl Zeiss SMT, Inc., One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D, E-mail: p.f.a.alkemade@tudelft.nl [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States)

    2010-11-12

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(C{sub P}CH{sub 3}) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions.

  5. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH3)3Pt(CPCH3) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions.

  6. Coordination-Induced Syntheses of Two Hybrid Framework Iodides: A Thermochromic Luminescent Thermometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren-Chun; Wang, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Wang, Meng-Qi; Sun, Min; Ding, Feng; Zhang, Dao-Jun; An, Yong-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Two new 3D hybrid framework iodides, Hmta[(Hmta)Ag4I4] (1; Hmta = hexamethylenetetramine) and [(Hmta)2Ag8I6]I2 (2), have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. Compound 1 consists of a neutral 3D framework built up from alternation of the tetrahedral Ag4I4 unit and Hmta with dia-b topology. Compound 2 features a 3D cationic framework with flu topology, constructed by cationic [Ag8I6](2+) units linked with Hmta. Tetrahedral Hmta plays crucial structure-directing roles in the formation of these 3D frameworks with high symmetry. The temperature-dependent photoluminescent measurement reveals luminescent thermochromism of the compounds, the emission maximum of which shows a gradual blue shift with increasing temperature. The results indicate that 1 is a promising wavelength- and intensity-dependent luminescent thermometer applicable in two different temperature ranges. PMID:27438190

  7. Radiation-induced damage analysed by luminescence methods in retrospective dosimetry and emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing risk of a mass casualty scenario following a large scale radiological accident or attack necessitates the development of appropriate dosimetric tools for emergency response. Luminescence dosimetry has been reliably applied for dose reconstruction in contaminated settlements for several decades and recent research into new materials carried close to the human body opens the possibility of estimating individual doses for accident and emergency dosimetry using the same technique. This paper reviews the luminescence research into materials useful for accident dosimetry and applications in retrospective dosimetry. The properties of the materials are critically discussed with regard to the requirements for population triage. It is concluded that electronic components found within portable electronic devices, such as e.g. mobile phones, are at present the most promising material to function as a fortuitous dosimeter in an emergency response.

  8. Metal ion binding sites of bacteriorhodopsin. Laser-induced lanthanide luminescence study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-excited luminescence lifetimes of lanthanide ions bound to bacteriorhodopsin have been measured in deionized membranes. The luminescence titration curve, as well as the binding curve of apomembrane (retinal-free) with Eu3+, has shown that the removal of the retinal does not significantly affect the affinity of Eu3+ for the two high affinity sites of bacteriorhodopsin. The D2O effects on decay rate constants indicate that Eu3+ bound to the high affinity sites of native membrane or apomembrane is coordinated by about six ligands in the first coordination sphere. Tb3+ is shown to be coordinated by four ligands. The data indicate that metal ions bind to the protein with a specific geometry. From intermetal energy transfer experiments using Eu3+-Pr3+, Tb3+-Ho3+, and Tb3+-Er3+, the distance between the two high affinity sites is estimated to be 7-8 A

  9. Induced base transistor fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-Y.; Liu, W. C.; Jame, M. S.; Wang, Y. H.; Luryi, S.

    1986-09-01

    A novel three-terminal hot-electron device, the induced base transistor (IBT), has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. Two-dimensional electron gas induced by the applied collector field in an undoped GaAs quantum well is used as the base of the IBT. The common-base current gain alpha has been achieved as high as 0.96 under a collector bias of 2.5 V and an emitter current of 3 mA.

  10. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiol, Andrew A.; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-belle; Tao, Ye; Watt, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique.

  11. Basic Studies on Radiation-Induced Luminescence from Natural Quartz and Its Application to Retrospective Dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Hiroki; 藤田, 博喜

    2006-01-01

    It is very important to have a method of estimating radiation-dose received by people or irradiated in environmental space, without having or setting conventional dosemeters. However, dose evaluation method is not always established in the case of emergency situation. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from naturally occurring quartz could be used to estimate such accidental radiation doses or not. When ionizing...

  12. Protonation-induced red-coloured circularly polarized luminescence of [5]carbohelicene fused by benzimidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hayato; Kubota, Takako; Yuasa, Junpei; Araki, Yasuyuki; Sakanoue, Tomo; Takenobu, Taishi; Wada, Takehiko; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Hasobe, Taku

    2016-07-12

    Benzimidazole-fused [5]carbohelicene ([5]HeliBI) was newly synthesized to examine the spectroscopic and chiroptical properties. The reversible protonation and deprotonation processes of [5]HeliBI were successfully investigated using (1)H NMR, absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements. We also confirmed the circularly polarized luminescence of protonated [5]HeliBI (H(+)-[5]HeliBI). This is the first observation of red-coloured CPL of a helicene derivative. PMID:27319321

  13. Origin of the visible light induced persistent luminescence of Cr3+-doped zinc gallate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourier, Didier; Bessière, Aurélie; Sharma, Suchinder. K.; Binet, Laurent; Viana, Bruno; Basavaraju, Neelima; Priolkar, Kaustubh R.

    2014-07-01

    ZnGa2O4:Cr3+ (ZGO:Cr) is a very bright persistent phosphor able to emit a near infrared light for hours following a UV (band to band excitation) or visible (Cr3 excitation) illumination. As such it serves as an outstanding biomarker for in vivo imaging. Persistent luminescence, due to trapping of electrons/holes at point defects, is studied here on a series of ZGO:Cr spinel compounds where the introduction of defects is controlled by varying the Zn/(Ga+Cr) nominal ratio during synthesis. Simulation of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra revealed up to six types of Cr3+ ions with different neighboring defects and correlated to four emission lines in low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. Of particular importance, three EPR signals were attributed to Cr3+ with a pair of neighboring ZnGa' and GaZn0° antisite defects. They were identified to the emission line N2 that plays a key role in the persistent luminescence mechanism for both storage of visible excitation and persistent luminescence emission. A model is proposed whereby the local electric field at Cr3+ created by the two neighboring antisite defects triggers the electron-hole separation and trapping upon excitation of Cr3+. The process is equivalent to a photoinduced electron transfer from a donor (here ZnGa') to an acceptor (here GaZn0°) observed in some molecular systems.

  14. Luminescence properties of alkalifeldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldspar emits various kinds of strong luminescences associated with radiation irradiation and subsequent thermal and/or optical stimulation. These luminescences reflect the physico-chemical compositions, thermal conditions, crystal structures and also amounts of exposed radiation of the minerals, so they are useful techniques for estimation of dating, thermal history, forming condition of the minerals and so on. Especially, since Huett et al. (1988) introduced the infrared light as a stimulation source for feldspar, both basic and applied fields have been investigated extensively (Spooner, 1992; Prescott et al., 1994; Krbetschek et al., 1995; Botter-Jensen, 1997; Clarke et al., 1997; Clark et al., 1997). Generally most of measurements is conducted with photon-counting method using photo-multipliers (PMTs), whereas our laboratory has developed several convenient techniques using color photography, which have been verified to be useful for qualitative analysis of 2-dimensional luminescence images (Hashimoto et al., 1995, 1997). In this study, some feldspars were irradiated artificially and their several radiation-induced luminescences were examined from aspects of luminescence spectra, bleaching properties, etc. In particular, alkali feldspars having intense luminescences were subjected to Thermoluminescence (TL), Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and ESR measurements. Their properties were discussed with respect of bleaching behavior and applicability for OSL-dating. (author)

  15. Effect of induced spatial incoherence on flow induced laser beam deflection: Analytic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytic results are presented for the laser beam deflection rate in the case of spatial and temporal smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). It is shown that for flow perpendicular to the beam propagation direction with Mach number M, temporal smoothing decreases the beam deflection rate for M>1, but may increase it for M<1 and weak acoustic wave damping. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Electron-beam induced synthesis of nanostructures: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, I. G.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Bezugly, V.; Kunstmann, J.; Gemming, T.; Liu, Z.; Cuniberti, G.; Rümmeli, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    As the success of nanostructures grows in modern society so does the importance of our ability to control their synthesis in precise manners, often with atomic precision as this can directly affect the final properties of the nanostructures. Hence it is crucial to have both deep insight, ideally with real-time temporal resolution, and precise control during the fabrication of nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopy offers these attributes potentially providing atomic resolution with near real time temporal resolution. In addition, one can fabricate nanostructures in situ in a TEM. This can be achieved with the use of environmental electron microscopes and/or specialized specimen holders. A rather simpler and rapidly growing approach is to take advantage of the imaging electron beam as a tool for in situ reactions. This is possible because there is a wealth of electron specimen interactions, which, when implemented under controlled conditions, enable different approaches to fabricate nanostructures. Moreover, when using the electron beam to drive reactions no specialized specimen holders or peripheral equipment is required. This review is dedicated to explore the body of work available on electron-beam induced synthesis techniques with in situ capabilities. Particular emphasis is placed on the electron beam-induced synthesis of nanostructures conducted inside a TEM, viz. the e-beam is the sole (or primary) agent triggering and driving the synthesis process.

  17. MgAl2O4 spinel: Synthesis, carbon incorporation and defect-induced luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sanu S.; Gupta, Santosh K.; Grover, V.; Muthe, K. P.; Natarajan, V.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    The present work explores the synthesis of carbon-doped MgAl2O4 and investigates the effect of doping on the photophysical properties of MgAl2O4. Pure MgAl2O4 spinel was synthesized by gel combustion followed by annealing at 1100 °C. The carbon doping was performed by two methods. The first method involved heating the sample with electron beam (from electron gun) in graphite crucible (A) and second method involved heating the sample up to 2100 °C in graphite furnace (B). The photoluminescence spectroscopy exhibited defect-induced emissions with enhanced intensity in the case of sample B. A significant blue shift in the emission band was also observed in the case of sample B. The photoluminescence decay studies indicated that multiple trapping and detrapping events are experienced before the radiative recombination process, which eventually occurs. Average lifetime was observed to be 4.83 μs which is typical of defect-related emission. The results were complimented by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. The CIE co-ordinates for sample B were found to be x = 0.231 and y = 0.227 which establish it as a blue-emitter.

  18. Luminescence of nuclear-induced rare-gas plasmas in near infrared spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. A.; Gorbunov, V. V.; Melnikov, S. P.; Mukhamatullin, A. Kh.; Pikulev, A. A.; Sinitsyn, A. V.; Sinyanskii, A. A.; Tsvetkov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation results of the spectral-luminescent characteristics of rare gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe and their binary mixtures He-Ne(Ar,Kr,Xe), Ne-Ar(Kr,Xe), Ar-Kr(Xe), and Kr-Xe under high pressures in the 740-1100 nm spectral range are presented. Excitation of gas media was carried out by uranium fission fragments. The information on the absolute intensities of the spectral lines belonging to the transitions of Nel, An, KrI, and XeI was obtained. The lines belonging to atomic transitions of 0, N, and C were also observed.

  19. Ligand Induced Anionic Cuprous Cyanide Framework for Cupric Ion Turn on Luminescence Sensing and Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Qiu-Cheng; Yu, Ya-Dong; Huang, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    A new microporous luminescent coordination polymer [(CH3)2NH2]·[Cu2(CN)3] (1) with channels occupied by dimethylamine cations was synthesized due to the inducing effect of 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole. Complex 1 exhibits bright-green emission in the solid state, and its emission intensity would be significantly enhanced, especially by DMAc and cupric ion after immersing the as-synthesized crystals of 1 into common organic solvents or methanol solutions of various metal ions. In addition, 1 exhibits photocatalytic activity for the degradation of RhB and MB under natural light and is stable during the photocatalysis process. Thus, 1 can act as a multifunctional material for selectively sensing of Cu(2+) and effectively photocatalytic degradation of dyes. PMID:26671534

  20. Mobile interstitial model and mobile electron model of mechano-induced luminescence in coloured alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study is made on the mobile interstitial and mobile electron models of mechano-induced luminescence in coloured alkali halide crystals. Equations derived indicate that the mechanoluminescence intensity should depend on several factors like strain rate, applied stress, temperature, density of F-centres and volume of crystal. The equations also involve the efficiency and decay time of mechanoluminescence. Results of mobile interstitial and mobile electron models are compared with the experimental observations, which indicated that the latter is more suitable as compared to the former. From the temperature dependence of ML, the energy gaps between the dislocation band and ground state of F-centre is calculated which are 0.08, 0.072 and 0.09 eV for KCl, KBr and NaCl crystals, respectively. The theory predicts that the decay of ML intensity is related to the process of stress relaxation in crystals. (author). 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Electromagnetic forces on plasmonic nanoparticles induced by fast electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total momentum transfer from fast electron beams, like those employed in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), to plasmonic nanoparticles is calculated. The momentum transfer is obtained by integrating the electromagnetic forces acting on the particles over time. Numerical results for single and dimer metallic nanoparticles are presented, for sizes ranging between 2 and 80 nm. We analyze the momentum transfer in the case of metallic dimers where the different relevant parameters such as particle size, interparticle distance, and electron beam impact parameter are modified. It is shown that depending on the specific values of the parameters, the total momentum transfer yields a force that can be either attractive or repulsive. The time-average forces calculated for electron beams commonly employed in STEM are on the order of piconewtons, comparable in magnitude to optical forces and are thus capable of producing movement in the nanoparticles. This effect can be exploited in mechanical control of nanoparticle induced motion.

  2. Limits for Beam Induced Damage: Reckless or too Cautious?

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Accidental events implying direct beam impacts on collimators are of the utmost importance as they may lead to serious limitations of the overall LHC Performance. In order to assess damage threshold of components impacted by high energy density beams, entailing changes of phase and extreme pressures, state-of-the-art numerical simulation methods are required. In this paper, a review of the different dynamic response regimes induced by particle beams is given along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each regime. Particular attention is paid to the most critical case, that of shock waves, for which standard Finite Element codes are totally unfit. A novel category of numerical tools, named Hydrocodes, has been adapted and used to analyse the consequences of an asynchronous beam abort on Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT). A number of simulations has been carried out with varying beam energy, number of bunches and bunch sizes allowing to identify different damage levels for the TCT up to catastr...

  3. Quantitative Traits of Ion Beam Induced Mutagenesis in Triticum aestivum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan FANG; Zhen JIAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this study was to elucidate the quantitative traits of plants mutagenized by ion beam. [Method] The particular variation phenotypes, a- gronomic traits, and protein and wet gluten contents of progenies derived from the same ion beam induced mutant were investigated. [Result] Morphological polymor- phism existed in some individuals. Plant height, spike length and protein content were significantly influenced by ion beam, and effective tiller number and wet gluten content were moderately influenced. Multiple comparisons of all the indices within groups indicated genomic instability among these groups. Coefficient of variation im- plied the differences within group were very low. [Conclusion] Ion beam irradiation displayed characteristics of multi-directivity and non-directiveness. It aroused multiple variations in the same mutant. Instability among progeny indicates cells had different fate even in the same irradiated tissue. It may take several generations for mutants to stabilize particular phenotypes. The effects of ion beam irradiation may be the in- terrelated direct irradiation damage, indirect irradiation damage and late effect, such as bystander effect and adaptive response.

  4. Electron beam induced current in photovoltaics with high recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Koirala, Prakash; Collins, Robert W.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Ideally, an EBIC measurement reflects the spatially resolved quantum efficiency of the device. In this work, a model for EBIC measurements is presented which applies when recombination within the depletion region is substantial. This model is motivated by cross-sectional EBIC experiments on CdS-CdTe photovoltaic cells which show th...

  5. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Schmied; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Robert Winkler; Rack, Phillip D; Harald Plank

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity r...

  6. Short-living centers of color and luminescence in LiNbO3 crystals irradiated by pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper presents data on investigation into spectra of short-living optical absorption (SOA) and of luminescence inducted in lithium niobate crystals under pulsed electron irradiation (0.25 MeV, 20 ns, 15-160 mJ/Cm2) within 80-350 K temperature range. Within SOA spectra one distinguished anisotropic band with maximums at 1.6 and 4.0 eV resulting from capture of one or two conduction electrons for bunches (NbNb - NbLi) respectively as well as, slightly polarized bands at 2.5 and 3.3 eV caused by holes localized in Li and Nb vacancies. Cathodoluminescence (CL) of lithium niobate crystals is characterized by quick (τ < 4 ns) dying down. Variation of initial defect nature of crystal via their regeneration under 830 K is shown to result in similar for CL and for SOA variation of spectra

  7. Field-induced single-ion magnetic behaviour in a highly luminescent Er3+ complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of a perfluorinated Er3+ complex, with record luminescent properties, have been investigated. [Er(F-TPIP)3] displays thermally activated slow relaxation of the magnetisation under an applied HDC field of 500 Oe. The effective relaxation barrier Eeff is found to be 26.8 K (18.6 cm−1). At zero static field, efficient quantum tunnelling of the magnetization occurs. - Highlights: • Under DC field, slow relaxation of magnetisation occurs with a barrier of 27 K. • Efficient quantum tunnelling of magnetization is displayed at zero static field. • The lifetime value of the 4I13/2 multiplet is τ = 0.28 ms. • [Er(F-TPIP)3] complex can be considered a multifunctional material

  8. A critical literature review of focused electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Hagen, C. W.

    2008-10-01

    An extensive review is given of the results from literature on electron beam induced deposition. Electron beam induced deposition is a complex process, where many and often mutually dependent factors are involved. The process has been studied by many over many years in many different experimental setups, so it is not surprising that there is a great variety of experimental results. To come to a better understanding of the process, it is important to see to which extent the experimental results are consistent with each other and with the existing model. All results from literature were categorized by sorting the data according to the specific parameter that was varied (current density, acceleration voltage, scan patterns, etc.). Each of these parameters can have an effect on the final deposit properties, such as the physical dimensions, the composition, the morphology, or the conductivity. For each parameter-property combination, the available data are discussed and (as far as possible) interpreted. By combining models for electron scattering in a solid, two different growth regimes, and electron beam induced heating, the majority of the experimental results were explained qualitatively. This indicates that the physical processes are well understood, although quantitatively speaking the models can still be improved. The review makes clear that several major issues remain. One issue encountered when interpreting results from literature is the lack of data. Often, important parameters (such as the local precursor pressure) are not reported, which can complicate interpretation of the results. Another issue is the fact that the cross section for electron induced dissociation is unknown. In a number of cases, a correlation between the vertical growth rate and the secondary electron yield was found, which suggests that the secondary electrons dominate the dissociation rather than the primary electrons. Conclusive evidence for this hypothesis has not been found. Finally

  9. Irradiation-induced reduction and luminescence properties of Sm2+ doped in BaBPO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usually, Sm2+ ions could be reduced by heating the materials in reducing atmospheres. Exposure to ionizing radiations is also known to cause Sm3+→Sm2+ conversion. In this work, BaBPO5 doped with the samarium ion was prepared by high temperature solid-state reaction. Sm2+ ions were obtained by two different reduction methods, i.e., heating in H2 reduced atmosphere and X-ray irradiation. The measurements of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were investigated. It is found that the conversion of Sm3+→Sm2+ is very efficient in BaBPO5 hosts after X-ray irradiation. Sm2+ ions under these two reduction methods exhibit different characteristics that were studied by measurements of luminescence and decay. The results showed that the luminescence properties of Sm2+ ions in BaBPO5 were highly dependent on the sample preparation conditions. - Graphical abstract: The Sm doped in BaBPO5 as-prepared in air contains only Sm3+ ions and shows its fluorescence bands due to the 4G5/2 to 6H5/2, 6H7/2, 6H9/2, and 6H11/2 transitions (a) under the excitation of 488 nm Ar+-ion laser. The emission spectra of the samples after X-ray subsequentially irradiations are characteristic of Sm2+ transitions between the energy levels of 4f6 electronic configurations (b). It is found that the conversion of Sm3+→Sm2+ is very efficient in BaBPO5 hosts after X-ray irradiation

  10. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (<100 nm), a sensitive detection system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique

  11. Semiconductor characterization by scanning ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Olivero, P; Manfredotti, C; Jaksic, M; Giudice, A Lo; Fizzotti, F; Colombo, E

    2016-01-01

    The acronym IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) was coined in early 1990's to indicate a scanning microscopy technique which uses MeV ion beams as probes to image the basic electronic properties of semiconductor materials and devices. Since then, IBIC has become a widespread analytical technique to characterize materials for electronics or for radiation detection, as testified by more than 200 papers published so far in peer-reviewed journals. Its success stems from the valuable information IBIC can provide on charge transport phenomena occurring in finished devices, not easily obtainable by other analytical techniques. However, IBIC analysis requires a robust theoretical background to correctly interpret experimental data. In order to illustrate the importance of using a rigorous mathematical formalism, we present in this paper a benchmark IBIC experiment aimed to test the validity of the interpretative model based on the Gunn's theorem and to provide an example of the analytical capability of IBIC to characteriz...

  12. Electron-beam-induced conduction in Si02 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of an investigation into electron-beam-induced conduction (EBIC) in films of Si02 thermally grown on a silicon substrate. A strong dependence on the polarity of the voltage applied during irradiation is observed. For negative applied voltages which correspond to an electron flow to the silicon substrate, the EBIC gain curves follow the the predictions of a recent theory. For positive voltages an electron emission analogous to internal photoemission occurs from the silicon substrate as soon as the beam begins to penetrate into the silicon. In some samples this emission current was sufficiently low that an EBIC gain curve due to hole flow to the substrate was observed. However, only by taking into account the dispersive nature of hole transport could agreement between experiment and the theory be obtained. Finally, effects due to previous irradiation are observed and interpreted as the generation of traps and/or a space charge build-up during the initial irradiation. (author)

  13. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.;

    The effect of ions in aerosol nucleation is a subject where much remains to be discovered. That ions can enhance nucleation has been shown by theory, observations, and experiments. However, the exact mechanism still remains to be determined. One question is if the nature of the ionization affects...... the nucleation. This is an essential question since many experiments have been performed using radioactive sources that ionize differently than the cosmic rays which are responsible for the majority of atmospheric ionization. Here we report on an experimental study of sulphuric acid aerosol nucleation under near...... atmospheric conditions using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear and significant contribution from ion induced nucleation and consider this to be an unambiguous observation of the ion-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions not far...

  14. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  15. Change of silica luminescence due to fast hydrogen ion bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhurenko Vitaliy P.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the luminescence of silica (KV-type induced by beam of hydrogen ions with the energy of 210 keV per nucleon. An average implantation dose of up to 3.5 × 1021 cm−3 (5 × 1010 Gy was accumulated during irradiation over an extended period. The luminescent spectra consisted of the blue band (maximum at 456 nm and the red band (650 nm in the visible range. It was shown that increase in the absorption dose had an effect on the silica luminescence. It was found that the most significant changes in the spectrum occurred during the dose accumulation in the region of 550–700 nm. The shape of the spectrum of the luminescent radiation in this wavelength range was affected both by the oxygen deficient centres (blue band and non-bridging oxygen hole centers (red band. Mathematical processing of the experimental spectra permitted to identify contributions to the luminescent radiation coming from both types of defects.

  16. Mapping ion beam induced current changes in a commercial MOSFET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, A.D.C.; Thompson, S.; Yang, C. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, D.N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We demonstrate a novel nuclear microprobe imaging and analysis modality for micrometre-scale field effect transistor devices probed with focused beams of MeV ions. By recording the drain current as a function of time during ion irradiation it is possible to identify current transients induced by the passage of single ions through the sensitive structures of the device. This modality takes advantage of the fact that the ionization produced by the passage of a single ion acts in an equivalent way to a transient change in the gate bias which therefore modulates the drain current as a function of time. This differs from the traditional ion beam induced charge technique where the ionization drifts in an internal electric field and induces a single charge pulse in an electrode applied to the device. Instead a richer variety of phenomena are observed, with different time constants which depend on the proximity of the ion strike to the channel of the device. The signals may be used to examine device function, radiation sensitivity or to count ion impacts within the channel.

  17. Laser-Induced Luminescence Study of Samarium(III) Thiodiglycolate Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Dong Yong; Lee, Eil Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kimura, Takaumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2003-09-15

    The hydration number of Sm(III) has been obtained by using the difference in the decay rate constants in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O solutions. In general, k{sub obs}(H{sub 2}O) >> k{sub obs}(D{sub 2}O), k{sub obs}(D{sub 2}O) ≅ constant, and ligands are not as effective in causing non-radiative de-excitation of the excited state. For Sm(III), a relationship has been proposed in which the hydration number is related directly to the decay rate constant in H{sub 2}O. If there is no contribution from the ligand to the de-excitation of the luminescence excited state, the hydration of Sm(III) in the different complexes can be obtained directly from the values of k{sub obs} measured in H{sub 2}O. The number and the geometric distribution of solvent molecules around a metal ion in solution are an important factor in the structural and chemical behavior of cation. Indeed, such information has been utilized to design novel ionophores and receptors. However, there have been few studies of hydration structure for lanthanides. The fact that many f-element salts which have relatively large lattice energies are fairly soluble in water is a reflection of the strength of the interactions between the metal cations and water molecules.

  18. Industrial perspective on focused electron beam-induced processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, Tristan; Hofmann, Thorsten; Edinger, Klaus [Betriebsstaette Rossdorf, Carl Zeiss SMS GmbH, Rossdorf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    After a short overview of the historical developments of the technique of gas-assisted focused electron beam-induced processing (mostly deposition and etching), this paper deals with the applications of this technology to photolithographic mask repair. A commented list of results is shown on different mask types, for different types of defects, and at different node generations. The scope of this article is double: summarize the state of the art in a fast-paced highly specific industrial environment driven by ''Moore's law'' and feedback to academic researchers some technologically relevant directions for further investigations. (orig.)

  19. Volume changes in glass induced by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three glasses (float, borosilicate float and Schott D263 glasses) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 0.21–318.5 kC/m2. Volume changes induced by electron bombarding were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. Incubation doses, related to mobility of alkali ions, were measured. Low doses showed compaction of all glasses while higher doses revealed volume inflation, except for borosilicate float glass. Both surfaces of float glass were irradiated and significant differences between them were found

  20. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, W.; Zhou, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Walz, D.; England, J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Muggli, P.

    2013-10-01

    Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head) of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame) of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided) causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy) and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs) for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  1. Focused ion beam induced deflections of freestanding thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prominent deflections are shown to occur in freestanding silicon nitride thin membranes when exposed to a 50 keV gallium focused ion beam for ion doses between 1014 and 1017 ions/cm2. Atomic force microscope topographs were used to quantify elevations on the irradiated side and corresponding depressions of comparable magnitude on the back side, thus indicating that what at first appeared to be protrusions are actually the result of membrane deflections. The shape in high-stress silicon nitride is remarkably flat-topped and differs from that in low-stress silicon nitride. Ion beam induced biaxial compressive stress generation, which is a known deformation mechanism for other amorphous materials at higher ion energies, is hypothesized to be the origin of the deflection. A continuum mechanical model based on this assumption convincingly reproduces the profiles for both low-stress and high-stress membranes and provides a family of unusual shapes that can be created by deflection of freestanding thin films under beam irradiation

  2. Application of cold beam of atoms and molecules for studying luminescence of oxygen atoms stimulated by metastable helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a method for creating a high flux beam of cold atoms and molecules. By using this beam method, spectroscopic studies of the afterglow of oxygen-helium gas mixtures at cryogenic temperatures were performed. The cooling by helium vapor of a helium jet containing trace amounts of oxygen after passing through a radiofrequency discharge zone led to the observation of strong emissions from atomic oxygen. The effect results from the increased efficiency of energy transfer from metastable helium atoms and molecules to the atomic oxygen in the cold dense helium vapor. The effect might find application for the detection of small quantities of impurities in helium gas as well as possible laser action

  3. Rapid ion-beam-induced Ostwald ripening in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-beam-induced grain coarsening in initially amorphous (Zr,Y)Ox layers is observed by atomic force microscopy. The films were bombarded at room temperature. Grain-boundary grooves indicate that the larger grains have a diameter of about 83 nm at 2 min, and 131 nm at 5 min. Up to 5 min, the grain size evolves with time as tβ, with β=0.5±0.2. Based on a new parametrization of ion-induced grain-boundary translation, we derive a theoretical estimate of β=3/7, consistent with our measurement. By 7.5 min, many of the grain-boundary grooves are shallow and indistinct, suggesting that the surviving grains are mutually well aligned. Such rapid grain growth at room temperature is unusual and is enabled by the ion bombardment. Similar grain growth processes are expected during ion-beam-assisted deposition film growth. The status of ion-textured yttria stabilized zirconia films as buffer layers for high-current high-temperature superconducting films is briefly summarized

  4. Electron-Beam Induced Transformations of Layered Tin Dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, E; Huang, Y; Komsa, H-P; Ghorbani-Asl, M; Krasheninnikov, A V; Sutter, P

    2016-07-13

    By combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated analytical methods with first-principles calculations, we study the behavior of layered tin dichalcogenides under electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate that the controllable removal of chalcogen atoms due to electron irradiation, at both room and elevated temperatures, gives rise to transformations in the atomic structure of Sn-S and Sn-Se systems so that new phases with different properties can be induced. In particular, rhombohedral layered SnS2 and SnSe2 can be transformed via electron beam induced loss of chalcogen atoms into highly anisotropic orthorhombic layered SnS and SnSe. A striking dependence of the layer orientation of the resulting SnS-parallel to the layers of ultrathin SnS2 starting material, but slanted for transformations of thicker few-layer SnS2-is rationalized by a transformation pathway in which vacancies group into ordered S-vacancy lines, which convert via a Sn2S3 intermediate to SnS. Absence of a stable Sn2Se3 intermediate precludes this pathway for the selenides, hence SnSe2 always transforms into basal plane oriented SnSe. Our results provide microscopic insights into the transformation mechanism and show how irradiation can be used to tune the properties of layered tin chalcogenides for applications in electronics, catalysis, or energy storage. PMID:27336595

  5. SOME PROPERTIES OF ATOMIC BEAM PRODUCED BY LASER INDUCED ABLATION OF Li TARGET

    OpenAIRE

    Harnafi, M.; Dubreuil, B.

    1987-01-01

    In this experiment, pulsed atomic beams produced in vacuum by laser induced ablation from lithium target are analyzed by laser-induced fluorescsence (LIF). As an application of this atomic beam production technique, the l-mixing processes induced in the n = 9, 10 Li Rydberg states by collisions with CO2 molecules have been investigated.

  6. Time-evolving photo-induced changes of luminescent and spectral properties of PbS quantum dots sols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstropiev, S. K.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Bagrov, I. V.; Belousova, I. M.; Kiselev, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Light irradiation influence on spectral and luminescent properties of PbS sol, stabilized by high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone, was studied as a time-evolving process. Uniform and stable for at least three months PbS/PVP suspensions were obtained with an average quantum dots size of 4 nm. Photoluminescent spectra of the suspensions showed wide intensive emission at 1000-1400 nm upon excitation by visible light. Luminescence intensities of all the suspensions demonstrate nonlinear dependences on the exciting radiation intensity. Experimental results show that light irradiation during luminescence measurements even with low excitation power density can significantly change luminescent and spectral properties of PbS quantum dots. The dependences found can be useful in preparation of a variety of quantum dots-containing photonics materials.

  7. Radiation-induced luminescence images and TL-property changes with thermal annealing treatment on Japanese twin quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional patterns of radiation-induced phenomena, including thermoluminescence (TL), after-glow (AG) and colour centre (CC) images, showed significantly different behaviour between the core and outer parts of a Japanese twin quartz slice. Intense smoky colouration and blue luminescence appeared in the core, giving a good inverse correlation with the distribution of aluminium impurity. In addition, there was a characteristic red AG in the outer parts of the crystal. The response to radiation of the blue TL (BTL) from the outer part of the as-received quartz slice segments revealed poor BTL sensitivity and a tendency to saturation at low doses. The outer part was especially characterized by high contents of both aluminium and OH impurity, although the annealing treatments greatly eliminated the OH concentrations as water vapour. The annealing treatment (50 hr at 1000 deg. C) of the slice segments brought on a remarkable changes to the TL-property; the core part was converted from BTL having a broad peak around 480 nm at 230 deg. C into a new BTL peak around 100 deg. C, and broad spectrum ranging from BTL to red TL (RTL) at 300 deg. C. The outer part was characterized by a change into a new single 100 deg. C BTL peak from some weak peaks of the as-received segment. On the basis of these radiation-induced phenomena, a new formation mechanism for twin quartz is proposed. We propose that the core part was formed first and was followed by the formation of the out part from hydrothermal solution and with a higher aluminium concentration

  8. Comparison of luminescence spectra of natural spodumene under KrCl laser and e-beam excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral characteristics of pulsed photoluminescence (PL) and pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) of a natural spodumene were investigated. PL was excited by laser radiation at 222 nm with pulse duration of 10 ns at FWHM. PCL was excited by electron beams with pulse duration from 0.1 up to 4 ns and with current densities of 40-200 A/cm2. There was a dominant broad band at 600 nm due to the manganese impurity in PCL spectra. But in PL spectra, the orange band had the intensity comparable with intensities of intrinsic defect bands. At sample cooling by liquid nitrogen, the intensity of orange band in the PCL spectrum increased by two times and the short-wave shoulder of the band reduced

  9. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-15

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  10. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 1034 cm-2s-1 in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  11. An optimized nanoparticle separator enabled by electron beam induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Size-based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct-write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism for depositing/etching nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam-interaction region. Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub-50 nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular-sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects) and (2) preserved the fidelity of the spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size-based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  12. Ion-beam-induced amorphous structures in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic structure of ion-beam-induced amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has been investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The electron intensities of halo patterns recorded on imaging plates were digitized quantitatively to extract reduced interference functions. We demonstrated the relationship between maximum scattering vector (Qmax) measured in scattering experiments and the resolution of the corresponding pair-distribution function by changing Qmax values from 160 to 230 nm-1. The results revealed that the C-C peak becomes broadened and eventually a shoulder as the Qmax value becomes shorter, indicating that Qmax values of -1 measured in previous studies are not enough to detect C-C homonuclear bonds in a-SiC. We are the first to reveal the existence of C-C and Si-Si homonuclear bonds in a-SiC using a diffraction technique

  13. Ion beam induced conductivity in chemically vapor deposited diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond films deposited by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique onto quartz substrates have been irradiated with 100 keV C and 320 keV Xe ions at room temperature and at 200 degree C. The dose dependence of the electrical conductivity measured in situ exhibited complicated, nonmonotonic behavior. High doses were found to induce an increase of up to ten orders of magnitude in the electrical conductivity of the film. The dose dependence of the conductivity for the CVD films was found to be very similar to that measured for natural, type IIa, single-crystal diamonds irradiated under identical conditions. This result suggests that the conduction mechanism in ion beam irradiated polycrystalline CVD diamond films is not dominated by grain boundaries and graphitic impurities as one might have expected, but rather is determined by the intrinsic properties of diamond itself

  14. Characterisation of a real-time fibre-coupled beryllium oxide (BeO) luminescence dosimeter in X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time the feasibility of using beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramics as a fibre-coupled radioluminescent dosimeter is investigated. BeO ceramic exhibits both radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and has the potential to be a near tissue equivalent alternative to Al2O3:C. A BeO fibre-coupled radioluminescence dosimeter is demonstrated and characterised for 6 MV X-rays and superficial X-ray energies, 150 kVp and 120 kVp. Based on the results, we demonstrate the capability of the RL BeO FOD for accurate and reproducible dose measurements with a linear dose rate and dose response. It has also been found that the percentage depth dose curves for 6 MV agreed with ion chamber measurements to within 2%, except in the build up region. For the 150 kVp and 120 kVp photon beams, the depth dose measurements agreed with ion chamber measurements to within 2.5% and 4%, respectively. - Highlights: • We construct a fibre-coupled beryllium oxide ceramic radioluminescence (RL) dosimeter. • RL found to be linear with dose-rate from 100 to 600 cGy/min. • Integrated RL found to be linear with dose from 1 to 500 cGy. • 6 MV PDD found to be within 2% agreement with Ion chamber measurements. • 150 kVp and 120 kVp PDDs found to be within 2.5% and 4%, respectively

  15. Luminescence Study of Structural-Changes Induced by Laser Cutting in Diamond Films

    OpenAIRE

    Cremades Rodríguez, Ana Isabel; Piquiras, J.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of laser cutting on the structure of a chemical vapor deposited diamond film has been investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) in the scanning electron microscope. The variation of particle morphology and CL spectra as a function of the distance to the cutting edge is described and possible laser induced structural changes are discussed. At the damaged region total CL emission increases and nitrogen-vacancy centers are detected.

  16. THE RHIC HYDROGEN JET LUMINESCENCE MONITOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUSSO,T.; BELLAVIA, S.; GASSNER, D.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; TSANG, T.

    2007-06-25

    A hydrogen jet polarimeter was developed for the RHIC accelerator to improve the process of measuring polarization. Particle beams intersecting with gas molecules can produce light by the process known as luminescence. This light can then be focused, collected, and processed giving important information such as size, position, emittance, motion, and other parameters. The RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter was modified in 2005 with specialized optics, vacuum windows, light transport, and a new camera system making it possible to monitor the luminescence produced by polarized protons intersecting the hydrogen beam. This paper describes the configuration and preliminary measurements taken using the RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter as a luminescence monitor.

  17. Laser-induced luminescence of multilayer structures based on polyimides and CdSe and CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced luminescence of multilayer structures based on the solids of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, different organic semiconductors and on the layers of organic semiconductors with embedded nanocrystals has been investigated. Drastic decrease of luminescence quantum yield is observed in the films of CdSe nanocrystals on organic semiconductors compared to those on optical glasses. The luminescence of the nanocrystals in the matrices of organic semiconductors and in multilayer structures is shown to be suppressed. The effects observed are explained by the transfer of photogenerated carriers from the nanocrystals to the molecules of organic semiconductors. The presence of the charge transfer is confirmed by a drastic increase in the conductivity (by 2 – 4 orders of magnitude) and in photovoltaic effect at the presence of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals in the structures under investigation. The prospects of using the multilayer structures for development new materials for solar cells are discussed

  18. Aggregation-induced emission from gold nanoclusters for use as a luminescence-enhanced nanosensor to detect trace amounts of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingzhi; Wang, Xi; Shen, Xin; Zhu, Wanying; Xu, Lei; Zhou, Xuemin

    2016-04-01

    Several research have reported that silver ions (Ag(+)) could enhance the photoluminescence of some kinds of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs), and redox reaction involved mechanisms were recognized as the main reason to cause such phenomenon. However, in this work, we found that Ag(+) could enhance the luminescence of aggregation-induced emission gold nanoclusters (AIE-AuNCs) without valence state change. Upon addition of Ag(+), the luminescence of AIE-AuNCs enhanced instantly by 7.2 times with a red-shift of emission peak and a complete restoration of luminescence features was observed when Ag(+) was removed. A cost-effective, rapid-response, highly sensitive and selective method to detect trace amount of Ag(+) has thereby been established using AIE-AuNCs as a nanosensor. This analytical method exhibited a linear range of 0.5nM-20μM with a limit of detection of 0.2nM and it showed great promise for Ag(+) monitoring in environmental water. PMID:26773614

  19. Photopolymerization-Induced Two-Beam Coupling and Light-Induced Scattering in Polymethyl Methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light amplification due to two-beam coupling is realized in doped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) glasses. A coupling gain as large as 14 cm-1 is obtained. The dynamic behaviour of absorption and light-induced scattering due to the process of photopolymerization are also studied. The results show that the amplification and its dynamic process enable possible applications of PMMA in optical devices. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  20. Reactions induced by 11Be beam at Rex-Isolde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppesen H.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The collision induced by the three Beryllium isotopes, 9,10,11Be, on a 64Zn target were investigated at Ec.m. ≈ 1.4 the Coulomb barrier. The experiments with the radioactive 10,11Be beams were performed at the Rex-Isolde facility at CERN. In the case of 9,10Be, elastic scattering angular distributions were measured whereas, in the 11Be case, the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. A strong damping of the quasielastic cross-section was observed in the 11Be case, in the angular range around the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. In this latter case a large total-reaction cross-section is found. Such a cross-section is more than a factor of two larger than the ones extracted in the reactions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the 11Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  1. Efficient manganese luminescence induced by Ce3+-Mn2+ energy transfer in rare earth fluoride and phosphate nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Manganese materials with attractive optical properties have been proposed for applications in such areas as photonics, light-emitting diodes, and bioimaging. In this paper, we have demonstrated multicolor Mn2+ luminescence in the visible region by controlling Ce3+-Mn2+ energy transfer in rare earth nanocrystals [NCs]. CeF3 and CePO4 NCs doped with Mn2+ have been prepared and can be well dispersed in aqueous solutions. Under ultraviolet light excitation, both the CeF3:Mn and CePO4:Mn NCs exhibit Mn2+ luminescence, yet their output colors are green and orange, respectively. By optimizing Mn2+ doping concentrations, Mn2+ luminescence quantum efficiency and Ce3+-Mn2+ energy transfer efficiency can respectively reach 14% and 60% in the CeF3:Mn NCs.

  2. Temperature induced phase separation of luminescent silica nanoparticles in Triton X-100 solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafina, Asiya R; Elistratova, Julia G; Bochkova, Olga D; Burilov, Vladimir A; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Konovalov, Alexander I; Soloveva, Svetlana Ye

    2011-02-15

    The aggregation and cloud point behavior of Tb(III)-doped silica nanoparticles has been studied in Triton X-100 (TX-100) solutions at various concentration conditions by fluorimetry, dynamic light scattering, electrophoresis and transmission electron microscopy methods. The temperature responsive behavior of nanoparticles is observed at definite concentration of TX-100, where the aggregation of TX-100 at the silica/water interface is evident from the increased size of the silica nanoparticles. The reversible dehydration of TX-100 aggregates at the silica/water interface should be assumed as the main reason of the temperature induced phase separation of silica nanoparticles. The distribution of nanoparticles between aqueous and surfactant rich phases at the phase separation conditions can be modified by the effect of additives. PMID:21163490

  3. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K., E-mail: k.prakrajang@gmail.com [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  4. Space-charged-induced emittance growth in the transport of high-brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emittance induced by space charge in a drifting beam of finite length has been investigated, and a scaling law has been obtained from simple considerations of the different rates of expansion of different portions of the beam. The scaling law predicts the initial rate of emittance growth, before the beam shape has distorted significantly, and thus represents an upper bound on the rate of emittance increase. This scaling law has been substantiated by particle-in-cell simulation and the dependence on geometric factors evaluated for specific choices of the beam profile. For long, axially nonuniform beams, the geometric factors have been evaluated explicitly for Gaussian profiles, and other shapes

  5. Deflection, spraying and induced scattering of intense laser beams in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations into laser beam spraying, deflection and induced scattering in plasmas are presented. Recent calculations and experiments on beam spraying due to filamentation are discussed. A simple model is presented for an enhanced beam deflection associated with nearly sonic plasma flow transverse to the beam. This model provides useful insights on the laser beam deflection, its scaling and the importance of self-consistent profile modifications. Finally, some discussion is given of recent experiments demonstrating the interplay between stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering. (Author)

  6. Deflection, spraying, and induced scattering of intense laser beams in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations into laser beam spraying, deflection, and induced scattering in plasmas are presented. Recent calculations and experiments on beam spraying due to filamentation are discussed. A simple model is presented for an enhanced beam deflection associated with nearly sonic plasma flow transverse to the beam. This model provides useful insights on the laser beam deflection, its scaling and the importance of self-consistent profile modifications. Finally, some discussion is given of recent experiments demonstrating the interplay between stimulated.Raman and Brillouin scattering

  7. Controllable Airy-like beams induced by tunable phase patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Qian, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally observe a novel family of Airy-like beams. First, we theoretically investigate the physical generation of our proposed controllable Airy-like beams by introducing a rotation angle factor into the phase function, which can regulate and flexibly control the beam wavefront. Meanwhile we can also readily control the main lobes of these beams to follow appointed parabolic trajectories using the rotation angle factor. We also demonstrate that the controllable Airy-like beams lack the properties of being diffraction-free and self-healing. The experiments are performed and the results are in accord with the theoretical simulations. We believe that the intriguing characteristics of our proposed Airy-like beams could provide more degrees of freedom, and are likely to give rise to new applications and lend versatility to the emerging field.

  8. High-power, electron beam-induced switching in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are developing a high-voltage, high-average-power, electron beam-controlled diamond switch that could significantly impact high power solid-state electronics in industrial and defense applications. An electron beam-controlled, thin film diamond could switch, with high efficiency, well over 100 kW average power at MHz frequencies greater than 5kV. This performance is due to the excellent thermal and electronic properties of diamond, the high efficiency achieved with electron beam control, and the demonstrated effectiveness of microchannel cooling. The authors' electron beam penetration-depth measurements agree with their Monte Carlo calculations. They have not observed electron beam damage in diamond for beam energies up to 150 keV. This report describes their experimental and calculational results and research objectives

  9. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comins, J.D. [Materials Physics Research Institute, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Raman and Luminescence Laboratory, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)], E-mail: darrell.comins@wits.ac.za; Amolo, G.O. [Materials Physics Research Institute, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Derry, T.E.; Connell, S.H. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Erasmus, R.M. [Raman and Luminescence Laboratory, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Witcomb, M.J. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Electron Microscope Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2009-08-15

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au{sup 3+} ions with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I{sub 3}{sup -} structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I{sub 3}{sup -} and I{sub 5}{sup -} aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 x 10{sup 15} to 250 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup -2} induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and

  10. Colloidal luminescent silicon nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaotang; Hessel, Colin M; Yu, Yixuan; Bogart, Timothy D; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-07-10

    Silicon nanorods are grown by trisilane decomposition in hot squalane in the presence of tin (Sn) nanocrystals and dodecylamine. Sn induces solution-liquid-solid nanorod growth with dodecylamine serving as a stabilizing ligand. As-prepared nanorods do not luminesce, but etching with hydrofluoric acid to remove residual surface oxide followed by thermal hydrosilylation with 1-octadecene induces bright photoluminescence with quantum yields of 4-5%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the ligands prevent surface oxidation for months when stored in air. PMID:23731184

  11. Temperature behaviour of photoluminescence and electron-beam-induced current recombination behaviour of extended defects in solar grade silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Arguirov, T; Kittler, M; Reif, J

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of D-band and band-to-band (BB) luminescence was measured in EFG samples between 80 K and room temperature for defects/dislocations presenting different amounts of contamination. The contamination density was estimated from the temperature behaviour of the electron-beam-induced current contrast, ranging between about 10 sup 4 and 10 sup 6 impurities cm sup - sup 1 dislocation length. The D1 line became already visible at room temperature but its intensity was found to exhibit a maximum at about 150 K. D2, D3 and D4 start to show up at about 250, 190 and 170 K, respectively, and increase their intensities upon lowering temperature. At room temperature the width of the D1 line is broad and becomes narrower upon lowering the temperature. D2 shows the opposite behaviour. The intensities of D1 and D2 were observed to show strong variations across the sample, whereas this was not observed for the pair D4/D3. In particular, the origin of the lines D1 and D2 is still far from being understo...

  12. Beam-Induced Deposition of Thin Metallic Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, Herbert Oliver, III

    1990-01-01

    Ion and electron beam induced deposition (BID) of thin (1 μm), conductive films is accomplished by dissociating and removing the nonmetallic components of an adsorbed, metal-based, molecular gas. Current research has focused primarily on room temperature (monolayer adsorption) BID using electrons and slow, heavy ions. This study investigates low temperature (50 to 200 K) BID in which the condensation of the precursor gases (SnCl _4 and (CH_3) _4Sn) maximizes the efficiency of the incident radiation which can create and remove nonmetallic fragments located several monolayers below the film surface. The desired properties of the residual metallic films are produced by using as incident radiation either nuclear (35 keV Ar ^+) or electronic (2 keV electrons, 25 keV H^+, or 50 keV H ^+) energy loss mechanisms. Residual films are analyzed ex situ by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thickness measurements, resistivity measurements, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and infrared spectroscopy. Low temperature BID film growth models, which are derived from both a computer simulation and a mathematical analysis, closely agree. Both the fragmentation and sputtering cross sections for a particular ion and energy are derived for films created from (CH_3) _4Sn. The fragmentation cross section, which corresponds to film growth, is roughly related to the electronic stopping power by the 1.9 power. The loss of carbon in films which were created from (CH_3) _4Sn is strongly dependent on the nuclear stopping power. Film growth rates for low temperature BID have been found to be 10 times those of room temperature BID.

  13. Localization induced intense red upconversion luminescence in monodispersed K3ZrF7:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenqin; Wu, Haiyan; Li, Bin

    2016-08-01

    There are increasing demands for upconversion (UC) nanocrystals since they are found to have important applications in the field of bio-imaging. Herein, novel monodispersed Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped K3ZrF7 nanocrystals with tunable sizes of 6-30 nm were prepared by high temperature co-precipitation method. Intense UC emission of Er3+ with large red to green ratio was obtained under the excitation of 980 nm-laser due to the cation localization effects. The UC luminescent lifetimes of 4S3/2 and 4F9/2 were determined to be 0.137 and 0.217 ms, respectively. At last, the possible upconversion mechanism was proposed basing on the pump power dependent UC luminescence experiments.

  14. Focused electron beam induced deposition as a tool to create electron vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Winkler, R; Plank, H; Hofer, F; Verbeeck, J

    2016-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a microscopic technique that allows geometrically controlled material deposition with very high spatial resolution. This technique was used to create a spiral aperture capable of generating electron vortex beams in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The vortex was then fully characterized using different TEM techniques, estimating the average orbital angular momentum to be ∼0.8ℏ per electron with almost 60% of the beam ending up in the ℓ=1 state. PMID:26432987

  15. Strong thermo-induced single and two-photon green luminescence in self-organized peptide microtubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, S; van Etteger, A; Cattaneo, L; Amdursky, N; Kulyuk, L; Lavrov, S; Sigov, A; Mishina, E; Rosenman, G; Rasing, Th

    2015-03-01

    Diphenylalanine peptide nano- and microtubes formed by self-assembly demonstrate strongly enhanced and tunable single-photon and two-photon luminescence in the visible range, which appears after heat- or laser treatment of these self-organized peptide microtubes. This process significantly extends the functionality of these microstructures and can trigger a new interest in the optical properties of structures based on short peptides. PMID:25074710

  16. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Foster, G W

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors. (7 refs).

  17. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  18. Physico-chemical study of the focused electron beam induced deposition process

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, Tristan; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    The focused electron beam induced deposition process is a promising technique for nano and micro patterning. Electrons can be focused in sub-angström dimensions, which allows atomic-scale resolution imaging, analysis, and processing techniques. Before the process can be used in controlled applications, the precise nature of the deposition mechanism must be described and modelled. The aim of this research work is to present a physical and chemical description of the focused electron beam induc...

  19. Limitations and design considerations for donor–acceptor systems in luminescent solar concentrators: the effect of coupling-induced red-edge absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Rowan W.; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Webb, James E. A.; Falber, Alexander; Thordarson, Pall; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) use luminescence and waveguiding to concentrate photons within thin dielectric slabs for use in photovoltaic, lighting, and photobioreactor applications. Donor–acceptor systems of organic chromophores are widely used in LSCs to broaden the sunlight absorption range and attempt to reduce loss-inducing reabsorption by the emitting chromophore. We use raytrace simulations across a large parameter space to model the performance of LSCs containing two novel donor–acceptor trimers based on the perylene moiety. We find that under certain conditions, trimers outperform single-dye LSCs as expected. However, at higher concentrations, a slight increase in red-edge absorption by the trimers increases reabsorption and has a deleterious effect on LSC performance. This underscores the large effect that even small changes in the red edge can have, and may discourage the use of donor–acceptor schemes with high interchromophore coupling that promotes red-edge absorption. Finally, we show that for a LSC-PV pair, selecting a PV cell that is well-matched with the LSC emission spectrum has a large effect on the flux gain of the system, and that the systems studied here are well-matched to emerging PV technologies.

  20. The effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the sensitivity of Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to 6 MV photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the response of Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to accumulated doses of 6 MV photon beams. Methods: In this study the authors used nanoDot OSLDs readout with a MicroStar reader. The authors first characterized the dose–response, fading, and OSL signal loss of OSLDs exposed to doses from 0.5 to 10 Gy. To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the OSLDs’ response, the authors optically treated the OSLDs with 26 W fluorescent lamps in two modes: (i) directly under the lamps for 10, 120, and 600 min and (ii) with a long-pass filter for 55, 600, and 2000 min. Changes in the OSLDs’ sensitivity were determined for an irradiation-readout–bleaching-readout cycle after irradiations with 1 and 10 Gy dose fractions. Results: The OSLDs presented supralinearity for doses of 2 Gy and above. The signal loss rates for sequential readouts were (0.287 ± 0.007)% per readout in the reader's strong-stimulation mode, and (0.019 ± 0.002)% and (0.035 ± 0.007)% per readout for doses of 0.2 and 10 Gy, respectively, in the reader's weak-stimulation mode. Fading half-life values ranged from (0.98 ± 0.14) min to (1.77 ± 0.24) min and fading showed dose dependence for the first 10-min interval. For 10 and 55 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 14% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions). For OSLDs exposed to 10 Gy fractions, the OSL signal increased 30% and 25% for bleaching modes (i) and (ii) and accumulated dose of 70 Gy, respectively. For 120 and 600 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 2.7% and 1.5% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions), respectively. For 10 Gy fractions, the signal increased 14% for bleaching mode (i) (120 min bleaching) and decreased 1.3% for bleaching mode (ii) (600 min bleaching) for an accumulated dose of 70 Gy. For 600 and 2000 min bleaching using modes (i

  1. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  2. Laser-induced retinal damage thresholds for annular retinal beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Paul K.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.; Till, Stephen; Stuck, Bruce E.; Hollins, Richard C.

    2004-07-01

    The dependence of retinal damage thresholds on laser spot size, for annular retinal beam profiles, was measured in vivo for 3 μs, 590 nm pulses from a flashlamp-pumped dye laser. Minimum Visible Lesion (MVL)ED50 thresholds in rhesus were measured for annular retinal beam profiles covering 5, 10, and 20 mrad of visual field; which correspond to outer beam diameters of roughly 70, 160, and 300 μm, respectively, on the primate retina. Annular beam profiles at the retinal plane were achieved using a telescopic imaging system, with the focal properties of the eye represented as an equivalent thin lens, and all annular beam profiles had a 37% central obscuration. As a check on experimental data, theoretical MVL-ED50 thresholds for annular beam exposures were calculated using the Thompson-Gerstman granular model of laser-induced thermal damage to the retina. Threshold calculations were performed for the three experimental beam diameters and for an intermediate case with an outer beam diameter of 230 μm. Results indicate that the threshold vs. spot size trends, for annular beams, are similar to the trends for top hat beams determined in a previous study; i.e., the threshold dose varies with the retinal image area for larger image sizes. The model correctly predicts the threshold vs. spot size trends seen in the biological data, for both annular and top hat retinal beam profiles.

  3. Detecting Thermal Barrier Coating Delamination Using Visible and Near-Infrared Luminescence from Erbium-Doped Sublayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bencic, T. J.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive diagnostic tools are needed to monitor early stages of delamination progression in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) because the risk of delamination induced coating failure will compromise engine performance and safety. Previous work has demonstrated that for TBCs composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), luminescence from a buried europium-doped sublayer can be utilized to identify the location of TBC delamination from the substantially higher luminescence intensity observed from the delaminated regions of the TBC. Luminescence measurements from buried europium-doped layers depend on sufficient transmittance of the 532 nm excitation and 606 nm emission wavelengths through the attenuating undoped YSZ overlayer to produce easily detected luminescence. In the present work, improved delamination indication is demonstrated using erbium-doped YSZ sublayers. For visible-wavelength luminescence, the erbium-doped sublayer offers the advantage of a very strong excitation peak at 517 nm that can be conveniently excited a 514 nm Ar ion laser. More importantly, the erbium-doped sublayer also produces near-infrared luminescence at 1550 nm that is effectively excited by a 980 nm laser diode. Both the 980 nm excitation and the 1550 nm emission are transmitted through the TBC with much less attenuation than visible wavelengths and therefore show great promise for delamination monitoring through thicker or more highly scattering TBCs. The application of this approach for both electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma-sprayed TBCs is discussed.

  4. Lateral resolution in focused electron beam-induced deposition: scaling laws for pulsed and static exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we review the single-adsorbate time-dependent continuum model for focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID). The differential equation for the adsorption rate will be expressed by dimensionless parameters describing the contributions of adsorption, desorption, dissociation, and the surface diffusion of the precursor adsorbates. The contributions are individually presented in order to elucidate their influence during variations in the electron beam exposure time. The findings are condensed into three new scaling laws for pulsed exposure FEBID (or FEB-induced etching) relating the lateral resolution of deposits or etch pits to surface diffusion and electron beam exposure dwell time for a given adsorbate depletion state. (orig.)

  5. The importance of inversion disorder in the visible light induced persistent luminescence in Cr$^{3+}$ doped AB$_2$O$_4$ (A = Zn or Mg and B = Ga or Al)

    OpenAIRE

    Basavaraju, Neelima; Priolkar, K. R.; Gourier, Didier; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Bessiere, Aurelie; Viana, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Cr$^{3+}$ doped spinel compounds AB$_2$O$_4$ with A=Zn, Mg and B=Ga, Al exhibit a long near infrared persistent luminescence when excited with UV or X-rays. In addition, persistent luminescence of ZnGa$_2$O$_4$ and to a lesser extent MgGa$_2$O$_4$, can also be induced by visible light excitation via $^4$A$_2$ $ \\rightarrow $ $^4$T$_2$ transition of Cr$^{3+}$, which makes these compounds suitable as biomarkers for in vivo optical imaging of small animals. We correlate this peculiar optical pro...

  6. Coherent detection of THz waves based on THz-induced time-resolved luminescence quenching in bulk gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zheng; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Kejia

    2012-05-01

    A kind of photoluminescence quenching, in which the time-resolved photoluminescence is modulated by a THz pulse, has been theoretically investigated by performing the ensemble Monte Carlo method in bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) at room temperature. The quenching ratio could reach up to 50% under a strong THz field (100  kV/cm). The range in which luminescence quenching is linearly proportional to the THz field could be over 60  kV/cm. On the basis of these results, a principle for THz modulation and coherent detection is proposed. PMID:22555695

  7. Temperature dependence of gamma ray induced luminescence of ethanolamine based liquid scintillator between 212 and 273 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The luminescence response of ethanolamine based liquid scintillator (Ethanolamine + 1g/l Butyle PBD + 0.1g/l BBOT) has been investigated as a function of temperature in the range 212-273 K. It has been observed that under gamma excitation the scintillation efficiency increases by a factor of 1.37 with decrease in temperature. The data obtained conforms to Arrhenius relation in which activation energy of rate process (.20 ev) is typical for thermal activated diffusion controlled process. (author)

  8. Analysis of mutagenic effects induced by carbon beams at different LET in a red yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate inactive and mutagenic effects of carbon beam at different LET, the inactivation cross section and mutation cross section induced by carbon beams of different LET values were investigated in a red yeast strain Rhodotorula glutinis AY 91015. It was found that the maximum inactivation cross section of 4.37μm2, which was very close to the average nucleus cross section, was at LET of 120.0 keV/μm. The maximum mutation cross section was at LET of 96.0 keV/μm. Meanwhile, the highest mutagenicity of carbon ion was found around 58.2 keV/μm. It implied that the most efficient LET to induce mutation in survival yeasts was 58.2 keV/μm, which corresponded to energy of 35 MeV/u carbon beam. The most effective carbon beam to induce inactivation and mutation located at different energy region. (authors)

  9. Laser-induced time-resolved luminescence of natural sillimanite Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} and synthetic Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} activated by chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaft, M., E-mail: michaelg@laserdetect.com [Laser Distance Spectrometry Company (LDS), Petach Tikva (Israel); Strek, W. [Institute for Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland); Nagli, L. [Laser Distance Spectrometry Company (LDS), Petach Tikva (Israel); Panczer, G. [Physical Chemistry of Luminescence Materials Laboratory, Lyon 1 University, UMR 5620 CNRS, Villeurbanne (France); Rossman, G.R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125-2500 (United States); Marciniak, L. [Institute for Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Luminescence of natural sillimanite Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} was studied by a laser-induced time-resolved technique combined with absorption spectroscopy. It was found that two red broad emission bands are connected to Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} luminescence centers. Chromium participation in luminescence was proved by the study of synthetic sillimanite activated by Cr. Several narrow emission lines have been found which were preliminary ascribed to Mn{sup 4+} and V{sup 2+} luminescence centers. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied luminescence centers in natural sillimanite by time-resolved technique Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We proved Cr{sup 3+} emission by the study of artificial sillimanite activated by Cr Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We proved that broad red emission band with long decay is connected to Fe{sup 3+} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We substantiate that narrow emission lines are connected to Mn{sup 4+} and V{sup 2+}.

  10. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere. PMID:26125388

  11. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering

    CERN Document Server

    Zunino, Luciano; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  12. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  13. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  14. Luminescence induced by dehydration of kaolin - Association with electron-spin-active centers and with surface activity for dehydration-polymerization of glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L.; Hovatter, W.; Sweeney, M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data concerning emission of light upon dehydration as a function of preheating and pre-gamma-irradiation are correlated with reported studies of electron-spin resonance (ESR) activity after similar pretreatments. The effect of these pretreatments on the kaolin-promoted incorporation of glycine into peptide oligomers in a wet/cold, hot/dry fluctuating environment is compared to their effect on the ESR and luminescent signals. The existence of spectroscopically active centers appears to be loosely anticorrelated with reaction yield; these yields are increased by increasing the overall energy content of the material. It is concluded that some part of the chemical yield is produced by a mechanism involving intrinsic, excited electronic states of the clay crystal lattice. These states may be derived from thermally, interfacially, and/or mechanically induced charge reorganization within interspersed energy levels in the band structure of the material.

  15. Defects induced luminescence and tuning of bandgap energy narrowing in ZnO nanoparticles doped with Li ions

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Saif Ullah

    2014-08-28

    Microstructural and optical properties of Zn1-yLiyO (0.00 ≤y ≤0.10) nanoparticles are investigated. Li incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characterization. From micro-structural analysis, no secondary phases or clustering of Li was detected. Elemental maps confirmed homogeneous distribution of Li in ZnO. Sharp UV peak due to the recombination of free exciton and defects based luminescence broad visible band was observed. The transition from the conduction band to Zinc vacancy defect level in photoluminescence spectra is found at 518±2.5nm. The yellow luminescence was observed and attributed to Li related defects in doped samples. With increasing Li doping, a decrease in energy bandgap was observed in the range 3.26±0.014 to 3.17±0.018eV. The bandgap narrowing behavior is explained in terms of the band tailing effect due to structural disorder, carrier-impurities, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interactions. Tuning of the bandgap energy in this class of wide bandgap semiconductor is very important for room temperature spintronics applications and optical devices. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  16. Acetone and the precursor ligand acetylacetone : distinctly different electron beam induced decomposition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warneke, Jonas; Van Dorp, Willem F.; Rudolf, Petra; Stano, Michal; Papp, Peter; Matejcik, Stefan; Borrmann, Tobias; Swiderek, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) acetylacetone plays a role as a ligand in metal acetylacetonate complexes. As part of a larger effort to understand the chemical processes in FEBID, the electron-induced reactions of acetylacetone were studied both in condensed layers and in the ga

  17. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Meijer, J.

    1995-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature fo

  18. Beam induced deposition of platinum using a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, C.A.; Stern, L.; Barriss, L.; Farkas, L.; DiManna, M.; Mello, R.; Maas, D.J.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Helium ion microscopy is now a demonstrated practical technology that possesses the resolution and beam currents necessary to perform nanofabrication tasks, such as circuit edit applications. Due to helium’s electrical properties and sample interaction characteristics relative to gallium, it is like

  19. Beam induced deposition of platinum using a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, C.A.; Stern, L.; Barriss, L.; Farkas, L.; DiManna, M.; Mello, R.; Maas, D.J.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Helium ion microscopy is now a demonstrated practical technology that possesses the resolution and beam currents necessary to perform nanofabrication tasks, such as circuit edit applications. Due to helium's electrical properties and sample interaction characteristics relative to gallium, it is like

  20. Transparency induced by two photon interference in a beam splitter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai-Ge; Yang Guo-Jian

    2004-01-01

    We propose a special two-photon state which is completely transparent in a 50/50 beam splitter. This effect is caused by the destructive two-photon interference and shows the signature of photon entanglement. We find that the symmetry of the two-photon spectrum plays the key role for the properties of two-photon interference.

  1. Probe beam-free detection of terahertz wave by electroluminescence induced by intense THz pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.; Jin, Z.; Nosaka, Y.; Nakazawa, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a table-top fs laser system can generate MW terahertz (THz) pulse with its electric field higher than 100 kV/cm can be generated by several schemes. Such a strong THz field can directly drive electrons inside various materials. Here, we demonstrated a direct THz electric field detection method by measuring the electroluminescence induced by intense THz pulse inside commonly available light emitting diode. An intense THz wave obtained by the two-color laser scheme was focused onto LED along with an external DC bias to induce luminescence which we found proportional to the amplitude of the incident THz field. The scheme can be useful to realize a low-cost, probe-free THz detection and imaging system.

  2. Locally Resonant Gaps of Phononic Beams Induced by Periodic Arrays of Resonant Shunts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Sheng-Bing; WEN Ji-Hong; WANG Gang; HAN Xiao-Yun; WEN Xi-Sen

    2011-01-01

    @@ Periodic arrays of shunted piezoelectric patches are employed to control the propagation of elastic waves in phononic beams.Each piezo-patch is connected to a single resistance-inductance-capacitance shunting circuit.Therefore,the resonances of the shunting circuits will produce locally resonant gaps in the phononic beam.However,the existence of locally resonant gaps induced by resonant shunts has not been clearly proved by experiment so far.In this work,the locally resonant gap in a piezo-shunted phononic beam is investigated theoretically and verified by experiment.The results prove that resonances of shunting circuits can produce locally resonant gaps in phononic beams.%Periodic arrays of shunted piezoelectric patches are employed to control the propagation of elastic waves in phononic beams. Each piezo-patch is connected to a single resistance-inductance-capacitance shunting circuit. Therefore, the resonances of the shunting circuits will produce locally resonant gaps in the phononic beam. However, the existence of locally resonant gaps induced by resonant shunts has not been clearly proved by experiment so far. In this work, the locally resonant gap in a piezo-shunted phononic beam is investigated theoretically and verified by experiment. The results prove that resonances of shunting circuits can produce locally resonant gaps in phononic beams.

  3. Electron-beam-induced dislocations in GaAs and InP single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dislocations have been induced in GaAs and InP single crystals by the electron beam exposure in a scanning electron microscope, with neither a mechanical bending nor a special pretreatment of the specimens. The generation and movement of the dislocations were not dependent upon the electron beam energy, crystal orientation, dopant nature, or doping level, but only on the electron beam current; a beam current of (1--2)x10-6 A was found to be the threshold for the dislocation release. By increasing the beam current up to 5x10-6 A, As or P losses from the specimen surface have been evidenced. In GaAs (001)-oriented crystals, the dislocations were found to be of pure edge type with the Burgers vector normal to the sample surface. A climb process, involving As or P vacancy migration, has been assumed to be the physical mechanism responsible for the dislocation origin

  4. Extrinsic Influence of Environment-Induced Degradation on Load Carrying Capacity of Steel Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Sunil; Patnaik, A.; Payer, J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of a study aimed at evaluating the strength of wide-flanged beams subjected to corrosion-induced damage, modeled using a standard finite element program (ABAQUS) is presented and discussed. Typical beams in consideration were subjected to different cases of corrosion-induced damage, such as non-uniform and varying degree of material loss that simulates pitting corrosion. Many variables, such as (a) shape of pitting damage, (b) location of pits along the length of the beam, (c) number of pits, and (d) depth of pits, were considered to facilitate a better understanding of the load carrying capacity of steel I-beams having damage quite similar to pitting damage to the web. The results are compared with an "as-new" beam for purpose of evaluation of the reduction in strength due to environment-induced deterioration. A "corrosion strength reduction factor (CSRF)" is introduced to help identify the reduction in load carrying capacity as a consequence of both height and depth of the damage due to corrosion. The results are presented in charts for purpose of practical beam design.

  5. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  6. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  7. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  8. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  9. Construction of TSL lector equipment with spectral resolution for the determination of thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) properties of NaCl: Tl+ induced by UV-visible radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revision of physical models of thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) in crystals induced by both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the connection of TSL with other thermally stimulated processes and physico-chemical phenomena because basic information on physical mechanics for TSL can be obtained through them. Glow curves of TSL induced by UV-visible radiation in NaCl: Tl+ were measured. Additionally, the following spectrums were obtained for the same samples: optical absorption, excitation, fluorescent emission, and TSL emission. An optical absorption peak was correlated with the Thallium ion concentration. With respect to the TSL emission spectrums, some peaks associated to Thallium dimmers were at 298 and at 480 nm; others which were attributed to NaCl intrinsic properties were at 365, 430, 450 and 525 nm. Also TSL glow curves were studied as a function of the Thallium ion concentration (0.8 ppm to 14.8 ppm). They were de convoluted so as to calculate the activation energy, the frequency factor and the kinetic order for each separate TSL peak. Anomalous values were observed for some frequency factors. A method and TSL lector equipment to obtain TSL emission spectra were developed. (Author)

  10. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar+ ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge+ implantation, followed by B+ implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 1015 ions/cm2. Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  11. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2013-11-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  12. Application of lateral photovoltage towards contactless light beam induced current measurements and its dependence on the finite beam size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of the signal due to light beam induced current (LBIC) at the remote contacts is verified as a lateral photovoltage for non-uniformly illuminated planar p-n junction devices; simulation and experimental results are presented. The limitations imposed by the ohmic contacts are successfully overcome by the introduction of capacitively coupled remote contacts, which yield similar results without any significant loss in the estimated material and device parameters. It is observed that the LBIC measurements introduce artefacts such as shift in peak position with increasing laser power. Simulation of LBIC signal as a function of characteristic length Lc of photo-generated carriers and for different beam diameters has resulted in the observed peak shifts, thus attributed to the finite size of the beam. Further, the idea of capacitively coupled contacts has been extended to contactless measurements using pressure contacts with an oxidized aluminium electrodes. This technique avoids the contagious sample processing steps, which may introduce unintentional defects and contaminants into the material and devices under observation. Thus, we present here, the remote contact LBIC as a practically non-destructive tool in the evaluation of device parameters and welcome its use during fabrication steps

  13. The transverse shift of a high order paraxial vortex-beam induced by a homogeneous anisotropic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeyeva, T A; Volyar, A V

    2008-01-01

    We consider the propagation of a tilted high order paraxial vortex-beam through a homogeneous anisotropic medium of a uniaxial crystal. We found that the initially circularly polarized beam bearing the l-order optical vortex splits into ordinary and extraordinary beams with a complex vortex structure. After a series of dislocation reactions the vortices gather together at the axis of the partial beam with the initial circular polarization shaping the l-order optical vortex. However, only l-1 vortices gather together on the axis of the partial beam with the orthogonal circular polarization. One optical vortex is shifted along the direction perpendicular to the inclination plane of the beam. Such a vortex displacement induces the transverse shift of the partial beam. In fact, we deal with the beam quadrefringence in a uniaxial, homogeneous anisotropic medium. The first two beams is a result of the splitting of the initial tilted beam into the ordinary and extraordinary once.

  14. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  15. Low level RF systems for synchrotrons part II: High Intensity. Compensation of the beam induced effects

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P

    2005-01-01

    The high intensity regime is reached when the voltage induced by the beam in the RF cavities is of an amplitude comparable to the desired accelerating voltage. In steady state this beam loading can be compensated by providing extra RF power. Transient beam loading occurs at injection or in the presence of a beam intensity that is not uniform around the ring. The transients are periodic at the revolution frequency. Without correction transient beam loading can be very harmful: The stable phase and bucket area will not be equal for all bunches. Strong beam loading often goes in pair with longitudinal instabilities because the RF cavities are a large contributor to the total ring impedance. The low level systems that reduce the effect of the transient beam loading will also increase the threshold intensity of the longitudinal instability caused by the cavity impedance at the fundamental RF frequency. Four classic methods are presented here: Feedforward, RF feedback, long delay feedback and bunch by bunch feedbac...

  16. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  17. Compositional changes in industrial hemp biomass (Cannabis sativa L.) induced by electron beam irradiation Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical decomposition of industrial hemp biomass were evaluated at doses of 150, 300, and 450 kGy. The quantity of decomposed components was indirectly estimated by measuring changes in alkaline extraction. The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation doses resulted in larger amounts of alkaline extract. Carbohydrate compositional analysis using 1H-NMR spectroscopy was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the polysaccharides of the industrial hemp. The xylose peak intensity in the NMR spectra decreased with increasing electron irradiation dose, indicating that xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose. -- Highlights: → The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation. → Carbohydrate analysis was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the industrial hemp. → Xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose.

  18. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  19. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  20. Focused electron beam induced processing and the effect of substrate thickness revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Beyer, A.; Mainka, M.; Gölzhäuser, A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Hagen, C. W.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2013-01-01

    The current understanding in the study of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is that the growth of a deposit is mainly the result of secondary electrons (SEs). This suggests that the growth rate for FEBIP is affected by the SE emission from the support. Our experiments, with membranes...

  1. Graphitic cage transformation by electron-beam-induced catalysis with alkali-halide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Jun-ichi; Tachi, Masashi; Ito, Naoto; Murakami, Katsuhisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    We found that alkali-halide nanocrystals, such as KCl and NaCl, have strong catalytic capability to form graphitic carbon cages from amorphous carbon shells under electron beam irradiation. In addition to the electron beam irradiation strongly inducing the decomposition of alkali-halide nanocrystals, graphene fragments were formed and linked together to form the final product of thin graphitic carbon cages after the evaporation of alkali-halide nanocrystals. The required electron dose was approximately 1 to 20 C/cm2 at 120 keV at room temperature, which was about two orders of magnitude smaller than that required for conventional beam-induced graphitization. The “knock-on” effect of primary electrons strongly induced the decomposition of the alkali-halide crystal inside the amorphous carbon shell. However, the strong ionic cohesion quickly reformed the crystal into thin layers inside the amorphous shell. The bond excitation induced by the electron beam irradiation seemed to enhance strongly the graphitization at the interface between the outer amorphous carbon shell and the inner alkali-halide crystal.

  2. Electron beam induced degradation of clopyralid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation characteristics of clopyralid irradiated by electron beam (EB) was studied in aqueous solutions. The effects of factors, such as initial clopyralid concentrations, addition of radicals scavenger, initial solution pH and addition of H2O2, were investigated on clopyralid degradation efficiency and mechanism. It was found that the EB-radiolysis was an effective way to degrade clopyralid and its degradation rate decreased with the increasing of substrate concentration. In the investigated initial concentrations range of 100-400 mg L-1, the radiolytic degradation of clopyralid followed a pseudo-first kinetic order. The results from addition of radicals scavenger indicated that both ·OH and eaq- played significant roles in the degradation of clopyralid. Furthermore, the alkaline condition and addition of H2O2 (<10 mM) in the solution also slightly enhanced the efficiency of clopyralid degradation. The ion chromatography analysis showed that some organic acids (formic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid) were formed, while the completely dechlorination of the substrate was achieved and organic nitrogen was recovered in the form of ammonium and nitrate ions during the irradiation process. (author)

  3. Designing a program to assess potential induced radioactivity in electron beam sterilization of medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISO 11137-1:2006 requires that the potential for induced radioactivity be evaluated for medical devices irradiated with electrons with energy more than 10 MeV. For a manufacturing operation where new devices are being developed, a practical program for making such an evaluation needs to be engrained in the process. A program was developed such that the induced radioactivity evaluation is imbedded in the development of the irradiation process. - Highlights: • A program is described to evaluate induced radioactivity in electron beam. • The program entails evaluation of design prior to manufacturing. • Radiation measurement is done immediately following irradiation. • The instrument has adequate sensitivity for this purpose

  4. Some properties of atomic beam produced by laser induced ablation of Li target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed atomic beams produced in vacuum by laser induced ablation from a lithium target are analyzed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The 1-mixing processes induced in the n = 9, 10 Li Rydberg states by collisions with CO2 molecules illustrate the application of the method. Resolution is limited by the 1 mm diameter of the probe laser beam. Combining LIF and absorption measurements gives nLi as a function of time at various distances from the target surface. The investigation of the Li-C02 1-mixing process in a heat pipe oven proved impossible due to the high reactivity of Li with C02. This problem was solved by renewing the Li atoms at each laser shot. Values obtained for n = 9, n = 10 are k = 17 x 10-8 and 15 x 10-8 cc/sec, respectively

  5. Light-induced spiral mass transport in azo-polymer films under vortex-beam illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, Antonio; Borbone, Fabio; Roviello, Antonio; Maddalena, Pasqualino

    2012-01-01

    When an azobenzene-containing polymer film is exposed to a non-uniform illumination, a light-induced mass migration process may be induced, leading to the formation of relief patterns on the polymer free surface. Despite a research effort of many years and several proposed models many aspects of this phenomenon remain not well understood. Here we report the appearance of spiral-shaped relief patterns on the polymer under the illumination of focused Laguerre-Gauss beams, having helical wavefront and an optical vortex at their axis. The induced spiral reliefs are sensitive to the vortex topological charge and to the wavefront handedness. These findings are unexpected, because the "doughnut"-shaped intensity profile of Laguerre- Gauss beams contains no information about the wavefront handedness. We propose a model that explains the main features of this phenomenon from the surface-mediated interference of the longitudinal and the transverse components of the optical field. These results may find applications in ...

  6. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron or X-ray beam sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons, based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γn) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γn) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. For electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10 to 11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. (author)

  7. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  8. Ion-beam-induced nanodots formation from Au/Si thin films on quartz surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, D. P.; Siva, V.; Singh, A.; Joshi, S. R.; Kanjilal, D.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report the synthesis of Si nanodots on quartz surface using ion irradiation. When a bi-layer of ultrathin Au and Si on quartz surface is irradiated by 500 keV Xe-ion beam, the bi-layer spontaneously transforms into nanodots at a fluence of 5 × 1014 ions cm-2. The spatial density and diameter of the nanodots are reduced with increase in applied ion fluence. The nanostructures exhibit photoluminescence in the visible range at room temperature where the intensity and wavelength depends upon ion fluence. The observed evolution seems to be correlated to ion beam mixing induced silicide formation at Au-Si interface.

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of corrosion induced cover cracking in reinforced concrete beam

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Benjamin; Quiertant, Marc; Bouteiller, Véronique; Adelaide, Lucas; PERRAIS, Maxime; Tailhan, Jean-Louis; CREMONA, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to present both experimental and numerical studies of the corrosion induced cracking pattern evolution of a reinforced concrete sample subjected to accelerated corrosion. The sample was a concrete beam (1000x250x100 mm3) reinforced with two rebars (20 mm diameter; 25 mm cover). The beam was not mechanically loaded. The corrosion process was applied on 500 mm rebar length on the central part. Rebars were intentiostatically corroded using a current density of 100µA/cm² of steel,...

  10. Site control technique for quantum dots using electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Kanji; Jung, JaeHun; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    To develop simple and high throughput sit definition technique for quantum dots (QDs), the electron beam induced deposition (EBID) method was used as desorption guide of phosphorus atoms form InP substrate. As the results one or a few indium (In) droplets (DLs) were created in the carbon grid pattern by thermal annealing at a temperature of 450°C for 10 min in the ultra high vacuum condition. The size of In DLs was larger than QDs, but arsenide DLs by molecular beam in growth chamber emitted wavelength of 1.028μm at 50K by photoluminescence measurement.

  11. Development of CNS Active Target for Deuteron Induced Reactions with High Intensity Exotic Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shinsuke; Tokieda, H.; Lee, C. S.; Kojima, R.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Corsi, A.; Dozono, M.; Gibelin, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kawase, S.; Kubono, S.; Kubota, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Nishi, T.; Obertelli, A.; Otsu, H.; Santamaria, C.; Sasano, M.; Takaki, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Leung, T.; Uesaka, T.; Yako, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Zenihiro, J.; Takada, E.

    An active target system called CAT, has been developed aiming at the measurement of deuteron induced reactions with high intensity beams in inverse kinematics. The CAT consists of a time projection chamber using THGEM and an array of Si detectors or NaI scintilators. The effective gain for the recoil particle is deisgned to be 5 - 10 × 103, while one for the beam is reduced by 102 using mesh grid to match the amplified signal to the dynamic range same as the one for recoil particle. The structure of CAT and the effect of the mesh grid are reported.

  12. Flow-Induced Beam Steering in a Single Laser Hot Spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmitted angular distribution of a 527 nm nearly diffraction-limited laser is measured after it propagates through a plasma with supersonic transverse flow. The laser beam is deflected by as much as 10 degree sign and exhibits bowlike features in the flow direction, which is attributed to flow-induced beam steering. The finite interaction volume allows for direct comparison with a 3D hydrodynamic simulation, which is in good agreement with details of the experiment. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  13. The ultraviolet and blue luminescence properties of ZnO:Zn thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) and blue luminescence of Zn-rich zinc oxide thin film deposited by electron-beam evaporation have been investigated at room temperature (RT). We observed that the UV and blue electroluminescence (EL) emission band centered around 480 nm which is blue shifted in comparison with that of the ZnO thin film prepared by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (LP MOCVD). The UV emission is much stronger than blue emission in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The field-induced ionization of excited luminescent centers of ZnO:Zn thin film at high electric field and the difference between PL and EL are discussed. The experiments show that the ZnO:Zn thin film provides a hopeful new mechanism to obtain UV and blue emission.

  14. Simultaneous irradiation of laser and ion beams on optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simultaneous irradiation system of laser and ion beams has been developed to investigate ion beam induced luminescence and optical absorption of crystalline α-Al2O3 samples. The luminescence induced by 30 keV Ar+ in visible wavelength region had peaks that were attributed to oxygen vacancies. The optical absorption at 633 nm in wavelength was also measured during the ion irradiation. The amount of optical absorption for the irradiated sample with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses was less than that without the laser pulses. The ion irradiation reduced the threshold level of laser damage on the surface region of the sample, and the laser ablation selectively happened on the ion irradiation region

  15. Multi-bunch energy spread induced by beam loading in standing wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a relativistic beam with the modes of the TM010 pass-band of a multicell cavity does not cause any problem: although all the modes are excited by the RF (radiofrequency) generator, resulting in different cell excitations during the cavity filling and the beam pulse, the net accelerating field exhibits negligible fluctuations from bunch to bunch. However, when the beam is not fully relativistic, this is no more true. The phase slippage occurring in the first cells, between the non relativistic beam and the lower pass-band modes, produces an effective enhancement of the shunt impedances, which is usually negligible for a relativistic beam in a well tuned cavity. Moreover, the voltage jumps (amplitude and phase) occurring at each bunch passage, as well as the beam detuning caused by the off-crest bunches, vary from cell to cell. These effects enhance dramatically the fluctuation of the accelerating voltage, with a dominant beating provided by the pass-band mode nearest to the pi-mode. The induced beam energy spread has been estimated by the help of two distinct codes, developed at Frascati (Italy) and (Saclay), with results in good agreement. While an interaction integral is computed at each bunch passage, the cavity refilling is calculated by solving coupled differential equations of the modes of the pass-band, driven by a generator linked to one end-cell. It is shown also that the intermode coupling arises from the external Q of the drive end-cell, and not from the wall losses. For illustration, the authors applied the method to the beam-loading problem in the SC capture cavity of the low charge injector of the TESLA test facility installed at DESY

  16. Intra-zoned luminescence in alkali earth metal carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The fundamental plasma luminescence of wide band alkali halide crystals has been found out by Vaisburd et al. This broadband luminescence with very short duration of attenuation (∼10-12 s) arises at an irradiations of crystals with electronic beam powerful pulses of nanosecond duration. It is related to radiating 'hot' electrons and holes in a conductivity zone and in a valent zone, accordingly and in later time began to refer to as an intra-zoned luminescence. The data set on revealing features of display of an intra-zoned luminescence in different classes of crystals now proceeds. We investigated a fast luminescence at excitation with pulse electrons (3 nanoseconds) in crystals CaCO3, SrCO3, BaCO3 and MgCO3. In spectra all investigated carbonates it is possible to allocate two areas: area concerning high intensity of a fast luminescence (from 2 eV down 3 eV) and area of low intensity (is higher 4 eV) with slow recession at increase in photon energy. Thus it is typical, that in area concerning high intensity at rise in temperature from 80 up to 300 K a sample intensity of luminescence falls down, whereas in area is higher 5 eV with rise in temperature of a sample increase of intensity is observed. This broadband fast (is shorter than the time sanction of the equipment) should be connected a luminescence poorly dependent on temperature and a modular status of a sample with intra zoned transitions This luminescence reaches from 2 eV down to 7 eV but as for carbonates while is absent the reliable data on structure of a valent zone, division of an intra-zoned luminescence into electronic and hole components is not obviously possible on the basis of spectra of a fast luminescence. The nature of other luminescence processes arising at excitation with pulse electrons is discussed

  17. Thermally Stimulated Luminescence of Radiation-Induced Defects in the Glasses of CaO-Ga2O3-GeO2 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Padlyak

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL and electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of X-, g- and b-irradiated glasses with garnet (Ca3Ga2Ge3O12, Ca-gallogermanate (Ca3Ga2Ge4O14 and Ca3Ga2O6 compositions have been investigated and analysed. X- and g-irradiation of the Ge-containing glasses induces simultaneously electron and hole paramagnetic defects, stable at room temperature, whereas the same irradiation of glasses with Ca3Ga2O6 composition yields only in stable hole paramagnetic defects. The electron defects are assigned to ensembles of E` (Ge centres with different local environments. The hole defects belong to ensembles of O- centres, localised at different non-bridging oxygens of the glass network. The pronounced TSL glow curves in the g- and X-irradiated Ge-containing glasses peaked at about 280 C are attributed to recombination of the E` (Ge centres. The TSL glow curves with the maximum near 230 C in the g- and X-irradiated Ge-containing glasses and the glass and ceramics with Ca3Ga2O6 composition are related to recombination of the O- centres. The TSL glow curve peaked in the vicinity of 380 C observed in the g- and X-irradiated glasses with Ca3Ga2O6 composition could be assigned to recombin-ation of non-paramagnetic defects. No TSL glow curves are observed in the b-irradiated Ge-containing glasses, whereas the TSL glow curves with the maxima at about 120, 220 and 380 C are peculiar for the glass and ceramics with Ca3Ga2O6 composition. The activation energy for the b-induced defects is estimated and their models are discussed.

  18. Solid solution luminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration and kinetic dependences of cathodo- and radioluminescence of Mn2+ ion in CaF2 base solid solutions with Zr, Hf, Pb additions are studied. It is shown that introduction of 2-3 mass % of Zr and Hf into matrix composition causes increase of Mn2+ luminescence intensity with simultaneous increase of persistance duration and a small shift of luminescence band to larger wave lengths. Pb introduction results in efficient quenching of luminescence. 5 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Nonlinear propagation of a spatially incoherent laser beam: self-induced smoothing and reduction of scattering instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that plasma-induced angular spreading and spectral broadening of a spatially incoherent laser beam correspond to increased spatial and temporal incoherence of the laser light. The spatial incoherence is characterized by an effective beam f-number, decreasing in space along the direction of light propagation. Plasma-induced beam smoothing can influence laser-plasma interaction physics. In particular, decreasing the correlation time of the propagating laser light may dramatically reduce the levels of backward stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering inside the plasma. Also, the decrease of the laser beam effective f-number reduces the reflectivity of backward stimulated Brillouin scattering. (authors)

  20. Fibre-Coupling Zig-Zag Beam Deflection Technology for Investigation of Attenuation Process of Laser-Induced Shock Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping; BIAN Bao-Min; LI Zhen-Hua

    2005-01-01

    @@ A novel fibre-coupling zig-zag beam deflection technology is developed to investigate the attenuation process of laser-induced shock waves in air. Utilizing ordinal reflections of probe beams by a pair of parallel mirrors,a zig-zag beam field is formed, which has eleven probe beams in the horizontal plane. When a laser-induced shock wave propagates through the testing field, it causes eleven deflection signals one after another. The whole attenuation process of the shock wave in air can be detected and illuminated clearly on one experimental curve.

  1. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated neon (400 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm) or iron (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/μm) ion beams. Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies, were cultured for 48 h to obtained samples for Western blot analysis, or were cultured for several weeks to fix mutations in the locus of hprt gene. ICR male mice (Jcl:ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL)- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant reduction of mutation rate of the hprt gene was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate neon or iron ion beams. This reduction was partially suppressed by NO radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO. The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in unirradiated intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. These observations were partially suppressed by carboxy-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. (author)

  2. Electron-beam induced deposition and autocatalytic decomposition of Co(CO3NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Vollnhals

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The autocatalytic growth of arbitrarily shaped nanostructures fabricated by electron beam-induced deposition (EBID and electron beam-induced surface activation (EBISA is studied for two precursors: iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO5, and cobalt tricarbonyl nitrosyl, Co(CO3NO. Different deposits are prepared on silicon nitride membranes and silicon wafers under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, and are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM, including near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectroscopy. It has previously been shown that Fe(CO5 decomposes autocatalytically on Fe seed layers (EBID and on certain electron beam-activated surfaces, yielding high purity, polycrystalline Fe nanostructures. In this contribution, we investigate the growth of structures from Co(CO3NO and compare it to results obtained from Fe(CO5. Co(CO3NO exhibits autocatalytic growth on Co-containing seed layers prepared by EBID using the same precursor. The growth yields granular, oxygen-, carbon- and nitrogen-containing deposits. In contrast to Fe(CO5 no decomposition on electron beam-activated surfaces is observed. In addition, we show that the autocatalytic growth of nanostructures from Co(CO3NO can also be initiated by an Fe seed layer, which presents a novel approach to the fabrication of layered nanostructures.

  3. Beam Energy Scaling on Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impacton Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur; Friedman, Alex; Westenskow,Glen; Barnard, John J.; Cohen, Ronald; Grote, David; Lund, Steven M.; Seidl, Peter; Kwan, Joe W.; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, Christine M.; Vay Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2006-01-01

    Electron clouds limit the performance of many major accelerators. Significant quantities of electrons result when halo ions are lost to beam tubes, generating gas which can be ionized and ion-induced electrons that can multiply and accumulate, causing degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanisms of ion-induced electron production, experiments studied the impact of 50 to 400 keV K{sup +} ions on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the 500 kilovolts Ion Source Test Stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The experimental electron yield scales with the electronic component (dE{sub e}/dx) of the stopping power. A theoretical model is developed, using TRIM code to evaluate dE{sub e}/dx at several depths in the target, to estimate the electron yield, which is compared with the experimental results.

  4. Suspended nanostructures grown by electron beam-induced deposition of Pt and TEOS precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suspended nanostructures (SNSs) are grown by electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) of Pt and tetra-ethyl-ortho-silicate (TEOS) gas precursors on nanopillar tips, by lateral shifting of a scanning electron microscope beam. Shape evolution of SNSs is characterized as a function of electron energy (5, 10, 15 keV) and electron charge deposited per unit length (CDL, 1-9 pC nm-1 range) along the beam track. Pt SNSs grow as single nanowires, evolving from thin (15-20 nm) and horizontal to thick (up to 70 nm) and inclined (up to 600) geometry as CDL increases. TEOS SNSs consist of multiple nanowires arranged in a stack: horizontal and parallel along the beam shift direction and aligned on top of each other along the beam incidence axis. As the CDL increases, the number of nanowires increases and the top edge of the stack progressively inclines, taking the form of a hand-fan. Deposition yield and overall size of SNSs are found to be proportional to CDL and inversely proportional to electron energy for both Pt and TEOS precursors. As an example of 3D nanoarchitectures achievable by this lateral EBID approach, a 'nano-windmill' TEOS structure is presented

  5. Direct and compound reactions induced by unstable helium beams near the Coulomb barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, A.; Tripathi, V.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Nanal, V.; Simenel, C.; Casandjian, J. M.; de France, G.; Raabe, R.; Bazin, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Dasgupta, M.; Kailas, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Mahata, K.; Pillay, R. G.; Pollacco, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Rejmund, M.; Shrivastava, A.; Sida, J. L.; Tryggestad, E.

    2004-10-01

    Reactions induced by radioactive 6,8 He beams from the SPIRAL facility were studied on 63,65 Cu and 188,190,192 Os targets and compared to reactions with the stable 4He projectiles from the Mumbai Pelletron. Partial residue cross sections for fusion and neutron transfer obtained from the measured intensities of characteristic in-beam γ rays for the 6He + 63,65 Cu systems are presented. Coincidence measurements of heavy reaction products, identified by their characteristic γ rays, with projectilelike charged particles, provide direct evidence for a large transfer cross section with Borromean nuclei 6He at 19.5 and 30 MeV and 8He at 27 MeV. Reaction cross sections were also obtained from measured elastic angular distributions for 6,8 He +Cu systems. Cross sections for fusion and direct reactions with 4,6 He beams on heavier targets of 188,192 Os at 30 MeV are also presented. The present work underlines the need to distinguish between various reaction mechanisms leading to the same products before drawing conclusions about the effect of weak binding on the fusion process. The feasibility of extracting small cross sections from inclusive in-beam γ -ray measurements for reaction studies near the Coulomb barrier with low intensity isotope separation on-line beams is highlighted.

  6. Intriguing surface-extruded plastic flow of SiOx amorphous nanowire as athermally induced by electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xianfang; Su, Jiangbin; Wu, Yan; Wang, Lianzhou; Wang, Zhanguo

    2014-01-01

    Nanoinstability and nanoprocessing of a SiOx amorphous nanowire at room temperature as induced by in situ electron beam irradiation in transmission electron microscopy are systematically investigated. It is demonstrated that in contrast to the crystalline nanowires where only the beam-induced ablation of atoms was observed, the amorphous nanowire herein can give rise to an arresting beam-induced surface-extruded plastic flow of massive atoms and surface migration of atoms in addition to the beam-induced ablation of atoms. Via the plastic flow and ablation, a new S-type deformed wire and the thinnest amorphous nanowire are elaborately created locally at nanoscale precision with a highly controllable manner depending on the beam current density, beam spot size, and beam position. The existing knock-on mechanism and simulation seem inadequate to explain these processes. However, it is indicated that a much higher nanocurved surface energy of nanowires and an enhanced beam-induced soft mode and instability of atomic vibration control the processes. PMID:24317010

  7. Electron-beam induced optical superresolution in integrated light-electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Väkeväinen, Aaro

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an optical superresolution method based on electronbleaching of fluorophores in integrated light-electron microscopy. The main advantage of this novel superresolution method is that the non-fluorescent ultrastructure of the sample can be revealed by the simultaneously acquired SEM image. Furthermore, as the fluorescence superresolution image is based on an electron-beam-induced modification of the specimen, by "switching off" fluorescent probes, both the fluorescence and SEM...

  8. Focused electron beam induced etching of copper in sulfuric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Lindsay; Bresin, Matthew; Botman, Aurélien; Ranney, James; Hastings, J. Todd

    2015-12-01

    We show here that copper can be locally etched by an electron-beam induced reaction in a liquid. Aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is utilized as the etchant and all experiments are conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The extent of etch increases with liquid thickness and dose, and etch resolution improves with H2SO4 concentration. This approach shows the feasibility of liquid phase etching for material selectivity and has the potential for circuit editing.

  9. ION-BEAM INDUCED GENERATION OF CU ADATOMS ON CU(100)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; BOERMA, DO

    1992-01-01

    Low-energy ion scattering was used to study on-beam induced adatom generation during irradiation of a Cu(100) surface with 6 keV Ne ions at a sample temperature of 60 K. It was found that the number of adatoms produced per incoming ion decreases from an average of 3.5 to a saturation level of 1.8 af

  10. Direct simulation of ion beam induced stressing and amorphization of silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Beardmore, Keith M.; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we investigate the mechanical response of silicon to high dose ion-irradiation. We employ a realistic and efficient model to directly simulate ion beam induced amorphization. Structural properties of the amorphized sample are compared with experimental data and results of other simulation studies. We find the behavior of the irradiated material is related to the rate at which it can relax. Depending upon the ability to deform, we observe either the ge...

  11. Advanced ion beam analysis of materials using ion-induced fast electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Ishihara, Toyoyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-energy shadowing effect using ion-induced electron spectroscopy is reported with emphasis on a possibility of determination of local electronic structure in solids, which has been a difficult problem to approach with other experimental techniques. We demonstrate real-space determination of covalent-bond electron distribution in Si crystal. The analysis technique may provide a new field of ion beam analysis of solids. (author)

  12. Bulk micromachining of silicon using electron-beam-induced carbonaceous nanomasking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on an alternative nanolithographic technique for bulk micromachining of silicon. We show how to selectively etch Si(110) in aqueous KOH solutions using electron-beam-induced nanomasking. Already nanometre thin carbonaceous films can completely suppress the wet anisotropic chemical etching of Si performed in alkaline solution (10 wt% KOH+5 wt% isopropanol). It is shown that under optimized conditions, this approach can be exploited for the fabrication of three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures

  13. Bulk micromachining of silicon using electron-beam-induced carbonaceous nanomasking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenizian, T [Laboratoire MADIREL (UMR 6121), Electrochemistry of Materials Group, Universite de Provence-CNRS Centre Saint Jerome, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Salhi, B [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI), Avenue Poincare BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Boukherroub, R [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI), Avenue Poincare BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Schmuki, P [Department of Materials Science, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, WW4-LKO, Martensstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-11-14

    This paper reports on an alternative nanolithographic technique for bulk micromachining of silicon. We show how to selectively etch Si(110) in aqueous KOH solutions using electron-beam-induced nanomasking. Already nanometre thin carbonaceous films can completely suppress the wet anisotropic chemical etching of Si performed in alkaline solution (10 wt% KOH+5 wt% isopropanol). It is shown that under optimized conditions, this approach can be exploited for the fabrication of three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures.

  14. Irradiation effect on zooplankton eggs applied by bremsstrahlung induced from pulsed intense electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have considered an irradiation effect on zooplankton eggs applied by bremsstrahlung induced from pulsed intense electron beam. Zooplankton eggs about 200 have been successfully inactivated using a bremsstrahlung at 3 kGy. We found that 63.9% of zooplankton eggs are inactivated by bremsstrahlung irradiation. It was the increase of 30 points in comparisons with 33.3% of zooplankton eggs inactivated for non-irradiation case. (author)

  15. Electron beam induced electronic transport in alkyl amine-intercalated VOx nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Colm; Lavayen, Vladimir; Clavijo-Cedeno, C.; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.

    2008-01-01

    The electron beam induced electronic transport in primary alkyl amine-intercalated V2O5 nanotubes is investigated where the organic amine molecules are employed as molecular conductive wires to an aminosilanized substrate surface and contacted to Au interdigitated electrode contacts. The results demonstrate that the high conductivity of the nanotubes is related to the non-resonant tunnelling through the amine molecules and a reduced polaron hopping conduction through the vanadium oxide itself...

  16. Study on Nanostructures Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Gao; Yi Hao; Ganfeng Tu; Wenyuan Wu

    2012-01-01

    Four techniques using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) were proposed to obtain surface nanostructure of metal and alloys. The first method involves the distribution of several fine Mg nanoparticles on the top surface of treated samples by evaporation of pure Mg with low boiling point. The second technique uses superfast heating, melting, and cooling induced by HCPEB irradiation to refine the primary phase or the second phase in alloys to nanosized uniform distributed phases in the ma...

  17. Two-photon excitation in living cells induced by low-power cw laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Yagang; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1996-05-01

    We demonstrate multi-photon excitation in optically-trapped living cells. Intracellular non- resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous and exogenous chromophores was induced by CW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams of 105 mW power. In the case of fluorescent chromophores, detection of NIR-excited visible fluorescence was achieved by imaging and spectroscopy methods. Trap-induced, two-photon excited fluorescence was employed as a novel diagnostic method to monitor intracellular redox state and cell vitality of single motile spermatozoa and Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found, that nonlinear absorption of NIR photons NIR, single-frequency traps (`optical tweezers') for micromanipulation of vital cells.

  18. Analysis of quantum dots and their conjugates by capillary electrophoresis with detection of laser-induced luminescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klepárník, Karel; Datinská, Vladimíra; Voráčová, Ivona; Lišková, Marcela

    2nd Edition. Totowa: Humana Press Inc, 2014 - (Fontes, A.), s. 33-54. (Methods in Molecular Biology. Volume 1199). ISBN 978-1-4939-1279-7 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/2377; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28254S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * quantum dots * laser-induced fluorescence * immuno assay Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  19. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm). Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies. ICR male mice (Jcl: ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 25 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The small intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TUNEL- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant elevated surviving fractions of cells was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon ion beams. This enhancement was partially suppressed by Nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (c-PTIO). The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in the unirradiated small intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. In addition, a significant reduction of apoptotic cells in the intestine and testis, when mice were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon or argon ion beams. These observations were partially suppressed by c-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, it is suggested that the apoptosis may be induced in the tissue stem cells of small intestine and testis. (author)

  20. Nanodot and nanocrystal pattern formation and luminescent properties of BiB{sub 3}O{sub 6} glasses after moderate energy ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaza, J.L., E-mail: joseluis.plaza@uam.es [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Dpto. de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, O., E-mail: oscar@fmc.uva.es [GdS-Optronlab, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I-D, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Hortelano, V., E-mail: vhorsan@gmail.com [GdS-Optronlab, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I-D, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Bensalah, H., E-mail: bensalahhakima@yahoo.fr [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Dpto. de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dieguez, E., E-mail: ernesto.dieguez@uam.es [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Dpto. de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-01

    In this work we study the nanopatterning effect on the surface of BIBO glasses by means of Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS), using moderate energy (<5 kV) Ar ions. The analysis, changing the energy of the Ar ions, has demonstrated the formation of nanodots, nanorripples, and nanopyramids. We have also analysed the dependence of the nanopatterns on the sample thickness for the same experimental conditions. The sizes of the nanodots have been analysed by AFM, while their optical properties studied by means of {mu}-Raman/{mu}-photoluminescence techniques.

  1. Are super-exponential luminescence decays possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Overview of the mathematical aspects and systematics of luminescence decays. • Super-exponential (faster-than-exponential) decays can be either induced (by acting upon the system in real time) or spontaneous. • Spontaneous (intrinsic) super-exponential decays are identified for the first time in an experimental system. - Abstract: Luminescence decay functions describe the time dependence of radiation emitted by a sample after excitation. An overview of the mathematical aspects and systematics of luminescence decays is presented. In particular, super-exponential (faster-than-exponential) decays are defined and the possibility of their observation in single species physicochemical systems discussed. It is shown that this type of behavior can be both spontaneous and induced (by acting upon the system in real time). Spontaneous super-exponentiality is identified for the first time in experimental decays, these being phosphorescence decays affected by triplet–triplet absorption

  2. Ion beam induced crystallization of amorphous Si from NiSi2 precipitates: An in situ study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By first growing NiSi2 precipitates in a-Si and then irradiating with a 150 keV Si beam, the authors have studied ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) of Si initiated at a-Si/NiSi2 precipitate interfaces. The growth shape and its temperature dependence are studied in-beam via in situ transmission electron microscopy. Interface roughening is evidenced. Preliminary results for the Co-Si system are also reported

  3. The importance of inversion disorder in the visible light induced persistent luminescence in Cr³⁺ doped AB₂O₄ (A = Zn or Mg and B = Ga or Al).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraju, Neelima; Priolkar, Kaustubh R; Gourier, Didier; Sharma, Suchinder K; Bessière, Aurélie; Viana, Bruno

    2015-01-21

    Cr(3+) doped spinel compounds AB2O4 with A = Zn, Mg and B = Ga, Al exhibit a long, near infrared persistent luminescence when excited with UV or X-rays. In addition, the persistent luminescence of ZnGa2O4, and to a lesser extent MgGa2O4, can also be induced by visible light excitation via (4)A2→(4)T2 transition of Cr(3+), which makes these compounds suitable as biomarkers for in vivo optical imaging of small animals. We correlate this peculiar optical property with the presence of antisite defects, which are present in ZnGa2O4 and MgGa2O4. By using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, associated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical emission spectroscopy, it is shown that an increase in antisite defects concentration results in a decrease in the Cr-O bond length and the octahedral crystal field energy. A part of the defects occurs in the close environment of Cr(3+) ions, as shown by the increasing strain broadening of EPR and XAFS peaks observed upon increasing antisite disorder. It appears that ZnAl2O4, which exhibits the largest crystal field splitting of Cr(3+) and the smallest antisite disorder, does not show considerable persistent luminescence upon visible light excitation as compared to ZnGa2O4 and MgGa2O4. These results highlight the importance of Cr(3+) ions with neighboring antisite defects in the mechanism of persistent luminescence exhibited by Cr(3+) doped AB2O4 spinel compounds. PMID:25462833

  4. Trapping induced nonlinear behavior of backward stimulated Raman scattering in multi-speckled laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In inertial confinement fusion experiments, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) occurs when electron density fluctuations are amplified resonantly by the incident laser beams and scattered light. These beams comprise several thousands of individual laser speckles. We have found in single-speckle studies that electron trapping lowers the threshold intensity for SRS onset to a value below that from linear theory and enhances scattering. The trapping-induced plasma-wave frequency shift leads to wave-front bowing and filamentation processes that saturate SRS and limit scattering within a speckle. With large-scale simulations, we have now examined how laser speckles interact with one another through three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of two interacting speckles and 2D PIC simulations of ensembles of laser speckles (hundreds of speckles). Our work shows that kinetic trapping physics also governs the onset and saturation of SRS in ensembles of speckles. Speckles interact in a manner that is nonlinear and nonlocal: An intense speckle can destabilize its neighbors through transport of hot electrons and SRS waves, resulting in enhanced emission of particles and waves that, in turn, act upon the original speckle. In this manner, speckles below threshold when in isolation can be above the threshold in multi-speckled beams under conditions for laser-driven fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and ensembles of speckles are thus found to collectively lower the SRS onset threshold. Simulations of the hohlraum interior where laser beams overlap show that multi-speckled laser beams at low average intensity (a few times 1014 W/cm2) have correspondingly lower thresholds for enhanced SRS and that the sub-ps bursts of SRS saturate through trapping induced nonlinearities. Because of electron trapping effects, SRS reflectivity grows slowly with average laser intensity. While SRS reflectivity saturates under NIF conditions, SRS hot electron energy

  5. Comparative dose evaluations between XVI and OBI cone beam CT systems using Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of energy (kVp) and filters (no filter, half Bowtie, and full Bowtie) on the dose response curves of the Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in CBCT dose fields. To measure surface and internal doses received during x-ray volume imager (XVI) (Version R4.5) and on board imager (OBI) (Version 1.5) CBCT imaging protocols using these two types of dosimeters. Methods: Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLD dose response curves were generated at different kV imaging settings used by XVI (software version R4.5) and OBI (software version 1.5) CBCT systems. The settings for the XVI system were: 100 kVp/F0 (no filter), 120 kVp/F0, and 120 kVp/F1 (Bowtie filter), and for the OBI system were: 100 kVp/full fan, 125 kVp/full fan, and 125 kVp/half fan. XRQA2 film was calibrated in air to air kerma levels between 0 and 11 cGy and scanned using reflection scanning mode with the Epson Expression 10000 XL flat-bed document scanner. NanoDot OSLDs were calibrated on phantom to surface dose levels between 0 and 14 cGy and read using the inLightTM MicroStar reader. Both dosimeters were used to measure in field surface and internal doses in a male Alderson Rando Phantom. Results: Dose response curves of XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLDs at different XVI and OBI CBCT settings were reported. For XVI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in head region during fast head and neck scan and 4.99 cGy in the chest region during symmetry scan. On the other hand, the internal dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 3.17 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. The average (internal and external) dose ranged between 0.05 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 2.41 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. For OBI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.19 cGy in head region during head scan and 4.55 cGy in the pelvis region during spot

  6. Effect of smoothing by spectral dispersion on flow induced laser beam deflection: The random phase modulation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical results are presented for the effect of random phase modulated smoothing by spectral dispersion on flow induced laser beam deflection. It is shown that in the limit of a large number of color cycles, Ncc, the effect is identical to that of the induced spatial incoherence method of temporal smoothing. For small Ncc, the beam deflection rate may be significantly larger in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, than in the parallel direction. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  8. Exact analytical solution of shear-induced flexural vibration of functionally graded piezoelectric beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The priority of this paper is to obtain the exact analytical solution for free flexural vibration of FGPM beam actuated using the d15 effect. In piezoelectric actuators, the potential use of d15 effect has been of particular interest for engineering applications since shear piezoelectric coefficient d15 is much higher than the other piezoelectric coupling constants d31 and d33. The applications of shear actuators are to induce and control the flexural vibrations of beams and plates. In this study, a modified Timoshenko beam theory is used where electric potential is assumed to vary sinusoidaly along the thickness direction. The material properties are assumed to be graded across the thickness in accordance with power law distribution. Hamilton`s principle is employed to obtain the equations of motion along with the associated boundary conditions for FGPM beams. Exact analytical solution is derived thus obtained equations of motion. Results for clamped-clamped and clamped-free boundary conditions are presented. The presented result and method shell serve as benchmark for comparing the results obtained from the other approximate methods.

  9. In-beam PET measurement of $^{7}Li^{3+}$ irradiation induced $\\beta^+}$-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Priegnitz, M; Parodi, K; Sommerer, F; Fiedler, F; Enghardt, W

    2008-01-01

    At present positron emission tomography (PET) is the only feasible method of an in situ and non-invasive monitoring of patient irradiation with ions. At the experimental carbon ion treatment facility of the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt an in-beam PET scanner has been integrated into the treatment site and lead to a considerable quality improvement of the therapy. Since ions other than carbon are expected to come into operation in future patient treatment facilities, it is highly desirable to extend in-beam PET also to other therapeutic relevant ions, e.g. 7Li. Therefore, by means of the in-beam PET scanner at GSI the β+-activity induced by 7Li3+ ions has been investigated for the first time. Targets of PMMA, water, graphite and polyethylene were irradiated with monoenergetic, pencil-like beams of 7Li3+ with energies between 129.1 A MeV and 205.3 A MeV and intensities ranging from 3.0 × 107 to 1.9 × 108 ions s−1. This paper presents the measured β+-activity profiles as well as d...

  10. Time-of-flight MeV-SIMS with beam induced secondary electron trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Borchers, Martina; Döbeli, Max; Müller, Arnold Milenko; George, Matthias; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2016-08-01

    A new Time-of-flight MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) setup was developed to be used with a capillary microprobe for molecular imaging with heavy primary ions at MeV energies. Due to the low output current of the ion collimating capillary a Time-of-flight (ToF) measurement method with high duty cycle is necessary. Secondary electrons from the sample surface and transmitted ions were studied as start signals. They enable measurements with a continuous primary beam and unpulsed ToF spectrometer. Tests with various primary ion beams and sample types have shown that a secondary electron signal is obtained from 30% to 40% of incident MeV particles. This provides a ToF start signal with considerably better time resolution than the one obtained from transmitted primary ions detected in a radiation hard gas ionization detector. Beam induced secondary electrons therefore allow for MeV-SIMS measurements with reasonable mass resolution at primary ion beam currents in the low fA range.

  11. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wongkham, W. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90112 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-06-15

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  12. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  13. Search for multibody nuclear reactions in metal deuteride induced with ion beam and electrolysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the experimental results suggesting the occurrence of multibody nuclear reactions in metal deuterides under ion-beam irradiation and electrolysis. A meaningful increase of helium-4 was observed during electrolysis with the Pd-D2O system, while neutron emission was not observed. The D + D + D fusion, 3D → t + 3He + 9.5 MeV, has been observed repeatedly in deuteron-beam irradiation experiments with a TiDχ target. On the other hand, in proton-beam experiments with TiDχ, H + D + D-fusion: H + D + D → p + 4He + 23.8 MeV was observed. Considering this result, it seems that the 3D reaction occurred between two deuterons trapped closely in TiDχ and an incident particle of deuteron. The multibody nuclear reaction model can interpret both the results obtained in electrolysis and ion-beam experiments. It is considered that the lattice dynamics of metal deuteride is of key importance for inducing short-transient and closely packed d-d pairs and, thus, such fusions. (author)

  14. Ion-beam-induced epitaxial crystallization of implanted and chemical vapor deposited amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, A.; Priolo, F.; Spinella, C.; Rimini, E.; Baroetto, F.; Ferla, G.

    1989-03-01

    The dependence of ion-beam enhanced epitaxial growth of amorphous Si layers on impurities either dissolved in the film or present at the film-substrate interface is considered. In the case of ion implanted layers, electrically active dopants, like B, P, As at concentrations above 1 × 10 20/cm 3, enhance the rate by a factor of 2 with respect to the undoped layer. The enhancement shows also a weak dependence on the dopant concentration. Inert impurities, like Ar, which prevent pure thermal regrowth, do not show any appreciable influence on the ion-beam-induced growth rate. Chemical vapor deposited Si layers with a thin native interfacial oxide layer can also be epitaxially regrown under ion irradiation. A critical fluence is needed before the interfacial oxide breaks down and broadens, allowing the epitaxial crystallization to take place. This process is characterized by an activation energy of 0.44 eV. The complex phenomenon of ion-beam-induced crystallization involves a dynamical interaction between production and annealing of point defects. The presence of electrically active dopants probably influences the lifetime of point defects. Impurities which prevent thermal regrowth are instead dissolved by ballistic effects and/or radiation-enhanced mixing.

  15. Investigation of focused ion beam induced damage in single crystal diamond tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The FIB-induced damage layer should be paid enough attention when shaping the cutting edges of nanoscale diamond tools. • During FIB processing cutting tools made of natural single crystal diamond, the Ga+ collision will create a damage layer around tool tips. • The thicknesses of damaged layer and the level for amorphization of diamond significantly increase with beam energy. • The FIB-induced doping and defects during tool fabrication are responsible for the early detection of tool wear of nanoscale diamond tools. - Abstract: In this work, transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to characterise the focused ion beam (FIB) induced damage layer in a single crystal diamond tool under different FIB processing voltages. The results obtained from the experiments and the simulations are in good agreement. The results indicate that during FIB processing cutting tools made of natural single crystal diamond, the energetic Ga+ collision will create an impulse-dependent damage layer at the irradiated surface. For the tested beam voltages in a typical FIB system (from 8 kV to 30 kV), the thicknesses of the damaged layers formed on a diamond tool surface increased from 11.5 nm to 27.6 nm. The dynamic damage process of FIB irradiation and ion–solid interactions physics leading to processing defects in FIB milling were emulated by MD simulations. The research findings from this study provide the in-depth understanding of the wear of nanoscale multi-tip diamond tools considering the FIB irradiation induced doping and defects during the tool fabrication process

  16. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production

  17. Luminescence techniques: Instrumentation and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used...... luminescence stimulation and detection techniques are reviewed and information is given on recent developments in instrument design and on the stale of the art in luminescence measurements and analysis. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett B. Lewis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IVMe3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  19. Beam-induced Electron Loading Effects in High Pressure Cavities for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Jansson, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Insepov, Z.; /Argonne

    2010-05-01

    Ionization cooling is a critical building block for the realization of a muon collider. To suppress breakdown in the presence of the external magnetic field, an idea of using an RF cavity filled with high pressure hydrogen gas is being considered for the cooling channel design. One possible problem expected in the high pressure RF cavity is, however, the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced electrons accumulated inside the cavity. To characterize this detrimental loading effect, we develop a simplified model that relates the electron density evolution and the observed pickup voltage signal in the cavity, with consideration of several key molecular processes such as the formation of the polyatomic molecules, recombination and attachment. This model is expected to be compared with the actual beam test of the cavity in the MuCool Test Area (MTA) of Fermilab.

  20. Beam induced annealing of damage in carbon implanted silicon, ch. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annealing of damage introduced by 70 keV C implantation of Si is studied for impact of H+ and He+ beams in the energy interval 30 - 200 keV. For a good description of the annealing behaviour it is necessary to account for the damage introduction which occurs simultaneously. It turns out that the initial damage annealing rate is proportional to the amount of damage. The proportionality constant is related to the quantity fsub(a)sigmasub(a) introduced in an earlier paper in order to describe saturation effects in the damage production after H+ or He+ impact in unimplanted Si. This indicates that the same mechanism governs both processes: beam induced damage annealing and saturation of the damage introduction. (Auth.)

  1. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium; Ionenstrahlinduzierte Strukturmodifikationen in amorphem Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-05-03

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy {epsilon}{sub n} deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 {mu}m thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of {epsilon}{sub e}{sup HRF}=(10.5{+-}1.0) kev nm{sup -1} was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation {epsilon}{sub e}{sup S{sub a}}=(12{+-}2) keV nm{sup -1} for the first

  2. Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector and discusses methods to tag and remove background contaminated events in data. Trigger-rate based monitoring of beam-related backgrounds is presented. The correlations of backgrounds with machine conditions, such as residual pressure in the beam-pipe, are discussed. Results from dedicated beam-background simulations are shown, and their qualitative agreement with data is evaluated. Data taken during the passage of unpaired, i.e. non-colliding, proton bunches is used to obtain background-enriched data samples. These are used to identify characteristic features of beam-induced backgrounds, which then are exploited to develop dedicated background tagging tools. These tools, based on observables in the Pixel detector, the muon spectrometer and the calorimeters, are described in detail and their efficiencies are evaluated. Finally an example of an application of these techniques to a monojet analysis is given, which demonstra...

  3. Defect creation under UV irradiation of CsI:Pb crystals in Pb 2+ -induced absorption bands investigated by luminescence methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babin, V.; Kalder, K.; Krasnikov, A.; Nikl, Martin; Nitsch, Karel; Zazubovich, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 234, č. 2 (2002), s. 689-700. ISSN 0370-1972 Grant ostatní: NATO(XX) SfP 973510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : CsI:Pb crystal * luminescence * thermoluminescence * defect creation * UV irradiation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2002

  4. Target-induced quenching for highly sensitive detection of nucleic acids based on label-free luminescent supersandwich DNA/silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangfeng; Zhu, Yanhong; Chen, Ling; Wang, Lun; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Luminescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) were anchored by designed oligonucleotides, acting as fluorescent labels. They hybridized with specific nucleic acid targets to form a supersandwich structure resulting in the fluorescence intensity of the DNA/AgNCs decreasing linearly with respect to the concentration of the target DNA. PMID:24244937

  5. Pulsed-Laser-Induced Simple Synthetic Route for Tb(3)Al(5)O(12):Ce Colloidal Nanocrystals and Their Luminescent Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhin, Sung Wook; Ryu, Jeong Ho; Kim, Kang Min; Park, Gyeong Seon; Ryu, Han Wool; Shim, Kwang Bo; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    Cerium-doped Tb(3)Al(5)O(12) (TAG:Ce(3+)) colloidal nanocrystals were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in de-ionized water and lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid betain (LDA) aqueous solution for luminescent bio-labeling application. The influence of LDA molecules on the crystallinity, crystal morphology, crystallite size, and luminescent properties of the prepared TAG:Ce(3+) colloidal nanocrystals was investigated in detail. When the LDA solution was used, smaller average crystallite size, narrower size distribution, and enhanced luminescence were observed. These characteristics were explained by the effective role of occupying the oxygen defects on the surface of TAG:Ce(3+) colloidal nanocrystal because the amphoteric LDA molecules were attached by positively charged TAG:Ce(3+) colloidal nanocrystals. The blue-shifted phenomena found in luminescent spectra of the TAG:Ce(3+) colloidal nanocrystals could not be explained by previous crystal field theory. We discuss the 5d energy level of Ce(3+) with decreased crystal size with a phenomenological model that explains the relationship between bond distance with 5d energy level of Ce(3+) based on the concept of crystal field theory modified by covalency contribution. PMID:20596420

  6. Pulsed-Laser-Induced Simple Synthetic Route for Tb3Al5O12:Ce3+Colloidal Nanocrystals and Their Luminescent Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cerium-doped Tb3Al5O12(TAG:Ce3+ colloidal nanocrystals were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA in de-ionized water and lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid betain (LDA aqueous solution for luminescent bio-labeling application. The influence of LDA molecules on the crystallinity, crystal morphology, crystallite size, and luminescent properties of the prepared TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystals was investigated in detail. When the LDA solution was used, smaller average crystallite size, narrower size distribution, and enhanced luminescence were observed. These characteristics were explained by the effective role of occupying the oxygen defects on the surface of TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystal because the amphoteric LDA molecules were attached by positively charged TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystals. The blue-shifted phenomena found in luminescent spectra of the TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystals could not be explained by previous crystal field theory. We discuss the 5d energy level of Ce3+with decreased crystal size with a phenomenological model that explains the relationship between bond distance with 5d energy level of Ce3+based on the concept of crystal field theory modified by covalency contribution.

  7. Sequence variations of in vitro pUC18 plasmid DNA induced by high energy 7Li ion beams implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy heavy ion beams is a new mutagen for crop mutation breeding, but limited data are available on the molecular level induced by this mutagen. The in vitro pUC18 plasmid DNA was implanted by 7Li ion beams by doses of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100Gy, respectively, with the energy of 42.3Mev. The results showed that the damage effects induced by 7Li ion beams implantation was different from low LET rays, even low doses of 7Li ion beam could induce high damage on hydrogen bonds. Percentage of damages on hydrogen bonds of in vitro DNA induced by 7Li ion beams implantation increased with dosage increase up to 40Gy, then reduced with dosage increase, and higher than those of gamma rays in the same dosage. The relationship of dosage and damage percentage was different from that of gamma rays which was positive-linear correlation. Mutation frequency of 7Li ion beam implantation was 1.6 to 4.3 times to that of spontaneous mutation. The relationship of mutation frequency and dosage was similar with that of damage effects on hydrogen bonds, and showed a peak at 40Gy. The above results were identical with biological effects of wheat implanted by 7Li ion beams. Ten mutants were used for sequence analysis, which indicated that the types of base changes included base transversion, transition and deletion. Among all base changes detected, the frequency of bases transition (60%) was higher than that of bases transversion (30%) and bases deletion (10%). It seemed that thymine was more sensitive to the implantation than any other bases and base changes were mainly T→C and C→T. Bases between T and C were seemed to be easily induced by 7Li ion beams. The high percentage of DNA sequence variations could explain primarily the biological effects caused by 7Li ion beams in the M1 generation of crops. (author)

  8. Digital IBIC - new spectroscopic modalities for ion-beam-induced charge imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first implementation of digital ion-beam-induced charge (IBIC) imaging is presented, which permits spectroscopic time-resolved IBIC imaging of charge transport in semiconductors. A digital IBIC system has been developed which uses a high-speed waveform digitiser to capture the pulse shapes produced by interactions of a 1 μm resolution scanning microbeam in semiconductor samples. Using a variety of digital pulse shape analysis algorithms, quantitative images of charge signal amplitude, charge carrier lifetime, mobility and trapping phenomena can be acquired in real-time, with a time resolution of 3 cm2/Vs

  9. Electron beam induced current measurement on a specimen biased in a cathode lens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Miroslav; Zobač, Martin; Vlček, Ivan

    Graz : Verlag der Technischen Universität, 2009, Vol. 1: 211-212. ISBN 978-3-85125-062-6. [MC 2009 - Joint Meeting of Dreiländertagung and Multinational Congress on Microscopy /9./. Graz (AT), 30.08.2009-04.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : elektron beam induced current * SEM * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * specimen bias Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://www.univie.ac.at/asem/Graz_MC_09/papers/77645.pdf

  10. Laser induced bubbles inside liquids: Transient optical properties and effects on a beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light transmission through a laser formed bubble (LFB) following ablation of a metallic target inside water was studied. During the early expansion and late collapsing phases, the refraction index nb of the hot high-pressure vapor bubble is higher than 1.23 and close to that of the surrounding liquid. The cavity growth lowers nb down to 1.00 and causes strong defocusing of the incident laser beam with consequent enlargement of the ablation crater diameter, here overcoming factor two. Inhomogeneous water vapor clustering inside the cool expanded bubble further perturbs the light transmission and induces irregular ablation by the successive laser pulse.

  11. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth

  12. Numerical Simulation on Expansion Process of Ablation Plasma Induced by Intense Pulsed Ion Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Chang; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang; MA Teng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional time-dependent numerical model for the expansion process of ablation plasmainduced by intense pulsed ion beam(IPIB).The evolutions of density,velocity,temperature,and pressure of theablation plasma of the aluminium target are obtained.The numerical results are well in agreement with therelative experimental data.It is shown that the expansion process of ablation plasma induced by IPIB includesstrongly nonlinear effects and that shock waves appear during the propagation of the ablation plasma.

  13. Low temperature electron-beam induced voltage contrast in YBCO thin film structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realisation of high temperature superconducting thin film devices will require superconducting and insulating layered structures which maintain high quality properties. It is desirable to characterise such devices locally to determine limitations in the design or growth processes. The technique of beam-induced voltage contrast, using low temperature scanning electron microscopy, has been utilised to observe spatial variations in superconducting properties of single layer YBa2Cu3O7, Josephson junctions, and a flux transformer spiral. This paper reports on the limiting elements of insulated cross-over arrays and window contacts between superconducting layers. (orig.)

  14. Beam Induced Background Simulation Studies at IR1 with New High Luminosity LHC Layout

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218654; Gibson, Stephen; Bruce, Roderik; Cerutti, Francesco; Esposito, Luigi Salvatore; Lechner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the collimation system will be upgraded in the high-luminosity experimental regions. Additional protection is planned for the Q4 and Q5 magnets that are located further upstream of the tertiary collimators that protect the inner triplet magnets. We evaluate the effect of this proposed collimation layout for the incoming beam 1 on machine-induced background in the experimental area of IR1 (ATLAS). The main scenario is the round optics with β$^∗$ of 15 cm, but a flat scenario is also briefly discussed

  15. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  16. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, H. [Air Force Research Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walsh, D.S.; Sexton, F.W.; Doyle, B.L.; Aurand, J.F.; Dodd, P.E.; Flores, R.S.; Wing, N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth.

  17. Dispersive ground plane core-shell type optical monopole antennas fabricated with electron beam induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Hakkı; Coenen, Toon; Polman, Albert; Kuipers, Laurens Kobus

    2012-09-25

    We present the bottom-up fabrication of dispersive silica core, gold cladding ground plane optical nanoantennas. The structures are made by a combination of electron-beam induced deposition of silica and sputtering of gold. The antenna lengths range from 300 to 2100 nm with size aspect ratios as large as 20. The angular emission patterns of the nanoantennas are measured with angle-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and compared with finite-element methods. Good overall correspondence between the the measured and calculated trends is observed. The dispersive nature of these plasmonic monopole antennas makes their radiation profile highly tunable. PMID:22889269

  18. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Near-Infrared and Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, Jogender; Wolfe, Doug E.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that TBC delamination can be monitored by incorporating a thin luminescent sublayer that produces greatly increased luminescence intensity from delaminated regions of the TBC. Initial efforts utilized visible-wavelength luminescence from either europium or erbium doped sublayers. This approach exhibited good sensitivity to delamination of electron-beam physical-vapor-deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs, but limited sensitivity to delamination of the more highly scattering plasma-sprayed TBCs due to stronger optical scattering and to interference by luminescence from rare-earth impurities. These difficulties have now been overcome by new strategies employing near-infrared (NIR) and upconversion luminescence imaging. NIR luminescence at 1550 nm was produced in an erbium plus ytterbium co-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent sublayer using 980-nm excitation. Compared to visible-wavelength luminescence, these NIR emission and excitation wavelengths are much more weakly scattered by the TBC and therefore show much improved depth-probing capabilities. In addition, two-photon upconversion luminescence excitation at 980 nm wavelength produces luminescence emission at 562 nm with near-zero fluorescence background and exceptional contrast for delamination indication. The ability to detect TBC delamination produced by Rockwell indentation and by furnace cycling is demonstrated for both EB-PVD and plasma-sprayed TBCs. The relative strengths of the NIR and upconversion luminescence methods for monitoring TBC delamination are discussed.

  19. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  20. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescence from porous silicon is investigated. Both under cathodic and anodic polarization emission can be observed in the presence of oxidizing and reducing agents, respectively. Also in indifferent electrol...

  1. A system for measuring defect induced beam modulation on inertial confinement fusion-class laser optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Mike; Hawley-Fedder, Ruth; Widmayer, Clay; Williams, Wade; Weinzapfel, Carolyn; Roberts, Dave

    2005-12-01

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm2 and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO2 lasers.

  2. Coded-aperture imaging using photo-induced reconfigurable aperture arrays for mapping terahertz beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kannegulla, Akash; Rahman, Syed; Fay, Patrick; Xing, Huili Grace; Cheng, Li-Jing; Liu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    We report terahertz coded-aperture imaging using photo-induced reconfigurable aperture arrays on a silicon wafer. The coded aperture was implemented using programmable illumination from a commercially available digital light processing projector. At 590 GHz, each of the array element apertures can be optically turned on and off with a modulation depth of 20 dB and a modulation rate of ~1.3 KHz. Prototype demonstrations of 4 by 4 coded-aperture imaging using Hadamard coding have been performed and this technique has been successfully applied to mapping THz beams by using a 6 by 6 aperture array at 590 GHz. The imaging results agree closely with theoretical calculations based on Gaussian beam transformation, demonstrating that this technique is promising for realizing real-time and low-cost terahertz cameras for many applications. The reported approach provides a simple but powerful means to visualize THz beams, which is highly desired in quasi-optical system alignment, quantum-cascade laser design and characte...

  3. Radioactive Ion Beam Production by Fast-Neutron-Induced Fission in Actinide Targets at EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Martínez, Adonai

    The European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (EURISOL) is set to be the 'next-generation' European Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility. It will extend and amplify current research on nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics and fundamental interactions beyond the year 2010. In EURISOL, the production of high-intensity RIBs of specific neutron-rich isotopes is obtained by inducing fission in large-mass actinide targets. In our contribution, the use of uranium targets is shown to be advantageous to other materials, such as thorium. Therefore, in order to produce fissions in U-238 and reduce the plutonium inventory, a fast neutron energy spectrum is necessary. The large beam power required to achieve these RIB levels requires the use of a liquid proton-to-neutron converter. This article details the design parameters of the converter, with special attention to the coupled neutronics of the liquid converter and fission target. Calculations performed with the ...

  4. Proton implanted silicon wafers investigated by electron beam induced current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) is an analysis method used in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to investigate buried junctions or defects in semiconductors. During an EBIC measurement, the electron beam enters a semiconductor and generates electron-hole pairs. If the charge carriers diffuse into a region where there is a built-in electric eld, such as a pn junction or a Schottky contact, charge separation will occur and a current will flow. This is similar to what happens in a solar cell except in an EBIC measurement the electron-hole pairs are generated by the electron beam instead of by light. We have used EBIC to investigate proton implanted silicon wafers with implantation doses from 1 x 1013 p+/cm2 to 1 x 1015 p+/cm2 and with implantation energies from 500 keV to 5 MeV. The implantation introduces vacancies, silicon interstitials, and hydrogen into the crystal. The sample is then annealed in the temperature range from room temperature to 10000C and defect complexes form. The microscopic structure of these defect complexes is not completely understood. There is a class of oxygen-vacancy defect complexes called thermal donors that are known to act as donors in silicon. Since electron-hole pairs recombine at defects, the EBIC signal is decreased if the charge carriers have to diffuse past defects on their way to the measurement contacts. (author)

  5. Thermal effects on the Ga+ ion beam induced structural modification of a-SiC:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of implantation temperature and post-implantation thermal annealing on the Ga+ ion beam induced optical contrast formation in hydrogenated silicon-carbon alloy (a-SiC:H) films and underlying structural modifications have been studied. The optical contrast formed (between implanted and unimplanted regions of the film material) has been made use of in the form of optical pattern formation by computer-operated Ga+-focused ion beam. Possible applications of this effect in the area of submicron lithography and high-density optical data storage have been suggested with regard to the most widely spread focused micro-beam systems based on Ga+ liquid metal ion sources. The implanted samples were structurally analysed using vibrational spectroscopies, like Raman and infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, to define optimum implantation conditions. The precise role of implantation temperature effects, i.e. the target temperature during Ga+ ion irradiation, on the structural modification obtainable has been therefore a key part of this study. Appropriate post-implantation annealing treatments were also studied, since these are expected to offer further benefits in reducing the required ion dose and enhancing the optical contrast, thus increasing the cost-effectiveness of the method.

  6. Reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by 8B beam close to the barrier

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of the proposed experiment is to investigate on the reaction dynamics of proton-halo induced collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier where coupling to continuum effects are expected to be important. We propose to measure $^{8}$B+$^{64}$Zn elastic scattering angular distribution together with the measurement, for the first time, of p-$^{7}$Be coincidences coming from transfer and/or break-up of $^{8}$B. The latter will allow a better understanding of the relative contribution of elastic $\\textit{vs}$ non-elastic break-up in reactions induced by extremely weakly-bound nuclei. We believe that with the availability of the post accelerated $^{8}$B beam at REX-ISOLDE we will be able to collect for the first time high quality data for the study of such an important topic.

  7. Focused-electron-beam-induced-deposited cobalt nanopillars for nanomagnetic logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N.; van Mourik, R. A.; Yin, Y.; Koopmans, B.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nanomagnetic logic (NML) intends to alleviate problems of continued miniaturization of CMOS-based electronics, such as energy dissipation through heat, through advantages such as low power operation and non-volatile magnetic elements. In line with recent breakthroughs in NML with perpendicularly magnetized elements formed from thin films, we have fabricated NML inverter chains from Co nanopillars by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) that exhibit shape-induced perpendicular magnetization. The flexibility of FEBID allows optimization of NML structures. Simulations reveal that the choice of nanopillar dimensions is critical to obtain the correct antiferromagnetically coupled configuration. Experiments carrying the array through a clocking cycle using the Oersted field from an integrated Cu wire show that the array responds to the clocking cycle.

  8. Microbeam Studies of Diffusion Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection from Stripe-Like Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To design more radiation tolerant Integrated Circuits (ICs), it is essential to create and test accurate models of ionizing radiation induced charge collection dynamics within microcircuits. A new technique, Diffusion Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (DTRIBICC), is proposed to measure the average arrival time of the diffused charge at the junction. Specially designed stripe-like junctions were experimentally studied using a 12 MeV carbon microbeam with a spot size of 1 microm. The relative arrival time of ion-generated charge is measured along with the charge collection using a multiple parameter data acquisition system. The results show the importance of the diffused charge collection by junctions, which is especially significant in accounting for Multiple Bit Upset (MBUs) in digital devices

  9. Focused-electron-beam-induced-deposited cobalt nanopillars for nanomagnetic logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N; van Mourik, R A; Yin, Y; Koopmans, B; Parkin, S S P

    2016-04-22

    Nanomagnetic logic (NML) intends to alleviate problems of continued miniaturization of CMOS-based electronics, such as energy dissipation through heat, through advantages such as low power operation and non-volatile magnetic elements. In line with recent breakthroughs in NML with perpendicularly magnetized elements formed from thin films, we have fabricated NML inverter chains from Co nanopillars by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) that exhibit shape-induced perpendicular magnetization. The flexibility of FEBID allows optimization of NML structures. Simulations reveal that the choice of nanopillar dimensions is critical to obtain the correct antiferromagnetically coupled configuration. Experiments carrying the array through a clocking cycle using the Oersted field from an integrated Cu wire show that the array responds to the clocking cycle. PMID:26941232

  10. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of dental enamel for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Yukihara, E. G.; Mittani, J.; McKeever, S.W.S.; Simon, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of dental enamel and discusses the potential and challenges of OSL for filling the technology gap in biodosimetry required for medical triage following a radiological/nuclear accident or terrorist event. The OSL technique uses light to stimulate a radiation-induced luminescence signal from materials previously exposed to ionizing radiation. This luminescence originates from radiation-induced defects in insulatin...

  11. Electron beam induced synthesis of uranium dioxide nanoparticles: Effect of solvent composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, M. C.; Keny, S. J.; Naik, D. B.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various compositions of solvents was investigated on the electron beam induced synthesis of uranium dioxide, UO2 nanoparticles. The synthesis was carried out at different pHs from 2 to 7 in the aqueous solutions containing 10 mM uranyl nitrate and 10% 2-propanol. The formation of UO2 nanoparticles was found to occur only in the pH range from 2.5 to 3.7. Experiments were also carried out in the aqueous solutions containing various other alcohols (10% v/v) such as methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol or tert-butanol as well as in solutions containing 10 mM sodium formate at pH 3.4. The formation of UO2 nanoparticles in the aqueous solutions was found to occur only in the presence of ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1-butanol. It is therefore confirmed that the electron beam induced synthesis of UO2 nanoparticles strongly depends on the solvent compositions as well as the pH of the medium.

  12. Direct-Write Fabrication of Cellulose Nano-Structures via Focused Electron Beam Induced Nanosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganner, Thomas; Sattelkow, Jürgen; Rumpf, Bernhard; Eibinger, Manuel; Reishofer, David; Winkler, Robert; Nidetzky, Bernd; Spirk, Stefan; Plank, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In many areas of science and technology, patterned films and surfaces play a key role in engineering and development of advanced materials. Here, we introduce a new generic technique for the fabrication of polysaccharide nano-structures via focused electron beam induced conversion (FEBIC). For the proof of principle, organosoluble trimethylsilyl-cellulose (TMSC) thin films have been deposited by spin coating on SiO2 / Si and exposed to a nano-sized electron beam. It turns out that in the exposed areas an electron induced desilylation reaction takes place converting soluble TMSC to rather insoluble cellulose. After removal of the unexposed TMSC areas, structured cellulose patterns remain on the surface with FWHM line widths down to 70 nm. Systematic FEBIC parameter sweeps reveal a generally electron dose dependent behavior with three working regimes: incomplete conversion, ideal doses and over exposure. Direct (FT-IR) and indirect chemical analyses (enzymatic degradation) confirmed the cellulosic character of ideally converted areas. These investigations are complemented by a theoretical model which suggests a two-step reaction process by means of TMSC → cellulose and cellulose → non-cellulose material conversion in excellent agreement with experimental data. The extracted, individual reaction rates allowed the derivation of design rules for FEBIC parameters towards highest conversion efficiencies and highest lateral resolution. PMID:27585861

  13. Beam-induced radiation in the compact muon solenoid tracker at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Singh; P C Bhat; N V Mokhov; S Beri

    2010-05-01

    The intense radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN at a design energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV and a luminosity of 1034 cm−2S−1 poses unprecedented challenges for safe operation and performance quality of the silicon tracker detectors in the CMS and ATLAS experiments. The silicon trackers are crucial for the physics at the LHC experiments, and the inner layers, being situated only a few centimeters from the interaction point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. We have recently carried out extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies using MARS program to estimate particle fluxes and radiation dose in the CMS silicon pixel and strip trackers from proton–proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV and from machine-induced background such as beam–gas interactions and beam halo. We will present results on radiation dose, particle fluxes and spectra from these studies and discuss implications for radiation damage and performance of the CMS silicon tracker detectors.

  14. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impact on Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A; Friedman, A; Westenskow, G; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R; Seidl, P; Kwan, J W; Logan, G; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Celata, C M; Vay, J; Vujic, J L

    2006-03-06

    Electron clouds limit the performance of many major accelerators and storage rings. Significant quantities of electrons result when halo ions are lost to beam tubes, generating gas which can be ionized and ion-induced electrons that can multiply and accumulate, causing degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanisms of ion-induced electron production, experiments studied the impact of 50 to 400 keV K{sup +} ions on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the 500 kV Ion Source Test Stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The experimental electron yield scales with the electronic component (dE{sub e}/dx) of the stopping power and its angular dependence does not follow l/cos({theta}). A theoretical model is developed, using TRIM code to evaluate dE{sub e}/dx at several depths in the target, to estimate the electron yield, which is compared with the experimental results. The experiment extends the range of energy from previous works and the model reproduces the angular dependence and magnitude of the electron yield.

  15. Intrinsic and extrinsic luminescence of nanosize transition alumina powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence spectroscopy in the VUV-visible range under electron-beam excitation and synchrotron radiation was applied to investigate electronic properties of alumina nanopowders, which were prepared using the combustion synthesis method. By varying reaction and post treatment conditions we were able to prepare phase pure samples and powders with mixtures of α- and γ-phases mainly. In addition to the well-known 7.6 eV luminescence of STE of α-alumina, all samples possessed complex emission bands in UV range (3–5 eV) which originate from intrinsic excitonic emissions and extrinsic electronic excitations. -- Highlights: ► Luminescent spectroscopy of nanosized alumina powders was studied at 8 K. ► The crystalline structure of samples was analysed. ► Luminescent spectra, lifetimes and absorption onsets were discussed

  16. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  17. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Lopez, Santiago [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico)], E-mail: camachol@cicese.mx; Evans, Rodger [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, Luis [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Miguel A. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n, esq. Jesus Carranza, Toluca, Estado de Mexico 50120 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO{sub 2} in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance.

  18. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO2 in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance

  19. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Ions Impact on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kireeff-Covo, Michel; Barnard, John J; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, C M; Cohen, Ronald; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kwan, Joe W; Lund, Steven M; Molvik, Arthur; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L; Westenskow, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The cost of accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) can be reduced by using the smallest possible clearance between the beam and the wall from the beamline. This increases beam loss to the walls, generating ion-induced electrons that could be trapped by beam space charge potential into an "electron cloud," which can cause degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanism of production of ion-induced electrons we have measured impact of K+ ions with energies up to 400 KeV on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the ion source test stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The electron yield will be discussed and compared with experimental measurements from 1 MeV K+ ions in the High-Current Experiment at LBNL.*

  20. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  1. The mensuration of delayed luminescence on ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Fenghua; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guoqing

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the delayed luminescence of ginseng produced from two different areas was determined with the self built bioluminescence detecting system. And the attenuation curve of bioluminescence of the experimental samples were studied, before and after the samples extracted by 58% alcohol. We primarily gave out the parameters describing emitting characteristic. Using the method of optic induced bioluminescence, we also determined the weak luminescence emitting from the ginseng tuber, and find the intensity and decay time having obvious difference from skin and core, with these data we can distinguish the producing area and feature of the ginseng. In the experiment, the light-induce luminescence of the sample was menstruated, which has been infused by water and 58% alcohol; the difference between two kinds of samples which were infused and not infused has been delivered. In order to investigate the effect of excitation-light spectrum component to delayed luminescence of ginseng, a light filter witch allow a wavelength scope of 225nm~420nm pass through was installed between the light source and sample, keeping other work condition unchanged, the bioluminescence was also determined. For investigating the effect of extracting to emitting, the absorption spectrum of above samples ware studied, and the time-sequence of absorption spectrum was obtained. Based on the data obtained from our experiment, we analyzed the radiation mechanism of ginseng slice and tuber.

  2. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii. - Highlights: → Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal development of the leaf miner. → Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal reproduction of the leaf miner. → Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. → Electron beam irradiation induced p53 stability.

  3. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil-Hah, E-mail: khkim@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii. - Highlights: > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal development of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal reproduction of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. > Electron beam irradiation induced p53 stability.

  4. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R ampersand D Magazine 1991 R ampersand D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support

  5. Luminescence techniques: Instrumentation and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used lum...... luminescence stimulation and detection techniques are reviewed and information is given on recent developments in instrument design and on the stale of the art in luminescence measurements and analysis. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.......This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used...

  6. Developments in luminescence measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Denby, Phil M.;

    2006-01-01

    We report on our continuing investigation and development of new measurement facilities for use in irradiation, optical stimulation and luminescence signal detection; these facilities have potential application to all forms of luminescence-based retrospective dosimetry, and are particularly...

  7. Remote steering of laser beams by radar- and laser-induced refractive-index gradients in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refractive-index gradients induced in the atmospheric air by properly tailored laser and microwave fields are shown to enable a remote steering of laser beams. Heating-assisted modulation of the refractive index of the air by microwave radiation is shown to support small-angle laser-beam bending with bending angles on the order of 10-2. Ionization of the atmospheric air by dyads of femto- and nanosecond laser pulses, on the other hand, can provide beam deflection angles in excess of π/5, offering an attractive strategy for radiation transfer, free-space communications, and laser-based standoff detection

  8. Focused-ion-beam induced interfacial intermixing of magnetic bilayers for nanoscale control of magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification of the magnetic properties in a thin-film ferromagnetic/non-magnetic bilayer system by low-dose focused ion-beam (FIB) induced intermixing is demonstrated. The highly localized capability of FIB may be used to locally control magnetic behaviour at the nanoscale. The magnetic, electronic and structural properties of NiFe/Au bilayers were investigated as a function of the interfacial structure that was actively modified using focused Ga+ ion irradiation. Experimental work used MOKE, SQUID, XMCD as well as magnetoresistance measurements to determine the magnetic behavior and grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity to elucidate the interfacial structure. Interfacial intermixing, induced by low-dose irradiation, is shown to lead to complex changes in the magnetic behavior that are associated with monotonic structural evolution of the interface. This behavior may be explained by changes in the local atomic environment within the interface region resulting in a combination of processes including the loss of moment on Ni and Fe, an induced moment on Au and modifications to the spin-orbit coupling between Au and NiFe. (paper)

  9. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  10. Diagnostic of a laser induced plasma by means of a CO2 laser beam-deflection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to diagnose a laser-induced plasma of very small size with the aid of a beam-deflection technique, a cw probing CO2 laser beam which undergoes refraction and absorption by the electrons of this plasma has been employed. The resulting deflection is determined by means of a partially absorbing CaF2 wedge in conjunction with a fast HgCdTe infrared detector. By this diagnostic technique the spatial and temporal distribution of the electron density in a laser-induced plasma absorption and the actual laser power gives the possibility to estimate the electron temperature, the pressure and the velocity of the expanding plasma. (orig.)

  11. Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP) for emerging applications in carbon nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP), a resist-free additive nanomanufacturing technique, is an actively researched method for ''direct-write'' processing of a wide range of structural and functional nanomaterials, with high degree of spatial and time-domain control. This article attempts to critically assess the FEBIP capabilities and unique value proposition in the context of processing of electronics materials, with a particular emphasis on emerging carbon (i.e., based on graphene and carbon nanotubes) devices and interconnect structures. One of the major hurdles in advancing the carbon-based electronic materials and device fabrication is a disjoint nature of various processing steps involved in making a functional device from the precursor graphene/CNT materials. Not only this multi-step sequence severely limits the throughput and increases the cost, but also dramatically reduces the processing reproducibility and negatively impacts the quality because of possible between-the-step contamination, especially for impurity-susceptible materials such as graphene. The FEBIP provides a unique opportunity to address many challenges of carbon nanoelectronics, especially when it is employed as part of an integrated processing environment based on multiple ''beams'' of energetic particles, including electrons, photons, and molecules. This avenue is promising from the applications' prospective, as such a multi-functional (electron/photon/molecule beam) enables one to define shapes (patterning), form structures (deposition/etching), and modify (cleaning/doping/annealing) properties with locally resolved control on nanoscale using the same tool without ever changing the processing environment. It thus will have a direct positive impact on enhancing functionality, improving quality and reducing fabrication costs for electronic devices, based on both conventional CMOS and emerging carbon (CNT/graphene) materials. (orig.)

  12. Localized surface grafting reactions on carbon nanofibers induced by gamma and e-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evora, M.C., E-mail: cecilia@ieav.cta.br [Institute for Advanced Studies-IEAV/DCTA, Av. Cel Jose Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1-Putim, 12228-001 São Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Araujo, J.R., E-mail: jraraujo@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, E.H.M. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Strohmeier, B.R. [Thermo Fisher Scientific, 5225 Verona Road, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Silva, L.G.A., E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research- IPEN, Av. Prof lineu Prestes, 2242- Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 SP (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Methodology for the functionalization of carbon nanofibers was investigated. • Two radiation sources were used to promote grafting reactions: gamma and electron beam. • We report the optimum inhibitor concentration to achieve the functionalization. • Surface of carbon nanofibers showed an increase of oxygen content after irradiation. • The radiation-induced graphitization did not damage the overall sp{sup 2} structure. - Abstract: Electron beam and gamma-ray irradiation have potential application to modify the carbon fiber nanostructures in order to produce useful defects in the graphitic structure and create reactive sites. In this study, the methodology to functionalize carbon nanofiber (CNF), via a radiation process and using acrylic acid as a source of oxygen functional groups, was investigated. The samples were submitted to a direct grafting radiation process with electron beam and gamma-ray source. Several parameters were changed such as: acrylic acid concentration, radiation dose and percentage of inhibitor necessary to achieve functionalization, with higher percentage of oxygen functional groups on CNF surface, and better dispersion. The better results achieved were when mixing CNF in a solution of acrylic acid with 6% of inhibitor (FeSO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O) and irradiated at 100 kGy. The samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface composition (atomic%) showed a significant increase of oxygen content for the samples after irradiation. Also, the dispersion of the functionalized CNF in water was stable during months which may be a good indication that the functionalization process of CNF via ionizing radiation was successful.

  13. Lunar luminescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of lunar sites obtained in June 1983 have been analyzed for residual luminescence using the spectral line depth technique. The results or three sites each at three wavelengths are presented. The sites observed were Mare Crisium, Kepler, and Aristarchus. In each case, the value quoted was based not only on the strong Fraunhofer line in the spectral range covered but also on from 11 to 21 weaker lines within 80 A of the strongest feature. These data do not support previous observations. The values given do not indicate a greatly reddened spectrum, and the luminescence spectrum of the mare site is not significantly different from the two young crater sites. These observations cannot be adequately explained by thermal luminescence, theories of direct excitation are also unable to explain the strength of the flux.

  14. Luminescence from Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations of photoluminescene (PL and electroluminescence (EL from poroussilicon (PS have prompted many theoretical and experimental studies. Bulk crystalline Si is anindirect band gap material in which .recombination is dominated by non-radiative processes.Therefore, it cannot be used as light-emitting component in Si circuits. PS is a new material formed byanodisation ofsingle crystal Si wafers in hydro fluoric (liF solution. Luminescence from this materialis being explored for technological applications all over the world. The mechanism of luminescence isstill not well-understood. Several models have been proposed but still the facts about the strong lightemission at room temperature are unknown. This paper presents a review of the fabrication process andstudies on luminescent properties of PS. A hybrid model based on quantum confinement of carriers inthe nanometer size Si crystallites having a large number of surface states is suggested to explain theobserved properties.

  15. Luminescent detectors of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present in slow neutron imaging an active layer of an imaging plate IP contains a mixture of storage phosphors, usually BaFBr:Eu2+ used for imaging of X-rays, and a neutron converter material, usually Gd2O3, LiF. A novel Li-containing luminescent material perspective for a direct neutron conversion and storage is discussed. Irradiation of LiBaF3 crystals results in generation of Frenkel defect pairs and creation of F-type centres responsible for three absorption bands in UV-and visible spectral region. Because photo-stimulation in each of these absorption bands leads to bleaching of induced absorption, the F-type colour centres are convenient for storage of radiation dose. Photo-stimulated decay of F-centres causes recombination luminescence of impurity centres. Thermoactivated decay of F-type centres is governed by ionic process. The thermal stability of F-centres at RT and consequent material storage characteristics can be improved by doping of the LiBaF3 with heterovalent oxygen impurities. The obtained radiation energy storage, photo- and thermostimulated read-out characteristics justify that LiBaF3 is a suitable active media for imaging of slow neutrons

  16. Monte Carlo study of molecular weight distribution changes induced by degradation of ion beam irradiated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we study a polymeric material that degrades upon irradiation due to the energy inhomogeneously deposited by heavy ion beams. Ion beam irradiation of polymers generates rather different effects than those induced by 'classical' low ionizing particles such as electrons or gamma rays. This is due to the high electronic stopping power and the inhomogeneous distribution of deposited energy. This energy is transferred to the material within a small volume along the ion path forming the so called 'nuclear track' or 'latent track'. The track size primarily depends on the ion velocity, and it is determined by the secondary electrons (delta rays) generated along the ion trajectory. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we first obtained equilibrated polymer configurations using a coarse-grained model, and then investigated the spatially inhomogeneous chain scission process due to the passage of the ions. The number average molecular weight, weight average molecular weight and the polydispersity were calculated as a function of track radius, scission probability within the ion track and irradiation fluence. Finally we compared our results with a numerical implementation of a model for random homogeneous degradation.

  17. Wakefield-Induced Ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de la Ossa, A Martinez; Streeter, M J V; Osterhoff, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ($I_b^0\\gtrsim 8.5~\\mathrm{kA}$) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ($k_p\\sigma_z \\sim k_p\\epsilon_n \\sim 0.1$). In additi...

  18. Functional nickel-based deposits synthesized by focused beam induced processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, R.; Barcones, B.; Roelfsema, E.; Verheijen, M. A.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-02-01

    Functional nanostructures fabricated by focused electron/ion beam induced processing (FEBIP/FIBIP) open a promising route for applications in nanoelectronics. Such developments rely on the exploration of new advanced materials. We report here the successful fabrication of nickel-based deposits by FEBIP/FIBIP using bis(methyl cyclopentadienyl)nickel as a precursor. In particular, binary compounds such as nickel oxide (NiO) are synthesized by using an in situ two-step process at room temperature. By this method, as-grown Ni deposits transform into homogeneous NiO deposits using focused electron beam irradiation under O2 flux. This procedure is effective in producing highly pure NiO deposits with resistivity of 2000 Ωcm and a polycrystalline structure with face-centred cubic lattice and grains of 5 nm. We demonstrate that systems based on NiO deposits displaying resistance switching and an exchange-bias effect could be grown by FEBIP using optimized parameters. Our results provide a breakthrough towards using these techniques for the fabrication of functional nanodevices.

  19. Monte Carlo study of molecular weight distribution changes induced by degradation of ion beam irradiated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappa, V.C., E-mail: chappa@tandar.cnea.gov.a [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Pastorino, C.; Grosso, M.F. dwel; Arbeitman, C.R. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Mueller, M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Georg-August-Universitaet, Goettingen (Germany); Garci' a Bermudez, G. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologi' a, UNSAM (Argentina)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we study a polymeric material that degrades upon irradiation due to the energy inhomogeneously deposited by heavy ion beams. Ion beam irradiation of polymers generates rather different effects than those induced by 'classical' low ionizing particles such as electrons or gamma rays. This is due to the high electronic stopping power and the inhomogeneous distribution of deposited energy. This energy is transferred to the material within a small volume along the ion path forming the so called 'nuclear track' or 'latent track'. The track size primarily depends on the ion velocity, and it is determined by the secondary electrons (delta rays) generated along the ion trajectory. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we first obtained equilibrated polymer configurations using a coarse-grained model, and then investigated the spatially inhomogeneous chain scission process due to the passage of the ions. The number average molecular weight, weight average molecular weight and the polydispersity were calculated as a function of track radius, scission probability within the ion track and irradiation fluence. Finally we compared our results with a numerical implementation of a model for random homogeneous degradation.

  20. Ion beam induced effects at 15 K in z-cutLiNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary effects of the damage formation in z-cut LiNbO3 due to ion irradiation was investigated. Therefor the samples were irradiated stepwise and subsequently measured by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) at 15 K without changing the temperature of the sample. The irradiation was done with 30 keV H-, 50 keV Li-, 160 keV O- and 350 keV Ar-ions at ion fluences between 5 x 1011 cm-2 and 2 x 1017 cm-2. The RBS measurements were performed with 1.4 MeV He-ions in steps of equal charges providing a series of subspectra. It was observed that the backscattering yield of the damaged region decreases with increasing number of subspectra indicating an annealing of defects as a consequence of the RBS measurement. The energy deposited into electronic processes by the analyzing He beam is mostly responsible for the observed defect annealing. The amount of annealing depends on the defect concentration and the ion species. The undisturbed defect accumulation which will be observed without any effect of measurement was calculated for the different ion species by an analytical formula taking into account the He-beam induced annealing

  1. Electron-cloud instabilities and beam-induced multipacting in the LHC and in the VLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the beam pipe of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), photoemission and secondary emission give rise to a quasi-stationary electron cloud, which is established after a few buncn passages. The response of this electron cloud to a transversely displaced bunch resembles a short-range wakefield and can cause a fast instability. In additoin, beam-induced multipacting of the electrons may lead to an enhanced gas desorption and an associated pressure increase. In this paper the authors report preliminary simulation results of the electron-cloud build-up both in a dipole magnet and in a straight section of the LHC at top energy. The effective wakefield created by the electron cloud translates into an instability rise time of about 40 ms horizontally and 500 ms vertically. This rise time is not much larger than that of the resistive-wall instability at injection energy. Similar simulation studies show that the instability rise time for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is about 3--4 s in both trasnverse planes. The smaller growth rate in the VLHC, as compared with the LHC, is primarily due to the much lower bunch population

  2. A facility for studying radiative capture reactions induced with radioactive beams at ISAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, J. M.; Buchmann, L.; Hutcheon, D.; Lipnik, P.; Hunter, D.; Rogers, J.; Helmer, R.; Giesen, U.; Olin, A.; Bricault, P.; Bateman, N.

    The measurement of low energy fusion reactions of importance to nuclear astrophysics scenarios are a prime objective of the physics program of the new ISAC facility, located at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. Intense radioactive beams of 19Ne, 14,15O, 20,21Na, 17,18F and other low Z species with energies in the range of 0.15 to 1.5 MeV/mass unit will be available to measure cross sections and resonance strengths of alpha and proton induced reactions. An important component of the experimental configuration will be a new Recoil Product Detection Facility (RPDF) consisting of a windowless gas target, surrounded by a gamma array, while the recoils are separated from the intense radioactive beam using a Electro-Magnetic Separator (EMS) employing Wien filters. The recoiling reaction products will then be detected using either a Si μ-strip array or a gas filled detector. Using these devices along with coincidence requirements and time-of-flight conditions a background reduction factor of the order of 10 +15 is the present goal.

  3. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  4. Magnetotransport properties of high-quality cobalt nanowires grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-quality cobalt nanowires have been grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) and their magnetic and transport properties determined. The nanowires contain up to about 95% Co atomic percentage, as measured by EDX spectroscopy, which remarkably represents a high value compared with other metal deposits grown by the same technique. The Co content has been found to correlate with the beam current used for the growth. The magnetotransport properties have been studied on individual nanowires through 4-probe measurements. For the nanowires with the highest Co content, the resistivity at room temperature is low (∼40 μΩ cm), and shows metallic temperature dependence. The magnetotransport properties clearly demonstrate the ferromagnetic nature of the nanowire, with a saturation magnetization of Ms = 1329 ± 20 emu cm-3, very close to the bulk one. Due to the local character of this type of growth at targeted places and its high lateral resolution, these results pave the way for the creation of magnetic nanostructures and devices with the full potentiality of high-quality Co.

  5. The role of electron-stimulated desorption in focused electron beam induced deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of our study about the deposition rate of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) as a function of the substrate temperature with the substrate being an electron-transparent amorphous carbon membrane. When W(CO)6 is used as a precursor it is observed that the growth...... experiments compared to literature values is consistent with earlier findings by other authors. The discrepancy is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption, which is known to occur during electron irradiation. The data suggest that, of the W(CO)6 molecules that are affected by the electron irradiation......, the majority desorbs from the surface rather than dissociates to contribute to the deposit. It is important to take this into account during FEBIP experiments, for instance when determining fundamental process parameters such as the activation energy for desorption....

  6. Study of micro-dosimeter P-N junctions using ion beam induced charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reversed bias p-n junction offered an excellent opportunity to understand the radiobiological effects of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in tissues and carcinoma cells. Ionizing radiation creates electron hole pairs in semiconducting materials. Under an electric field the charge carriers can be tapped externally to produce charge pulses. Therefore the junction can serve as a micro-dosimeter for the detection of charged particles such as lithium and helium ions produced as a by-product of neutron capture by the boron and nitrogen nuclei respectively. By arranging the reverse biased p-n junctions into a two dimensional array, it offers the possibility of measuring the energy deposition pattern. In this paper, we have used the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) with a scanned MeV ion microbeam to image and characterise the array of p-n junctions (authors)

  7. Chemical effects induced by low-energy particle beams in fluorozirconate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modification of the chemical structure of fluorozirconate glasses (ZBLAN) with Ar ion and atom beams of low energy (2-10keV) has been studied in comparison with the damage produced in the starting polycrystalline ZrF4 and BaF2. A variety of reduced chemical states of Zr is produced in ZrF4 as well as in ZBLAN glasses, including metallic Zr0State. A strong enhancement of the amount of the metallic Zr formed under irradiation is observed in ZBLAN, while it is present only as trace in the irradiated pure ZrF4 samples. The reported effect is tentatively attributed to the presence of Ba ions in the glass network which could prompt the self-trapping of radiation-induced defects at the Zr sites, involving their progressive reduction

  8. Practical Framework for an Electron Beam Induced Current Technique Based on a Numerical Optimization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hideshi; Soeda, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    A practical framework for an electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique has been established for conductive materials based on a numerical optimization approach. Although the conventional EBIC technique is useful for evaluating the distributions of dopants or crystal defects in semiconductor transistors, issues related to the reproducibility and quantitative capability of measurements using this technique persist. For instance, it is difficult to acquire high-quality EBIC images throughout continuous tests due to variation in operator skill or test environment. Recently, due to the evaluation of EBIC equipment performance and the numerical optimization of equipment items, the constant acquisition of high contrast images has become possible, improving the reproducibility as well as yield regardless of operator skill or test environment. The technique proposed herein is even more sensitive and quantitative than scanning probe microscopy, an imaging technique that can possibly damage the sample. The new technique is expected to benefit the electrical evaluation of fragile or soft materials along with LSI materials.

  9. Induced photonuclear interaction by Rhodotron-TT200 10 MeV electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farshid Tabbakh; Mojtaba Mostajab Aldaavati; Mahdieh Hoseyni; Khadijeh Rezaee Ebrahim Saraee

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the photonuclear interaction induced by 10 MeV electron beam generating high-intensity neutrons is studied. Since the results depend on the target material, the calculations are performed for Pb, Ta and W targets which have high , in a simple geometry. MCNPX code has been used to simulate the whole process. Also, the results of photon generation has been compared with the experimental results to evaluate the reliability of the calculation. The results show that the obtained neutron flux can reach up to 1012 n/cm2 /s with average energies of 0.9 MeV, 0.4 MeV and 0.9 MeV for these three elements respectively with the maximum heat deposited as 3000 W/c3,4500 W/c3 and 6000 W/c3.

  10. Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Current measurements on MOS capacitors using a cyclotron microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As overlayers on electronic devices become progressively thicker, radiation effects microscopy using traditional microbeams (with ion energies up to a few tens of MeVs) is becoming less and less viable. To penetrate to the sensitive regions of these devices, much higher energies, several hundreds of MeVs are necessary. These high energies are available only from cyclotrons. A nuclear microprobe has been developed on the AVF cyclotron of the Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Applications (TIARA) facility. In this paper we will present the first results using 260 MeV Ne and 520 MeV Ar microbeams to perform Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Current (TRIBIC) measurements on Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The results will be compared to data taken with a traditional 15 MeV O microbeam.

  11. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing: the effect of substrate thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F; Lazic, Ivan; Beyer, André;

    2011-01-01

    It is often suggested that the growth in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is caused not only by primary electrons, but also (and even predominantly) by secondary electrons (SEs). If that is true, the growth rate for FEBIP can be changed by modifying the SE yield. Results from our...... Monte Carlo simulations show that the SE yield changes strongly with substrate thickness for thicknesses below the SE escape depth. However, our experimental results show that the growth rate is independent of the substrate thickness. Deposits with an average size of about 3 nm were written on 1 and 9...... nm thick carbon substrates. The apparent contradiction between simulation and experiment is explained by simulating the SE emission from a carbon substrate with platinum deposits on the surface. It appears that the SE emission is dominated by the deposits rather than the carbon substrate, even for...

  12. Induced Optical Losses in Optoelectronic Devices due to Focused Ion Beam Damages

    CERN Document Server

    Vallini, Felipe; Reis, Elohim Fonseca dos; von Zuben, Antônio Augusto; Frateschi, Newton Cesário

    2012-01-01

    A study of damages caused by gallium focused ion beam (FIB) into III-V compounds is presented. Potential damages caused by local heating, ion implantation, and selective sputtering are presented. Preliminary analysis shows that local heating is negligible. Gallium implantation is shown to occur over areas tens of nanometers thick. Gallium accumulation as well as selective sputtering during III-V compounds milling is expected. Particularly, for GaAs, this effect leads to gallium segregation and formation of metallic clusters. Microdisk resonators were fabricated using FIB milling with different emission currents to analyze these effects on a device. It is shown that for higher emission current, thus higher implantation doses, the cavity quality factor rapidly decreases due to optical scattering losses induced by implanted gallium atoms.

  13. Ion-beam-induced crystal grain nucleation in amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-beam-induced crystallization (IBIC) was used to produce nanocrystals in the preamorphized region of a 6H-SiC bulk crystal. The precipitation was stimulated by high dose Al implantation at temperatures from 300 deg. C to 700 deg. C. Using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) under grazing incidence, the morphology of the nanocrystalline phase and its dependence on the implantation parameters were investigated. After IBIC the morphology of the recrystallized material completely differs from that after thermal crystallization. Randomly oriented grains of 3C-SiC with almost spherical shape and mean diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm are formed during Al implantation. A critical ion dose for the onset of the recrystallization is found at about 1.9x1016 Al+/cm2

  14. Tunable atomic force microscopy bias lithography on electron beam induced carbonaceous platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kurra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tunable local electrochemical and physical modifications on the carbonaceous platforms are achieved using Atomic force microscope (AFM bias lithography. These carbonaceous platforms are produced on Si substrate by the technique called electron beam induced carbonaceous deposition (EBICD. EBICD is composed of functionalized carbon species, confirmed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis. AFM bias lithography in tapping mode with a positive tip bias resulted in the nucleation of attoliter water on the EBICD surface under moderate humidity conditions (45%. While the lithography in the contact mode with a negative tip bias caused the electrochemical modifications such as anodic oxidation and etching of the EBICD under moderate (45% and higher (60% humidity conditions respectively. Finally, reversible charge patterns are created on these EBICD surfaces under low (30% humidity conditions and investigated by means of electrostatic force microscopy (EFM.

  15. Luminescence of photoactivated pristine and Cr-doped MgAl2O4 spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyeva, E. S.; Barinov, D. S.; Atitar, F. M.; Murashkina, A. A.; Emeline, A. V.; Serpone, N.

    2015-04-01

    This Letter reports a comparative study of the luminescence from pristine and Cr-doped MgAl2O4 spinel induced by different excitation mechanisms: photoluminescence (PhL), thermoluminescence (ThL) and Photo-Induced Chemisorption Luminescence (the PhICL phenomenon) to understand the mechanism of PhICL emission. Cr-doping alters the major pathway of physical relaxation through a luminescence pathway: quenching of the luminescence associated with intrinsic defects and appearance of the luminescence from Cr3+-states. The similarity between ThL and PhICL spectra suggest the mechanism of the PhICL phenomenon is due to electron transfer from the surface to the emission centers of luminescence; an energy transfer pathway is not precluded.

  16. Refractive index changes induced by sheet beams with various intensity distributions in LiNbO3:Fe crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Peng; ZHAO; Jianlin; XU; Honglai; SUN; Yidong; YANG

    2005-01-01

    According to the Kukhtarev equations and a simplified model based on the photovoltaic charge carriers transport mechanism, the distributions of the index changes (DICs) in LiNbO3:Fe crystals induced by sheet beams with various intensity profiles are theoretically analyzed. The numerically simulated results coincide with the analytic expressions deduced from the simplified model. The DICs in a LiNbO3:Fe crystal induced by sheet beams with rectangular, Gaussian and square law profiles are measured by using the interferometric method. By employing the analytic expressions, the experimental data points are well fitted. By utilizing the angular spectrum theory and the ray equation, the uniformities of the intensity profiles of the writing beams along the propagation directions and the influences of the self-defocusing effect of the crystal are numerically simulated, respectively. The results show that the experimental results are reliable. The numerically simulated method and the analytic expressions can be both employed to predict the DICs induced by sheet beams with various light intensity profiles. Furthermore, utilizing writing beams with proper intensity profiles, any desired index distributions could be obtained.

  17. Electron-beam irradiation induced transformation of Cu2(OH)3NO3 nanoflakes into nanocrystalline CuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, S. K.; Gottapu, S. N.; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2016-05-01

    The transmission electron microscope electron-beam (TEM e-beam) as a material modification tool has been demonstrated. The material modification is realised in the high-resolution TEM mode (largest condenser aperture, 150 μm, and 200 nm spot size) at a 200 keV beam energy. The Cu2(OH)3NO3 (CHN) nanoflakes used in this study were microwave solution processed that were layered single crystals and radiation sensitive. The single domain CHN flakes disintegrate into a large number of individual CuO crystallites within a 90 s span of time. The sequential bright-field, dark-field, and selected area electron diffraction modes were employed to record the evolved morphology, microstructural changes, and structural transformation that validate CHN modification. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging of e-beam irradiated regions unambiguously supports the growth of CuO nanoparticles (11.8(3.2) nm in diameter). This study demonstrates e-beam irradiation induced CHN depletion, subsequent nucleation and growth of nanocrystalline CuO regions well embedded in the parent burnt porous matrix which can be useful for miniaturized sensing applications. NaBH4 induced room temperature reduction of CHN to elemental Cu and its printability on paper was also demonstrated.The transmission electron microscope electron-beam (TEM e-beam) as a material modification tool has been demonstrated. The material modification is realised in the high-resolution TEM mode (largest condenser aperture, 150 μm, and 200 nm spot size) at a 200 keV beam energy. The Cu2(OH)3NO3 (CHN) nanoflakes used in this study were microwave solution processed that were layered single crystals and radiation sensitive. The single domain CHN flakes disintegrate into a large number of individual CuO crystallites within a 90 s span of time. The sequential bright-field, dark-field, and selected area electron diffraction modes were employed to record the evolved morphology, microstructural changes, and structural

  18. Radiation induced currents in parallel plate ionization chambers: Measurement and Monte Carlo simulation for megavoltage photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarity effects in ionization chambers are caused by a radiation induced current, also known as Compton current, which arises as a charge imbalance due to charge deposition in electrodes of ionization chambers. We used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) for measurements of Compton current in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Electron contamination of photon beams and photon contamination of electron beams have a negligible effect on the measured Compton current. To allow for a theoretical understanding of the Compton current produced in the PEEC effect we carried out Monte Carlo calculations with a modified user code, the COMPTON/EGSnrc. The Monte Carlo calculated COMPTON currents agree well with measured data for both photon and electron beams; the calculated polarity correction factors, on the other hand, do not agree with measurement results. The conclusions reached for the PEEC can be extended to parallel-plate ionization chambers in general

  19. The fine structure of the vortex-beams in the biaxial and biaxially-induced birefringent media caused by the conical diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeyeva, Tatyana; Anischenko, Pavel; Volyar, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We consider the paraxial propagation of nondiffracting singular beams inside natural biaxial and biaxially-induced birefringent media in vicinity of one of the optical axes in terms of eigenmode vortex-beams, whose angular momentum does not change upon propagation. We have predicted a series of new optical effects in the natural biaxial crystals such as the stable propagation of vector singular beams bearing the coupled optical vortices with fractional topological charges, the conversion of the zero-order Bessel beam with a uniformly distributed linear polarization into the radially-, azimuthally- and spirally-polarized beams and the conversion of the space-variant linear polarization in the combined beam with coupled vortices. We have revealed that the field structure of the vortex-beams in the biaxially-induced crystals resembles that in the natural biaxial crystals and form the vector structure inherent in the conical diffraction. However, the mode beams in this case do not change the propagation direction...

  20. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  1. Modulated Luminescent Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanov, Plamen; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a mathematical model of Modulated Luminescent Tomography. We show that when single X-rays or focused X-rays are used as an excitation, the problem is similar to the inversion of weighted X-ray transforms. In particular, we give an explicit inversion in the case of Dual Cone X-ray excitation.

  2. CCD Luminescence Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  3. Luminescence study of spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study is made of the luminescence of five kinds of spodumene from Minas Gerais, Brazil, studied previously by optical absorption spectroscopy. Natural gemstones are used which, in the course of the experiments, were irradiated with X-rays. (L.C.)

  4. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied

  5. Electron beam induced cationic polymerization of epoxy resins. Dependence of Tg on conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The high-energy radiation curing of monomer blends polymerizing by a free radical or by a cationic mechanism receives increasing attention in the perspective of high performance composite materials. In the present work, we have focused our attention on epoxy formulations as models of the matrices polymerizing by a cationic mechanism that could be used in fiber-reinforced composites for aerospace applications. We have examined the progress of the electron beam (EB) induced polymerization of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence of a diaryliodonium salt (DAIS) by FTIR spectroscopy and by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMA). The obtained results allow to draw the gradual increase of the temperature for the network thermomechanical transition (Ta, associated with the glass transition temperature Tg) over a broad range of conversion (p) and reveal a peculiar behavior at high conversion. In this domain (p > 0.90), the material's Tg is shown to decrease when conversion approaches unity. Moreover, the post-irradiation thermal treatment of the materials, that generally yields effective 'dark curing', appears to induce a decrease of Tg, with an amplitude correlated with the amount of DAIS in the formulation. Owing to the particular nature of the propagating centers in cationic polymerisation, the thermal relaxation of ionic clusters trapped in the glassy matrix can be reasonably invoked as a possible cause for this behavior

  6. Study on Nanostructures Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four techniques using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB were proposed to obtain surface nanostructure of metal and alloys. The first method involves the distribution of several fine Mg nanoparticles on the top surface of treated samples by evaporation of pure Mg with low boiling point. The second technique uses superfast heating, melting, and cooling induced by HCPEB irradiation to refine the primary phase or the second phase in alloys to nanosized uniform distributed phases in the matrix, such as the quasicrystal phase Mg30Zn60Y10 in the quasicrystal alloy Mg67Zn30Y3. The third technique involves the refinement of eutectic silicon phase in hypereutectic Al-15Si alloys to fine particles with the size of several nanometers through solid solution and precipitation refinement. Finally, in the deformation zone induced by HCPEB irradiation, the grain size can be refined to several hundred nanometers, such as the grain size of the hypereutectic Al-15Si alloys in the deformation zone, which can reach ~400 nm after HCPEB treatment for 25 pulses. Therefore, HCPEB technology is an efficient way to obtain surface nanostructure.

  7. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L.; Ström, P.; Lejeune, A.; Doveil, F.

    2015-06-01

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  8. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency versus Nonlinear Faraday Effect. Coherent Control of the Light Beam Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Drampyan, R; Gawlik, W

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical study of the nonlinear Faraday effect under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency at the 5$S_{1/2} \\to 5P_{3/2} \\to 5D_{5/2}$ two-photon transition in rubidium vapors. These transitions realize the inverted Y model which combines the $\\Lambda$ and ladder systems. Strong nonlinearity allowing for large rotation angles of a probe beam tuned to the $S\\to P$ transition was obtained by creation of quantum superpositions of magnetic sublevels (Zeeman coherences) in the rubidium ground state ($\\Lambda$ scheme). Additionally, electromagnetically induced transparency was accomplished in a ladder scheme by acting with an additional strong coupling laser on the $P\\to D$ transition. Under conditions of a two-photon resonance the rotation was significantly reduced, which is interpreted as a competition between the two processes. The effect was observed in sub-Gauss magnetic fields and could be used for efficient coherent control of generation of the ground-state c...

  9. Toward steering a jet of particles into an x-ray beam with optically induced forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerskorn, Niko; Bowman, Richard; Kirian, Richard A.; Awel, Salah; Wiedorn, Max; Küpper, Jochen; Padgett, Miles J.; Chapman, Henry N.; Rode, Andrei V.

    2015-08-01

    Optical trapping of light-absorbing particles in a gaseous environment is governed by a laser-induced photophoretic force, which can be orders of magnitude stronger than the force of radiation pressure induced by the same light intensity. In spite of many experimental studies, the exact theoretical background underlying the photophoretic force and the prediction of its influence on the particle motion is still in its infancy. Here, we report the results of a quantitative analysis of the photophoretic force and the stiffness of trapping achieved by levitating graphite and carbon-coated glass shells of calibrated sizes in an upright diverging hollow-core vortex beam, which we refer to as an `optical funnel'. The measurements of forces were conducted in air at various gas pressures in the range from 5 mbar to 2 bar. The results of these measurements lay the foundation for developing a touch-free optical system for precisely positioning sub-micrometer bioparticles at the focal spot of an x-ray free electron laser, which would significantly enhance the efficiency of studying nanoscale morphology of proteins and biomolecules in femtosecond coherent diffractive imaging experiments.

  10. Study of the beam-induced neutron flux and required shielding for DIANA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low energy accelerators in underground locations have emerged as a powerful tool for the measurement of critical nuclear reactions for the study of energy production and element synthesis in astrophysics. While cosmic ray induced background is substantially reduced, beam induced background on target impurities and depositions on target and collimator materials remain a matter of serious concern. The Dual Ion Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics (DIANA) is proposed to operate as a low-level background facility in an underground location. One of the main goals of DIANA is the study of neutron sources in stellar helium burning. For these experiments DIANA is a neutron radiation source which may affect other nearby low background level experiments. We therefore investigated the required laboratory layout to attenuate the neutron flux generated in a worst-case scenario to a level below the natural background in the underground environment. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron propagation in the laboratory show that a neutron flux many orders of magnitude above expected values gets attenuated below the natural background rate using a 1 m thick water-shielded door as well as an emergency access/egress maze

  11. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L., E-mail: laurence.kovacic@univ-amu.fr; Doveil, F., E-mail: fabrice.doveil@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, FR-13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Ström, P., E-mail: pestro@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Lejeune, A., E-mail: aurelien.lejeune@ametek.com [CAMECA SAS - 29 Quai des Grésillons, 92622 Gennevilliers Cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  12. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Yuri K; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  13. Suppression of space charge induced beam halo in nonlinear focusing channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Yuri K.; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-04-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  14. Two bisthienylethene-Ir(III) complexes showing acid/base-induced structural transformation and on-off luminescence switching in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Deng-Ke; Hu, Jiong-Sheng; Li, Min-Qiang; Gong, Dan-Ping; Li, Xiao-Xiong; Ward, Michael D

    2015-12-28

    Complexes [Ir(dfppy)2(pbdtiH)](PF6)·2CHCl3 (1-H) and [Ir(dfppy)2(pbdti)] (1) were synthesized by the reaction of bisthienylethene pbdtiH and an [Ir(dfppy)2Cl]2 dimer under neutral and basic conditions, respectively. Thus, the {Ir(dfppy)2}(+) unit is coordinated by pbdtiH in 1-H, and by pbdti(-) in 1, which are confirmed by their crystal structures. The structures of 1-H and 1 could be interconverted in solution, upon alternately adding NEt3 and TFA, thus resulting in reversible luminescence switching between the on-state of 1-H and the off-state of 1 at room temperature. In addition, both 1-H and 1 show solid-state luminescence, with a broad emission at 534 nm and 525 nm, respectively. The free pbdtiH ligand shows photochromic behavior in CH2Cl2 solution. However, no photochromism has been observed in 1-H and 1, indicating that the coordination of the pbdtiH/pbdti(-) ligand to the {Ir(dfppy)2}(+) unit could suppress their photochromic behaviors. PMID:26586364

  15. Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Valenta, J.; Vrba, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul (2013), s. 1-58. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : background * induced * semiconductor detector * pixel * muon * spectrometer * jet * single production * ATLAS * calorimeter * new physics * beam Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013

  16. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron — or X-ray beam sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboutet, H.; Aucouturier, J.

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons ( BX rays), based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γ n) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γ n) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. We conclude that for electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10-11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. There is only a small increase of induced activity as the energy changes from 5 to 10 MeV, for the same total applied dose.

  17. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N., E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR7344, CNRS/University of Orleans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, BP6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Vayer, M. [ICMN, UMR 7374, CNRS/University of Orleans, 1b rue de la Ferollerie, CS 40059, 45071 Orleans Cedex (France); Sauldubois, A. [CME, UFR Sciences, University of Orleans, 1 Rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  18. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Vayer, M.; Sauldubois, A.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm2). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  19. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm2). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime

  20. Electron-beam induced RAFT-graft polymerization of poly(acrylic acid) onto PVDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores for the first time the post-radiation-induced-graft polymerization on solid substrate using reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) mechanism. Radiation-induced graft polymerization onto polymers is a potentially interesting technique to create easily new materials from highly resistant polymers, e.g. surface graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) improves its surface properties without losing its excellent mechanical properties. As a consequence of the radical nature of the polymerization processes it is difficult to control molecular weight of grafted chains, and therefore design and standardize the properties of the final product. RAFT polymerization is a suitable method to obtain monodisperse polymers. The ability of the RAFT agents to control the polymer chain length could be an interesting approach to improve the grafted polymers obtained by post-radiation-induced-graft polymerization technique. In this way, graft polymerization of AA onto electron-beam irradiated α-PVDF was performed using trithiocarbonic acid bis(1-phenylethyl) ester as a RAFT agent to control the radical polymerization. We studied several grafting parameters such as solvent, monomer concentration and grafting time in order to achieve a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) layer onto PVDF surface. Acetic acid was found to be the best solvent for many reasons, as to drive graft polymerization mainly to the polymer surface, complete solubility and stability of all reactants. Hydrolysis of PAA chains was also studied in order to remove the trithiocarbonate functionality from the grafted polymer. A mild chemical condition was achieved in order to have thiol groups that were detected onto the modified PVDF by specific enzymatic reaction

  1. Electron-beam induced RAFT-graft polymerization of poly(acrylic acid) onto PVDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, M.; Betz, N.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores for the first time the post-radiation-induced-graft polymerization on solid substrate using reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) mechanism. Radiation-induced graft polymerization onto polymers is a potentially interesting technique to create easily new materials from highly resistant polymers, e.g. surface graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) improves its surface properties without losing its excellent mechanical properties. As a consequence of the radical nature of the polymerization processes it is difficult to control molecular weight of grafted chains, and therefore design and standardize the properties of the final product. RAFT polymerization is a suitable method to obtain monodisperse polymers. The ability of the RAFT agents to control the polymer chain length could be an interesting approach to improve the grafted polymers obtained by post-radiation-induced-graft polymerization technique. In this way, graft polymerization of AA onto electron-beam irradiated α-PVDF was performed using trithiocarbonic acid bis(1-phenylethyl) ester as a RAFT agent to control the radical polymerization. We studied several grafting parameters such as solvent, monomer concentration and grafting time in order to achieve a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) layer onto PVDF surface. Acetic acid was found to be the best solvent for many reasons, as to drive graft polymerization mainly to the polymer surface, complete solubility and stability of all reactants. Hydrolysis of PAA chains was also studied in order to remove the trithiocarbonate functionality from the grafted polymer. A mild chemical condition was achieved in order to have thiol groups that were detected onto the modified PVDF by specific enzymatic reaction.

  2. Parameters Optimization of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Experimental Setup for the Case with Beam Expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Juanjuan; Li, Yufang; Gong, Yao; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of measurement precision and repeatability is one of the issues currently faced by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, which is expected to be capable of precise and accurate quantitative analysis. It was found that there was great potential to improve the signal quality and repeatability by reducing the laser beam divergence angle using a suitable beam expander (BE). In the present work, the influences of several experimental parameters for the case with BE are studied in order to optimize the analytical performances: the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the relative standard deviation (RSD). We demonstrate that by selecting the optimal experimental parameters, the BE-included LIBS setup can give higher SNR and lower RSD values of the line intensity normalized by the whole spectrum area. For validation purposes, support vector machine (SVM) regression combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used to establish a calibration model to realize the quantitative analysis of the ash content. Good agreement has been found between the laboratory measurement results from the LIBS method and those from the traditional method. The measurement accuracy presented here for ash content analysis is estimated to be 0.31%, while the average relative error is 2.36%. supported by the 973 Program of China (No. 2012CB921603), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61475093, 61127017, 61178009, 61108030, 61378047, 61275213, 61475093, and 61205216), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2013BAC14B01), the Shanxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013021004-1 and 2012021022-1), the Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Nos. 2013-011 and 2013-01), and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi, China

  3. Accelerating airy beams generated by ultrafast laser induced space-variant nanostructures in glass

    OpenAIRE

    Gecevičius, M.; M. Beresna; Kazansky, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate new technique to generate accelerating Airy beam with femtosecond laser imprinted space variant birefringence produced by self-assembled nanostructures in fused silica. The technique enables dual Airy beam generation.

  4. Measurement of longitudinal phase space in an accelerated H- beam using a laser-induced neutralization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced neutralization of H- ions is a process that can be used to measure the longitudinal phase space of accelerated H- beams. The laser-induced neutralization diagnostic approach (LINDA) measures the longitudinal emittance of an H- beam by photoneutralizing different phase slices of beam microbunches and analyzing the energy distribution of the neutral slices. A LINDA system utilizing a pulsed laser and time-of-flight analysis has successfully measured longitudinal emittance of the 5 MeV H- beam exiting the drift-tube linac of the Los Alamos Accelerator Test Stand. Design considerations associated with the LINDA laser-based emittance measuring system are given. The present LINDA system is described and its limitations are discussed. Experimental results are given from an application of the LINDA system to the measurement of longitudinal emittance growth in a drift space and following insertion into the beamline of beam transport elements comprising a single-arm funnel. A new system is proposed which uses a mode-locked laser and spectrometer to improve resolution and shorten measurement time. (orig.)

  5. Electron-beam irradiation induced transformation of Cu2(OH)3NO3 nanoflakes into nanocrystalline CuO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, S K; Gottapu, S N; Krishna, M Ghanashyam

    2016-06-01

    The transmission electron microscope electron-beam (TEM e-beam) as a material modification tool has been demonstrated. The material modification is realised in the high-resolution TEM mode (largest condenser aperture, 150 μm, and 200 nm spot size) at a 200 keV beam energy. The Cu2(OH)3NO3 (CHN) nanoflakes used in this study were microwave solution processed that were layered single crystals and radiation sensitive. The single domain CHN flakes disintegrate into a large number of individual CuO crystallites within a 90 s span of time. The sequential bright-field, dark-field, and selected area electron diffraction modes were employed to record the evolved morphology, microstructural changes, and structural transformation that validate CHN modification. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging of e-beam irradiated regions unambiguously supports the growth of CuO nanoparticles (11.8(3.2) nm in diameter). This study demonstrates e-beam irradiation induced CHN depletion, subsequent nucleation and growth of nanocrystalline CuO regions well embedded in the parent burnt porous matrix which can be useful for miniaturized sensing applications. NaBH4 induced room temperature reduction of CHN to elemental Cu and its printability on paper was also demonstrated. PMID:27181995

  6. Ion-beam-induced spinel-to-rocksalt structural phase transformation in MgAl2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ion-beam-induced metastable phase in magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) has been examined in detail using transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of MgAl2O4 with (111) orientation were irradiated with 180-keV Ne+ ions at 120 K to fluences of 1016 and 1017/cm2. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns obtained from the irradiation-induced damaged layer revealed that all even hkl reflections (e.g., 222) possess strong intensity, while all odd hkl reflections (e.g., 111) are weak. The features of these diffraction patterns corresponded to those of the rocksalt (NaCl) structure, suggesting that an ordered spinel to disordered rocksalt structural phase transformation in MgAl2O4 was induced by ion beam irradiation. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  7. Flexible generation of optical beams with quasicrystalline structures via astigmatism induced by a tilted lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J. C.; Liang, H. C.; Tsou, C. H.; Su, K. W.; Chen, Y. F.

    2012-12-01

    We theoretically show that a family of optical beams with vortex-lattice structures can be reliably generated by tilting the focal lens to introduce the relative phases between the interfering beams. We also experimentally generate the quasicrystal beams to confirm the theoretical analysis. With the analytical wave functions and experimental patterns, a variety of vortex-lattice structures are manifested.

  8. Pulsed cathodoluminescence and γ-luminescence of scintillation crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. A.; Ochkin, V. N.; Pestovskii, N. V.; Petrov, A. A.; Savinov, S. Yu; Zagumennyi, A. I.; Zavertyaev, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    The spectra and decay time of pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) of a scintillating crystals excited by the electron beam is compared to the spectra and decay time of the luminescence of the same crystals initiated by γ-rays (GL). It is shown that spectra and decay time of PCL and GL are identical within the experimental errors. The explanation of these results is based on taking into account the physical processes within the crystal media under the irradiation by high-energy particles. The results of this study confirm that the PCL method may be used for the rapid analysis of the luminescent properties of scintillators.

  9. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  10. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2012-01-01

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii.

  11. Fast crystallization of amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 induced by thermally activated electron-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the ionization and displacement effects of an electron-beam (e-beam) on amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 synthesized by the co-precipitation and calcination methods. The as-received amorphous specimens were irradiated under electron beams at different energies (80 keV, 120 keV, and 2 MeV) and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A metastable fluorite phase was observed in nanocrystalline Gd2Zr2O7 and is proposed to arise from the relatively lower surface and interface energy compared with the pyrochlore phase. Fast crystallization could be induced by 120 keV e-beam irradiation (beam current = 0.47 mA/cm2). The crystallization occurred on the nanoscale upon ionization irradiation at 400 °C after a dose of less than 1017 electrons/cm2. Under e-beam irradiation, the activation energy for the grain growth process was approximately 10 kJ/mol, but the activation energy was 135 kJ/mol by calcination in a furnace. The thermally activated ionization process was considered the fast crystallization mechanism

  12. Potential For Laser-Induced Microbunching Studies with the 3-MHZ-Rate Electron Beams at ASTA

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, A H; Byrd, J M; Wilcox, R B

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of the laser-induced microbunching as it is related to time-sliced electron-beam diagnostics and high-gain-harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron lasers using bright electron beams are proposed for the ASTA facility. Initial tests at 40-50 MeV with an amplified 800-nm seed laser beam co-propagating with the electron beam through a short undulator (or modulator) tuned for the resonance condition followed by transport through a subsequent chicane will result in energy modulation and z-density modulation (microbunching), respectively. The latter microbunching will result in generation of coherent optical or UV transition radiation (COTR, CUVTR) at a metal converter screen which can reveal slice beam size, centroid, and energy spread. Additionally, direct assessment of the microbunching factors related to HGHG by measurement of the COTR intensity and harmonic content after the chicane as a function of seed laser power and beam parameters will be done. These experiments will be performed using the...

  13. Spatially localised luminescence emission properties induced by formation of ring-shaped quasi-potential trap around V-pits in InGaN epi-layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The correlation between surface structural and luminescence properties of InGaN epi-layers grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition has been investigated. Ring-shaped regions with high In-content are observed around V-pits by spatial resolved cathodoluminescence and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These ring-shaped regions are found to form a potential energy well with depth about 300 meV with respect to the ordinary regions, which can attract carriers and suppress non-radiative recombination. The causes of the formation of high-In-content region are discussed. This localised characteristic of carriers is supported further by power and temperature dependent photoluminescence results. The understanding of the spatially emission characteristics might be helpful to improving the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs). (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam 7Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Di Meo, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; Lay, J. A.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Parkar, V. V.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Sava, T.; Sgouros, O.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Zerva, K.

    2015-10-01

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass (58Ni) and heavy (208Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×105 pps 7Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  15. Reduction of ion beam induced and atmospheric ageing of porous silicon using Al and SiO2 caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam analysis data are presented on both freshly prepared and 'aged' porous silicon layers of widely varying (10-85%) porosity. Both evaporated Al and PECVD SiO2 surface capping layers are shown to suppress some of the rapid ion beam induced changes in chemical composition that have been reported during analysis of uncapped layers. Specifically, these capping layers were successful in eliminating carbon and oxygen accumulation within the material but they only slightly reduced hydrogen loss under ion bombardment. Evaporated aluminium surface capping layers were partially successful in suppressing long term ambient oxygen pick-up. (author)

  16. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam 7Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass (58Ni) and heavy (208Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×105 pps 7Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems

  17. Radiation on luminescent properties of quartz glasses and fiber light pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper contains the results of investigation into X-ray luminescence of KI and KU-1 quartz glasses and of various composition and size quartz fiber light pipes (FLP) γ-irradiated within 102-107 Gy dose range. On the basis of analysis of X-ray luminescence spectra of glasses and FLP and comparison of the experimental data one detected in spectra two luminescence bands within 410, 450-470 nm range. One determined dose dependences of X-ray luminescence intensity of every of these bands of luminescence and hypothesized about the nature of the relevant centers. The protective role of OH-groups in the process of radiation-induced generation of luminescence centres under γ-irradiation of quartz glasses and FLP was confirmed experimentally

  18. Erbium doping of silicon and silicon carbide using ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucaud, P.; Julien, F.H.; Lourtioz, J.M.; Bernas, H.; Clerc, C.; Chaumont, J. [Univ. Paris XI, Orsay (France); Bodnar, S.; Regolini, J.L. [France Telecom CNET-CNS, Meylan (France); Lin, X.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Erbium doping of silicon and silicon carbide using implantation followed by ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) is investigated. The implanted concentration of Er was 1.4 at.% in both cases. In Si(100), Rutherford backscattering/channeling revealed that about 40% of the Er atoms evolved upon rapid thermal annealing from an undetermined position (room temperature) to an interstitial tetrahedral position (650 C) and finally to a substitutional position (950 C). The remaining Er atoms were presumably trapped in the small precipitates visible in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The photoluminescence at 1.54 {micro}m of Er{sup 3+} is enhanced with annealing and persists up to room temperature after a 950 C 1 min anneal. The high concentration of optically active Er atoms is illustrated by the lack of saturation of the photoluminescence at high pumping excitation intensity. Erbium was also implanted into cubic silicon carbide films prepared by chemical vapor deposition on Si at 900 C. Both solid phase epitaxy (SPE) and IBIEC were performed. After a 950 C anneal, the low temperature photoluminescence at 1.54 {micro}m after IBIEC was five times higher in SiC than in silicon. The difference in photoluminescence linewidth between IBIEC (broad lines) and SPE (sharp lines) is explained in terms of interactions between optically active erbium atoms.

  19. Substrate effects on the electron-beam-induced deposition of platinum from a liquid precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Eugenii U.; Schardein, Gregory; Wright, John C.; Hastings, J. Todd

    2011-07-01

    Focused electron-beam-induced deposition using bulk liquid precursors (LP-EBID) is a new nanofabrication technique developed in the last two years as an alternative to conventional EBID, which utilizes cumbersome gaseous precursors. Furthermore, LP-EBID using dilute aqueous precursors has been demonstrated to yield platinum (Pt) nanostructures with as-deposited metal content that is substantially higher than the purity achieved by EBID with currently available gaseous precursors. This advantage of LP-EBID--along with the ease of use, low cost, and relative innocuousness of the liquid precursors--holds promise for its practical applicability in areas such as rapid device prototyping and lithographic mask repair. One of the feasibility benchmarks for the LP-EBID method is the ability to deposit high-fidelity nanostructures on various substrate materials. In this study, we report the first observations of performing LP-EBID on bare and metal-coated silicon-nitride membranes, and compare the resulting Pt deposits to those obtained by LP-EBID on polyimide membranes in terms of nucleation, morphology, size dependence on electron dose, and purity.

  20. Evaluation of Health Consequences of Air Pollution Induced by Beam Rolling Mills Factory (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiei Masoud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increases in air pollution over the metropolitan cities are a threat to human health and environment. An attempt has been made to evaluate the health consequences of indoor air pollution induced by Beam Rolling Mills Factory at Ahwaz (Iran. A questionnaire was prepared to obtain information on health of 481 workers, out of which 200 each were selected from exposed and non-exposed category by stratified randomized method. Fisher exact test and chi-square test were used to calculate the values. The study concludes that more than 80% of the workers have high exposure risk to diseases. Analysis of the health impacts reveals that exposed workers are more prone to various diseases as compared to the non-exposed workers. It is also observed that exposure to air pollutants might be the causative factor for various diseases among the smokers but also nonsmoking workers. The analysis also reveals that there is higher relative risk in occupational fatigue and cardio-vascular disease. Further, the study found that percentage of workers having various diseases is much higher in the indoor environment as compared to the outdoor environment

  1. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.

    2012-06-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Spatial chemistry evolution during focused electron beam-induced deposition: origins and workarounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful application of functional nanostructures, fabricated via focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), is known to depend crucially on its chemistry as FEBID tends to strong incorporation of carbon. Hence, it is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms which finally determine the elemental composition after fabrication. In this study we focus on these processes from a fundamental point of view by means of (1) varying electron emission on the deposit surface; and (2) changing replenishment mechanism, both driven by the growing deposit itself. First, we revisit previous results concerning chemical variations in nanopillars (with a quasi-1D footprint) depending on the process parameters. In a second step we expand the investigations to deposits with a 3D footprint which are more relevant in the context of applications. Then, we demonstrate how technical setups and directional gas fluxes influence final chemistries. Finally, we put the findings in a bigger context with respect to functionalities which demonstrates the crucial importance of carefully set up fabrication processes to achieve controllable, predictable and reproducible chemistries for FEBID deposits as a key element for industrially oriented applications. (orig.)

  3. Effect of solubility parameter of monomers on electron beam induced graft-polymerization onto polyethylene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam induced graft-polymerization by the mutual irradiation technique of monomers with different solubility parameters δ onto low density polyethylene films (LDPE) and high density polyethylene films (HDPE) were investigated at high dose rates (25 Mrad per second). Graft-polymerization mechanisms were discussed on the basis of grafting rates, surface tensions, atomic ratios of surface by XPS, and SEM images of the grafted films. Grafting rates decreased with increasing δ of monomers, and grafting rates onto LDPE were larger than those onto HDPE. Graft chain contents on surface, which were evaluated in terms of surface tensions and atomic ratios of the surface, increased with increasing δ of monomers, and graft chain contents on surface of HDPE were higher than those of LDPE. It is assumed that mutual solubility of PE and monomers, i.e., infiltration of monomers into PE during graft-polymerization influence grafting rates and graft sites in films. In case of high mutual solubility, grafting rates were large and graft sites spread from the surface into bulk. On the other hand, in case of low mutual solubility, grafting rates were small and graft sites localized on the surface of films. (author)

  4. Electron beam induced graft-polymerization of methyl methacrylate onto polyethylene films at high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam induced graft-polymerization by the mutual irradiation technique of methyl methacrylate on the surface of low density polyethylene films (LD) and high density polyethylene films (HD) was investigated at high dose rates over 10 Mrad per second. Graft-polymerization mechanisms were discussed on the basis of O2 permeability, tensile strength, elongation at break, and surface tension of the grafted films. As the degree of grafting increased, the O2 permeability of LD decreased, while that of HD little changed at the grafting up to 4 ∼ 5 %. This indicates that the grafting occurred in the amorphous regions for LD and occurred in the amorphous regions in the neighborhood of crystalline regions for HD. For HD, when the degree of the grafting surpassed 4 ∼ 5 %, the O2 permeability, tensile strength, elongation at break, and surface tension decreased with an increase in the degree of grafting. It was assumed that rapid grafting in the amorphous regions in the neighborhood of crystalline regions caused the increase in local temperature by the heat of polymerization, and the viscosity of polyethylene in the amorphous regions decreased with an increase in temperature. As a result, the graft chains, which formed micro domain structure, condensed in the amorphous regions and the domain increased in size. (author)

  5. Effect of solubility parameter of solvents on electron beam induced graft-polymerization onto polyethylene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam induced graft-polymerization by the mutual irradiation technique of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAAc) blended with solvents, which have different solubility parameters δ, onto high density polyethylene films (PE) were investigated at high dose rates (25 Mrad per second). Graft-polymerization mechanisms were discussed on the basis of grafting rates, surface tensions, atomic rations on the surface by XPS, and SEM images of the grafted films. Grafting rates decreased with increasing δ of solvents, and grafting rates for MMA were larger than those for MAAc. Graft chain contents on the surface, which were evaluated in terms of surface tensions and atomic ratios on the surface, increased with increasing δ of solvents, and graft chain contents on the surface of MAAc grafted PE were higher than those of MMA grafted PE. It is assumed that mutual solubility of PE and solvents (monomer solutions), i.e., infiltration of monomer solutions into PE during graft-polymerization, influenced grafting rates and graft sites in films. In case of high mutual solubility, grafting rates were large and graft sites spread from the surface into bulk. On the other hand, in case of low mutual solubility, grafting rates were small and graft sites localized on the surface of films. (author)

  6. Radiation response of multi-quantum well solar cells: Electron-beam-induced current analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximenko, S. I., E-mail: sergey.maximenko@nrl.navy.mil; Scheiman, D. A.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lumb, M. P.; Hoheisel, R. [The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Gonzalez, M. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Herndon, Virginia 20171 (United States); Messenger, S. R. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Tibbits, T. N. D. [QuantaSol Ltd, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 3GZ (United Kingdom); Imaizumi, M. [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Ohshima, T.; Sato, S. I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    Solar cells utilizing multi-quantum well (MQW) structures are considered promising candidate materials for space applications. An open question is how well these structures can resist the impact of particle irradiation. The aim of this work is to provide feedback about the radiation response of In{sub 0.01}Ga{sub 0.99}As solar cells grown on Ge with MQWs incorporated within the i-region of the device. In particular, the local electronic transport properties of the MQW i-regions of solar cells subjected to electron and proton irradiation were evaluated experimentally using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique. The change in carrier collection distribution across the MQW i-region was analyzed using a 2D EBIC diffusion model in conjunction with numerical modeling of the electrical field distribution. Both experimental and simulated findings show carrier removal and type conversion from n- to p-type in MQW i-region at a displacement damage dose as low as ∼6.06–9.88 × 10{sup 9} MeV/g. This leads to a redistribution of the electric field and significant degradation in charge carrier collection.

  7. Direct Simulation of Ion Beam Induced Stressing and Amorphization of Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the authors investigate the mechanical response of silicon to high dose ion-irradiation. The authors employ a realistic model to directly simulate ion beam induced amorphization. Structural properties of the amorphized sample are compared with experimental data and results of other simulation studies. The authors find the behavior of the irradiated material is related to the rate at which it can relax. Depending upon the ability to deform, the authors observe either the generation of a high compressive stress and subsequent expansion of the material, or generation of tensile stress and densification. The authors note that statistical material properties, such as radial distribution functions are not sufficient to differentiate between the different densities of the amorphous samples. For any reasonable deformation rate, the authors observe an expansion of the target upon amorphization in agreement with experimental observations. This is in contrast to simulations of quenching which usually result in a denser structure relative to crystalline Si. The authors conclude that although there is substantial agreement between experimental measurements and simulation results, the amorphous structures being investigated may have fundamental differences; the difference in density can be attributed to local defects within the amorphous network. Finally the authors show that annealing simulations of their amorphized samples can lead to a reduction of high energy local defects without a large scale rearrangement of the amorphous network. This supports the proposal that defects in a-Si are analogous to those in c-Si

  8. Methods of optimising ion beam induced charge collection of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witham, L.C.G.; Jamieson, D.N.; Bardos, R.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics, Microanalytical Research Centre

    1998-06-01

    Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) is a valuable method for the mapping of charge carrier transport and recombination in silicon solar cells. However performing IBIC analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cells is problematic in a manner unlike previous uses of IBIC on silicon-based electronic devices. Typical solar cells have a surface area of several square centimeters and a p-n junction thickness of only few microns. This means the cell has a large junction capacitance in the many nanoFarads range which leads to a large amount of noise on the preamplifier inputs which typically swamps the transient IBIC signal. The normal method of improving the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio by biasing the junction is impractical for these cells as the low-quality silicon used leads to a large leakage current across the device. We present several experimental techniques which improve the S/N ratio which when used together should make IBIC analysis of many low crystalline quality devices a viable and reliable procedure. (authors). Extended abstract. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Gas-assisted electron-beam-induced nanopatterning of high-quality titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazanova, A. V.; Costanzi, B. N.; Aristov, A. I.; Rikers, Y. G. M.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Kabashin, A. V.; Dahlberg, E. Dan; Belova, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition of titanium oxide nanopatterns is described. The precursor is titanium tetra-isopropoxide, delivered to the deposition point through a needle and mixed with oxygen at the same point via a flow through a separate needle. The depositions are free of residual carbon and have an EDX determined stoichiometry of TiO2.2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies reveal an amorphous structure of the fabricated titanium oxide. Ellipsometric characterization of the deposited material reveals a refractive index of 2.2-2.4 RIU in the spectral range of 500-1700 nm and a very low extinction coefficient (lower than 10-6 in the range of 400-1700 nm), which is consistent with high quality titanium oxide. The electrical resistivity of the titanium oxide patterned with this new process is in the range of 10-40 GΩ cm and the measured breakdown field is in the range of 10-70 V μm-1. The fabricated nanopatterns are important for a variety of applications, including field-effect transistors, memory devices, MEMS, waveguide structures, bio- and chemical sensors.

  10. Surface Nanostructure Formations in an AISI 316L Stainless Steel Induced by Pulsed Electron Beam Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB is an efficient technique for surface modifications of metallic materials. In the present work, the formations of surface nanostructures in an AISI 316L stainless steel induced by direct HCPEB treatment and HCPEB alloying have been investigated. After HCPEB Ti alloying, the sample surface contained a mixture of the ferrite and austenite phases with an average grain size of about 90 nm, because the addition of Ti favors the formation of ferrite. In contrast, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD analyses revealed no structural refinement on the direct HCPEB treated sample. However, transmission electron microscope (TEM observations showed that fine cells having an average size of 150 nm without misorientations, as well as nanosized carbide particles, were formed in the surface layer after the direct HCPEB treatment. The formation of nanostructures in the 316L stainless steel is therefore attributed to the rapid solidification and the generation of different phases other than the steel substrate in the melted layer.

  11. Direct Simulation of Ion Beam Induced Stressing and Amorphization of Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the authors investigate the mechanical response of silicon to high dose ion-irradiation. The authors employ a realistic model to directly simulate ion beam induced amorphization. Structural properties of the amorphized sample are compared with experimental data and results of other simulation studies. The authors find the behavior of the irradiated material is related to the rate at which it can relax. Depending upon the ability to deform, the authors observe either the generation of a high compressive stress and subsequent expansion of the material, or generation of tensile stress and densification. The authors note that statistical material properties, such as radial distribution functions are not sufficient to differentiate between the different densities of the amorphous samples. For any reasonable deformation rate, the authors observe an expansion of the target upon amorphization in agreement with experimental observations. This is in contrast to simulations of quenching which usually result in a denser structure relative to crystalline Si. The authors conclude that although there is substantial agreement between experimental measurements and simulation results, the amorphous structures being investigated may have fundamental differences; the difference in density can be attributed to local defects within the amorphous network. Finally the authors show that annealing simulations of their amorphized samples can lead to a reduction of high energy local defects without a large scale rearrangement of the amorphous network. This supports the proposal that defects in a-Si are analogous to those in c-Si.

  12. Ion beam induced charge and numerical modeling study of novel detector devices for single ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the near future devices which are fabricated from shallow arrays of few and single atoms will exploit quantum mechanical rules to perform useful functions including quantum computation. Fabrication of these devices presents formidable technological challenges. We have developed a single ion implantation system that is capable of verifiable fabrication of single donor devices using 14 keV 31P ions implanted into ultra-pure, high resistivity silicon substrates based on the technique of Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC). A detection system with integrated detector electrodes registers the charge transient from a single ion impact which is used to signal the implantation of an ion into the substrate. We describe here the use of IBIC with MeV ions to study the charge collection efficiency of the detector electrodes. By using three dimensional numerical technology computer-aided design (TCAD) models for the decrease in the IBIC signal as a function of distance from the detector electrode, we can obtain an accurate measurement of the resistivity of the silicon substrate, allowing confirmation of the values specified by the supplier, and providing us with confidence in the numerical models used by TCAD for simulation. This technique has advantages over resistivity measurements by four-point probes because it is spatially resolved, probes through the intact oxide, and can be done without making contact to the device in the area of the probe

  13. Methods of optimising ion beam induced charge collection of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) is a valuable method for the mapping of charge carrier transport and recombination in silicon solar cells. However performing IBIC analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cells is problematic in a manner unlike previous uses of IBIC on silicon-based electronic devices. Typical solar cells have a surface area of several square centimeters and a p-n junction thickness of only few microns. This means the cell has a large junction capacitance in the many nanoFarads range which leads to a large amount of noise on the preamplifier inputs which typically swamps the transient IBIC signal. The normal method of improving the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio by biasing the junction is impractical for these cells as the low-quality silicon used leads to a large leakage current across the device. We present several experimental techniques which improve the S/N ratio which when used together should make IBIC analysis of many low crystalline quality devices a viable and reliable procedure. (authors)

  14. Post-growth purification of Co nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, E.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Kompaniiets, M.; Sachser, R.; Gspan, Ch; Plank, H.; Huth, M.

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of cases nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) employing an organometallic precursor contain predominantly carbon-based ligand dissociation products. This is unfortunate with regard to using this high-resolution direct-write approach for the preparation of nanostructures for various fields, such as mesoscopic physics, micromagnetism, electronic correlations, spin-dependent transport and numerous applications. Here we present an in situ cleaning approach to obtain pure Co-FEBID nanostructures. The purification procedure lies in the exposure of heated samples to a H2 atmosphere in conjunction with the irradiation by low-energy electrons. The key finding is that the combination of annealing at 300 °C, H2 exposure and electron irradiation leads to compact, carbon- and oxygen free Co layers down to a thickness of about 20 nm starting from as-deposited Co-FEBID structures. In addition to this, in temperature-dependent electrical resistance measurements on post-processed samples we find a typical metallic behavior. In low-temperature magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements we observe ferromagnetic behavior.

  15. Radiation response of multi-quantum well solar cells: Electron-beam-induced current analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar cells utilizing multi-quantum well (MQW) structures are considered promising candidate materials for space applications. An open question is how well these structures can resist the impact of particle irradiation. The aim of this work is to provide feedback about the radiation response of In0.01Ga0.99As solar cells grown on Ge with MQWs incorporated within the i-region of the device. In particular, the local electronic transport properties of the MQW i-regions of solar cells subjected to electron and proton irradiation were evaluated experimentally using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique. The change in carrier collection distribution across the MQW i-region was analyzed using a 2D EBIC diffusion model in conjunction with numerical modeling of the electrical field distribution. Both experimental and simulated findings show carrier removal and type conversion from n- to p-type in MQW i-region at a displacement damage dose as low as ∼6.06–9.88 × 109 MeV/g. This leads to a redistribution of the electric field and significant degradation in charge carrier collection

  16. Luminescence of laminated crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoluminescence and reflection spectra of single crystals PbI2, SnI2, CdI2 and their solid mixed solutions were investigated. It has been established that the n-1 of the exciton spectrum of luminescence of PrI2 crystals is a doublet, whose origin is associated with a longitudinal-transverse splitting of excitons due to the effects of strong light-exciton mixing

  17. Luminescence properties of Si-containing porous matrix–PbS nanoparticle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The luminescence properties of systems that contain lead-sulfide nanoparticles deposited onto substrates fabricated from porous silicon, oxidized porous silicon, and porous (tin-oxide)–(silicon-oxide) layers are studied. It is shown that the structure and composition of the matrix induce a strong effect on the luminescence spectra of colloidal quantum dots, defining their emission wavelength

  18. Luminescence properties of Si-containing porous matrix–PbS nanoparticle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, S. A., E-mail: satarasov@mail.ru; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Lamkin, I. A.; Maksimov, A. I.; Maraeva, E. V.; Mikhailov, I. I.; Moshnikov, V. A. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation); Musikhin, S. F. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Nalimova, S. S.; Permyakov, N. V.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Travkin, P. G. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The luminescence properties of systems that contain lead-sulfide nanoparticles deposited onto substrates fabricated from porous silicon, oxidized porous silicon, and porous (tin-oxide)–(silicon-oxide) layers are studied. It is shown that the structure and composition of the matrix induce a strong effect on the luminescence spectra of colloidal quantum dots, defining their emission wavelength.

  19. Study on the bias-dependent effects of proton-induced damage in CdZnTe radiation detectors using ion beam induced charge microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Na; Guo, Rongrong; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    The influence of damage induced by 2MeV protons on CdZnTe radiation detectors is investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) in irradiated region is found to be degraded above a fluence of 3.3×10(11)p/cm(2) and the energy spectrum is severely deteriorated with increasing fluence. Moreover, CCE maps obtained under the applied biases from 50V to 400V suggests that local radiation damage results in significant degradation of CCE uniformity, especially under low bias, i. e., 50V and 100V. The CCE nonuniformity induced by local radiation damage, however, can be greatly improved by increasing the detector applied bias. This bias-dependent effect of 2MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe detectors is attributed to the interaction of electron cloud and radiation-induced displacement defects. PMID:27399802

  20. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH3– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH3 and α-AlH3 irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH3 and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers

  1. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  2. Electric field strength measurements in a megavolt vacuum diode using laser induced fluorescence of an atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined technique of an atomic beam probing and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFABS) is applied for measuring of local electric field in a 1 MV, 100 kJ, 4 μsec electron diode. Laser-produced lithium beam is stepwise excited by two resonant wide-band laser beams. Stark-splitted spontaneous emission from n=4 level is detected with a polychromator. Time dependence of the electric field was inferred from splitting of the 460.3 nm lithium line. The electric field strength F grows during a pulse from 160 to 260 kV/cm in the center of a 6 cm gap. By comparing calculated and experimental F-values, expansion of the emission boundaries of the cathode and anode plasmas was reconstructed

  3. Ion beam-induced shaping of Ni nanoparticles embedded in a silica matrix: from spherical to prolate shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avasthi Devesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present work reports the elongation of spherical Ni nanoparticles (NPs parallel to each other, due to bombardment with 120 MeV Au+9 ions at a fluence of 5 × 1013 ions/cm2. The Ni NPs embedded in silica matrix have been prepared by atom beam sputtering technique and subsequent annealing. The elongation of Ni NPs due to interaction with Au+9 ions as investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM shows a strong dependence on initial Ni particle size and is explained on the basis of thermal spike model. Irradiation induces a change from single crystalline nature of spherical particles to polycrystalline nature of elongated particles. Magnetization measurements indicate that changes in coercivity (Hc and remanence ratio (Mr/Ms are stronger in the ion beam direction due to the preferential easy axis of elongated particles in the beam direction.

  4. Carbon-ion beam irradiation kills X-ray-resistant p53-null cancer cells by inducing mitotic catastrophe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napapat Amornwichet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To understand the mechanisms involved in the strong killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation on cancer cells with TP53 tumor suppressor gene deficiencies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DNA damage responses after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation in isogenic HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines with and without TP53 (p53+/+ and p53-/-, respectively were analyzed as follows: cell survival by clonogenic assay, cell death modes by morphologic observation of DAPI-stained nuclei, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by immunostaining of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX, and cell cycle by flow cytometry and immunostaining of Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3. RESULTS: The p53-/- cells were more resistant than the p53+/+ cells to X-ray irradiation, while the sensitivities of the p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation were comparable. X-ray and carbon-ion beam irradiations predominantly induced apoptosis of the p53+/+ cells but not the p53-/- cells. In the p53-/- cells, carbon-ion beam irradiation, but not X-ray irradiation, markedly induced mitotic catastrophe that was associated with premature mitotic entry with harboring long-retained DSBs at 24 h post-irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Efficient induction of mitotic catastrophe in apoptosis-resistant p53-deficient cells implies a strong cancer cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation that is independent of the p53 status, suggesting its biological advantage over X-ray treatment.

  5. Pressure-induced Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub 0} luminescence in cubic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Alok M. [GE Global Research, One Research Circle, Niskayuna 12309, NY (United States); Renero-Lecuna, Carlos [MALTA CONSOLIDER Team – Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander 39005 (Spain); Santamaría-Pérez, David [MALTA CONSOLIDER Team – Dpto. Químico Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodríguez, Fernando [MALTA CONSOLIDER Team – DCITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander 39005 (Spain); Valiente, Rafael, E-mail: valientr@unican.es [MALTA CONSOLIDER Team – Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander 39005 (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    An explanation for the puzzling absence of luminescence from the Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub J[=0,1,2]} states in C-Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} (cubic; Ln{sup 3+}=Lu{sup 3+}, Y{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}) family of materials is provided by conducting a study of the emission properties of C-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Pr{sup 3+} under applied hydrostatic pressure. Above 7 GPa, electronic transitions from the Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub J[=0,1,2]} states are observed in the emission spectrum of C-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Pr{sup 3+} at room temperature and below. The experimental data reveal that the crystal-field split Pr{sup 3+} 4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1} configuration is located entirely within the host lattice conduction band and that the promotion of the electron to the Pr{sup 3+} 4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1} state produces a self-trapped exciton-like state with the configuration, [Pr{sup 4+}+e{sub CB}], where e{sub CB} indicates an electron in the host lattice conduction band. Upon excitation, the exciton-like state bypasses the upper emitting {sup 3}P{sub J[=0,1,2]} states and directly feeds the lower emitting {sup 1}D{sub 2} state. This explains the absence of optical transitions from the Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub J[=0,1,2]} states in the emission spectrum of C-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Pr{sup 3+} at ambient pressure. At high pressures, emission transitions from the Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub J[=0,1,2]} states are observed because of the localization of the Pr{sup 3+} 4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1} state to below the host lattice conduction band edge. -- Highlights: • Explanation for the complete absence of luminescence from the Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub J} state in cubic Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} sesquioxides. • By high pressure experiments, we have associated the absence of Pr{sup 3+} {sup 3}P{sub J} emission to the presence of an exciton state • The exciton state bypasses the upper emitting {sup 3}P{sub J} states and directly feeds the lower emitting {sup 1}D{sub 2} state. • Apart from the fundamental interest, this finding is relevantly

  6. Feshbach-resonance-induced atomic filamentation and quantum pair correlation in atom-laser-beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Weiping; Search, Chris P.; Pu, Han; Meystre, Pierre; Wright, Ewan M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of an atom laser beam through a spatial region with a magnetic field tuned to a Feshbach resonance. Tuning the magnetic field below the resonance produces an effective focusing Kerr medium that causes a modulational instability of the atomic beam. Under appropriate circumstances, this results in beam breakup and filamentation seeded by quasi-particle fluctuations, and in the generation of correlated atomic pairs.

  7. Decursin reduce radio-resistance of hypoxic regions under the proton beam therapy by induced HIF-1α degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Protons induce cancer-cell apoptosis in vitro and block blood vessel formation in vivo through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The fact that proton severely inhibits blood vessel development in zebrafish embryos suggests a higher sensitivity of vascular endothelial cells to proton beam. Decursin, a coumarin compound, was originally isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai (Dang Gui). A. gigas root has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine for the treatment of anemia and other common diseases. In previous reports, decursin was reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells and to inhibit the activities of the androgen and androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway in prostate cancer, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, bladder, and colon cancer cells. Decursin also inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis through the suppression of the VEGFR-2-signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of decursin mediates change of HIF-1α activities is not clear. In this research, we identified regulations of the HIF-1α and the anti-angiogenesis effects of decursin in proton-beam-irradiated human lung cancer, prostate cancer and Hepatic cancer cells. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of positive effects of protonbeam-induced anti-angiogenesis. Our data indicate that the groups co-treated with decursin and a proton-beam had significant reduced HIF-1α activity compared with the groups treated with only a proton beam under the hypoxic condition caused by DFX(desferrioxamine). Decursin was found to induced HIF-1α degradation. Therefore, we suggest that decursin may be a potential candidate for use as a sensitizer for proton-beaminduced cell apoptosis. Here we have shown that decursin successfully reduced HIF-1α stability under hypoxic condition by induced desferrioxamine. We showed novel candidates for anti-angiogenic compound, decursin, leading to complete inhibition of radio

  8. On the Beam Induced Quasi-instability Transformation of the Damped Aperiodic Mode in the Intergalactic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolberg, U.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-02-01

    Highly relativistic electron-positron pair beams considerably affect the spontaneously emitted field fluctuations in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM). In view of the considered small density ratio of beam and background plasma, a perturbative treatment is employed in order to derive the spectral balance equations for the fluctuating fields from first principles of plasma kinetic theory that are covariantly correct within the limits of special relativity. They self-consistently account for the competing effects of spontaneous and induced emission and absorption in the perturbed thermal plasma. It is found that the presence of the beam transforms the growth rate of the dominating transverse damped aperiodic mode into an effective growth rate that displays positive values in certain spectral regions if beam velocity and wave vector are perpendicular or almost perpendicular to each other. This corresponds to a quasi-instability that induces an amplification of the fluctuations for these wavenumbers. Such an effect can greatly influence the cosmic magnetogenesis as it affects the strengths of the spontaneously emitted magnetic seed fields in the IGM, thereby possibly lowering the required growth time and effectivity of any further amplification mechanism such as an astrophysical dynamo.

  9. Twist phase-induced polarization changes in electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Korotkova, O.

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam with twist phase (i.e., twisted EGSM beam) is introduced as an extension of its scalar version based on the unified theory of coherence and polarization. We show how analytical paraxial propagation formulae of isotropic and anisotropic EGSM beams passing through a general astigmatic ABCD optical system can be modified in the presence of the twist phase. Numerical examples demonstrate that the twist phase affects the spectral density, the state of coherence, and the degree of polarization of EGSM beams on propagation.

  10. Measurement of therapeutic photon beams-induced Cerenkov radiation generated in PMMA- and PS-based plastic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongsoo; Shin, Sang Hun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we characterized Cerenkov radiation generated in polystyrene (PS)- and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based plastic optical fibers (POFs) to select an adequate optical fiber for producing Cerenkov radiation. To determine the relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensity of Cerenkov radiation, we calculated the energy depositions of photon beams and fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. Also, intensities of Cerenkov radiation generated in PS- and PMMA-based POFs were measured as functions of dose rate and monitor unit. At last, therapeutic photon beams-induced Cerenkov radiation in PS- and PMMA-based POFs was measured according to depths of solid water phantom.

  11. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Thorman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (3, Pt(PF34, Co(CO3NO, and W(CO6. Through these case studies, it is evident that this combination of studies can provide valuable insight into potential mechanisms governing deposit formation in FEBID. Although further experiments and new approaches are needed, these studies are an important stepping-stone toward better understanding the fundamental physics behind the deposition process and establishing design criteria for optimized FEBID precursors.

  12. Proton induced γ-ray emission yields for external beam analysis of F and Na in aerosol samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) is commonly used as a complementary technique of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for the analysis of light elements in aerosol samples. In order to get the best operating conditions of PIGE for F and Na determination in aerosol samples relative to thin reference standards in an external beam setup, the γ-ray yields of the reaction 19F (p, p' γ) 19F (Eγ=110 keV and 197 keV) and 23Na (p, p' γ) 23Na (Eγ=440 keV) were measured for incident protons in the energy range of 1.8-2.9 MeV at the external beam facility of the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator in Beijing Normal University. (authors)

  13. The persistent luminescence and up conversion photostimulated luminescence properties of nondoped Mg2SnO4 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachi; Yu, Minghui; Qin, Qingsong; Zhou, Hongliang; Zhou, Meijiao; Xu, Xuhui; Wang, Yuhua

    2010-12-01

    The nondoped Mg2SnO4 material with inverse spinel structure was synthesized by solid state reaction. This phosphor showed a broad green emission band covering 470-550 nm under 291 nm excitation, which was due to the recombination of F centers with holes. Stimulated by 980 nm infrared laser, the green photostimulated luminescence was first observed in a nondoped oxide. After ultraviolet irradiation, the green persistent luminescence of Mg2SnO4 could be seen in darkness for about 5 h. The decay curves revealed that the long persistent luminescence was governed by tunneling mechanism and it proved the presence of different trap clusters in Mg2SnO4. These trap clusters (such as [SnMg••-Oi″], [SnMg••-2e'], and [SnMg••-e″]) induced the trap levels with different depths in band gap and corresponded to the three components (at 110, 168, and 213 °C) of the thermoluminescence glow curve of Mg2SnO4. These trap levels with different depths were proved to be not independent. It revealed that the shallow traps (110 °C) and part of the deep traps (168 and 213 °C) were involved in the persistent luminescence. Meanwhile, all the shallow and deep traps were responsible for the photostimulated luminescence. Accordingly, the photoluminescence, persistent, and photostimulated luminescence mechanisms of the nondoped Mg2SnO4 material were first proposed.

  14. Seismic-induced fire resistance of composite welded beam-to-column joints with concrete-filled tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Pucinotti, Raffaele; Bursi, Oreste,; Franssen, Jean-Marc; Lennon, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Major earthquakes in urban areas have often been followed by significant fires that cause extensive damage to property. Therefore, a seismic-induced fire is a scenario that should be addressed properly in performance-based engineering. In this paper, numerical and experimental results of welded steel–concrete composite full-strength beam-to-column joints under post-earthquake fires are described. This was part of a European project aimed at developing fundamental data and prequalification ...

  15. Megaelectron volt ion beam-induced epitaxy of deposited silicon and germanium-silicon alloys on (100) silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid phase heteroepitaxial crystallization of GexSi1-x/(100) Si was induced by MeV ion bombardment while heating the substrate at low temperatures. Rutherford Backscatter Spectrometry (RBS), Ion Channeling, Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to investigate the kinetics of the reordering process as well as characterize the strain in the resultant epitaxial layer. The epitaxial recrystallization of amorphous silicon and silicon-germanium layers on (100)silicon, deposited under medium (10-7 torr) vacuum conditions, was induced by 2.5 MeV Ar beam irradiation in the low temperature range of 200-400C. The regrowth follows an Arrhenius dependence with temperature and activation energies of ∼0.3 eV were determined for the regrowth of deposited Si and a Ge38Si62 alloy. Ion beam induced heteroepitaxy was found to be sensitive to interfacial contaminants. In addition, the resultant crystalline quality for Ge-rich alloys was poor after irradiation. Ion beam induced heteroepitaxy of MBE-deposited GexSi1-x/(100) Si, deposited under high vacuum conditions after strict interfacial preparation, resulted in layer-by-layer reordering for alloys up to 65 at. % Ge. Coherently strained epilayers were reported for ion beam annealed GeSi alloys with germanium concentration less than 15 at. %. The pseudomorphic epilayers were characterized by planar and axial channeling to measure the tetragonal distortion in the strained overlayers. Strained films, produced by MeV Ar bombardment while heating the substrate at temperatures as low as 300C, were observed to relax following extended furnace anneals at temperatures of 800-900C. Such results offer the possibility of extending defect-free growth of metastable strained layers to other lattice mismatched systems

  16. Controlling the visible luminescence in hydrothermal ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodoluminescence spectra have been measured in hydrothermal and hydrogen-doped ZnO at different excitation densities and temperatures to investigate the emission efficiencies of near-band-edge (NBE), green and yellow luminescence bands. The NBE intensity depends linearly on the electron beam excitation as expected for excitonic recombination character. The intensities of the green and yellow bands are highly dependent not only on the excitation density but also on temperature. At high excitation densities ZnO exhibits dominant green emission at room temperature; the intensity of the green band can be further controlled by doping ZnO with hydrogen, which passivates green luminescence centers. Conversely at small excitation densities (< 0.1 nA) and low temperatures the visible luminescence from ZnO is predominantly yellow due to the abundance of Li in hydrothermal ZnO. The results are explained by differences in the recombination kinetics and the relative concentrations of the green and yellow centers, and illustrate that single-color emission can be achieved in ZnO by adjusting the excitation power and temperature. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal ZnO crystals are analyzed by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. • Intensities of luminescence bands are highly dependent on excitation density. • Visible luminescence is influenced by temperature and hydrogen dopants. • Emission efficiencies are explained by recombination kinetics of defects

  17. Time-resolved luminescence of Cr3+ in topaz Al2SiO4(OH,F)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced time-resolved luminescence, decay times and optical spectroscopy of natural topaz Al2SiO4(OH,F)2 show the presence of several luminescence centers: single Cr3+ in intermediate crystal field position, Cr-Cr pairs and radiation induced center. The possible connection of the last center with Mn4+ and V2+ is discussed

  18. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ∼50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core–shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  19. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ∼50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27454835

  20. Study of Genetics and Embryology of Polyembryonic Mutant of Autotetraploid Rice Induced by N+ Beam Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ximei; Huang, Qunce; Li, Guoping; Hu, Xiuming; Qin, Guangyong; Yu, Zengliang

    2006-11-01

    In the present study autotetraploid rice IR36-4X was treated by an ion implantation technique with nitrogen ion beams. A polyembryonic mutant (named IR36-Shuang) was identified in the M2 generation. The mutant line and its offspring were systematically investigated in regard to their major agronomic properties and the rate of polyembryonic seedling in the M3-M6 generation. The abnormal phenomena in the embryo sac development and the cytological mechanism of the initiation of additional embryo in IR36-Shuang were observed by Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy. The results were as follows. 1) The plant height, the panicle length and 1000 grain weight of IR36-Shuang were lower than that of its control by 35.41%, 5.08% and 15.72% respectively, Moreover, the setting percentage decreased 12.39% compared with that in normal IR36-4X plants. 2) The polyembryonic trait of IR36-Shuang was genetically stable and the frequency of the polyembryonic seedlings in the IR36-Shuang line was also relatively stable. 3) The rate of abnormal embryo sacs in IR36-Shuang was significantly higher than that in the control IR36-4X. 4) The additional embryo in IR36-Shuang might arise from the double set of embryo sacs in a single ovary, antipodal cells or endosperm cells. These results suggest that IR36-Shuang is a polyembryonic mutant and a new apomixis rice line induced by low energy ion implantation. The prospects for the application in production of the IR36-Shuang line are also discussed. The present study may provide a basis for future investigations of apomixis rice breeding via the ion implantation biotechnology.

  1. A novel electron beam-induced reaction of sulfonium salt in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron beam irradiation of triphenylsulfonium methanesulfonate in the crystalline state provides a new benzene-substitute sulfonium salt. This product has not been observed either by photolysis in the crystalline state nor by electron beam irradiation in a solution. The formation of the substitution product was confirmed by GC-MS analysis. (author)

  2. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  3. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behavior and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Rubanov, Sergey [Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  4. Micro-vibrating spatial filters-induced beam positioning stability in large laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Jianqiang Zhu; Jia Xu; Quanyuan Shan; Kun Xiao; Xuejie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic beam propagation model of micro-vibrating spatial filters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities is built based on the additional beam in SG-Ⅱ facility.The transfer matrix is then deduced,and the sensitivities of the beam positioning to the pellet in the target area to the vibrations of every spatial filter are analyzed,which indicates that the vibrations of spatial filters in the pre-amplify zone has less effects on beam positioning stability at the target.In addition,the vibrations of spatial filters in the main amplify zone dominates the beam positioning stability of the target,especially the vibration of the spatial filter SF7.

  5. Cavity Alignment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Marc; Frisch, Josef; Hacker, Kirsten E; Jones, Roger M; McCormick, Douglas; Napoly, Olivier; Paparella, Rita; Smith, Tonee; Wendt, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    Each nine cell superconducting accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY* has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power.** They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and commissioned a four channel heterodyne receiver and time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present an experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  6. UV-luminescence and thermostimulated processes in nonlinear crystals LiB3O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of study on luminescence and recombination processes in the large LiB3O5 single crystals are reported. It was shown that the luminescence at 295 nm is excited by photons with energy exceeding the band gap energy, by an electron beam, and also in recombination processes. Four peaks of thermoluminescence at 130, 180, 240 and 330 K are revealed, their parameters are fixed, and the origin of the trapping and recombination centers are determined. The most acceptable models of recombination processes and the origin of the LiB3O5 luminescence are discussed. (Author)

  7. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed. PMID:26574714

  8. Luminescence from metals and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term luminescence is normally applied to light emission that is not explainable by the mechanisms discussed by the other speakers in this meeting. Specifically, it is not transition radiation, surface plasmon radiation, or bremsstrahlung. One normally thinks of luminescence as arising from one-electron transitions within a medium. This talk consists of an overview of luminescence from condensed matter under irradiation by either energetic particles or photons. The author begins with organic molecules, where luminescence is best understood, and then discusses inorganic insulators and metals. Finally, the dependence of yield upon projectile species and velocity is discussed, and predictions are made concerning the relative effectiveness of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in exciting luminescence

  9. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  10. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  11. Study on isoenzymes and SDS-PAGE of the electron beam induced mutant of gladiolus 'Beauty Queen'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test the feasibility of electron beam induced mutation on Gladiolus and the effects of various doses of electron beam on flower traits, the corms of gladiolus 'Beauty Queen' were irradiated by electron beam with different doses. Flower-colour and inflorescence mutants (M1' and M2')were obtained, respectively at the doses of 40 Gy and l60 Gy. The two mutants and the parent (CK) and those irradiated with same doses (40 Gy and 160 Gy) were studied. The isozymes of POD, CAT, AMY and EST were tested, it shows that isozymes patterns of gladiolus irradiated at the doses of 40 Gy and 160 Gy a similar to CK, but the mutants' bands were added or absent compared to CK. Based on band types of isozymes, the cluster analysis was carried out and dendrogram generated using SPSS software version 11.5, it indicates that they may be divided into three groups: CK group (CK, gladiolus irradiated at the doses of 40 Gy and 160 Gy), M1' group and M2' group. The bands of protein subunit were analyzed by SDS- PAGE, it shows protein expression is obviously inhibited by electron beam irradiation. But three different protein bands were found in the two mutants, and their molecular weights were 96 kDa, 115.4 kDa, 137.2 kDa, respectively. These special proteins may have relation with regulation and control flower-color and inflorescence. The results indicate that electron beam irradiation is an effective way for inducing flower-color and flower-shape mutants. (authors)

  12. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  13. The nature of unusual luminescence in natural calcite, CaCO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Panczer, G.; Waychunas, G.; Porat, N.

    2008-11-01

    The unusual luminescence of particular varieties of natural pink calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) samples was studied by laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy at different temperatures. The luminescence is characterized by intense blue emission under short-wave UV lamp excitation with an extremely long decay time, accompanied by pink-orange luminescence under long wave UV excitation. Our investigation included optical absorption, natural thermostimulated luminescence (NTL) and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) studies. Two luminescence centers were detected: a narrow violet band, with {lambda}{sub max} = 412 nm, {Delta} = 45 nm, two decay components of {tau}{sub 1} = 5 ns and {tau}{sub 2} = 7.2 ms, accompanied by very long afterglow, and an orange emission band with {lambda}{sub max} = 595 nm, {Delta} = 90 nm and {tau} = 5 ns. Both luminescence centers are thermally unstable with the blue emission disappearing after heating at 500 C, and the orange emission disappearing after heating at different temperatures starting from 230 C, although sometimes it is stable up to 500 C in different samples. Both centers have spectral-kinetic properties very unusual for mineral luminescence, which in combination with extremely low impurity concentrations, prevent their identification with specific impurity related emission. The most likely explanation of these observations may be the presence of radiation-induced luminescence centers. The long violet afterglow is evidently connected with trapped charge carrier liberation, with their subsequent migration through the valence band and ultimate recombination with a radiation-induced center responsible for the unusual violet luminescence.

  14. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10-9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×1013 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  15. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurebayashi, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Sakurai, H., E-mail: sakurail@sci.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Doshita, N. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kikuchi, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Horiuchi, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki 036-8561, Aomori (Japan); Tajima, Y. [Institute of Arts and Sciences, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Oe, T. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Sato, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Gunji, S. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Inui, E. [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kondo, K. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Iwata, N. [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, N. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki 036-8561, Aomori (Japan); Matsuzaki, H. [Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT), The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Kunieda, S. [Nuclear Data Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun 319-1195, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10{sup –9} PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×10{sup 13} was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  16. Energy dependence measurement of small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter by means of characteristic X-rays induced with general diagnostic X-ray equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For X-ray inspections by way of general X-ray equipment, it is important to measure an entrance-skin dose. Recently, a small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter was made commercially available by Landauer, Inc. The dosimeter does not interfere with the medical images; therefore, it is expected to be a convenient detector for measuring personal exposure doses. In an actual clinical situation, it is assumed that X-rays of different energies will be detected by a dosimeter. For evaluation of the exposure dose measured by a dosimeter, it is necessary to know the energy dependence of the dosimeter. Our aim in this study was to measure the energy dependence of the OSL dosimeter experimentally in the diagnostic X-ray region. Metal samples weighing several grams were irradiated and, in this way, characteristic X-rays having energies ranging from 8 to 85 keV were generated. Using these mono-energetic X-rays, the dosimeter was irradiated. Simultaneously, the fluence of the X-rays was determined with a CdTe detector. The energy-dependent efficiency of the dosimeter was derived from the measured value of the dosimeter and the fluence. Moreover, the energy-dependent efficiency was calculated by Monte-Carlo simulation. The efficiency obtained in the experiment was in good agreement with that of the simulation. In conclusion, our proposed method, in which characteristic X-rays are used, is valuable for measurement of the energy dependence of a small OSL dosimeter in the diagnostic X-ray region. PMID:26589210

  17. Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous attempts to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations have been based on attaching a beam to a moving wing or structure. Here, we exploit self-excited oscillations of a fluttering composite beam to harvest energy using piezoelectric transduction. Details of the beam properties and experimental setup are presented. The effects of preset angle of attack, wind speed, and load resistance on the levels of harvested power are determined. The results point to a complex relation between the aerodynamic loading and its impact on the static deflection and amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations on one hand and the load resistance and level of power harvested on the other hand

  18. Experimental study of electron beam induced removal of H/sub 2/S from geothermal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Singhvi, R.; Evans, R.D.; Reynolds, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The treatment of geothermal steam by electron beam irradiation is a potential alternative method of H/sub 2/S removal which can be applied upstream or downstream and has no chemical requirements. The experimental work reported here examines the effectiveness of electron beam treatment of geothermal fluids. These fluids are produced by combining the constituents in a heated cell, which contains an electron beam transparent window. Irradiation of the contents and subsequent chemical analysis allows an evaluation of effectiveness. These results are used for a commercial feasibility assessment.

  19. On Compensating Tune Spread Induced by Space Charge in Bunched Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator - or - in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. But all of these methods d...

  20. Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Mohamed Y., E-mail: zakaria@vt.edu; Al-Haik, Mohammad Y.; Hajj, Muhammad R. [Virginia Tech, Norris Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2015-07-13

    Previous attempts to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations have been based on attaching a beam to a moving wing or structure. Here, we exploit self-excited oscillations of a fluttering composite beam to harvest energy using piezoelectric transduction. Details of the beam properties and experimental setup are presented. The effects of preset angle of attack, wind speed, and load resistance on the levels of harvested power are determined. The results point to a complex relation between the aerodynamic loading and its impact on the static deflection and amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations on one hand and the load resistance and level of power harvested on the other hand.