WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam induced epitaxial

  1. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Pamplin, Brian R

    1980-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy introduces the reader to the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the generation of III-V and IV-VI compounds and alloys and describes the semiconductor and integrated optics reasons for using the technique. Topics covered include semiconductor superlattices by MBE; design considerations for MBE systems; periodic doping structure in gallium arsenide (GaAs); nonstoichiometry and carrier concentration control in MBE of compound semiconductors; and MBE techniques for IV-VI optoelectronic devices. The use of MBE to fabricate integrated optical devices and to study semicond

  3. Pumping requirements and options for molecular beam epitaxy and gas source molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCollum, M.J.; Plano, M.A.; Haase, M.A.; Robbins, V.M.; Jackson, S.L.; Cheng, K.Y.; Stillman, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of gas sources in growth by MBE as a result of current interest in growth of InP/InGaAsP/InGaAs lattice matched to InP. For gas flows greater than a few sccm, pumping speed requirements dictate the use of turbomolecular or diffusion pumps. GaAs samples with high p-type mobilities have been grown with diffusion pumped molecular beam epitaxial system. According to the authors, this demonstration of the inherent cleanliness of a properly designed diffusion pumping system indicates that a diffusion pump is an excellent inexpensive and reliable choice for growth by molecular beam epitaxy and gas source molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy

  4. Molecular beam epitaxy a short history

    CERN Document Server

    Orton, J W

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the development of molecular beam epitaxy from its origins in the 1960s through to the present day. It begins with a short historical account of other methods of crystal growth, both bulk and epitaxial, to set the subject in context, emphasising the wide range of semiconductor materials employed. This is followed by an introduction to molecular beams and their use in the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the development of the microwave MASER.

  5. Materials fundamentals of molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y

    1992-01-01

    The technology of crystal growth has advanced enormously during the past two decades. Among, these advances, the development and refinement of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been among the msot important. Crystals grown by MBE are more precisely controlled than those grown by any other method, and today they form the basis for the most advanced device structures in solid-state physics, electronics, and optoelectronics. As an example, Figure 0.1 shows a vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structure grown by MBE. * Provides comprehensive treatment of the basic materials and surface science principles that apply to molecular beam epitaxy * Thorough enough to benefit molecular beam epitaxy researchers * Broad enough to benefit materials, surface, and device researchers * Referenes articles at the forefront of modern research as well as those of historical interest.

  6. Short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Suian; Cui, Jie; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan)); Tanaka, Akihiko (Bentec Co., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-10

    Short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy has been proposed and studied. The short pulses with supersonic characteristics and a width of milliseconds were generated by high speed valves and the related pumping lines on a purpose-built CBE system. Using a time-of-fight technique, we verified the dependence of pulse properties on the source pressures and the valve on-time. The results indicate that modulation of molecular kinetic energy and accurate control of molecule supply were obtained. GaAs epitaxial growth with use of trimethylgallium pulses was carried out and investigated by means of RHEED (reflection high-energy electron diffraction) observation. It was demonstrated that the newly developed short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy has the advantage of high controllability

  7. Vertical transport in isotype InAlN/GaN dipole induced diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, M. N.; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.

    2017-05-01

    InAlN dipole diodes were developed and fabricated on both (0001) Ga-Face and (" separators="| 000 1 ¯) N-face oriented GaN on sapphire templates by molecular beam epitaxy. The orientation and direction of the InAlN polarization dipole are functions of the substrate orientation and composition, respectively. Special consideration was taken to minimize growth differences and impurity uptake during growth on these orientations of opposite polarity. Comparison of devices on similarly grown structures with In compositions in excess of 50% reveals that dipole diodes shows poorer forward bias performance and exhibited an increase in reverse bias leakage, regardless of orientation. Similarly, (0001) Ga-face oriented InAlN at a lowered 40% In composition had poor device characteristics, namely, the absence of expected exponential turn on in forward bias. By contrast, at In compositions close to 40%, (" separators="| 000 1 ¯) N-face oriented InAlN devices had excellent performance, with over five orders of magnitude of rectification and extracted barrier heights of 0.53- 0.62 eV; these values are in close agreement with simulation. Extracted ideality factors ranging from 1.08 to 1.38 on these devices are further evidence of their optimal performance. Further discussion focuses on the growth and orientation conditions that may lead to this discrepancy yet emphasizes that with proper design and growth strategy, the rectifying dipole diodes can be achieved with InAlN nitride dipole layers.

  8. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  9. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of GaN Nanowires on Epitaxial Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Gao, Guanhui; Galves, Lauren A; Sharma, Bharat; Corfdir, Pierre; Calabrese, Gabriele; de Souza Schiaber, Ziani; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Lopes, João Marcelo J; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2017-09-13

    We demonstrate an all-epitaxial and scalable growth approach to fabricate single-crystalline GaN nanowires on graphene by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. As substrate, we explore several types of epitaxial graphene layer structures synthesized on SiC. The different structures differ mainly in their total number of graphene layers. Because graphene is found to be etched under active N exposure, the direct growth of GaN nanowires on graphene is only achieved on multilayer graphene structures. The analysis of the nanowire ensembles prepared on multilayer graphene by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of graphene underneath as well as in between nanowires, as desired for the use of this material as contact layer in nanowire-based devices. The nanowires nucleate preferentially at step edges, are vertical, well aligned, epitaxial, and of comparable structural quality as similar structures fabricated on conventional substrates.

  10. Epitaxial growth and new phase of single crystal Dy by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Yueh; Homma, Hitoshi; Schuller, I.K.

    1987-09-01

    We have grown two novel epitaxial phases of dysprosium (Dy) on vanadium (V) by molecular beam epitaxy technique. Surface and bulk structures are studied by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray diffraction techniques. The new hcp phases are ∼4% expanded uniformly in-plane (0001), and ∼9% and ∼4% expanded out of plane along the c-axes for non-interrupted and interrupted deposition case, respectively. We also observed (2 x 2), (3 x 3), and (4 x 4) Dy surface reconstruction patterns and a series of transitions as the Dy film thickness increases. 12 refs., 3 figs

  11. Chemical beam epitaxy — a child of surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüth, Hans

    1994-01-01

    Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE) or MOMBE is currently one of the major deposition techniques in semiconductor technology. The growth process is performed in a UHV chamber under low pressure conditions and the source material is supplied by molecular beams, such that only surface kinetics are determining the chemical reactions leading to growth of the epilayer. This paper intends to give a review on the development of this deposition technique. After considering the early period, where this epitaxy method started to develop, partially from ideas being born in surface science, some milestones in the further development and basic understanding are presented. The mutual interaction between CBE/MOMBE as a deposition technique and other fields of surface science is described as well as the impact on the deposition technology of other semiconductors (e.g. for Si-based material systems). Future prospects of CBE are finally discussed, particularly in comparison with the competing techniques MBE and MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition).

  12. Graphene growth on h-BN by molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    García Martínez, Jorge Manuel; Pinczuk, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Graphene growth on dielectric substrates has potential to enable new kinds of devices and applications. We explore graphene growth via direct depositing carbon in a MBE environment on different dielectric substrates, such as h-BN and sapphire. The growth of single layer graphene nanometer size domains by solid carbon source molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) flakes is demonstrated [1]. Formation of single-layer graphene is clearly apparent in Raman spectra which disp...

  13. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  14. Multialkali photocathodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovoi, I. A.; Chernikov, A. S.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.; Ushakov, Victor N.

    1991-04-01

    A new technique of bialkali photocathodes growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MI3E) has been developed. The photocathode film was deposited onto the substrate from molecular beams produced by simultaneously operating molecular sources of Sb, Na and K. Thus suggested procedure is noticeably differed from the classical one. Growth rate was about 1 A/sec and complete cycle of photocathode fabrication was 15-20 minutes. A special ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for MBE of multialkali photocathodes has been designed. The chamber is a part of UHV system consisting of an analysis vessel supplied with Auger and ESCA electron spectrometer and low energy electron diffractometer (LEED), the MBE chamber itself and a chamber for cold sealing of photocathodes with device body through indium ring. The system gives a possibility to carry out investigations of multialkali photocathode physics and to produce commercial devices. Developed technique can be used for fabrication of vacuum devices including streak tubes.

  15. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lastras-Martínez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD spectroscopy of GaAs(001 grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  16. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martínez, A., E-mail: alm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx, E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F. [Instituto de Investigación en Comunicación Optica, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Alvaro Obregón 64, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78000 (Mexico); Lastras-Montaño, L. A. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Lastras-Montaño, M. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  17. Environmental safety issues for molecular beam epitaxy platform growth technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Shigekazu; Shirahama, Hiroyuki; Kouji, Yoshiharu

    2001-07-01

    The choice of a technology must clearly depend on its ability to fulfill not only material requirements but also environmental safety criteria. Therefore, the possibility of environmental impact raises questions related to safety and in the near future, the tolerable amount of hazardous materials, particularly for crystal growth of compound semiconductors. In the epitaxial field, both molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have already been acknowledged as well-established production methods and are playing important roles in the mass production of various device structures. Currently, however, it is common knowledge that there still exists one critical issue, namely, that of environmental safety with respect to the use of many hazardous materials. In MOCVD growth, large amounts of arsine (AsH 3) and phosphine (PH 3) are used, and in MBE growth the problem of higher amounts of arsine generation than the TLV (threshold limited value: 50 ppb) is commonly faced, particularly during maintenance procedures. By using gas source MBE (GSMBE), the arsenic contamination (adhesion) onto the wall inside the growth chamber is markedly reduced compared with that in the case of conventional MBE, and unintentional arsine generation is suppressed to be under the TLV. In addition, the consumption efficiency for hydrides is higher than 80%. This value is significantly higher than in the case of alternative growth methods, such as MBE (3-10%) and MOCVD (1-20%).

  18. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-01

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy for high-efficiency nitride optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffernan, J.; Kauer, M.; Windle, J.; Hooper, S.E.; Bousquet, V.; Zellweger, C.; Barnes, J.M. [Sharp Laboratories of Europe, Edmund Halley Road, Oxford Science Park, Oxford OX4 4GB (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    We review the significant progress made in the development of nitride laser diodes by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We report on our recent result of room temperature continuous-wave operation of InGaN quantum well laser diodes grown by MBE. Ridge waveguide lasers fabricated on freestanding GaN substrates have a continuous-wave threshold current of 125 mA, corresponding to a threshold current density of 5.7 kA cm{sup -2}. The lasers have a threshold voltage of 8.6 V and a lifetime of several minutes. We outline the further technical challenges associated with demonstrating lifetimes of several thousand hours and present an assessment of the potential of MBE as a growth method for commercial quality nitride optoelectronic devices. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystal colossal magnetoresistive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, J.N.; Bozovic, I.; Rzchowski, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Hinaus, B.; Onellion, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have grown films of (LaSr)MnO 3 (LSMO) and (LaCa)MnO 3 (LCMO) using atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). Depending on growth conditions, substrate lattice constant and the exact cation stoichiometry, the films are either pseudomorphic or strain relaxed. The pseudomorphic films show atomically flat surfaces, with a unit cell terrace structure that is a replica of that observed on the slightly vicinal substrates, while the strain relaxed films show bumpy surfaces correlated with a dislocation network. All films show tetragonal structure and exhibit anisotropic magnetoresistance, with a low field response, (1/R)(dR/dH) as large as 5 T -1

  1. DURIP 98-99: Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth and In Situ Characterization of Phase Separated Optoelectronic Semiconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millunchick, J. Mirecki

    1999-01-01

    This proposal requested funding to procure a Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) chamber with extensive in situ diagnostic capabilities to study phase separation of III-V semiconductor alloys during epitaxial growth...

  2. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy for high Tc superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothiyal, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity with T c above 30K in Ba doped La 2 CuO 4 by Bednorz and Muller generated considerable research interest world wide for developing new layered oxide superconductors. These layered copper oxides based superconductors have inherently short coherence lengths which make them very sensitive to interfacial degradation of the SNS and SIS junctions. Therefore, there is an intrinsic need for the growth of thin films with high degree of compositional homogeneity, crystalline orientation and perfection with sharp interfaces. The low growth temperatures, atomic layering capability that molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has demonstrated for the growth of semiconductors suggest its potential use in the growth of high T c superconducting device structures fulfilling above requirements. The article focusses the attention on the special features of MBE and the difficulties in adopting conventional systems for the growth of high T c superconductors (HTSCs). The problems related to oxygenation required for achieving in situ superconductivity using MBE are discussed in brief. A review of the work pertaining to MBE growth of HTSCs including efforts made in author's laboratory is presented. (author). 47 refs., 6 figs

  4. Creating Ruddlesden-Popper phases by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haislmaier, Ryan C.; Stone, Greg; Alem, Nasim; Engel-Herbert, Roman, E-mail: rue2@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    The synthesis of a 50 unit cell thick n = 4 Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} (Sr{sub 5}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 13}) Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase film is demonstrated by sequentially depositing SrO and TiO{sub 2} layers in an alternating fashion using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), where Ti was supplied using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). A detailed calibration procedure is outlined for determining the shuttering times to deposit SrO and TiO{sub 2} layers with precise monolayer doses using in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as feedback. Using optimized Sr and TTIP shuttering times, a fully automated growth of the n = 4 RP phase was carried out over a period of >4.5 h. Very stable RHEED intensity oscillations were observed over the entire growth period. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that a constant periodicity of four SrTiO{sub 3} perovskite unit cell blocks separating the double SrO rocksalt layer was maintained throughout the entire film thickness with a very little amount of planar faults oriented perpendicular to the growth front direction. These results illustrate that hybrid MBE is capable of layer-by-layer growth with atomic level precision and excellent flux stability.

  5. Topological Insulator Film Growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa P. Ginley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will review recent progress in the growth of topological insulator (TI thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. The materials we focus on are the V2-VI3 family of TIs. These materials are ideally bulk insulating with surface states housing Dirac excitations which are spin-momentum locked. These surface states are interesting for fundamental physics studies (such as the search for Majorana fermions as well as applications in spintronics and other fields. However, the majority of TI films and bulk crystals exhibit significant bulk conductivity, which obscures these states. In addition, many TI films have a high defect density. This review will discuss progress in reducing the bulk conductivity while increasing the crystal quality. We will describe in detail how growth parameters, substrate choice, and growth technique influence the resulting TI film properties for binary and ternary TIs. We then give an overview of progress in the growth of TI heterostructures. We close by discussing the bright future for TI film growth by MBE.

  6. Redundant Sb condensation on GaSb epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy during cooling procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpapay, B.; Şahin, S.; Arıkan, B.; Serincan, U.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of four different cooling receipts on the surface morphologies of unintentionally-doped GaSb epilayers on GaSb (100) substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Those receipts include three different Sb beam equivalent pressure (BEP) levels and two different termination temperatures. Surface morphologies of epilayers were examined by wet etching, surface profiler, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that during the cooling period, a Sb BEP of 4.00 × 10 −4 Pa at a termination temperature of 400 °C induces a smooth surface without Sb condensation whereas same Sb BEP at a termination temperature of 350 °C forms a 300 nm thick Sb layer on the surface. In addition, it is revealed that by applying a wet etching procedure and using a surface profiler it is possible to identify this condensed layer from the two-sloped feature of mesa profile. - Highlights: • Sb beam flux termination temperature is crucial for redundant Sb condensation. • Sb beam flux level has a role on the thickness of redundant condensed Sb layer. • Redundant Sb layer thickness can be measured by two-sloped mesa structure

  7. Deep ultraviolet emission in hexagonal boron nitride grown by high-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T. Q. P.; Cassabois, G.; Valvin, P.; Rousseau, E.; Summerfield, A.; Mellor, C. J.; Cho, Y.; Cheng, T. S.; Albar, J. D.; Eaves, L.; Foxon, C. T.; Beton, P. H.; Novikov, S. V.; Gil, B.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the opto-electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride grown by high temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We combine atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and photoluminescence spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet to compare the quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown either on sapphire or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. For both substrates, the emission spectra peak at 235 nm, indicating the high optical quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The epilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrate superior performance in the deep ultraviolet (down to 210 nm) compared to those on sapphire. These results reveal the potential of molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene, and more generally, for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures and devices by means of a scalable technology.

  8. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kushvaha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001 substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 108 cm−2 at 750 °C than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 109 cm−2 at 730 °C. A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  9. GaN Schottky diodes with single-crystal aluminum barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, H. Y.; Yang, W. C.; Lee, P. Y.; Lin, C. W.; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, K. C.; Cheng, K. Y.; Hsu, C.-H.

    2016-08-01

    GaN-based Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) with single-crystal Al barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are fabricated. Examined using in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffractions, ex-situ high-resolution x-ray diffractions, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, it is determined that epitaxial Al grows with its [111] axis coincident with the [0001] axis of the GaN substrate without rotation. In fabricated SBDs, a 0.2 V barrier height enhancement and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in leakage current are observed in single crystal Al/GaN SBDs compared to conventional thermal deposited Al/GaN SBDs. The strain induced piezoelectric field is determined to be the major source of the observed device performance enhancements.

  10. GaN Schottky diodes with single-crystal aluminum barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, H. Y.; Yang, W. C.; Lee, P. Y.; Lin, C. W.; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, K. C.; Cheng, K. Y., E-mail: kycheng@ee.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hsu, C.-H. [Division of Scientific Research, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-22

    GaN-based Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) with single-crystal Al barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are fabricated. Examined using in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffractions, ex-situ high-resolution x-ray diffractions, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, it is determined that epitaxial Al grows with its [111] axis coincident with the [0001] axis of the GaN substrate without rotation. In fabricated SBDs, a 0.2 V barrier height enhancement and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in leakage current are observed in single crystal Al/GaN SBDs compared to conventional thermal deposited Al/GaN SBDs. The strain induced piezoelectric field is determined to be the major source of the observed device performance enhancements.

  11. Chemical beam epitaxy as a breakthrough technology for photovoltaic solar energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Warabisako, Terunori; Sugiura, Hideo

    1994-03-01

    Chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) is a possible breakthrough technology for photovoltaic (PV) solar energy applications. This paper reviews the present status of epitaxial technologies for high-efficiency III-V compound semiconductor solar cells. It also discusses the advantages of CBE technology over metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for III-V compound solar cell fabrication. CBE and related growth technologies can effectively produce high-efficiency and low-cost multi-junction III-V compound solar cells. Moreover, CBE may possibly reduce solar cell fabrication costs in the future because it utilizes source materials more efficiently than MBE and MOCVD. The cost of solar cell fabrication using CBE are estimated and compared with those using MOCVD and MBE.

  12. Positron annihilation studies of defects in molecular beam epitaxy grown III-V layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umlor, M.T.; Keeble, D.J.; Cooke, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    A summary of recent positron annihilation experiments on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown III-V layers is Presented. Variable energy positron beam measurements on Al 0.32 Ga 0.68 As undoped and Si doped have been completed. Positron trapping at a open volume defect in Al 0.32 Ga 0.68 :Si for temperatures from 300 to 25 K in the dark was observed. The positron trap was lost after 1.3 eV illumination at 25K. These results indicate an open volume defect is associated with the local structure of the deep donor state of the DX center. Stability of MBE GaAs to thermal annealing war, investigated over the temperature range of 230 to 700 degrees C, Proximity wafer furnace anneals in flowing argon were used, Samples grown above 450 degrees C were shown to be stable but for sample below this temperature an anneal induced vacancy related defect was produced for anneals between 400 and 500 degrees C. The nature of the defect was shown to be different for material grown at 350 and 230 degrees C. Activation energies of 2.5 eV to 2.3 eV were obtained from isochronal anneal experiments for samples grown at 350 and 230 degrees C, respectively

  13. Dependence of the concentration of ionized donors on epitaxy temperature for Si:Er/Si layers grown by sublimation molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V. P., E-mail: kuznetsov_vp@mail.ru [Lobachevsky State University, Research Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Shmagin, V. B.; Drozdov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Marychev, M. O. [Lobachevsky State University (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, K. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, M. V. [Lobachevsky State University, Research Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Andreev, B. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Kornaukhov, A. V. [Lobachevsky State University, Research Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Krasilnik, Z. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15

    The dependence of the concentrations of the Er impurity and ionized donors on the epitaxy temperature has been studied before and after annealing of Si:Er/Si layers grown by sublimation molecular-beam epitaxy. n-Si:Er layers have been grown in the temperature range 400-800 Degree-Sign C and annealed in hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C for 30 min. The possible nature of the donor centers is discussed.

  14. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  15. High-mobility BaSnO3 grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility perovskite BaSnO3 films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO3 films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnOx. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO3. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm2 V−1 s−1 in films grown on PrScO3. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  16. High-mobility BaSnO3 grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO3 films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO3 films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnOx. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO3. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm2 V-1 s-1 in films grown on PrScO3. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  17. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne, E-mail: stemmer@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  18. Electronic structure of monolayer 1T′-MoTe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujie Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs in the 1T′ structural phase have drawn a great deal of attention due to the prediction of quantum spin Hall insulator states. The band inversion and the concomitant changes in the band topology induced by the structural distortion from 1T to 1T′ phases are well established. However, the bandgap opening due to the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC is only verified for 1T′-WTe2 recently and still debated for other TMDCs. Here we report a successful growth of high-quality monolayer 1T′-MoTe2 on a bilayer graphene substrate through molecular beam epitaxy. Using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES, we have investigated the low-energy electronic structure and Fermi surface topology. The SOC-induced breaking of the band degeneracy points between the valence and conduction bands is clearly observed by ARPES. However, the strength of SOC is found to be insufficient to open a bandgap, which makes monolayer 1T′-MoTe2 on bilayer graphene a semimetal.

  19. Electronic structure of monolayer 1T'-MoTe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shujie; Zhang, Chaofan; Jia, Chunjing; Ryu, Hyejin; Hwang, Choongyu; Hashimoto, Makoto; Lu, Donghui; Liu, Zhi; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2018-02-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) in the 1T' structural phase have drawn a great deal of attention due to the prediction of quantum spin Hall insulator states. The band inversion and the concomitant changes in the band topology induced by the structural distortion from 1T to 1T' phases are well established. However, the bandgap opening due to the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is only verified for 1T'-WTe2 recently and still debated for other TMDCs. Here we report a successful growth of high-quality monolayer 1T'-MoTe2 on a bilayer graphene substrate through molecular beam epitaxy. Using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have investigated the low-energy electronic structure and Fermi surface topology. The SOC-induced breaking of the band degeneracy points between the valence and conduction bands is clearly observed by ARPES. However, the strength of SOC is found to be insufficient to open a bandgap, which makes monolayer 1T'-MoTe2 on bilayer graphene a semimetal.

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy of Cd3As2 on a III-V substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Schumann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial, strain-engineered Dirac semimetal heterostructures promise tuning of the unique properties of these materials. In this study, we investigate the growth of thin films of the recently discovered Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 by molecular beam epitaxy. We show that epitaxial Cd3As2 layers can be grown at low temperatures (110 °C–220 °C, in situ, on (111 GaSb buffer layers deposited on (111 GaAs substrates. The orientation relationship is described by ( 112 Cd 3 As 2 || (111 GaSb and [ 1 1 ¯ 0 ] Cd 3 As 2 || [ 1 ¯ 01 ] GaSb . The films are shown to grow in the low-temperature, vacancy ordered, tetragonal Dirac semimetal phase. They exhibit high room temperature mobilities of up to 19300 cm2/Vs, despite a three-dimensional surface morphology indicative of island growth and the presence of twin variants. The results indicate that epitaxial growth on more closely lattice matched buffer layers, such as InGaSb or InAlSb, which allow for imposing different degrees of epitaxial coherency strains, should be possible.

  1. Development of a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy deposition system for in situ surface x-ray studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Tassie K.; Cook, Seyoung; Benda, Erika; Hong, Hawoong; Marks, Laurence D.; Fong, Dillon D.

    2018-03-01

    A portable metalorganic gas delivery system designed and constructed to interface with an existing molecular beam epitaxy chamber at beamline 33-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source is described. This system offers the ability to perform in situ X-ray measurements of complex oxide growth via hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. The performance of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system while delivering metalorganic source materials is described. The high-energy X-ray scattering capabilities of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system are demonstrated both on oxide films grown solely from the metalorganic source and ABO3 oxide perovskites containing elements from both the metalorganic source and a traditional effusion cell.

  2. Tuning the magnetism of epitaxial cobalt oxide thin films by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Q. Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Shen, X.; Yang, H. W.; Zhang, H. R.; Guan, X. X.; Wang, W.; Yao, Y.; Wang, Y. G.; Peng, Y.; Liu, B. G.; Sun, J. R.; Yu, R. C.

    2017-07-01

    Tuning magnetic properties of perovskite thin films is a central topic of recent studies because of its fundamental significance. In this work, we demonstrated the modification of the magnetism of L a0.9C a0.1Co O3 (LCCO) thin films by introducing a stripelike superstructure in a controllable manner using electron beam irradiation (EBI) in a transmission electron microscope. The microstructure, electronic structure, strain change, and origin of magnetism of the LCCO thin films were studied in detail using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the EBI-induced unit cell volume expansion accompanies the formation of oxygen vacancies and leads to the spin state transition of Co ions. The low spin state of C o4 + ions depress the stripelike superstructure, while higher spin states of Co ions with lower valences are conductive to the formation of "dark stripes". Our work clarifies the origin of magnetism of epitaxial LCCO thin films, benefiting a comprehensive understanding of correlated physics in cobalt oxide thin films.

  3. Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of (11-22)-oriented 3-nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahourcade, L.

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on the molecular-beam epitaxial growth of (1122)-oriented semi-polar nitride semiconductors using m-sapphire substrates. The (1122) crystallographic orientation is predefined by AlN deposition on m-sapphire under N excess. On top of this AlN buffer layer, undoped or Si-doped two-dimensional GaN(1122) films are formed under Ga-rich conditions, with a stabilized Ga-excess ad-layer of about 1.05±0.10 ML. In contrast, Mg tends to segregate on the GaN surface, inhibiting the self-regulated Ga excess film. Nevertheless, uniform Mg incorporation can be obtained, and p-type conductivity was achieved. GaN/AlN quantum wells are synthesized by deposition of the binary compounds under the above-described conditions. In the case of GaN/AlN quantum dots, the three-dimensional transition is induced by a growth interruption under vacuum. The reduction of the internal electric field in GaN/AlN nano-structures is confirmed by the blue shift of the photoluminescence spectrum and by the short photoluminescence decay times measured at low temperature. These results are consistent with theoretical calculations of the electronic structure. (author)

  4. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuwei [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083 (China); Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhang_yang@semi.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083 (China); Guan, Min; Cui, Lijie; Li, Yanbo; Wang, Baoqiang; Zhu, Zhanping; Zeng, Yiping [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures have been successfully grown by MBE with electron mobility exceeding 16,000 cm{sup 2}/V s. • We present a new shutter sequence to reduce interface mixing and accurate control of Sb composition in InAsSb alloy. • Higher temperature could be applied for InAsSb growth with good crystalline quality, allowing relatively higher growth temperature for the subsequent AlSb barrier. • Raman spectra is used to examine interface mixing between AlSb and InAsSb layers. - Abstract: AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures have been successfully grown on GaAs substrate by modulated molecular-beam epitaxy (MMBE). New shutter sequence has been presented and room temperature mobility of 16,170 cm{sup 2}/V s has been achieved with our non-intentionally doped structures. With a view for optimization, we analyze variation of electron mobility induced by growth temperature and InAsSb thickness. By increasing growth temperature and thickness of InAsSb, improvement of electron mobility has been observed. With our optimized AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures, accurate control of composition in InAsSb alloy and reduced interface mixing have been confirmed by X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Min; Cui, Lijie; Li, Yanbo; Wang, Baoqiang; Zhu, Zhanping; Zeng, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures have been successfully grown by MBE with electron mobility exceeding 16,000 cm 2 /V s. • We present a new shutter sequence to reduce interface mixing and accurate control of Sb composition in InAsSb alloy. • Higher temperature could be applied for InAsSb growth with good crystalline quality, allowing relatively higher growth temperature for the subsequent AlSb barrier. • Raman spectra is used to examine interface mixing between AlSb and InAsSb layers. - Abstract: AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures have been successfully grown on GaAs substrate by modulated molecular-beam epitaxy (MMBE). New shutter sequence has been presented and room temperature mobility of 16,170 cm 2 /V s has been achieved with our non-intentionally doped structures. With a view for optimization, we analyze variation of electron mobility induced by growth temperature and InAsSb thickness. By increasing growth temperature and thickness of InAsSb, improvement of electron mobility has been observed. With our optimized AlSb/InAsSb heterostructures, accurate control of composition in InAsSb alloy and reduced interface mixing have been confirmed by X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements

  6. Single orientation graphene synthesized on iridium thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Dangwal Pandey, A.; Krausert, Konstantin; Franz, D.; Grånäs, E.; Shayduk, R.; Müller, P.; Keller, Thomas F.; Noei, H.; Vonk, V.; Stierle, A.

    2016-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial iridium thin films were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy, and subsequently, one monolayer of graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The influence of the growth parameters on the quality of the Ir films, as well as of graphene, was investigated system atically by means of low energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force mic...

  7. Strain-engineered graphene grown on hexagonal boron nitride by molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Korolkov, Vladimir V.; Cho, YongJin; Mellor, Christopher J.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Eaves, Laurence; Novikov, Sergei V.; Beton, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene grown by high temperature molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) forms continuous domains with dimensions of order 20??m, and exhibits moir? patterns with large periodicities, up to ~30?nm, indicating that the layers are highly strained. Topological defects in the moir? patterns are observed and attributed to the relaxation of graphene islands which nucleate at different sites and subsequently coalesce. In addition, cracks are formed leading to strain relaxation, hig...

  8. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Semiconductor Tin by P Folkes, P Taylor, C Rong, B Nichols, H Hier, and M Neupane Approved for public release; distribution...Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin by P Folkes, P Taylor, C Rong, B Nichols... Semiconductor Tin 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) P Folkes, P Taylor, C Rong, B Nichols, H Hier, and M

  9. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and structural characterization of ZnS on (001) GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, R. G., II; Huang, P. C.; Stock, S. R.; Summers, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of surface nucleation processes on the quality of ZnS layers grown on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Reflection high energy electron diffraction indicated that nucleation at high temperatures produced more planar surfaces than nucleation at low temperatures, but the crystalline quality as assessed by X-ray double crystal diffractometry is relatively independent of nucleation temperature. A critical factor in layer quality was the initial roughness of the GaAs surfaces.

  10. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface

  11. A visualization method for probing grain boundaries of single layer graphene via molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Linjie; Wan, Wen; Zhu, Zhenwei; Zhao, Zhijuan; Zhang, Zhenhan; Shih, Tien-Mo; Cai, Weiwei

    2017-07-01

    Graphene, a member of layered two-dimensional (2D) materials, possesses high carrier mobility, mechanical flexibility, and optical transparency, as well as enjoying a wide range of promising applications in electronics. Adopting the chemical vaporization deposition method, the majority of investigators have ubiquitously grown single layer graphene (SLG), which inevitably involves polycrystalline properties. Here we demonstrate a simple method for the direct visualization of arbitrarily large-size SLG domains by synthesizing one-hundred-nm-scale MoS2 single crystals via a high-vacuum molecular beam epitaxy process. The present study based on epitaxial growth provides a guide for probing the grain boundaries of various 2D materials and implements higher potentials for the next-generation electronic devices.

  12. High quality atomically thin PtSe2 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingzhe; Wang, Eryin; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Guangqi; Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Kenan; Yao, Wei; Lu, Nianpeng; Yang, Shuzhen; Wu, Shilong; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Wu, Yang; Yu, Pu; Duan, Wenhui; Zhou, Shuyun

    2017-12-01

    Atomically thin PtSe2 films have attracted extensive research interests for potential applications in high-speed electronics, spintronics and photodetectors. Obtaining high quality thin films with large size and controlled thickness is critical. Here we report the first successful epitaxial growth of high quality PtSe2 films by molecular beam epitaxy. Atomically thin films from 1 ML to 22 ML have been grown and characterized by low-energy electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Moreover, a systematic thickness dependent study of the electronic structure is revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and helical spin texture is revealed by spin-ARPES. Our work provides new opportunities for growing large size single crystalline films to investigate the physical properties and potential applications of PtSe2.

  13. Defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films probed by monoenergetic positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mikado, Tomohisa.

    1994-01-01

    Vacancy-type defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation and lifetime spectra of positrons were measured for the epitaxial films grown on the Si substrates by plasma chemical vapor deposition. For the as-deposited film, divacancy-phosphorus complexes were found with high concentration. After 600degC annealing, vacancy clusters were formed near the Si/Si interface, while no drastic change in the depth distribution of the divacancy-phosphorus complexes was observed. By 900degC annealing, the vacancy clusters were annealed out; however, the average number of phosphorus atoms coupled with divacancies increased. The relationship between the vacancy-type defects probed by the positron annihilation technique and the carrier concentration was confirmed. (author)

  14. Defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films probed by monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1994-11-01

    Vacancy-type defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation and lifetime spectra of positrons were measured for the epitaxial films grown on the Si substrates by plasma chemical vapor deposition. For the as-deposited film, divacancy-phosphorus complexes were found with high concentration. After 600degC annealing, vacancy clusters were formed near the Si/Si interface, while no drastic change in the depth distribution of the divacancy-phosphorus complexes was observed. By 900degC annealing, the vacancy clusters were annealed out; however, the average number of phosphorus atoms coupled with divacancies increased. The relationship between the vacancy-type defects probed by the positron annihilation technique and the carrier concentration was confirmed. (author).

  15. Improvement of GaN epilayer by gradient layer method with molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yen-Liang [Department of Physics, Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lo, Ikai, E-mail: ikailo@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, ROC (China); Gau, Ming-Hong; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Sham, Meng-Wei; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi [Department of Physics, Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Jenn-Kai [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Formosa University, Hu-Wei, Yun-Lin County 63208, Taiwan, ROC (China); Schuber, Ralf; Schaadt, Daniel [Institute of Applied Physics/DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-07-31

    We demonstrated a molecular beam epitaxy method to resolve the dilemma between structural and morphological quality in growth of the GaN epilayer. A gradient buffer layer was grown in such a way that the N/Ga ratio was gradually changed from nitrogen-rich to gallium-rich. The GaN epitaxial layer was then grown on the gradient buffer layer. In the X-ray diffraction analysis of GaN(002) rocking curves, we found that the full width at half-maximum was improved from 531.69 Double-Prime to 59.43 Double-Prime for the sample with a gradient buffer layer as compared to a purely gallium-rich grown sample. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the root-mean-square roughness of the surface was improved from 18.28 nm to 1.62 nm over an area of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 {mu}m{sup 2} with respect to a purely nitrogen-rich grown sample. Raman scattering showed the presence of a slightly tilted plane in the gradient layer. Furthermore we showed that the gradient layer can also slash the strain force caused by either Ga-rich GaN epitaxial layer or AlN buffer layer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The GaN epilayer was grown on sapphire substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample quality was improved by gradient buffer layer.

  16. Magnetization reversal in YIG/GGG(111) nanoheterostructures grown by laser molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichevtsov, Boris B; Gastev, Sergei V; Suturin, Sergey M; Fedorov, Vladimir V; Korovin, Alexander M; Bursian, Viktor E; Banshchikov, Alexander G; Volkov, Mikhail P; Tabuchi, Masao; Sokolov, Nikolai S

    2017-01-01

    Thin (4-20 nm) yttrium iron garnet (Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 , YIG) layers have been grown on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd 3 Ga 5 O 12 , GGG) 111-oriented substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy in 700-1000 °C growth temperature range. The layers were found to have atomically flat step-and-terrace surface morphology with step height of 1.8 Å characteristic for YIG(111) surface. As the growth temperature is increased from 700 to 1000 °C the terraces become wider and the growth gradually changes from layer by layer to step-flow regime. Crystal structure studied by electron and X-ray diffraction showed that YIG lattice is co-oriented and laterally pseudomorphic to GGG with small rhombohedral distortion present perpendicular to the surface. Measurements of magnetic moment, magneto-optical polar and longitudinal Kerr effect (MOKE), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) were used for study of magnetization reversal for different orientations of magnetic field. These methods and ferromagnetic resonance studies have shown that in zero magnetic field magnetization lies in the film plane due to both shape and induced anisotropies. Vectorial MOKE studies have revealed the presence of an in-plane easy magnetization axis. In-plane magnetization reversal was shown to occur through combination of reversible rotation and abrupt irreversible magnetization jump, the latter caused by domain wall nucleation and propagation. The field at which the flip takes place depends on the angle between the applied magnetic field and the easy magnetization axis and can be described by the modified Stoner-Wohlfarth model taking into account magnetic field dependence of the domain wall energy. Magnetization curves of individual tetrahedral and octahedral magnetic Fe 3+ sublattices were studied by XMCD.

  17. An ultra-compact, high-throughput molecular beam epitaxy growth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A. A.; Hesjedal, T. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Braun, W., E-mail: w.braun@fkf.mpg.de, E-mail: fischer@createc.de; Rembold, S.; Fischer, A., E-mail: w.braun@fkf.mpg.de, E-mail: fischer@createc.de [CreaTec Fischer and Co. GmbH, Industriestr. 9, 74391 Erligheim (Germany); Gassler, G. [Dr. Gassler Electron Devices GmbH, List Str. 4, 89079 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    We present a miniaturized molecular beam epitaxy (miniMBE) system with an outer diameter of 206 mm, optimized for flexible and high-throughput operation. The three-chamber system, used here for oxide growth, consists of a sample loading chamber, a storage chamber, and a growth chamber. The growth chamber is equipped with eight identical effusion cell ports with linear shutters, one larger port for either a multi-pocket electron beam evaporator or an oxygen plasma source, an integrated cryoshroud, retractable beam-flux monitor or quartz-crystal microbalance, reflection high energy electron diffraction, substrate manipulator, main shutter, and quadrupole mass spectrometer. The system can be combined with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) end stations on synchrotron and neutron beamlines, or equivalently with other complex surface analysis systems, including low-temperature scanning probe microscopy systems. Substrate handling is compatible with most UHV surface characterization systems, as the miniMBE can accommodate standard surface science sample holders. We introduce the design of the system, and its specific capabilities and operational parameters, and we demonstrate the epitaxial thin film growth of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on c-plane sapphire and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on MgO (001)

  18. Formation behavior of BexZn1−xO alloys grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mingming; Zhu, Yuan; Su, Longxing; Zhang, Quanlin; Chen, Anqi; Ji, Xu; Xiang, Rong; Gui, Xuchun; Wu, Tianzhun; Pan, Bicai; Tang, Zikang

    2013-01-01

    We report the phase formation behavior of Be x Zn 1−x O alloys grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We find the alloy with low- and high-Be contents could be obtained by alloying BeO into ZnO films. X-ray diffraction measurements shows the c lattice constant value shrinks, and room temperature absorption shows the energy band-gap widens after Be incorporated. However, the alloy with intermediate Be composition are unstable and segregated into low- and high-Be contents BeZnO alloys. We demonstrate the phase segregation of Be x Zn 1−x O alloys with intermediate Be composition resulted from large internal strain induced by large lattice mismatch between BeO and ZnO.

  19. Graphitic carbon growth on crystalline and amorphous oxide substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Christine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report graphitic carbon growth on crystalline and amorphous oxide substrates by using carbon molecular beam epitaxy. The films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formations of nanocrystalline graphite are observed on silicon dioxide and glass, while mainly sp2 amorphous carbons are formed on strontium titanate and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Interestingly, flat carbon layers with high degree of graphitization are formed even on amorphous oxides. Our results provide a progress toward direct graphene growth on oxide materials. PACS: 81.05.uf; 81.15.Hi; 78.30.Ly.

  20. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.

  1. Epitaxial Ni films, e-beam nano-patterning and BMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszew, R. Alejandra; Zhang, Zhengdong; Pearson, Dave; Zambano, Antonio

    2004-05-01

    We have attempted to clarify possible domain-wall processes present in the recently reported large ballistic magnetoresistance effects in nano-contacts. To that effect we have used e-beam lithography applied to epitaxial Ni films to fabricate nano-bridges in more controlled geometry than electrochemical deposition. Our preliminary results indicate that magnetic domains do play a role in the magneto-resistance of these nano-bridges but the order of magnitude of the observed effect is considerably smaller than the reported observations in electrochemically prepared nano-contacts.

  2. Epitaxial Ni films, e-beam nano-patterning and BMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszew, R.A.; Zhang Zhengdong; Pearson, Dave; Zambano, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    We have attempted to clarify possible domain-wall processes present in the recently reported large ballistic magnetoresistance effects in nano-contacts. To that effect we have used e-beam lithography applied to epitaxial Ni films to fabricate nano-bridges in more controlled geometry than electrochemical deposition. Our preliminary results indicate that magnetic domains do play a role in the magneto-resistance of these nano-bridges but the order of magnitude of the observed effect is considerably smaller than the reported observations in electrochemically prepared nano-contacts

  3. Near-bandgap optical properties of pseudomorphic GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Costa, Vijay Richard, E-mail: vdcosta@asu.edu; Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: eleyeoyc@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore)

    2016-08-14

    We investigated the compositional dependence of the near-bandgap dielectric function and the E{sub 0} critical point in pseudomorphic Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} alloys grown on Ge (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The complex dielectric functions were obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.5 to 4.5 eV at room temperature. Analogous to the E{sub 1} and E{sub 1}+Δ{sub 1} transitions, a model consisting of the compositional dependence of relaxed alloys along with the strain contribution predicted by the deformation potential theory fully accounts for the observed compositional dependence in pseudomorphic alloys.

  4. Ferromagnetic resonance of Py deposited on ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Chen, Lin; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Dietl, Tomasz; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We report on the growth of a high-quality single crystal ZnO film on an a-plane sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the properties of a sputtered permalloy (Py) film on the ZnO investigated by ferromagnetic resonance. The results show that one can obtain the Py with a reasonable quality on ZnO, which is expected to provide a testbed system for the investigation of the spin current-related phenomena in materials with a weak spin-orbit interaction.

  5. Precision bragg reflectors obtained by molecular beam epitaxy under in situ tunable dynamic reflectometry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardinal, V.; Legros, R.; Fontaine, C.

    1995-12-31

    Highly accurate layer thickness are required for multilayers involved in photonic devices, such as Bragg reflectors. In this letter, we demonstrate that precise, real-time monitoring of molecular beam epitaxy growing layers can be achieved by near-normal incidence dynamic reflectometry with a tunable sapphire-titanium laser used as a source. The advantage of this new technique lies in the possibility of synchronizing the material changes and the reflectivity extrema by selecting adequate analysis wavelengths. This technique is shown to provide 885 nm GaAs-AlAs Bragg reflectors with a layer thickness accuracy in excess of 1%. (author). 17 refs.

  6. Ambipolar transistor behavior in p-doped InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, B. S.; Aagesen, M.; Soerensen, C. B.; Lindelof, P. E.; Martinez, K. L.; Nygaard, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present the electric properties of p-InAs nanowire field-effect transistors showing ambipolar conduction. Be doped nanowires are grown by the vapor-solid-solid mechanism using molecular beam epitaxy with in situ deposited Au catalyst particles. P-type conduction in InAs nanowires is challenging because of the Fermi-level pinning above the conduction band edge at the nanowire surface that leads to creation of an electron inversion layer. We demonstrate that this task is possible without a modified surface and report a strong temperature dependence (10-10 5 ) of the on-off ratio caused by the surface inversion layer

  7. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Tung, I. C. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA; Chang, S. -H. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Bhattacharya, A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Fong, D. D. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Freeland, J. W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Hong, Hawoong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  8. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong, E-mail: hhong@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Tung, I. C. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chang, S.-H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  9. Self-regulated growth of LaVO3 thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    LaVO 3 thin films were grown on SrTiO 3 (001) by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. A volatile metalorganic precursor, vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP), and elemental La were co-supplied in the presence of a molecular oxygen flux. By keeping the La flux fixed and varying the VTIP flux, stoichiometric LaVO 3 films were obtained for a range of cation flux ratios, indicating the presence of a self-regulated growth window. Films grown under stoichiometric conditions were found to have the largest lattice parameter, which decreased monotonically with increasing amounts of excess La or V. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering measurements were carried out to confirm film compositions. Stoichiometric growth of complex vanadate thin films independent of cation flux ratios expands upon the previously reported self-regulated growth of perovskite titanates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this growth approach to other complex oxide materials, where a precise control over film stoichiometry is demanded by the application

  10. The design, fabrication, and characterization of silicon-germanium optoelectronic devices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustersic, Nathan Anthony

    In recent years, Ge and SiGe devices have been actively investigated for potential optoelectronic applications such as germanium solar cells for long wavelength absorption, quantum-dot intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs), quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) and germanium light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Current research into SiGe based optoelectronic devices is heavily based on nanostructures which employ quantum confinement and is at a stage where basic properties are being studied in order to optimize growth conditions necessary for incorporation into future devices. Ge and SiGe based devices are especially attractive due to ease of monolithic integration with current Si-based CMOS processing technology, longer carrier lifetime, and reduced phonon scattering. Defect formation and transformation was studied in SiGe layers grown on Si and Ge (100) substrates. The epitaxial layers were grown with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and characterized by X-ray measurements in order to study the accommodation of elastic strain energy in the layers. The accommodation of elastic strain energy specifies the amount of point defects created on the growth surface which may transform into extended crystalline defects in the volume of the layers. An understanding of crystalline defects in high lattice mismatched epitaxial structures is critical in order to optimize growth procedures so that epitaxial structures can be optimized for specific devices such as Ge based solar cells. Considering the optimization of epitaxial layers based on the structural transformation of point defects, Ge solar cells were fabricated and investigated using current-voltage measurements and quantum efficiency data. These Ge solar cells, optimized for long wavelength absorption, were fabricated to be employed in a bonded Ge/Si solar cell device. The doping of self-assembled Ge quantum dot structures grown on Si (100) was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL

  11. Single orientation graphene synthesized on iridium thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dangwal Pandey, A., E-mail: arti.pandey@desy.de; Grånäs, E.; Shayduk, R.; Noei, H.; Vonk, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Krausert, K.; Franz, D.; Müller, P.; Keller, T. F.; Stierle, A., E-mail: andreas.stierle@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Universität Hamburg, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-08-21

    Heteroepitaxial iridium thin films were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy, and subsequently, one monolayer of graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The influence of the growth parameters on the quality of the Ir films, as well as of graphene, was investigated systematically by means of low energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Our study reveals (111) oriented iridium films with high crystalline quality and extremely low surface roughness, on which the formation of large-area epitaxial graphene is achieved. The presence of defects, like dislocations, twins, and 30° rotated domains in the iridium films is also discussed. The coverage of graphene was found to be influenced by the presence of 30° rotated domains in the Ir films. Low iridium deposition rates suppress these rotated domains and an almost complete coverage of graphene was obtained. This synthesis route yields inexpensive, air-stable, and large-area graphene with a well-defined orientation, making it accessible to a wider community of researchers for numerous experiments or applications, including those which use destructive analysis techniques or irreversible processes. Moreover, this approach can be used to tune the structural quality of graphene, allowing a systematic study of the influence of defects in various processes like intercalation below graphene.

  12. Radical-source molecular beam epitaxy of ZnO-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadofiev, Sergey

    2009-10-27

    This work focuses on the development of the novel growth approaches for the fabrication of Group II-oxide materials in the form of epitaxial films and heterostructures. It is shown that molecular-beam epitaxial growth far from thermal equilibrium allows one to overcome the standard solubility limit and to alloy ZnO with MgO or CdO in strict wurtzite phase up to mole fractions of several 10 %. In this way, a band-gap range from 2.2 to 4.4 eV can be covered. A clear layer-by-layer growth mode controlled by oscillations in reflection high-energy electron diffraction makes it possible to fabricate atomically smooth heterointerfaces and well-defined quantum well structures exhibiting prominent band-gap related light emission in the whole composition range. On appropriately designed structures, laser action from the ultraviolet down to green wavelengths and up to room temperature is achieved. The properties and potential of the ''state-of-the-art'' materials are discussed in relation to the advantages for their applications in various optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  13. Hybrid molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Abhinav, E-mail: praka019@umn.edu; Dewey, John; Yun, Hwanhui; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jalan, Bharat, E-mail: bjalan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Owing to its high room-temperature electron mobility and wide bandgap, BaSnO{sub 3} has recently become of significant interest for potential room-temperature oxide electronics. A hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach for the growth of high-quality BaSnO{sub 3} films is developed in this work. This approach employs hexamethylditin as a chemical precursor for tin, an effusion cell for barium, and a radio frequency plasma source for oxygen. BaSnO{sub 3} films were thus grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) and LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrates. Growth conditions for stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3} were identified. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations, characteristic of a layer-by-layer growth mode were observed. A critical thickness of ∼1 nm for strain relaxation was determined for films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} using in situ RHEED. Scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirmed the cube-on-cube epitaxy and composition. The importance of precursor chemistry is discussed in the context of the MBE growth of BaSnO{sub 3}.

  14. Growth of GaN on Ge(111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieten, R. R.; Degroote, S.; Cheng, K.; Leys, M.; Kuijk, M.; Borghs, G.

    2006-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of GaN on Ge is reported. The authors found that direct growth of GaN performs exceptionally well on Ge(111) with plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A streaky reflection high energy electron diffraction pattern is observed during growth. X-ray diffraction showed a rocking curve full width at half maximum of only 371 arc sec for a 38 nm GaN layer and indicates an abrupt interface between the GaN and Ge. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows limited diffusion of Ga atoms into the Ge substrate and Ge atoms into the GaN layers. Current-voltage measurements show rectifying behavior for n-GaN on p-Ge. Their results indicate that GaN growth on Ge does not require intermediate layers, allowing the Ge substrate to be used as back contact in vertical devices. A p-n junction formed between GaN and Ge can be used in heterojunction devices

  15. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aheli Ghosh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ∼0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90  ° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness < 2 nm. Temperature dependent Hall mobility measurements and the modelling thereof indicated that ionized impurity scattering limited carrier mobility in Ge layer. Capacitance- and conductance-voltage measurements were performed to determine the effect of epilayer dislocation density on interfacial defect states (Dit and their energy distribution. Finally, extracted Dit values were benchmarked against published Dit data for Ge MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  16. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aheli; Clavel, Michael B.; Nguyen, Peter D.; Meeker, Michael A.; Khodaparast, Giti A.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Hudait, Mantu K.

    2017-09-01

    The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ˜0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  17. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-23

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SnO{sub 2} on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga{sub 2}O, In{sub 2}O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO{sub 2}, somewhat lower for In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the lowest for Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  18. In situ monitoring of the surface reconstructions on InP(001) prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanyan, K. B.; Parbrook, P. J.; Hopkinson, M.; Whitehouse, C. R.; Sobiesierski, Z.; Westwood, D. I.

    1997-07-01

    Reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) were applied to study clean InP(001) surfaces prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). At phosphorus beam equivalent pressures (BEPs) between 3.5×10-7 and 3.5×10-6 mbar and substrate temperature (Ts) falling from 590 to 150 °C, (2×4), (2×1), (2×2), and c(4×4) RHEED patterns are observed. The main RAS features, observed at 1.7-1.9 and 2.6-2.9 eV are assigned to In and P dimers, respectively. The above reconstruction sequence is associated closely with transformations identified in RAS signatures that are induced by progressively increasing the P surface coverage. The RAS results also imply the existence of (2×4)α and (2×4)β phases. A surface-phase diagram for MBE-grown (001) InP, in the whole range of Ts and phosphorus BEPs is proposed.

  19. Microstructure of InxGa1−xN nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, R F; Soundararajah, Q Y; Griffiths, I J; Cherns, D; Novikov, S V; Foxon, C T

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the structure and composition of In x Ga 1−x N nanorods grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The results confirm a core–shell structure with an In-rich core and In-poor shell resulting from axial and lateral growth sectors respectively. Atomic resolution mapping by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and high angle annular dark field imaging show that both the core and the shell are decomposed into Ga-rich and In-rich platelets parallel to their respective growth surfaces. It is argued that platelet formation occurs at the surfaces, through the lateral expansion of surface steps. Studies of nanorods with graded composition show that decomposition ceases for x ≥ 0.8 and the ratio of growth rates, shell:core, decreases with increasing In concentration. (paper)

  20. Nickel enhanced graphene growth directly on dielectric substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wofford, Joseph M., E-mail: joewofford@gmail.com, E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J., E-mail: joewofford@gmail.com, E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institut für Physik, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-07-28

    The efficacy of Ni as a surfactant to improve the crystalline quality of graphene grown directly on dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is examined. Simultaneously exposing the substrate to a Ni flux throughout C deposition at 950 °C led to improved charge carrier mobility and a Raman spectrum indicating less structural disorder in the resulting nanocrystalline graphene film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that no residual Ni could be detected in the film and showed a decrease in the intensity of the defect-related component of the C1s level. Similar improvements were not observed when a lower substrate temperature (850 °C) was used. A close examination of the Raman spectra suggests that Ni reduces the concentration of lattice vacancies in the film, possibly by catalytically assisting adatom incorporation.

  1. High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inagaki, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm 2 /Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

  2. Growth of semiconductor alloy InGaPBi on InP by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K; Wang, P; Pan, W W; Wu, X Y; Yue, L; Gong, Q; Wang, S M

    2015-01-01

    We report the first successful growth of InGaPBi single crystals on InP substrate with Bi concentration far beyond the doping level by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The InGaPBi thin films reveal excellent surface and structural qualities, making it a promising new III–V compound family member for heterostructures. The strain can be tuned between tensile and compressive by adjusting Ga and Bi compositions. The maximum achieved Bi concentration is 2.2 ± 0.4% confirmed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Room temperature photoluminescence shows strong and broad light emission at energy levels much smaller than the InP bandgap. (paper)

  3. Si Incorporation in InP Nanowires Grown by Au-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Rigutti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the growth, structural characterization, and conductivity studies of Si-doped InP nanowires grown by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that Si doping reduces the mean diffusion length of adatoms on the lateral nanowire surface and consequently reduces the nanowire growth rate and promotes lateral growth. A resistivity as low as 5.1±0.3×10−5 Ω⋅cm is measured for highly doped nanowires. Two dopant incorporation mechanisms are discussed: incorporation via catalyst particle and direct incorporation on the nanowire sidewalls. The first mechanism is shown to be less efficient than the second one, resulting in inhomogeneous radial dopant distribution.

  4. CeCo5 thin films with perpendicular anisotropy grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Hildebrandt, E.; Major, M.; Komissinskiy, P.; Radulov, I.; Alff, L.

    2018-04-01

    Buffer-free, highly textured (0 0 1) oriented CeCo5 thin films showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were synthesized on (0 0 1) Al2O3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Ce exists in a mixture of Ce3+ and Ce4+ valence states as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The first anisotropy constant, K1, as measured by torque magnetometry was 0.82 MJ/m3 (8.2 ×106erg /cm3) . A maximum coercivity of 5.16 kOe with a negative temperature coefficient of -0.304%K-1 and a magnetization of 527.30 emu/cm3 was measured perpendicular to the film plane at 5 K. In addition, a large anisotropy of the magnetic moment of 15.5% was observed. These magnetic parameters make CeCo5 a potential candidate material for spintronic and magnetic recording applications.

  5. High efficiency thin film solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy (HEFTY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, N.B.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Ballard, I.M.; Zhang, J. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-04

    The project sought to show the UK as a world leader in the field of thin film crystalline solar cells. A premise was that the cell design be suitable for large-scale manufacturing and provide a basis for industrial exploitation. The study demonstrated (1) that silicon films grown at temperatures suitable for deposition on glass by Gas Phase Molecular Beam Epitaxy gives better PV cells than does Ultra Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition; (2) a conversion energy of 15 per cent was achieved - the project target was 18 per cent and (3) one of the highest reported conversion efficiencies for a 15 micrometre silicon film was achieved. The study was carried out by BP Solar Limited under contract to the DTI.

  6. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; Novák, Vít; Martí, X.; Cukr, Miroslav; Máca, František; Shick, Alexander; Mašek, Jan; Horodyská, P.; Němec, P.; Holý, V.; Zemek, Josef; Kužel, Petr; Němec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 3 (2011), , , "035321-1"-"035321-6" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08087 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet; European Commission(XE) 214499 - NAMASTE; European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : antiferromagnetic semiconductors * spintronics * molecular beam epitaxy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011

  7. Electrical characterization of ensemble of GaN nanowires grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K.

    2013-01-01

    High quality Schottky contacts are formed on GaN nanowires (NWs) structures grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique on Si(111) substrate. The current-voltage characteristics show the rectification ratio of about 10 3 and the leakage current of about 10 −4 A/cm 2 at room temperature. From the capacitance-voltage measurements the free carrier concentration in GaN NWs is determined as about 10 16 cm −3 . Two deep levels (H200 and E280) are found in the structures containing GaN NWs. H200 is attributed to an extended defect located at the interface between the substrate and SiN x or near the sidewalls at the bottom of the NWs whereas E280 is tentatively assigned to a gallium-vacancy- or nitrogen interstitials-related defect

  8. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  10. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of free-standing plane-parallel InAs nanoplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagesen, Martin; Johnson, Erik; Sørensen, Claus B.; Mariager, Simon O.; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Spiecker, Erdmann; Nygård, Jesper; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2007-12-01

    Free-standing nanostructures such as suspended carbon nanotubes, graphene layers, III-V nanorod photonic crystals and three-dimensional structures have recently attracted attention because they could form the basis of devices with unique electronic, optoelectronic and electromechanical characteristics. Here we report the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of free-standing nanoplates of InAs that are close to being atomically plane. The structural and transport properties of these semiconducting nanoplates have been examined with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and low-temperature electron transport measurements. The carrier density of the nanoplates can be reduced to zero by applying a voltage to a nearby gate electrode, creating a new type of suspended quantum well that can be used to explore low-dimensional electron transport. The electronic and optical properties of such systems also make them potentially attractive for photovoltaic and sensing applications.

  11. SIMS studies of CI- doped Zn Se epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gard, F.S.; Riley, J.D.; Lekey, R.; Usher, B.F.; Prine, K.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorine is one of the most used species to produce n-type zinc selenium epilayers. In this paper, we present secondary ion mass spectrometry profiles of a series of chlorine-doped zinc selenium samples, which were grown in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. These profiles have been used to examine the limitation of secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of narrow chlorine-delta layers. In order to covert secondary ion mass spectrometry raw data to quantified data, the depth profile from a chlorine-implanted standard sample has been used to estimate the u seful ion yield o f chlorine and thus the instrument sensitivity for chlorine in a zinc selenium matrix. The u seful ion yield a nd detection limit of chlorine in the zinc selenium host matrix were calculated to be 4.7 X 10 -17 atoms/ cm 3 , respectively

  12. Hydrogen reduction in GaAsN thin films by flow rate modulated chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Nishimura, K.; Suzuki, H.; Ohshita, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The amount of residual H in the GaAsN film grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) can be decreased by flow rate modulation growth. Many H atoms in the films grown by CBE exist as N-H or N-H 2 structures. Although a higher growth temperature was required for decreasing the H concentration ([H]), it caused a decrease in the N concentration ([N]). A reduction in [H] while keeping [N] constant was necessary. By providing an intermittent supply of Ga source while continuously supplying As and N sources, [H] effectively decreased in comparison with the [H] value in the film grown at the same temperature by conventional CBE without reducing [N

  13. Effect of diatomic islands on step morphological stability of a terrace edge in molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, S.; Chu, H.-S.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of two-dimensional diatomic-island nucleation on the linear stability of the step morphology during molecular beam epitaxy is investigated numerically via shooting methods. It is found that the effect of diatomic islands on the step morphological stability is significant. The greater the effects of diatomic islands, the more stable the step morphology. Increasing capture efficiency can decrease the critical surface capillary length and shift the critical wave number toward short-wavelength regimes. The unstable region is shrunk with increasing capture efficiency. Further, increasing flux coverage and/or surface coverage can decrease the critical surface capillary length and shift the critical wave number toward short-wavelength regimes. (orig.)

  14. Photoluminescence characteristics of Pb-doped, molecular-beam-epitaxy grown ZnSe crystal layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Yoh; Kuronuma, Ryoichi; Inoue, Masanori; Sasaki, Shoichiro; Miyamoto, Yoshinobu

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic green photoluminescence emission and related phenomena in Pb-doped, molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE)-grown ZnSe crystal layers were investigated to explore the nature of the center responsible for the green emission. The intensity of the green emission showed a distinct nonlinear dependence on excitation intensity. Pb-diffused polycrystalline ZnSe was similarly examined for comparison. The characteristic green emission has been observed only in MBE-grown ZnSe crystal layers with moderate Pb doping. The results of the investigations on the growth conditions, luminescence, and related properties of the ZnSe crystal layers suggest that the green emission is due to isolated Pb replacing Zn and surrounded with regular ZnSe lattice with a high perfection

  15. Preparation of epitaxial yttrium-iron garnet micropatterns using metal-organic decomposition with electron-beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kenji; Manago, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    We have succeeded in obtaining epitaxial yttrium-iron garnet (YIG) micropatterns on a gadolinium-gallium garnet (GGG) substrate by a metal-organic decomposition method with electron-beam (EB) irradiation. We have demonstrated that metal-octylates of Y and Fe showed negative exposure behavior for EB irradiation. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that the YIG micropatterns were epitaxially well grown on a GGG(111) substrate. The magnetization curve of the YIG micropatterns showed a clear hysteresis loop and the saturation magnetization was estimated to be approximately 100 emu/cm3, which is consistent with that of bulk YIG.

  16. Combinatorial screening of halide perovskite thin films and solar cells by mask-defined IR laser molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yuji; Annayev, Orazmuhammet; Toyokura, Nobuo; Takahashi, Ryota; Lippmaa, Mikk; Itaka, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Matsuki, Nobuyuki; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract As an extension of combinatorial molecular layer epitaxy via ablation of perovskite oxides by a pulsed excimer laser, we have developed a laser molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system for parallel integration of nano-scaled thin films of organic?inorganic hybrid materials. A pulsed infrared (IR) semiconductor laser was adopted for thermal evaporation of organic halide (A-site: CH3NH3I) and inorganic halide (B-site: PbI2) powder targets to deposit repeated A/B bilayer films where the thic...

  17. The preparation of Zn-ferrite epitaxial thin film from epitaxial Fe3O4:ZnO multilayers by ion beam sputtering deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Hui-Chia; Dai, Jeng-Yi; Liao, Yen-Fa; Wu, Yu-Han; Huang, J.C.A.; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2010-01-01

    A new method to grow a well-ordered epitaxial ZnFe 2 O 4 thin film on Al 2 O 3 (0001) substrate is described in this work. The samples were made by annealing the ZnO/Fe 3 O 4 multilayer which was grown with low energy ion beam sputtering deposition. Both the Fe 3 O 4 and ZnO layers were found grown epitaxially at low temperature and an epitaxial ZnFe 2 O 4 thin film was formed after annealing at 1000 o C. X-ray diffraction shows the ZnFe 2 O 4 film is grown with an orientation of ZnFe 2 O 4 (111)//Al 2 O 3 (0001) and ZnFe 2 O 4 (1-10)//Al 2 O 3 (11-20). X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies show that Zn 2+ atoms replace the tetrahedral Fe 2+ atoms in Fe 3 O 4 during the annealing. The magnetic properties measured by vibrating sample magnetometer show that the saturation magnetization of ZnFe 2 O 4 grown from ZnO/Fe 3 O 4 multilayer reaches the bulk value after the annealing process.

  18. Growth of defect-free GaAsSbN axial nanowires via self-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manish; Deshmukh, Prithviraj; Kasanaboina, Pavan; Reynolds, C. Lewis, Jr.; Liu, Yang; Iyer, Shanthi

    2017-12-01

    Bandgap reduction of 10% by incorporation of a dilute amount of N is reported for the first time, in axial GaAsSb nanowires (NWs) grown on Si (111) via Ga-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Impact of N incorporation on the surface morphology, NW growth kinetics, and their structural and optical properties were examined. Dilute nitride NWs with Sb composition of 7 at% did not exhibit any noticeable planar defects, as revealed by the absence of satellite twin peaks in the selected-area diffraction pattern and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. Point defects were also minimal in as-grown dilute nitride NWs, as ascertained from the comparison of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra as well as the shape and shift of Raman modes, with in situ annealed NWs in different ambients. Evidence of enhanced incorporation of N was found in the NWs in situ annealed in N ambient, but with deteriorated optical quality due to simultaneous creation of N-induced defects. The lack of any noticeable defects in the as-grown GaAsSbN NWs demonstrates the advantage of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism responsible for growth of axial configuration over the vapor-solid growth mechanism for core-shell NWs as well as their thin film counterpart, which commonly exhibit N-induced point defects.

  19. Germanium growth on electron beam lithography patterned Si3N4/Si(001) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subhendu Sinha; Katiyar, Ajit K.; Sarkar, Arijit; Dhar, Achintya; Rudra, Arun; Khatri, Ravinder K.; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2018-04-01

    It is important to investigate the growth dynamics of Ge adatoms under different surface stress regimes of the patterned dielectric to control the selective growth of self-assembled Ge nanostructures on silicon. In the present work, we have studied the growth of Ge by molecular beam epitaxy on nanometer scale patterned Si3N4/Si(001) substrates generated using electron beam lithography. The pitch of the patterns has been varied to investigate its effect on the growth of Ge in comparison to un-patterned Si3N4. For the patterned Si3N4 film, Ge did not desorbed completely from the Si3N4 film and hence no site selective growth pattern is observed. Instead, depending upon the pitch, Ge growth has occurred in different growth modes around the openings in the Si3N4. For the un-patterned substrate, the morphology exhibits the occurrence of uniform 3D clustering of Ge adatoms on Si3N4 film. This variation in the growth modes of Ge is attributed to the variation of residual stress in the Si3N4 film for different pitch of holes, which has been confirmed theoretically through Comsol Multiphysics simulation. The variation in stress for different pitches resulted in modulation of surface energy of the Si3N4 film leading to the different growth modes of Ge.

  20. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  1. Development of III-nitride semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy and cluster beam epitaxy and fabrication of LEDs based on indium gallium nitride MQWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Chou Papo

    The family of III-Nitrides (the binaries InN, GaN, AIN, and their alloys) is one of the most important classes of semiconductor materials. Of the three, Indium Nitride (InN) and Aluminum Nitride (AIN) have been investigated much less than Gallium Nitride (GaN). However, both of these materials are important for optoelectronic infrared and ultraviolet devices. In particular, since InN was found recently to be a narrow gap semiconductor (Eg=0.7eV), its development should extend the applications of nitride semiconductors to the spectral region appropriate to fiber optics communication and photovoltaic applications. Similarly, the development of AIN should lead to deep UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). The first part of this work addresses the evaluation of structural, optical and transport properties of InN films grown by two different deposition methods. In one method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of nitrogen radicals by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted source. In an alternative method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of clusters containing approximately 2000 nitrogen molecules. These clusters were produced by adiabatic expansion from high stagnation pressure through a narrow nozzle into vacuum. The clusters were singly or doubly ionized with positive charge by electron impact and accelerated up to approximately 20 to 25 KV prior to their disintegration on the substrate. Due to the high local temperature produced during the impact of clusters with the substrate, this method is suitable for the deposition of InN at very low temperatures. The films are auto-doped n-type with carrier concentrations varying from 3 x 1018 to 1020 cm-3 and the electron effective mass of these films was determined to be 0.09m0. The majority of the AIN films was grown by the cluster beam epitaxy method and was doped n- and p- type by incorporating silicon (Si) and magnesium (Mg) during the film deposition. All films were grown under Al-rich conditions at relatively

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of CdSe epilayers and quantum wells on ZnTe substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.M.; Andre, R.; Kasprzak, J.; Dang, Le Si; Bellet-Amalric, E.

    2007-01-01

    We have grown zinc-blende cadmium selenide (CdSe) epilayers on ZnTe-(0 0 1) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). By controlling the substrate temperature and beam-equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio, of Se to Cd, we determined the most suitable growth condition based on reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pattern. At a substrate temperature of 280 deg. C and a BEP ratio of 3.6, the RHEED pattern showed a V-like feature, indicating a rough surface with facets. As the substrate temperature was increased to 360 deg. C at the same BEP ratio, a V-like RHEED pattern moved to a clear streaky pattern. Moreover when the BEP ratio was increased to 4.8 at 360 deg. C of substrate temperature, a clear (2 x 1) reconstruction of the CdSe layer was observed. A CdSe/CdMgSe single quantum well structure was also grown on ZnTe-(0 0 1) substrate by MBE. The RHEED pattern showed a clear (2 x 1) surface reconstruction during the growth. By photoluminescence measurement, a good optical property of the structure was obtained

  3. Strain-induced properties of epitaxial VOx thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rata, AD; Hibma, T

    We have grown VOx thin films on different substrates in order to investigate the influence of epitaxial strain on the transport properties. We found that the electric conductivity is much larger for films grown under compressive strain on SrTiO3 substrates, as compared to bulk material and VOx films

  4. Molecular beam epitaxy of GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials studied by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayduk, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The integration of phase change materials into semiconductor heterostructures may lead to the development of a new generation of high density non-volatile phase change memories. Epitaxial phase change materials allow to study the detailed structural changes during the phase transition and to determine the scaling limits of the memory. This work is dedicated to the epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te phase change alloys on GaSb(001). We deposit Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films on GaSb(001) substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The film orientation and lattice constant evolution is determined in real time during growth using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The nucleation stage of the growth is studied in situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Four growth regimes of GST on GaSb(001) were observed: amorphous, polycrystalline, incubated epitaxial and direct epitaxial. Amorphous film grows for substrate temperatures below 100 C. For substrate temperatures in the range 100-160 C, the film grows in polycrystalline form. Incubated epitaxial growth is observed at temperatures from 180 to 210 C. This growth regime is characterized by an initial 0.6nm thick amorphous layer formation, which crystallizes epitaxially as the film thickness increases. The determined lattice constant of the films is 6.01 A, very close to that of the metastable GST phase. The films predominantly possess an epitaxial cube-on-cube relationship. At higher temperatures the films grow epitaxially, however the growth rate is rapidly decreasing with temperature. At temperatures above 270 C the growth rate is zero. The composition of the grown films is close to 2:2:5 for Ge, Sb and Te, respectively. The determined crystal structure of the films is face centered cubic (FCC) with a rhombohedral distortion. The analysis of X-ray peak widths gives a value for the rhombohedral angle of 89.56 . We observe two types of reflections in reciprocal space indicating two FCC sublattices in

  5. Catalyst-free III-nitride Nanowires by Plasma-assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Growth, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Santino D.

    In the past twenty years, III-nitride devices have had an enormous impact on semiconductor-based technologies. This impact is seen in both optoelectronic and electronic devices. The aim of this dissertation is to take advantage of III-nitride nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form heterostructures that are difficult or impossible to achieve in traditional, thin films. To do this, it is first necessary to establish the growth phase diagrams that correlate the characteristics of GaN nanowires to MBE growth conditions. By using the information in these growth maps we can control growth kinetics and the resulting nanowire structures by making strategic, timely changes to growth conditions. Using this control electronic and optoelectronic III-nitride nanowire devices are created. First, coaxially-oriented AlN/GaN nanowire resonant tunneling diodes are formed on Si substrates. Second, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are fabricated that exhibit electroluminescence at wavelengths from the deep UV into the visible. Because these PINLEDs utilize polarization doping, they can be formed with and without the use of dopants. Device and structural characterization are provided, including a detailed investigation of the mixed material polarity in these nanowires. Finally, the dissertation closes with a discussion of recent work and future ideas for optimizing the PINLED design.

  6. Electric-field effects on magnetic properties of molecular beam epitaxially grown thin (Ga,Mn)Sb layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H. W.; Akita, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-09-01

    We report molecular beam epitaxy of a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)Sb, which is a single crystal without detectable second phases. We report also the details of magnetotransport properties of (Ga,Mn)Sb and the effects of electric fields on them. The difference between the properties observed here and properties of those reported earlier for a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As, provides information critical for further understanding of fundamental and device physics of ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  7. Cu-doped AlN: A possible spinaligner at room-temperature grown by molecular beam epitaxy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, P. R.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Cu-doped AlN was prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on C-plane sapphire substrates. The growth conditions were investigated for different Cu to Al flux ratios from 1.0% to 4.0%. The formation of Cu-Al alloys on the surface was observed for all doping level. In contrast to Cu-doped GaN, all samples showed diamagnetic behavior determined by SQUID measurements.

  8. Optical effects induced by epitaxial tension in lead titanate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Chvostová, Dagmar; Pacherová, Oliva; Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav; Tyunina, Marina

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 3 (2018), s. 1-5, č. článku 031111. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13778S; GA ČR GA15-15123S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : epitaxy * inorganic compounds * optical properties * ferroelectric materials * optical metrology Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics , supercond.) Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  9. Optical investigations of Be doped ZnO films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingming, E-mail: andychain@live.cn [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Zhu, Yuan, E-mail: zhuy9@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, Anqi; Shen, Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Tang, Zikang, E-mail: phzktang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); The Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macau (China)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The optical properties of Be doped ZnO films were investigated. • Low temperature photoluminescence spectrum was dominated by D°X and DAP emissions. • Shallow acceptor state with ionization energy of 116 meV was found in ZnO:Be films. • It is suggested that the incorporated Be atom might favor formation of Zn vacancies defects. • This work demonstrates that N doping BeZnO might be suitable for fabricating reliable p-type ZnO materials. - Abstract: In this article, the optical properties of ZnO:Be films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated by the excitation density-dependent and temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements. The low temperature photoluminescence spectra showed a dominant excitons bound to neutral donors (D°X) emission centered at 3.3540 eV and strong donor-acceptor pair (DAP) transitions at 3.3000 eV. In addition, it showed that the intensity ratio of the DAP and D°X peaks changed with background electron concentration. Furthermore, a shallow acceptor state with ionization energy of 116 meV was found and attributed to Zn vacancy. The present study further suggests that Be and N codoping ZnO might be suitable for fabricating reliable p-type ZnO materials.

  10. Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

  11. Surface optical phonons in GaAs nanowires grown by Ga-assisted chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Núñez, C., E-mail: carlos.garcia@uam.es; Braña, A. F.; Pau, J. L.; Ghita, D.; García, B. J. [Grupo de Electrónica y Semiconductores, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Shen, G.; Wilbert, D. S.; Kim, S. M.; Kung, P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Surface optical (SO) phonons were studied by Raman spectroscopy in GaAs nanowires (NWs) grown by Ga-assisted chemical beam epitaxy on oxidized Si(111) substrates. NW diameters and lengths ranging between 40 and 65 nm and between 0.3 and 1.3 μm, respectively, were observed under different growth conditions. The analysis of the Raman peak shape associated to either longitudinal or surface optical modes gave important information about the crystal quality of grown NWs. Phonon confinement model was used to calculate the density of defects as a function of the NW diameter resulting in values between 0.02 and 0.03 defects/nm, indicating the high uniformity obtained on NWs cross section size during growth. SO mode shows frequency downshifting as NW diameter decreases, this shift being sensitive to NW sidewall oxidation. The wavevector necessary to activate SO phonon was used to estimate the NW facet roughness responsible for SO shift.

  12. Temperature conditions for GaAs nanowire formation by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchernycheva, M; Harmand, J C; Patriarche, G; Travers, L; Cirlin, G E

    2006-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires using Au particles as a catalyst was investigated. Prior to the growth during annealing, Au alloyed with Ga coming from the GaAs substrate, and melted. Phase transitions of the resulting particles were observed in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The temperature domain in which GaAs nanowire growth is possible was determined. The lower limit of this domain (320 deg. C) is close to the observed catalyst solidification temperature. Below this temperature, the catalyst is buried by GaAs growth. Above the higher limit (620 deg. C), the catalyst segregates on the surface with no significant nanowire formation. Inside this domain, the influence of growth temperature on the nanowire morphology and crystalline structure was investigated in detail by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The correlation of the nanowire morphology with the RHEED patterns observed during the growth was established. Wurtzite GaAs was found to be the dominant crystal structure of the wires

  13. Growth of layered superconductor β-PdBi{sub 2} films using molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, N.V., E-mail: denisov@iacp.dvo.ru [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Matetskiy, A.V.; Tupkalo, A.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Zotov, A.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 690950 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Department of Electronics, Vladivostok State University of Economics and Service, 690600 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Saranin, A.A. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 690950 Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Bulk β-PdBi{sub 2} is layered material with advanced properties of topological superconductor. • We present a method for growing β-PdBi{sub 2} films of a desired thickness. • Method utilizes MBE growth of β-PdBi{sub 2}, using Bi(111) film on Si(111) as a template. • Electronic and superconducting properties of the films are similar to those of bulk β-PdBi{sub 2}. - Abstract: Bulk β-PdBi{sub 2} layered material exhibits advanced properties and is supposed to be probable topological superconductor. We present a method based on molecular beam epitaxy that allows us to grow β-PdBi{sub 2} films from a single β-PdBi{sub 2} triple layer up to the dozens of triple layers, using Bi(111) film on Si(111) as a template. The grown films demonstrate structural, electronic and superconducting properties similar to those of bulk β-PdBi{sub 2} crystals. Ability to grow the β-PdBi{sub 2} films of desired thickness opens the promising possibilities to explore fascinating properties of this advanced material.

  14. Mapping growth windows in quaternary perovskite oxide systems by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahlek, Matthew; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Lapano, Jason; Engel-Herbert, Roman, E-mail: rue2@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States); Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-09-05

    Requisite to growing stoichiometric perovskite thin films of the solid-solution A′{sub 1-x}A{sub x}BO{sub 3} by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy is understanding how the growth conditions interpolate between the end members A'BO{sub 3} and ABO{sub 3}, which can be grown in a self-regulated fashion, but under different conditions. Using the example of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}VO{sub 3}, the two-dimensional growth parameter space that is spanned by the flux of the metal-organic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide and composition, x, was mapped out. The evolution of the adsorption-controlled growth window was obtained using a combination of X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It is found that the stoichiometric growth conditions can be mapped out quickly with a single calibration sample using RHEED. Once stoichiometric conditions have been identified, the out-of-plane lattice parameter can be utilized to precisely determine the composition x. This strategy enables the identification of growth conditions that allow the deposition of stoichiometric perovskite oxide films with random A-site cation mixing, which is relevant to a large number of perovskite materials with interesting properties, e.g., high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance, that emerge in solid solution A′{sub 1-x}A{sub x}BO{sub 3}.

  15. Dynamic grazing incidence fast atom diffraction during molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, P.; Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Khemliche, H.; Debiossac, M.; Mulier, M.; Lalmi, B.; Roncin, P.; Momeni, A.

    2014-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction (GIFAD) system has been mounted on a commercial molecular beam epitaxy chamber and used to monitor GaAs growth in real-time. In contrast to the conventionally used Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction, all the GIFAD diffraction orders oscillate in phase, with the change in intensity related to diffuse scattering at step edges. We show that the scattered intensity integrated over the Laue circle is a robust method to monitor the periodic change in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth, with oscillation phase and amplitude independent of incidence angle and crystal orientation. When there is a change in surface reconstruction at the start of growth, GIFAD intensity oscillations show that there is a corresponding delay in the onset of layer-by-layer growth. In addition, changes in the relative intensity of different diffraction orders have been observed during growth showing that GIFAD has the potential to provide insight into the preferential adatom attachment sites on the surface reconstruction during growth.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene and ridge-structure networks of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Fumihiko; Hibino, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    By gas-source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using cracked ethanol, we grew graphene at substrate temperatures between 600 and 915 °C on graphene formed on SiC(0 0 0 1) by thermal decomposition. To investigate the substrate temperature dependence of graphene growth we analysed the MBE-grown graphene by Raman spectroscopy and in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and observed it by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analyses using the G-band peak and the peak intensity ratio between D- and G-band peaks in the Raman spectra revealed that growth at higher temperatures improved the crystallinity and increased the domain size. Although the growth rate decreased at higher temperatures, as revealed by XPS, these results indicated that growth at a higher temperature is effective in obtaining graphene of higher quality. Furthermore, the AFM and TEM observations revealed a network of fin-like ridge structures of graphene sticking out from the surface. The presence of these 'graphene nanofins' indicated that two-dimensional islands of graphene are surrounded by the nanofins, and the island size was estimated to be 67 nm using the average distance between the nanofins.

  17. Electrical properties of GaAsN film grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.; Suzuki, H.; Saito, K.; Ohshita, Y.; Kojima, N.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The local vibrational modes (LVMs) observed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in GaAsN films grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) was studied, and the influence of the nitrogen-hydrogen bond (N-H) concentration on the hole concentration was investigated. The absorption peak around 936 cm -1 is suggested to be the second harmonic mode of the substitutional N, N As , LVM around 469 cm -1 . The absorption peak around 960 cm -1 is suggested to be the wagging mode of the N-H, where the stretch mode is observed around 3098 cm -1 . The hole concentration linearly increases with increasing N-H concentration, and the slope increases with increasing growth temperature. It indicates that the hole concentration in GaAsN film is determined by both the number of the N-H and unknown defect, such as impurities, vacancies, and interstitials. This defect concentration increases with increasing growth temperature, suggesting that it is determined by Arrhenius type reaction

  18. Thin film growth of CaFe2As2 by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, T; Fujimoto, R; Nakamura, I; Mori, Y; Ikuta, H; Kawaguchi, T; Harada, S; Ujihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Film growth of CaFe 2 As 2 was realized by molecular beam epitaxy on six different substrates that have a wide variation in the lattice mismatch to the target compound. By carefully adjusting the Ca-to-Fe flux ratio, we obtained single-phase thin films for most of the substrates. Interestingly, an expansion of the CaFe 2 As 2 lattice to the out-of-plane direction was observed for all films, even when an opposite strain was expected. A detailed microstructure observation of the thin film grown on MgO by transmission electron microscope revealed that it consists of cube-on-cube and 45°-rotated domains. The latter domains were compressively strained in plane, which caused a stretching along the c-axis direction. Because the domains were well connected across the boundary with no appreciable discontinuity, we think that the out-of-plane expansion in the 45°-rotated domains exerted a tensile stress on the other domains, resulting in the unexpectedly large c-axis lattice parameter, despite the apparently opposite lattice mismatch. (paper)

  19. MBE growth of nitride-arsenide materials for long wavelength optoelectronics[Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruytte, S.G.; Coldren, C.W.; Marshall, A.F.; Larson, M.C.; Harris, J.S.

    2000-07-01

    Group III-Nitride-Arsenides are promising materials for 1.3{micro}m and 1.55{micro}m telecommunications optoelectronic devices grown on GaAs substrates. Nitride-Arsenide materials were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a radio frequency (rf) nitrogen plasma. The plasma conditions that maximize the amount of atomic nitrogen versus molecular nitrogen were determined using the emission spectrum of the plasma. Under constant plasma source conditions and varying group III flux, the nitrogen concentration in the film is inversely proportional to the group III flux (i.e., the nitrogen sticking coefficient is unity). The relationship between nitrogen concentration in the film and lattice parameter of the film is not linear for nitrogen concentrations above 2.9 mole % GaN, indicating that some nitrogen is incorporated on other locations than the group V lattice sites. For films with these higher nitrogen concentrations, XPS indicates that the nitrogen exists in two configurations: a Gallium-Nitrogen bond and another type of nitrogen complex in which nitrogen is less strongly bonded to Gallium atoms. Annealing removes this nitrogen complex and allows some of the nitrogen to diffuse out of the film. Annealing also improves the crystal quality of GaAsN quantum wells.

  20. An atomic carbon source for high temperature molecular beam epitaxy of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albar, J D; Summerfield, A; Cheng, T S; Davies, A; Smith, E F; Khlobystov, A N; Mellor, C J; Taniguchi, T; Watanabe, K; Foxon, C T; Eaves, L; Beton, P H; Novikov, S V

    2017-07-26

    We report the use of a novel atomic carbon source for the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of graphene layers on hBN flakes and on sapphire wafers at substrate growth temperatures of ~1400 °C. The source produces a flux of predominantly atomic carbon, which diffuses through the walls of a Joule-heated tantalum tube filled with graphite powder. We demonstrate deposition of carbon on sapphire with carbon deposition rates up to 12 nm/h. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the formation of hexagonal moiré patterns when graphene monolayers are grown on hBN flakes. The Raman spectra of the graphene layers grown on hBN and sapphire with the sublimation carbon source and the atomic carbon source are similar, whilst the nature of the carbon aggregates is different - graphitic with the sublimation carbon source and amorphous with the atomic carbon source. At MBE growth temperatures we observe etching of the sapphire wafer surface by the flux from the atomic carbon source, which we have not observed in the MBE growth of graphene with the sublimation carbon source.

  1. Growth of N-polar GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, M. N.; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.

    2018-01-01

    The homoepitaxial growth of N-polar GaN was investigated by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy. Systematic growth studies varying the V/III flux ratio and the growth temperature indicated that the strongest factor in realizing morphologically smooth films was the growth temperature; N-face films needed to be grown approximately 100 °C or greater than Ga-face films provided the same metal flux. Smooth N-face films could also be grown at temperatures only 50 °C greater than Ga-face films, albeit under reduced metal flux. Too high a growth temperature and too low a metal flux resulted in dislocation mediated pitting of the surface. The unintentional impurity incorporation of such films was also studied by secondary mass ion spectroscopy and most importantly revealed an oxygen content in the mid 1017 to the mid 1018 cm-3 range. Hall measurements confirmed that this oxygen impurity resulted in n-type films, with carrier concentrations and mobilities comparable to those of intentionally silicon doped GaN.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of N-polar InGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Digbijoy N.; Ringel, Steven A.; Rajan, Siddharth; Guer, Emre

    2010-01-01

    We report on the growth of N-polar In x Ga 1-x N by N 2 plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Ga-polar and N-polar InGaN films were grown at different growth temperatures and the composition was estimated by photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A growth model that incorporates the incoming and desorbing atomic fluxes is proposed to explain the compositional dependence of InGaN on the flux of incoming atomic species and growth temperature. The growth model is found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The peak PL intensity for N-face samples is found to exhibit a two order of magnitude increase for a 100 deg. C increase in growth temperature. Besides, at 600 nm, the N-face sample shows more than 100 times higher PL intensity than Ga-face sample at comparable wavelengths indicating its superior optical quality. The understanding of growth kinetics of InGaN presented here will guide the growth of N-polar InGaN in a wide range of growth temperatures.

  3. Features of molecular-beam epitaxy and structural properties of AlInSb-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, A. N., E-mail: semenov@beam.ioffe.ru; Meltser, B. Ya.; Solov' ev, V. A.; Komissarova, T. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Kirylenko, D. A.; Nadtochyi, A. M.; Popova, T. V.; Kop' ev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15

    AlInSb layers are grown on highly lattice-mismatched GaAs (100) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) and studied in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). It is shown that one feature of AlInSb/GaAs heterostructure features is a high probability of forming microtwins; methods for decreasing their concentration are proposed. To initiate AlInSb growth on GaAs substrates under high lattice-mismatch ({approx}14.5%) conditions and to stimulate the transition to 2D growth, the GaAs layer surface was preliminarily exposed to an antimony flux followed by deposition of an intermediate AlSb buffer layer. The optimization of initial MBE growth stages of Sb-containing layers on the GaAs surface allows a decrease in the defect density in the GaAs/AlInSb heterostructures more than by two orders of magnitude, including a drastic decrease in the microtwin density. Optimal MBE growth conditions for Al{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}Sb are determined in a wide composition range (0 < x < 0.3). The TEM and SEM studies confirm the high structural quality of grown GaAs/AlInSb heterostructures. Hall-effect measurements showed the dependence of the carrier mobility and concentration on the aluminum content in AlInSb layers and allowed preliminary conclusions on scattering mechanisms.

  4. Size dependent bandgap of molecular beam epitaxy grown InN quantum dots measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Mahesh; Roul, Basanta; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Kalghatgi, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    InN quantum dots (QDs) were grown on Si (111) by epitaxial Stranski-Krastanow growth mode using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Single-crystalline wurtzite structure of InN QDs was verified by the x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to probe the structural aspects of QDs. A surface bandgap of InN QDs was estimated from scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) I-V curves and found that it is strongly dependent on the size of QDs. The observed size-dependent STS bandgap energy shifts with diameter and height were theoretical explained based on an effective mass approximation with finite-depth square-well potential model.

  5. Adsorption-controlled growth of La-doped BaSnO3 by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hanjong; Chen, Zhen; Lochocki, Edward; Seidner H., Ariel; Verma, Amit; Tanen, Nicholas; Park, Jisung; Uchida, Masaki; Shang, ShunLi; Zhou, Bi-Cheng; Brützam, Mario; Uecker, Reinhard; Liu, Zi-Kui; Jena, Debdeep; Shen, Kyle M.; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2017-11-01

    Epitaxial La-doped BaSnO3 films were grown in an adsorption-controlled regime by molecular-beam epitaxy, where the excess volatile SnOx desorbs from the film surface. A film grown on a (001) DyScO3 substrate exhibited a mobility of 183 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature and 400 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 10 K despite the high concentration (1.2 × 1011 cm-2) of threading dislocations present. In comparison to other reports, we observe a much lower concentration of (BaO)2 Ruddlesden-Popper crystallographic shear faults. This suggests that in addition to threading dislocations, other defects—possibly (BaO)2 crystallographic shear defects or point defects—significantly reduce the electron mobility.

  6. Growth of InN on 6H-SiC by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, April S.; Kim, Tong-Ho; Choi, Soojeong; Wu, Pae; Morse, Michael [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, 128 Hudson Hall, Durham, NC (United States); Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Moto, Akihiro [Innovation Core SEI, Inc., 3235 Kifer Road, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    We have investigated the growth of InN films by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on the Si-face of 6H-SiC(0001). Growth is performed under In-rich conditions using a two-step process consisting of the deposition of a thin, low-temperature 350 C InN buffer layer, followed by the subsequent deposition of the InN epitaxial layer at 450 C. The effect of buffer annealing is investigated. The structural and optical evolution of the growing layer has been monitored in real time using RHEED and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Structural, morphological, electrical and optic properties are discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Adsorption-controlled growth of La-doped BaSnO3 by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjong Paik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial La-doped BaSnO3 films were grown in an adsorption-controlled regime by molecular-beam epitaxy, where the excess volatile SnOx desorbs from the film surface. A film grown on a (001 DyScO3 substrate exhibited a mobility of 183 cm2 V−1 s−1 at room temperature and 400 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 10 K despite the high concentration (1.2 × 1011 cm−2 of threading dislocations present. In comparison to other reports, we observe a much lower concentration of (BaO2 Ruddlesden-Popper crystallographic shear faults. This suggests that in addition to threading dislocations, other defects—possibly (BaO2 crystallographic shear defects or point defects—significantly reduce the electron mobility.

  8. Growth, luminescence and magnetic properties of GaN:Er semiconductor thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, K.; Wu, J.; Huhtinen, H.; Jadwisienczak, W. M.; Palai, R.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the growth, surface, luminescence and magnetic properties of 180 nm thick Er-doped GaN thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on c-sapphire substrates with no buffer layer and with different Er concentrations. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns revealed crystalline and uniform growth of the films. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed c-axis-oriented growth. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed enhancement of surface morphology and smoothness with increasing Er doping, which could be due to minimization of surface defects because of the gettering effect of the rare earth. Scanning area-dependent surface morphology analysis showed a power law dependence indicating the fractal nature of the surface, which is confirmed by the observation of a non-integer D (fractal dimension) value. X-ray photoluminescence spectroscopy (XPS) revealed the formation of a GaN:Er phase and ruled out the presence of Ga and Er metallic and native oxide phases. The semi-quantitative elemental composition of the films was determined using N 1s, Ga 2p3/2 and Er 4d photoemission lines. The Er concentration was estimated from the x-ray photoelectron spectra and found to be between 3.0 and 9.0 at.% (˜1021 atoms cm-3). Photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) studies showed visible emission and concentration quenching of Er3+ ions in agreement with reported results. Excitation of the Er3+ ion might be affected by charge trapping due to Er-doping-induced defect complexes. The magnetic measurements carried out by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) showed a ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition at low temperature, contrary to the reported room temperature ferromagnetism in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN:Er thick films of 550 nm.

  9. Critical issues for homoepitaxial GaN growth by molecular beam epitaxy on hydride vapor-phase epitaxy-grown GaN substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, D. F.; Hardy, M. T.; Katzer, D. S.; Nepal, N.; Downey, B. P.; Meyer, D. J.; McConkie, Thomas O.; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.

    2016-12-01

    While the heteroepitaxial growth of gallium nitride-based materials and devices on substrates such as SiC, sapphire, and Si has been well-documented, the lack of a cost-effective source of bulk GaN crystals has hindered similar progress on homoepitaxy. Nevertheless, freestanding GaN wafers are becoming more widely available, and there is great interest in growing GaN films and devices on bulk GaN substrates, in order to take advantage of the greatly reduced density of threading dislocations, particularly for vertical devices. However, homoepitaxial GaN growth is far from a trivial task due to the reactivity and different chemical sensitivities of N-polar (0001) and Ga-polar (0001) GaN surfaces, which can affect the microstructure and concentrations of impurities in homoepitaxial GaN layers. In order to achieve high quality, high purity homoepitaxial GaN, it is necessary to investigate the effect of the ex situ wet chemical clean, the use of in situ cleaning procedures, the sensitivity of the GaN surface to thermal decomposition, and the effect of growth temperature. We review the current understanding of these issues with a focus on homoepitaxial growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on c-plane surfaces of freestanding GaN substrates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), as HVPE-grown substrates are most widely available. We demonstrate methods for obtaining homoepitaxial GaN layers by plasma-assisted MBE in which no additional threading dislocations are generated from the regrowth interface and impurity concentrations are greatly reduced.

  10. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Irvine Materials Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2800 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5–6 nm)/G (26–27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ∼2.5–3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  11. Characterization using ion beam analysis of In(Ga)As quantum dots grown by epitaxy on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloux-Gervais, D.

    2012-01-01

    The integration on silicon of direct band gap materials such as some semiconductors from the III-V group is of a rising interest for tomorrow's optoelectronic devices. Although silicon is the raw material for many microelectronic devices, it has a poor light emitting efficiency due to his indirect band gap. Among the III-V family, the In(Ga)As compounds present the advantage of a smaller band gap than silicon, which encourage the confinement of electron-hole pairs. However, the large lattice mismatch between silicon and In(Ga)As is a serious limitation for the epitaxial integration. This PhD work has been focused on the ion beam study of In(Ga)As quantum dots (QDs) grown by epitaxy on silicon and of the QD capping by silicon. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) has been used to quantify composition of both QDs and cap layer. Exo-diffusion and excess issues of some elements have been pointed out. The epitaxial relation between QDs and substrate have been investigated by ion channelling (RBS-C). Medium Energy Ion Scattering (MEIS) has also been used to obtain high resolution profiles of composition, defects and strain for both the QD plane and the capping layer. Direct space mapping of both crystals has also been achieved by MEIS thanks to the blocking effect. (author)

  12. Inhomogeneous Si-doping of gold-seeded InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, Chloe; Coinon, Christophe; Wallart, Xavier; Leturcq, Renaud [Institute of Electronics Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, UMR CNRS 8520, ISEN Department, Avenue Poincare, CS60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Caroff, Philippe [Institute of Electronics Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, UMR CNRS 8520, ISEN Department, Avenue Poincare, CS60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-06-03

    We have investigated in situ Si doping of InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy from gold seeds. The effectiveness of n-type doping is confirmed by electrical measurements showing an increase of the electron density with the Si flux. We also observe an increase of the electron density along the nanowires from the tip to the base, attributed to the dopant incorporation on the nanowire facets whereas no detectable incorporation occurs through the seed. Furthermore, the Si incorporation strongly influences the lateral growth of the nanowires without giving rise to significant tapering, revealing the complex interplay between axial and lateral growth.

  13. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations

  14. Improving stability of photoluminescence of ZnSe thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy by incorporating Cl dopant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J. S.; Shen, J. L.; Chen, W. J.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, C. S.; Chen, R. H.; Tsai, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation studies the effect of chlorine (Cl) dopant in ZnSe thin films that were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on their photoluminescence (PL) and the stability thereof. Free excitonic emission was observed at room-temperature in the Cl-doped sample. Photon irradiation with a wavelength of 404 nm and a power density of 9.1 W/cm 2 has a much stronger effect on PL degradation than does thermal heating to a temperature of 150 deg. C. Additionally, this study shows that the generation of nonradiative centers by both photon irradiation and thermal heating can be greatly inhibited by incorporating Cl dopant.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of Al-rich AlGaN nanowires for deep ultraviolet optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-organized AlGaN nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy have attracted significant attention for deep ultraviolet optoelectronics. However, due to the strong compositional modulations under conventional nitrogen rich growth conditions, emission wavelengths less than 250 nm have remained inaccessible. Here we show that Al-rich AlGaN nanowires with much improved compositional uniformity can be achieved in a new growth paradigm, wherein a precise control on the optical bandgap of ternary AlGaN nanowires can be achieved by varying the substrate temperature. AlGaN nanowire LEDs, with emission wavelengths spanning from 236 to 280 nm, are also demonstrated.

  16. Enhanced growth of highly lattice-mismatched CdSe on GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jyh-Shyang; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Hsiao-Hua; Ke, Han-Xiang; Tong, Shih-Chang; Yang, Chu-Shou; Wu, Chih-Hung; Shen, Ji-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the improvement of the molecular beam epitaxial growth of zinc-blende CdSe on (0 0 1) GaAs substrate with a large lattice mismatch by introducing a small amount of Te atoms. Exposing the growing surface to Te atoms changes the reflection high-energy electron diffraction pattern from spotty to streaky together with (2 × 1) surface reconstruction, and greatly reduces the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curve and increases the integral intensity of room-temperature photoluminescence by a factor of about nine.

  17. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of GaSb on GaAs Substrates with AlSb Buffer Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Qiang, Zhou; Ying-Qiang, Xu; Rui-Ting, Hao; Bao, Tang; Zheng-Wei, Ren; Zhi-Chuan, Niu

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaSb films on GaAs substrates using AlSb buffer layers. Optimization of AlSb growth parameter is aimed at obtaining high GaSb crystal quality and smooth GaSb surface. The optimized growth temperature and thickness of AlSb layers are found to be 450° C and 2.1 nm, respectively. A rms surface roughness of 0.67nm over 10 × 10 μm 2 is achieved as a 0.5μm GaSb film is grown under optimized conditions

  18. Molecular beam epitaxy of germanium nanoclusters and indium gallium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is an important method of growth of thin crystalline films. In this thesis, I study MBE of Ge on Si(100) substrates and InGaN on silicon and sapphire substrates. Formation and evolution of three-dimensional Ge/Si(100) islands of diameters between 10 to 150 nm are first investigated. Three types of Ge clusters are identified ex situ by atomic force microscopy. These are (i) pyramidal islands with four {105} facets, (ii) dome-type islands with steeper facets of {113}, and (iii) very large and strain relaxed "superdome" islands of {112}, {125} and {215} facets. The island size, shape, and spatial distributions are examined as functions of major growth parameters such as substrate temperature, Ge beam flux, and time of annealing. The growth of Ge on Si(100) is divided into different regimes according to the total coverage. In the low and moderate coverage (10 monolayers) regime, formation of pyramidal islands is a kinetically favored process. These pyramids can evolve into larger dome type islands by several kinetic pathways including coarsening and coalescence. By appropriate low temperature annealing, an ensemble of pyramids can reach a local equilibrium state where the islands can have a narrow size distribution and a locally ordered spatial distribution. This can be useful for growth of self-assembled quantum dot devices. At higher coverages, very large superdome-type islands could form and grow at the expense of the nearby small pyramids and domes. However, the superdome island formation can also be suppressed by using high Ge beam fluxes. The mechanisms of the evolution of the Ge islands and the transition of one type of islands to another type of islands in each growth regime are discussed. After I obtain an overall understanding of the growth and evolution of Ge nanoclusters on flat Si(100) surfaces, lateral alignment of Ge/Si(100) islands is explored using pre-patterned Si(100) substrates as the growth templates. The patterns are

  19. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of two-six materials for visible semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Linfei

    This thesis proposes the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and characterization of a new Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se based semiconductor materials system on InP substrates for visible light emitting diodes (LED) and lasers. The growth conditions for lattice-matched Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se layers with the desired bandgap have been established and optimized. A chemical etching technique to measure the defect density of Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se materials has been established. The accuracy of this method for revealing stacking faults and dislocations was verified by plan-view TEM. Using the techniques such as III-V buffer layer, Zn-irradiation, low-temperature growth, ZnCdSe interfacial layer and growth interruption to improve the quality of the interface of III-V and II-VI, the material quality of Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se has been improved dramatically. Defect density has been reduced from 10sp{10}\\ cmsp{-2} to {˜}5×10sp4\\ cmsp{-2}. The properties of this material system such as the quality and strain state in the epilayer, the dependence of bandgap on temperature, and the band offset have been studied by using double crystal x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and capacitance voltage measurements. The ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe based quantum well (QW) structures have been grown and studied. Optically pumped lasing with emission range from red to blue has been obtained from ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe based separate-confinement single QW laser structures. The results demonstrate the potential for these materials as integrated full color display devices. Preliminary studies of the degradation behavior of ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe QW were performed. No dark line defects (DLDs) were observed during the degradation. A very strong room temperature differential negative resistance behavior was observed from Al/Znsb{0.61}Cdsb{0.39}Se/nsp+-InP devices, which is useful in millimeter-wave applications. We also found that these devices can be set to either in highly conductive or

  1. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanowires and Nanomushrooms for Solid State Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-05-01

    InGaN is a promising semiconductor for solid state lighting thanks to its bandgap which spans the entire visible regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. InGaN is grown heteroepitaxially due to the absence of a native substrate; however, this results in a strained film and a high dislocation density—two effects that have been associated with efficiency droop, which is the disastrous drop in efficiency of a light-emitting diode (LED) as the input current increases. Heteroepitaxially grown nanowires have recently attracted great interest due to their property of eliminating the detrimental effects of the lattice mismatch and the corollary efficiency droop. In this study, InGaN nanowires were grown on a low-cost Si (111) substrate via molecular beam epitaxy. Unique nanostructures, taking the form of mushrooms, have been observed in localized regions on the samples. These nanomushrooms consist of a nanowire body with a wide cap on top. Photoluminescence characterization revealed that the nanowires emit violet-blue, whilst the nanomushrooms emit a broad yellow-orange-red luminescence. The simultaneous emission from the nanowires and nanomushrooms forms white light. Structural characterization of a single nanomushroom via transmission electron microscopy revealed a simultaneous increase in indium and decrease in gallium at the interface between the body and the cap. Furthermore, the cap itself was found to be indium-rich, confirming it as the source of the longer wavelength yellow-orange-red luminescence. It is believed that the nanomushroom cap formed as a consequence of the saturation of growth on the c-plane of the nanowire. It is proposed that the formation of an indium droplet on the tip of the nanowire saturated growth on the c-plane, forcing the indium and gallium adatoms to incorporate on the sidewall m-planes instead, but only at the nanowire tip. This resulted in the formation of a mushroom-like cap on the tip. How and why the indium droplets formed is not

  2. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  3. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in chromium nitride thin films grown by rf nitrogen plasma molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khan; Disseler, Steven M.; Ratcliff, William D.; Borchers, Julie A.; Ponce-Pérez, Rodrigo; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Foley, Andrew; Richard, Andrea; Ingram, David C.; Smith, Arthur R.

    2017-09-01

    A magnetostructural phase transition is investigated in single-crystal chromium nitride (CrN) thin films grown by rf plasma molecular beam epitaxy on MgO(001) substrates. While still within the vacuum environment following molecular beam epitaxy growth, in situ low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, and in situ variable low-temperature reflection high-energy electron diffraction are applied, revealing an atomically smooth and metallic CrN(001) surface, and an in-plane structural transition from 1 ×1 (primitive CrN unit cell) to √{2 }×√{2 }-R 45∘ with a transition temperature of (278 ±3 ) K, respectively. Ex situ temperature-dependent measurements using neutron diffraction are also performed, looking at the structural peaks and likewise revealing a first-order structural transition along the [111] out-of-plane direction, with transition temperatures of (268 ± 3) K. Turning to the magnetic peaks, neutron diffraction confirms a clear magnetic transition from paramagnetic at room temperature to antiferromagnetic at low temperatures with a sharp, first-order phase transition and a Néel temperature of (270 ±2 ) K or (280 ±2 ) K for two different films. In addition to the experimental measurements of structural and magnetic ordering, we also discuss results from first-principles theoretical calculations which explore various possible magnetostructural models.

  4. Studies of free-to-bound acceptor photoluminescence in an applied magnetic field for undoped GaAs grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemon, S.; Norris, P.; Koteles, E. S.; Lambert, G.

    1986-04-01

    Photoluminescence in an applied magnetic field is shown to be useful for the identification of trace acceptor impurities in GaAs. For an epitaxial layer grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE), a trace concentration of zinc acceptors was detected in a sample where the zinc transitions were obscured in zero magnetic field. In material grown by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), the 1.47-eV transition was identified as a conduction-band-to-deep-acceptor process. Also identified was a shallow impurity, magnesium or beryllium, not detected in zero field. Resolved Landau level transitions and the magnetic splitting of conduction-band-to-acceptor transitions were observed in both MOVPE and MBE material.

  5. Accurate determination of optical bandgap and lattice parameters of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films (0{<=}x{<=}0.3) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laumer, Bernhard [Walter Schottky Institut and Physics Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institut and Physics Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bergmaier, Andreas; Dollinger, Guenther [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Eickhoff, Martin [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2013-06-21

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films with Mg concentrations 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates. Precise determination of the Mg concentration x was performed by elastic recoil detection analysis. The bandgap energy was extracted from absorption measurements with high accuracy taking electron-hole interaction and exciton-phonon complexes into account. From these results a linear relationship between bandgap energy and Mg concentration is established for x{<=}0.3. Due to alloy disorder, the increase of the photoluminescence emission energy with Mg concentration is less pronounced. An analysis of the lattice parameters reveals that the epitaxial films grow biaxially strained on a-plane sapphire.

  6. Growth study of nonpolar Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films on a-plane bulk ZnO by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laumer, Bernhard [Walter Schottky Institut and Physics Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institut and Physics Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bergmaier, Andreas; Dollinger, Guenther [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Vogel, Stephen; Gries, Katharina I.; Volz, Kerstin [Philipps-Universitaet, Material Sciences Center-Structure and Technology Research Laboratory and Faculty of Physics, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Eickhoff, Martin [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2012-09-17

    Nonpolar Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane ZnO substrates. A smooth surface morphology was accomplished under oxygen-rich growth conditions. The benefits of the use of ZnO substrates on the structural properties are reflected by a low-density of threading dislocations. Furthermore, no indications for the generation of basal plane stacking faults are found. The pseudomorphic growth on a-plane ZnO substrates efficiently locks the epitaxial Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O films to the wurtzite structure up to x = 0.25. The Mg concentration is not constant and increases with larger thickness. The optical properties reflect the influence of alloy disorder.

  7. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  8. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  9. The effect of metal-rich growth conditions on the microstructure of Sc{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films grown using molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, H.C.L.; Moram, M.A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Goff, L.E. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Barradas, N.P. [CTN - Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [IPFN - Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratorio de Aceleradores e Tecnologias de Radiacao, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Pereira, S. [CICECO and Department of Physics, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal); Beere, H.E.; Farrer, I.; Nicoll, C.A.; Ritchie, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Epitaxial Sc{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.50 were grown using molecular beam epitaxy under metal-rich conditions. The Sc{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N growth rate increased with increasing Sc flux despite the use of metal-rich growth conditions, which is attributed to the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2} induced by the presence of Sc. Microstructural analysis showed that phase-pure wurtzite Sc{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N was achieved up to x = 0.26, which is significantly higher than that previously reported for nitrogen-rich conditions, indicating that the use of metal-rich conditions can help to stabilise wurtzite phase Sc{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride Two-Dimensional Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Renjing

    Van der Waals (vdW) materials (also called as two-dimensional (2D) material in some literature) systems have received extensive attention recently due to their potential applications in next-generation electronics platform. Exciting properties have been discovered in this field, however, the performance and properties of the systems rely on the materials' quality and interface significantly, leading to the urgent need for scalable synthesis of high-quality vdW crystals and heterostructures. Toward this direction, this dissertation is devoted on the study of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth and various characterization of vdW materials and heterostructures, especially graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The goal is to achieve high-quality vdW materials and related heterostructures. There are mainly four projects discussed in this dissertation. The first project (Chapter 2) is about MBE growth of large-area h-BN on copper foil. After the growth, the film was transferred onto SiO2 substrate for characterization. It is observed that as-grown film gives evident h-BN Raman spectrum; what's more, h-BN peak intensity and position is dependent on film thickness. N-1s and B-1s XPS peaks further suggest the formation of h-BN. AFM and SEM images show the film is flat and continuous over large area. Our synthesis method shows it's possible to use MBE to achieve h-BN growth and could also pave a way for some unique structure, such as h-BN/graphene heterostructures and doped h-BN films by MBE. The second project (Chapter 3) is focused on establishment of grapehene/h-BN heterostructure on cobalt (Co) film. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructures on Co film substrate was achieved by using plasma-assisted MBE. The direct graphene/h-BN vertical stacking structures were demonstrated and further confirmed by various characterizations, such as Raman spectroscopy, SEM, XPS and TEM. Large area heterostructures consisting of single- /bilayer graphene and

  11. Textured Sb2Te3 films and GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattices grown on amorphous substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Tisbi, E.; Placidi, E.; Momand, Jamo; Redaelli, Andrea; Kooi, Bart J.; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Calarco, Raffaella

    The realization of textured films of 2-dimensionally (2D) bonded materials on amorphous substrates is important for the integration of this material class with silicon based technology. Here, we demonstrate the successful growth by molecular beam epitaxy of textured Sb2Te3 films and GeTe/Sb2Te3

  12. Structural and optical properties of self-catalytic GaAs:Mn nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gas, Katarzyna; Sadowski, Janusz; Kasama, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Mn-doped GaAs nanowires were grown in the self-catalytic growth mode on the oxidized Si(100) surface by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and electron transport measurements. The tra...

  13. AlGaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirlin, G E; Reznik, R R; Shtrom, I V

    2017-01-01

    The data on growth peculiarities and physical properties of GaAs insertions embedded in AlGaAs nanowires grown on different (1 1 1) substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are presented. The influence of nanowires growth conditions on structural and optical properties is studied in detail...

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy of insulators, metastable phases and II-VI compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrow, R.F.C.

    1988-01-01

    MBE techniques are emerging for epitaxial growth of a wide range of other materials which are of key importance in electronics, optoelectronics and even magnetics. These include insulators, metals and II-VI compound semiconductors. The factors which control the range of materials which can be prepared by MBE techniques are discussed. The growth and characterization of CaF 2 /Si is reviewed. Developments in the epitaxial stabilization of the 3d transition metals Mn, Fe, Co and Ni are discussed. A recent study of the MBE growth of high-perfection films of CdTe on InSb substrates is used as an illustration of how such films can be prepared and their properties related to the growth conditions. 162 refs.; 25 figs.; 5 tabs

  15. Fabrication of GeSn-multiple quantum wells by overgrowth of Sn on Ge by using molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F. [Institute for Semiconductor Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Fischer, I. A.; Schulze, J. [Institute for Semiconductor Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Benedetti, A. [CACTI, Univ. de Vigo, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende 15, Vigo (Spain); Zaumseil, P. [IHP GmbH, Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics, Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Cerqueira, M. F.; Vasilevskiy, M. I. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Univ. de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain)

    2015-12-28

    We report on the fabrication and structural characterization of epitaxially grown ultra-thin layers of Sn on Ge virtual substrates (Si buffer layer overgrown by a 50 nm thick Ge epilayer followed by an annealing step). Samples with 1 to 5 monolayers of Sn on Ge virtual substrates were grown using solid source molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by atomic force microscopy. We determined the critical thickness at which the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional growth occurs. This transition is due to the large lattice mismatch between Ge and Sn (≈14.7%). By depositing Ge on top of Sn layers, which have thicknesses at or just below the critical thickness, we were able to fabricate ultra-narrow GeSn multi-quantum-well structures that are fully embedded in Ge. We report results on samples with one and ten GeSn wells separated by 5 and 10 nm thick Ge spacer layers that were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We discuss the structure and material intermixing observed in the samples.

  16. Roles of kinetics and energetics in the growth of AlN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, I. H.; Minegishi, T.; Hanada, T.; Lee, S. W.; Cho, M. W.; Yao, T.; Oh, D. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    The roles of kinetics and energetics in the growth processes of AlN on c-sapphire by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy are investigated by varying the growth rate from 1 to 31 A/min and the substrate temperature from 800 to 1000 .deg. C. The energetics is found to govern the growth of AlN in the low-growth rate region even at a low substrate temperature of 800 .deg. C owing to the enhanced residence time of adatoms, thereby increasing the surface migration length. As the growth rate increases, the growth tends to be governed by kinetics because of a reduction in the residence time of adatoms. Consequently, the surface roughness and crystal quality are greatly improved for the low-growth-rate case. In addition, the lattice strain relaxation is completed from the beginning of epitaxy for energetics-limiting growth while lattice strain relaxation is retarded for kinetics-limiting growth because of pre-existing partial strain relaxation. Energetics becomes more favorable as the substrate temperature is raised because of an increase in the surface diffusion length owing to an enhanced diffusion coefficient. Consequently high-crystal-quality AlN layers are grown under the energetics-limiting growth condition with a screw dislocation density of 7.4 x 10 8 cm -2 even for a thin 42-nm thick film.

  17. Large-area SnSe2/GaN heterojunction diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong Hee; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Paul, Pran K.; O'Hara, Dante J.; Brenner, Mark R.; Kawakami, Roland K.; Arehart, Aaron R.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2017-11-01

    We report on the synthesis and properties of wafer-scale two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) n-SnSe2/n-GaN(0001) heterojunctions. The hexagonal crystal structure of crystalline SnSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy was confirmed via in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and off-axis X-ray diffraction. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of SnSe2/GaN diodes exhibited 9 orders of magnitude rectification, and the SnSe2/GaN heterojunction barrier height was estimated to be 1 eV using capacitance-voltage measurements and internal photoemission measurements. Vertical electronic transport analyzed using temperature-dependent I-V measurements indicates thermionic field emission transport across the junction. This work demonstrates the potential of epitaxial growth of large area high quality 2D crystals on 3D bulk semiconductors for device applications involving carrier injection across 2D/3D heterojunctions.

  18. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanbo; Zhang Yang; Zhang Yuwei; Wang Baoqiang; Zhu Zhanping; Zeng Yiping

    2012-01-01

    We report on the growth of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We investigate the influence of the GaAs substrate surface treatment, growth temperature, and V/III flux ratios on the crystal quality and the surface morphology of GaSb epilayers. Comparing to Ga-rich GaAs surface preparation, the Sb-rich GaAs surface preparation can promote the growth of higher-quality GaSb material. It is found that the crystal quality, electrical properties, and surface morphology of the GaSb epilayers are highly dependent on the growth temperature, and Sb/Ga flux ratios. Under the optimized growth conditions, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high quality GaSb layers on GaAs substrates. The p-type nature of the unintentionally doped GaSb is studied and from the growth conditions dependence of the hole concentrations of the GaSb, we deduce that the main native acceptor in the GaSb is the Ga antisite (Ga Sb ) defect.

  19. Strain relaxation in single crystal SrTiO3 grown on Si (001) by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Miri; Posadas, Agham; Dargis, Rytis; Shih, Chih-Kang; Demkov, Alexander A.; Triyoso, Dina H.; David Theodore, N.; Dubourdieu, Catherine; Bruley, John; Jordan-Sweet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    An epitaxial layer of SrTiO 3 grown directly on Si may be used as a pseudo-substrate for the integration of perovskite oxides onto silicon. When SrTiO 3 is initially grown on Si (001), it is nominally compressively strained. However, by subsequent annealing in oxygen at elevated temperature, an SiO x interlayer can be formed which alters the strain state of SrTiO 3 . We report a study of strain relaxation in SrTiO 3 films grown on Si by molecular beam epitaxy as a function of annealing time and oxygen partial pressure. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction, reflection high energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, we describe the process of interfacial oxidation and strain relaxation of SrTiO 3 on Si (001). Understanding the process of strain relaxation of SrTiO 3 on silicon will be useful for controlling the SrTiO 3 lattice constant for lattice matching with functional oxide overlayers.

  20. Epitaxy of semiconductor-superconductor nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, P.; Ziino, N.L.B.; Chang, W.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the properties of semiconductor/metal interfaces is a powerful method for designing functionality and improving the performance of electrical devices. Recently semiconductor/superconductor hybrids have appeared as an important example where the atomic scale uniformity of the interface...... plays a key role in determining the quality of the induced superconducting gap. Here we present epitaxial growth of semiconductor-metal core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy, a method that provides a conceptually new route to controlled electrical contacting of nanostructures and the design...... of devices for specialized applications such as topological and gate-controlled superconducting electronics. Our materials of choice, InAs/Al grown with epitaxially matched single-plane interfaces, and alternative semiconductor/metal combinations allowing epitaxial interface matching in nanowires...

  1. Zinc-induced lattice contraction in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy grown AlGaInP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinyi; Zhang, Jianqin; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Hongbo; Zhou, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    p-Type Zn doped (Al x Ga 1-x ) 0.5 In 0.5 P layers have been grown on (001) GaAs substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The lattice constants have been carefully measured by X-ray double crystal diffraction. Mismatches between the substrates and epitaxial layers are observed in the direction corresponding to lattice contraction. The variation of fully-relaxed lattice constants calculated from symmetric (004) and asymmetric (115) diffraction shows that the contraction is related to both increasing inlet dopant flows and increasing growth temperatures. Secondary ion mass spectrometry is employed to analyze the elements in the epitaxial layers. The variations of Al, Ga, In and Zn components indicate that a decrease of In incorporation during the growth leads to the contracted lattice, although Zn atoms, which incorporate into the sites of In atoms during the doping, are smaller in covalent radius. The decrease is supposed to be caused by the competition between In and Zn atoms on the growth surface, which is well fit by the surface adsorption-trapping model. In addition, the suppression of Al and Ga incorporation by inlet dopant flows is observed. The possible cause might be the ethane generated by the pyrolysis of dopant source, which impedes the decomposition process of metalorganic sources of Al and Ga atoms. - Highlights: • AlGaInP layers are grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. • Zn induced lattice contraction in AlGaInP layers is observed. • Diethylzinc flow causes the contraction by impeding the incorporation of In. • The suppression of metalorganic decomposition by diethylzinc is noticed.

  2. Effects of growth temperature and device structure on GaP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaisman, M.; Tomasulo, S.; Masuda, T.; Lang, J. R.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) is an attractive candidate for wide-bandgap solar cell applications, possessing the largest bandgap of the III-arsenide/phosphides without aluminum. However, GaP cells to date have exhibited poor internal quantum efficiency (IQE), even for photons absorbed by direct transitions, motivating improvements in material quality and device structure. In this work, we investigated GaP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy over a range of substrate temperatures, employing a much thinner emitter than in prior work. Higher growth temperatures yielded the best solar cell characteristics, indicative of increased diffusion lengths. Furthermore, the inclusion of an AlGaP window layer improved both open-circuit voltage and short wavelength IQE.

  3. p-type ZnO films with solid-source phosphorus doping by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu, F.X.; Yang, Z.; Mandalapu, L.J.; Liu, J.L.; Beyermann, W. P.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorus-doped p-type ZnO films were grown on r-plane sapphire substrates using molecular-beam epitaxy with a solid-source GaP effusion cell. X-ray diffraction spectra and reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns indicate that high-quality single crystalline (1120) ZnO films were obtained. Hall and resistivity measurements show that the phosphorus-doped ZnO films have high hole concentrations and low resistivities at room temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements at 8 K reveal a dominant acceptor-bound exciton emission with an energy of 3.317 eV. The acceptor energy level of the phosphorus dopant is estimated to be 0.18 eV above the valence band from PL spectra, which is also consistent with the temperature dependence of PL measurements

  4. VO2 Thermochromic Films on Quartz Glass Substrate Grown by RF-Plasma-Assisted Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium dioxide (VO2 thermochromic thin films with various thicknesses were grown on quartz glass substrates by radio frequency (RF-plasma assisted oxide molecular beam epitaxy (O-MBE. The crystal structure, morphology and chemical stoichiometry were investigated systemically by X-ray diffraction (XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analyses. An excellent reversible metal-to-insulator transition (MIT characteristics accompanied by an abrupt change in both electrical resistivity and optical infrared (IR transmittance was observed from the optimized sample. Remarkably, the transition temperature (TMIT deduced from the resistivity-temperature curve was reasonably consistent with that obtained from the temperature-dependent IR transmittance. Based on Raman measurement and XPS analyses, the observations were interpreted in terms of residual stresses and chemical stoichiometry. This achievement will be of great benefit for practical application of VO2-based smart windows.

  5. UVB-emitting InAlGaN multiple quantum well synthesized using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A high Al-content (y > 0.4 multi-quantum-well (MQW structure with a quaternary InxAlyGa(1-x-yN active layer was synthesized using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The MQW structure exhibits strong carrier confinement and room temperature ultraviolet-B (UVB photoluminescence an order of magnitude stronger than that of a reference InxAlyGa(1-x-yN thin film with comparable composition and thickness. The samples were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Numerical simulations suggest that the UVB emission efficiency is limited by dislocation-related non-radiative recombination centers in the MQW and at the MQW - buffer interface. Emission efficiency can be significantly improved by reducing the dislocation density from 109cm−2 to 107cm−2 and by optimizing the width and depth of the quantum wells.

  6. Room temperature Ultraviolet B emission from InAlGaN films synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, W., E-mail: wei.kong@duke.edu; Jiao, W. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Brown, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Roberts, A. T. [Charles Bowden Laboratory, Army Aviation and Missile RD& E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Fournelle, J. [Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Losurdo, M. [CNR-NANOTEC, Istituto di Nanotecnologia, via Orabona, 4-70126 Bari (Italy); Everitt, H. O. [Charles Bowden Laboratory, Army Aviation and Missile RD& E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Thin films of the wide bandgap quaternary semiconductor In{sub x}Al{sub y}Ga{sub (1−x−y)}N with low In (x = 0.01–0.05) and high Al composition (y = 0.40–0.49) were synthesized on GaN templates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction was used to correlate the strain accommodation of the films to composition. Room temperature ultraviolet B (280 nm–320 nm) photoluminescence intensity increased with increasing In composition, while the Stokes shift remained relatively constant. The data suggest a competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination occurs for carriers, respectively, localized at centers produced by In incorporation and at dislocations produced by strain relaxation.

  7. Wavelength tuning of InAs quantum dots grown on InP (100) by chemical-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Q.; Noetzel, R.; Veldhoven, P.J. van; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    We report on an effective way to continuously tune the emission wavelength of InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on InP (100) by chemical-beam epitaxy. The InAs QD layer is embedded in a GaInAsP layer lattice matched to InP. With an ultrathin GaAs layer inserted between the InAs QD layer and the GaInAsP buffer, the peak wavelength from the InAs QDs can be continuously tuned from above 1.6 μm down to 1.5 μm at room temperature. The major role of the thin GaAs layer is to greatly suppress the As/P exchange during the deposition of InAs and subsequent growth interruption under arsenic flux, as well as to consume the segregated surface In layer floating on the GaInAsP buffer layer

  8. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Spin Glass-like Behavior in Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown Chromium Telluride Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anupam; Guchhait, Samaresh; Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Rai, Amritesh; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2015-04-28

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), vibrating sample magnetometry, and other physical property measurements are used to investigate the structure, morphology, magnetic, and magnetotransport properties of (001)-oriented Cr2Te3 thin films grown on Al2O3(0001) and Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy. Streaky RHEED patterns indicate flat smooth film growth on both substrates. STM studies show the hexagonal arrangements of surface atoms. Determination of the lattice parameter from the atomically resolved STM image is consistent with the bulk crystal structures. Magnetic measurements show the film is ferromagnetic, having a Curie temperature of about 180 K, and a spin glass-like behavior was observed below 35 K. Magnetotransport measurements show the metallic nature of the film with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy along the c-axis.

  9. Characteristics of AlN/GaN nanowire Bragg mirror grown on (001) silicon by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Heo, Junseok

    2013-10-01

    GaN nanowires containing AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A peak reflectance of 70% with normal incidence at 560 nm is derived from angle resolved reflectance measurements on the as-grown nanowire DBR array. The measured peak reflectance wavelength is significantly blue-shifted from the ideal calculated value. The discrepancy is explained by investigating the reflectance of the nanoscale DBRs with a finite difference time domain technique. Ensemble nanowire microcavities with In0.3Ga 0.7N nanowires clad by AlN/GaN DBRs have also been characterized. Room temperature emission from the microcavity exhibits considerable linewidth narrowing compared to that measured for unclad In0.3Ga0.7N nanowires. The resonant emission is characterized by a peak wavelength and linewidth of 575 nm and 39 nm, respectively. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  10. 1.142 mu m GaAsBi/GaAs Quantum Well Lasers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wenwu; Zhang, Zhenpu

    2017-01-01

    in GaAsBi0.058/GaAs quantum well LDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The output power is up to 127 mW at 300 K under pulsed mode. We also demonstrate continuous wave mode operation up to 273 K for the first time. The temperature coefficient of the GaAsBi/GaAs LD is 0.26 nm/K in the temperature range......As a promising new class of near-infrared light emitters, GaAsBi laser diodes (LDs) are considered to have a high energy efficiency and an insensitive temperature dependence of the band gap. In this paper, we realize the longest ever reported lasing wavelength up to 1.142 mu m at room temperature...

  11. Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry investigation of homoepitaxial GaN grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tong-Ho; Choi, Soojeong; Wu, Pae; Brown, April [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, 128 Hudson Hall, Durham, NC (United States); Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Moto, Akihiro [Innovation Core SEI, Inc., 3235 Kifer Road, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on GaN template substrates (GaN on sapphire) is investigated with in-situ multi-channel spectroscopic ellipsometry. Growth is performed under various Ga/N flux ratios at growth temperatures in the range 710-780 C. The thermal roughening of the GaN template caused by decomposition of the surface is investigated through the temporal variation of the GaN pseudodielectric function over the temperature range of 650 C to 850 C. The structural, morphological, and optical properties are also discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Effects of substrate anisotropy and edge diffusion on submonolayer growth during molecular beam epitaxy: A Kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devkota, J.; Shrestha, S.P.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation work to study the effect of diffusion anisotropy, bonding anisotropy and edge diffusion on island formation at different temperatures during the sub-monolayer film growth in Molecular Beam Epitaxy. We use simple cubic solid on solid model and event based Bortz, Kalos and Labowitch (BKL) algorithm on the Kinetic Monte Carlo method to simulate the physical phenomena. We have found that the island morphology and growth exponent are found to be influenced by substrate anisotropy as well as edge diffusion, however they do not play a significant role in island elongation. The growth exponent and island size distribution are observed to be influenced by substrate anisotropy but are negligibly influenced by edge diffusion. We have found fractal islands when edge diffusion is excluded and compact islands when edge diffusion is included. (author)

  13. Effect of thermal annealing on structural properties of GeSn thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. P.; Song, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Wu, X. Y.; Zhu, Z. Y. S.; Han, Y.; Zhang, L. Y.; Huang, H.; Wang, S. M.

    2017-10-01

    GeSn alloy with 7.68% Sn concentration grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been rapidly annealed at different temperatures from 300°C to 800°C. Surface morphology and roughness annealed below or equal to 500°C for 1 min have no obvious changes, while the strain relaxation rate increasing. When the annealing temperature is above or equal to 600°C, significant changes occur in surface morphology and roughness, and Sn precipitation is observed at 700°C. The structural properties are analyzed by reciprocal space mapping in the symmetric (004) and asymmetric (224) planes by high resolution X-ray diffraction. The lateral correlation length and the mosaic spread are extracted for the epi-layer peaks in the asymmetric (224) diffraction. The most suitable annealing temperature to improve both the GeSn lattice quality and relaxation rate is about 500°C.

  14. Evidence of magnesium impact on arsenic acceptor state: Study of ZnMgO:As molecular beam epitaxy layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przezdziecka, E.; Lisowski, W.; Reszka, A.; Kozanecki, A.

    2018-03-01

    A series of ZnMgO oxide films single doped with arsenic was grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy method. The concentration of Mg in Zn1-xMgxO alloys was evaluated on the basis of X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Changes of the band gap energy in Zn1-xMgxO were evidenced by cathodoluminescence measurements. Analysis of high resolution As 3d XPS spectra revealed three arsenic states with binding energies of ∼41 eV, 44.2 eV and 45.6 eV assigned to: deep acceptor of AsO, acceptor AsZn-2VZn and donor AsZn, respectively. Small concentrations of AsO species were detected in all samples. The As contribution due to AsZn-2VZn centers was found to be intensive, and increased with the concentration of Mg.

  15. True-blue laser diodes with tunnel junctions grown monolithically by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Muziol, Grzegorz; Nowakowski-Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Turski, Henryk; Siekacz, Marcin; Feduniewicz-Zmuda, Anna; Nowakowska-Szkudlarek, Anna; Sawicka, Marta; Perlin, Piotr

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate true-blue 450 nm tunnel junction (TJ) laser diodes (LDs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The absence of hydrogen during PAMBE growth allows us to achieve TJs with low resistance. We compare TJ LDs with LDs of standard construction with p-type metal contact. For both types of LD, the threshold current density is around 3 kA/cm2 and the slope efficiency is 0.5 W/A. We do not observe any significant changes in optical losses and differential gain in TJ LDs compared with standard LDs. The differential resistivity of the TJs for current densities higher than 2 kA/cm2 is below 10‑4 Ω·cm2.

  16. Formation of strained interfaces in AlSb/InAs multilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaï, J.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Gatel, C., E-mail: christophe.gatel@cemes.fr; Ponchet, A. [CEMES CNRS-UPR 8011, Université de Toulouse, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Teissier, R.; Baranov, A. N. [IES CNRS-UMR 5214, 34095 Montpellier (France); Magen, C. [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA)—ARAID and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-07-21

    Structural and chemical properties of InAs/AlSb interfaces have been studied by transmission electron microscopy. InAs/AlSb multilayers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy with different growth sequences at interfaces. The out-of-plane strain, determined using high resolution microscopy and geometrical phase analysis, has been related to the chemical composition of the interfaces analyzed by high angle annular dark field imaging. Considering the local strain and chemistry, we estimated the interface composition and discussed the mechanisms of interface formation for the different growth sequences. In particular, we found that the formation of the tensile AlAs-type interface is spontaneously favored due to its high thermal stability compared to the InSb-type interface. We also showed that the interface composition could be tuned using an appropriate growth sequence.

  17. Formation of strained interfaces in AlSb/InAs multilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaï, J.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Gatel, C.; Ponchet, A.; Teissier, R.; Baranov, A. N.; Magen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Structural and chemical properties of InAs/AlSb interfaces have been studied by transmission electron microscopy. InAs/AlSb multilayers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy with different growth sequences at interfaces. The out-of-plane strain, determined using high resolution microscopy and geometrical phase analysis, has been related to the chemical composition of the interfaces analyzed by high angle annular dark field imaging. Considering the local strain and chemistry, we estimated the interface composition and discussed the mechanisms of interface formation for the different growth sequences. In particular, we found that the formation of the tensile AlAs-type interface is spontaneously favored due to its high thermal stability compared to the InSb-type interface. We also showed that the interface composition could be tuned using an appropriate growth sequence

  18. Electrical performance of phase change memory cells with Ge3Sb2Te6 deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella; Boniardi, Mattia; Redaelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on the electrical characterization of phase change memory cells containing a Ge 3 Sb 2 Te 6 (GST) alloy grown in its crystalline form by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the high temperature growth on the amorphous substrate results in a polycrystalline film exhibiting a rough surface with a grain size of approximately 80–150 nm. A detailed electrical characterization has been performed, including I-V characteristic curves, programming curves, set operation performance, crystallization activation at low temperature, and resistance drift, in order to determine the material related parameters. The results indicate very good alignment of the electrical parameters with the current state-of-the-art GST, deposited by physical vapor deposition. Such alignment enables a possible employment of the MBE deposition technique for chalcogenide materials in the phase change memory technology, thus leading to future studies of as-deposited crystalline chalcogenides as integrated in electrical vehicles

  19. Molecular-beam epitaxy growth and structural characterization of semiconductor-ferromagnet heterostructures by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satapathy, D.K.

    2005-12-19

    The present work is devoted to the growth of the ferromagnetic metal MnAs on the semiconductor GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). The MnAs thin films are deposited on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). Grazing incidence diffraction (GID) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) are used in situ to investigate the nucleation, evolution of strain, morphology and interfacial structure during the MBE growth. Four stages of the nucleation process during growth of MnAs on GaAs(001) are revealed by RHEED azimuthal scans. GID shows that further growth of MnAs films proceed via the formation of relaxed islands at a nominal thickness of 2.5 ML which increase in size and finally coalesce to form a continuous film. Early on, an ordered array of misfit dislocations forms at the interface releasing the misfit strain even before complete coalescence occurs. The fascinating complex nucleation process of MnAs on GaAs(0 0 1) contains elements of both Volmer-Weber and Stranski-Krastanov growth. A nonuniform strain amounting to 0.66%, along the [1 -1 0] direction and 0.54%, along the [1 1 0] direction is demonstrated from x-ray line profile analysis. A high correlation between the defects is found along the GaAs[1 1 0] direction. An extremely periodic array of misfit dislocations with a period of 4.95{+-}0.05 nm is formed at the interface along the [1 1 0] direction which releases the 7.5% of misfit. The inhomogeneous strain due to the periodic dislocations is confined at the interface within a layer of 1.6 nm thickness. The misfit along the [1 -1 0] direction is released by the formation of a coincidence site lattice. (orig.)

  20. Nanoripple formation on GaAs (001) surface by reverse epitaxy during ion beam sputtering at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Debasree; Ghose, Debabrata, E-mail: debabrata1.ghose@gmail.com

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • GaAs (001) surfaces are sputtered by 1 keV Ar{sup +} at sample temperature of 450 °C. • Highly ordered defect-free ripples develop at near-normal incidence angles (θ ≈ 0–25{sup 0}). • Concurrent sample rotation does not alter the ripple orientation with respect to the ion beam. • At grazing incidence angles anisotropic structure is formed. • Concurrent sample rotation shows that the structure orientation depends on the beam direction. - Abstract: Self-organized pattern formation by the process of reverse epitaxial growth has been investigated on GaAs (001) surfaces during 1 keV Ar{sup +} bombardment at target temperature of 450 °C for a wide range of incident angles. Highly ordered ripple formation driven by diffusion instability is evidenced at near normal incidence angles. Concurrent sample rotation shows that the ripple morphology and its orientation do not depend on the incident beam direction; rather they are determined by the symmetry of the crystal face.

  1. Irradiation induced improvement in crystallinity of epitaxially grown Ag thin films on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahiro, Katsumi; Nagata, Shinji; Yamaguchi, Sadae [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1997-03-01

    We report the improvement in crystallinity of epitaxially grown Ag films on Si(100) substrates with ion irradiation. The irradiation of 0.5 MeV Si ions to 2x10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} at 200degC, for example, reduces the channeling minimum yield from 60% to 6% at Ag surface. The improvement originates from the decrease of mosaic spread in the Ag thin film. In our experiments, ion energy, ion species and irradiation temperature have been varied. The better crystallinity is obtained as the higher concentration of defect is generated. The mechanism involved in the irradiation induced improvement is discussed. (author)

  2. Deep levels in a-plane, high Mg-content Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guer, Emre [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Atatuerk University, Erzurum 25240 (Turkey); 205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Tabares, G.; Hierro, A. [Dpto. Ingenieria Electronica and ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arehart, A.; Ringel, S. A. [205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Chauveau, J. M. [CRHEA-CNRS, 06560 Valbonne (France); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, ParcValrose, 06102 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-12-15

    Deep level defects in n-type unintentionally doped a-plane Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire were fully characterized using deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and related methods. Four compositions of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O were examined with x = 0.31, 0.44, 0.52, and 0.56 together with a control ZnO sample. DLOS measurements revealed the presence of five deep levels in each Mg-containing sample, having energy levels of E{sub c} - 1.4 eV, 2.1 eV, 2.6 V, and E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV. For all Mg compositions, the activation energies of the first three states were constant with respect to the conduction band edge, whereas the latter two revealed constant activation energies with respect to the valence band edge. In contrast to the ternary materials, only three levels, at E{sub c} - 2.1 eV, E{sub v} + 0.3 eV, and 0.6 eV, were observed for the ZnO control sample in this systematically grown series of samples. Substantially higher concentrations of the deep levels at E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and E{sub c} - 2.1 eV were observed in ZnO compared to the Mg alloyed samples. Moreover, there is a general invariance of trap concentration of the E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV levels on Mg content, while at least and order of magnitude dependency of the E{sub c} - 1.4 eV and E{sub c} - 2.6 eV levels in Mg alloyed samples.

  3. Geometric continuum mechanics and induced beam theories

    CERN Document Server

    R Eugster, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This research monograph discusses novel approaches to geometric continuum mechanics and introduces beams as constraint continuous bodies. In the coordinate free and metric independent geometric formulation of continuum mechanics as well as for beam theories, the principle of virtual work serves as the fundamental principle of mechanics. Based on the perception of analytical mechanics that forces of a mechanical system are defined as dual quantities to the kinematical description, the virtual work approach is a systematic way to treat arbitrary mechanical systems. Whereas this methodology is very convenient to formulate induced beam theories, it is essential in geometric continuum mechanics when the assumptions on the physical space are relaxed and the space is modeled as a smooth manifold. The book addresses researcher and graduate students in engineering and mathematics interested in recent developments of a geometric formulation of continuum mechanics and a hierarchical development of induced beam theories.

  4. Substrate temperature dependence of ZnTe epilayers grown on GaAs(0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Chao; Li, Yanbo

    2010-04-01

    ZnTe thin films have been grown on GaAs(0 0 1) substrates at different temperatures with constant Zn and Te beam equivalent pressures (BEPs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) observation indicates that two-dimensional (2D) growth mode can be established after around one-minute three-dimensional (3D) nucleation by increasing the substrate temperature to 340 °C. We found that Zn desorption from the ZnTe surface is much greater than that of Te at higher temperatures, and estimated the Zn sticking coefficient by the evolution of growth rate. The Zn sticking coefficient decreases from 0.93 to 0.58 as the temperature is elevated from 320 to 400 °C. The ZnTe epilayer grown at 360 °C displays the narrowest full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 660 arcsec from (0 0 4) reflection in double-crystal X-ray rocking curve (DCXRC) measurements. The surface morphology of ZnTe epilayers is strongly dependent on the substrate temperature, and the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness diminishes drastically with the increase in temperature.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy of GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase change materials studied by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shayduk, Roman

    2010-05-20

    The integration of phase change materials into semiconductor heterostructures may lead to the development of a new generation of high density non-volatile phase change memories. Epitaxial phase change materials allow to study the detailed structural changes during the phase transition and to determine the scaling limits of the memory. This work is dedicated to the epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te phase change alloys on GaSb(001). We deposit Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films on GaSb(001) substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The film orientation and lattice constant evolution is determined in real time during growth using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The nucleation stage of the growth is studied in situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Four growth regimes of GST on GaSb(001) were observed: amorphous, polycrystalline, incubated epitaxial and direct epitaxial. Amorphous film grows for substrate temperatures below 100 C. For substrate temperatures in the range 100-160 C, the film grows in polycrystalline form. Incubated epitaxial growth is observed at temperatures from 180 to 210 C. This growth regime is characterized by an initial 0.6nm thick amorphous layer formation, which crystallizes epitaxially as the film thickness increases. The determined lattice constant of the films is 6.01 A, very close to that of the metastable GST phase. The films predominantly possess an epitaxial cube-on-cube relationship. At higher temperatures the films grow epitaxially, however the growth rate is rapidly decreasing with temperature. At temperatures above 270 C the growth rate is zero. The composition of the grown films is close to 2:2:5 for Ge, Sb and Te, respectively. The determined crystal structure of the films is face centered cubic (FCC) with a rhombohedral distortion. The analysis of X-ray peak widths gives a value for the rhombohedral angle of 89.56 . We observe two types of reflections in reciprocal space indicating two FCC sublattices in

  6. Modeling Radiation-Induced Degradation in Top-Gated Epitaxial Graphene Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-S. Moon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates total ionizing dose (TID effects in top-gated epitaxial graphene field-effect-transistors (GFETs. Measurements reveal voltage shifts in the current-voltage (I-V characteristics and degradation of carrier mobility and minimum conductivity, consistent with the buildup of oxide-trapped charges. A semi-empirical approach for modeling radiation-induced degradation in GFETs effective carrier mobility is described in the paper. The modeling approach describes Coulomb and short-range scattering based on calculations of charge and effective vertical field that incorporate radiation-induced oxide trapped charges. The transition from the dominant scattering mechanism is correctly described as a function of effective field and oxide trapped charge density. Comparison with experimental data results in good qualitative agreement when including an empirical component to account for scatterer transparency in the low field regime.

  7. A modified gradient approach for the growth of low-density InAs quantum dot molecules by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nandlal; Reuter, Dirk

    2017-11-01

    Two vertically stacked quantum dots that are electronically coupled, so called quantum dot molecules, are of great interest for the realization of solid state building blocks for quantum communication networks. We present a modified gradient approach to realize InAs quantum dot molecules with a low areal density so that single quantum dot molecules can be optically addressed. The individual quantum dot layers were prepared by solid source molecular beam epitaxy depositing InAs on GaAs(100). The bottom quantum dot layer has been grown without substrate rotation resulting in an In-gradient across the surface, which translated into a density gradient with low quantum dot density in a certain region of the wafer. For the top quantum dot layer, separated from the bottom quantum dot layer by a 6 nm thick GaAs barrier, various InAs amounts were deposited without an In-gradient. In spite of the absence of an In-gradient, a pronounced density gradient is observed for the top quantum dots. Even for an In-amount slightly below the critical thickness for a single dot layer, a density gradient in the top quantum dot layer, which seems to reproduce the density gradient in the bottom layer, is observed. For more or less In, respectively, deviations from this behavior occur. We suggest that the obvious influence of the bottom quantum dot layer on the growth of the top quantum dots is due to the strain field induced by the buried dots.

  8. Structural properties of Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Se{sub 3} thin films grown via molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babakiray, Sercan; Johnson, Trent A.; Borisov, Pavel; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David, E-mail: david.lederman@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Marcus, Matthew A. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tarafder, Kartick [Department of Physics, BITS-Pilani Hyderabad Campus, Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500078 (India)

    2015-07-28

    The effects of Mn doping on the structural properties of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in thin film form were studied in samples grown via molecular beam epitaxy. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, supported by density functional theory calculations, indicate that preferential incorporation occurs substitutionally in Bi sites across the entire film volume. This finding is consistent with x-ray diffraction measurements which show that the out of plane lattice constant expands while the in plane lattice constant contracts as the Mn concentration is increased. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the Mn valency is 2+ and that the Mn bonding is similar to that in MnSe. The expansion along the out of plane direction is most likely due to weakening of the Van der Waals interactions between adjacent Se planes. Transport measurements are consistent with this Mn{sup 2+} substitution of Bi sites if additional structural defects induced by this substitution are taken into account.

  9. Optimization of the Nonradiative Lifetime of Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy (MBE)-Grown Undoped GaAs/AlGaAs Double Heterostructures (DH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    efficiency of MBE-grown GaAs/ aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) double heterostructure (DH) structures grown at ARL with a growth temperature of 595...GaAs/ aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) double heterostructures (DHs) that were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at the U.S. Army Research...Phys. Rev. B 1994, 50, 1746. 10 List of Symbols, Abbreviations, and Acronyms AlGaAs aluminum /gallium arsenide ARL US Army Research

  10. Band lineup in GaAs(1-x)Sbx/GaAs strained-layer multiple quantum wells grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, G.; Agarwala, S.; Huang, D.; Chyi, J.; Morkoc, H.

    1988-11-01

    GaAs(1-x)Sbx/GaAs strained-layer multiple quantum wells have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and characterized by room-temperature photoreflectance (PR). The PR spectra denote that high-quality layers can be grown in the GaAs(1-x)Sbx/GaAs system. The method for determining the band offset Q(vh) is discussed in this strained-layer system.

  11. Beam Induced Pressure Rise at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Y; Bai, Mei; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Gullotta, Justin; He, Ping; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Peggs, Steve; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smart, Loralie; Snydstrup, Louis; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Zeno, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Beam induced pressure rise in RHIC warm sections is currently one of the machine intensity and luminosity limits. This pressure rise is mainly due to electron cloud effects. The RHIC warm section electron cloud is associated with longer bunch spacings compared with other machines, and is distributed non-uniformly around the ring. In addition to the countermeasures for normal electron cloud, such as the NEG coated pipe, solenoids, beam scrubbing, bunch gaps, and larger bunch spacing, other studies and beam tests toward the understanding and counteracting RHIC warm electron cloud are of interest. These include the ion desorption studies and the test of anti-grazing ridges. For high bunch intensities and the shortest bunch spacings, pressure rises at certain locations in the cryogenic region have been observed during the past two runs. Beam studies are planned for the current 2005 run and the results will be reported.

  12. Critical parameters for the molecular beam epitaxial growth of 1.55 μm (Ga,In)(N,As) multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Luna, Esperanza; Trampert, Achim; Ploog, Klaus H.

    2006-01-01

    The authors discuss the effect of substrate temperature and As beam equivalent pressure (BEP) on the molecular beam epitaxial growth of (Ga,In)(N,As) multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that a low substrate temperature essentially prevents composition modulations. Secondary ion mass spectrometry results indicate that a low As BEP reduces the incorporation competition of group V elements. The low substrate temperature and low As BEP growth condition leads to (Ga,In)(N,As) MQWs containing more than 4% N preserving good structural and optical properties, and hence demonstrating 1.55 μm photoluminescence emission at room temperature

  13. Fabrication of Fe{sub 3}Si/CaF{sub 2} heterostructures ferromagnetic resonant tunneling diode by selected-area molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadakuni-Makabe, Kenji; Suzuno, Mitsushi; Harada, Kazunori [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennohdai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Suemasu, Takashi, E-mail: suemasu@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennohdai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Akinaga, Hiro [Nanodevice Innovation Research Center and Nanotechnology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2011-10-03

    We have fabricated 200-nm-diameter ferromagnetic resonant tunneling diodes (FM-RTDs) using CaF{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}Si heterostructures on Si(111) substrates, by selected-area molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using electron-beam (EB) lithography. Clear negative differential resistances (NDRs) were observed in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at room temperature (RT). The reproducibility of the I-V characteristics was greatly improved, and approximately 40% of the FM-RTDs showed clear NDRs at RT.

  14. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction oscillations during molecular beam epitaxial growth of ZnSe on (001)GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Takafumi; Taneda, Hirohito; Funaki, Mitsuyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of II - VI compound of ZnSe are observed for the first time. The MBE growth was achieved on (001) GaAs substrate. After an 1-μm thick ZnSe buffer was grown, stable oscillations were observed at around the molecular beam flux ratio of Zn to Se of 1:3. One period of the oscillation corresponds to the growth rate of monomolecular layer. The observation of the oscillatory behaviors of RHEED is discussed in terms of surface morphology as is observed by RHEED. (author)

  15. Behaviors of beryllium compensation doping in InGaAsP grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Ma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report structural properties as well as electrical and optical behaviors of beryllium (Be-doped InGaAsP lattice-matched to InP grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. P type layers present a high degree of compensation on the order of 1018 cm−3, and for Be densities below 9.5×1017 cm−3, they are found to be n type. Enhanced incorporation of oxygen during Be doping is observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Be in forms of interstitial donors or donor-like Be-O complexes for cell temperatures below 800°C is proposed to account for such anomalous compensation behaviors. A constant photoluminescence energy of 0.98 eV without any Moss-Burstein shift for Be doping levels up to 1018 cm−3 along with increased emission intensity due to passivation effect of Be is also observed. An increasing number of minority carriers tend to relax via Be defect state-related Shockley-Read-Hall recombination with the increase of Be doping density.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of quasi-freestanding transition metal disulphide monolayers on van der Waals substrates: a growth study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joshua; Pielić, Borna; Murray, Clifford; Jolie, Wouter; Wekking, Tobias; Busse, Carsten; Kralj, Marko; Michely, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Based on an ultra-high vacuum compatible two-step molecular beam epitaxy synthesis with elemental sulphur, we grow clean, well-oriented, and almost defect-free monolayer islands and layers of the transition metal disulphides MoS2, TaS2 and WS2. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction we investigate systematically how to optimise the growth process, and provide insight into the growth and annealing mechanisms. A large band gap of 2.55 eV and the ability to move flakes with the scanning tunneling microscope tip both document the weak interaction of MoS2 with its substrate consisting of graphene grown on Ir(1 1 1). As the method works for the synthesis of a variety of transition metal disulphides on different substrates, we speculate that it could be of great use for providing hitherto unattainable high quality monolayers of transition metal disulphides for fundamental spectroscopic investigations.

  17. Physicochemical analysis of Bi2Te3 - (Fe, Eu) - Bi2Te3 junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, K.; Rapacz, R.; Weis, M.; Szade, J.

    2017-05-01

    Topological insulators (TI) are a class of materials gaining in importance due to their unique spin/electronic properties, which may allow for the generation of quasiparticles and electronic states which are not accessible in classical condensed-matter systems. Not surprisingly, TI are considered as promising materials for multiple applications in next generation electronic or spintronic devices, as well as for applications in energy conversion, such as thermo-electrics. In this study, we examined the practical challenges associated with the formation of a well-defined junction between a model 3D topological insulator, Bi2Te3, and a metal, Fe or Eu, from which spin injection could potentially be realized. The properties of multilayer systems grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), with Fe or Eu thin films sandwiched between two Bi2Te3 layers, were studied in-situ using electron diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy. Their magnetic properties were measured using a SQUID magnetometer, while the in-depth chemical structure was assessed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. An examination of impact of Bi2Te3 structure on chemical stability of the junction area has been realized. For Fe, we found that despite room temperature growth, a reaction between the Fe film and Bi2Te3 takes place, leading to the formation of FeTe and also the precipitation of metallic Bi. For the Eu tri-layer, a reaction also occurs, but the Te chemical state remains intact.

  18. Growth of GaN free-standing nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy: structural and optical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchernycheva, M; Sartel, C; Cirlin, G; Travers, L; Patriarche, G; Harmand, J-C; Dang, Le Si; Renard, J; Gayral, B; Nevou, L; Julien, F

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the growth, structural and optical properties of GaN free-stranding nanowires synthesized in catalyst-free mode on Si(111) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Cylindrical nanowires with a hexagonal cross-section defined by {1 0 1-bar 0} planes and diameters down to 20 nm were observed. The nanowire length increases as a function of their diameter, following the Gibbs-Thomson expression. The growth rate in the lateral direction was studied using thin AlN marker layers showing that the lateral over axial growth rate ratio can be tuned from ∼1% to ∼10% by changing the III/V flux ratio, with the lateral growth remaining homogeneous along the NW axis. Nanowire ensembles showed a strong near band edge photoluminescence up to room temperature. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence from a single wire is peaked at 3.478 eV with broadening of 6-10 meV. This emission is similar to the luminescence of nanowire ensembles, which demonstrates strain homogeneity from wire to wire. The optical properties along the wire axis probed by micro-cathodoluminescence were found to be uniform, with no evidence of a higher defect density in the bottom part of the nanowires next to the Si substrate

  19. Interface transparency and proximity effect in Nb/Cu triple layers realized by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesauro, A; Aurigemma, A; Cirillo, C; Prischepa, S L; Salvato, M; Attanasio, C [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E R Caianiello' and INFM-Laboratorio Regionale Supermat, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Baronissi, Sa, I-84081 (Italy)

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated, in the framework of the proximity effect theory, the interface transparency T between Nb and Cu in the case of high quality Nb/Cu trilayers fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering deposition techniques. The obtained T values do not seem to be strongly influenced by the fabrication methods but more by the intrinsic properties of the two metals; a slightly higher value for T has even been deduced for the MBE prepared samples. The proximity effect in these samples has also been studied in the presence of an external magnetic field. In the parallel configuration a significant shift towards lower values of the 2D-3D crossover temperature has been observed for MBE samples, in good agreement with very recent theoretical predictions. In the perpendicular case a positive curvature of the temperature dependence of the upper critical field has been detected, which was less pronounced for sputtered samples. Both the effects have been observed only for trilayers with low Nb thickness (<600 A) which confirms the crucial influence of the interface transparency on the values of the upper critical field in such samples.

  20. Automated angle-scanning photoemission end-station with molecular beam epitaxy at KEK-PF BL-1C

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, K; Horiba, K; Oh, J H; Nakazono, S; Kihara, T; Nakamura, K; Mano, T; Mizuguchi, M; Oshima, M; Aiura, Y; Kakizaki, A

    2001-01-01

    In order to satisfy demands to study the electronic structure of quantum nanostructures, a VUV beamline and a high-resolution and high-throughput photoemission end-station combined with a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system have been constructed at the BL-1C of the Photon Factory. An angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer, having high energy- and angular-resolutions; VG Microtech ARUPS10, was installed. The total energy resolution of 31 meV at the 60 eV of photon energy is achieved. For the automated angle-scanning photoemission, the electron spectrometer mounted on a two-axis goniometer can be rotated in vacuum by the computer-controlled stepping motors. Another distinctive feature of this end-station is a connection to a MBE chamber in ultahigh vacuum (UHV). In this system, MBE-grown samples can be transferred into the photoemission chamber without breaking UHV. Photoemission spectra of MBE-grown GaAs(0 0 1) surfaces were measured with high-resolution and bulk and surface components are clearly resolved.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy of InN layers on Sapphire, GaN and indium tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denker, Christian; Landgraf, Boris; Schuhmann, Henning; Malindretos, Joerg; Seibt, Michael; Rizzi, Angela [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Segura-Ruiz, Jaime; Gomez-Gomez, Maribel; Cantarero, Andres [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, Paterna (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Among the group-III nitrides semiconductors, InN is the one with the narrowest gap (0.67 eV), lowest effective electron mass and highest peak drift velocity. It is therefore a very interesting material for several applications, in particular semiconductor solar cells. Furthermore, the high electron affinity makes it suitable also as electrode material for organic solar cells. InN layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on MOCVD GaN templates, on bare c-plane sapphire and on polycrystalline indium tin oxide. On all substrates the III-V ratio as well as the substrate temperature was varied. A RHEED analysis of InN growth on GaN showed a relatively sharp transition from N-rich and columnar growth to In-rich growth with droplet formation by increasing the In flux impinging on the surface. The InN layers on single crystalline substrates were characterized by SEM, AFM, XRD, PL and Raman. The InN layers on ITO were mainly analyzed with respect to the surface morphology with SEM. HRTEM in cross section gives insight into the structure of the interface to the ITO substrate.

  2. Carrier Lifetimes of Iodine-Doped CdMgTe/CdSeTe Double Heterostructures Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, S.; Edirisooriya, M.; Ogedengbe, O. S.; Petersen, J. E.; Swartz, C. H.; LeBlanc, E. G.; Myers, T. H.; Li, J. V.; Holtz, M.

    2017-09-01

    Iodine-doped CdMgTe/CdSeTe double heterostructures (DHs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and studied using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL), focusing on absorber layer thickness of 2 μm. The n-type free carrier concentration was varied to ˜7 × 1015 cm-3, 8.4 × 1016 cm-3, and 8.4 × 1017 cm-3 using iodine as dopant in DHs. Optical injection at 1 × 1010 photons/pulse/cm2 to 3 × 1011 photons/pulse/cm2, corresponding to initial injection of photocarriers up to ˜8 × 1015 cm-3, was applied to examine the effects of excess carrier concentration on the PL lifetimes. Iodine-doped DHs exhibited an initial rapid decay followed by a slower decay at free carrier concentration of 7 × 1015 cm-3 and 8.4 × 1016 cm-3. The optical injection dependence of the carrier lifetimes for DHs was interpreted based on the Shockley-Read-Hall model. The observed decrease in lifetime with increasing n is consistent with growing importance of radiative recombination.

  3. Defects, strain relaxation, and compositional grading in high indium content InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazioti, C.; Kehagias, Th.; Pavlidou, E.; Komninou, Ph.; Karakostas, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P., E-mail: gdim@auth.gr [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papadomanolaki, E.; Iliopoulos, E. [Microelectronics Research Group (MRG), IESL, FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion Crete, Greece and Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Walther, T. [Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Smalc-Koziorowska, J. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-21

    We investigate the structural properties of a series of high alloy content InGaN epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, employing the deposition temperature as variable under invariant element fluxes. Using transmission electron microscopy methods, distinct strain relaxation modes were observed, depending on the indium content attained through temperature adjustment. At lower indium contents, strain relaxation by V-pit formation dominated, with concurrent formation of an indium-rich interfacial zone. With increasing indium content, this mechanism was gradually substituted by the introduction of a self-formed strained interfacial InGaN layer of lower indium content, as well as multiple intrinsic basal stacking faults and threading dislocations in the rest of the film. We show that this interfacial layer is not chemically abrupt and that major plastic strain relaxation through defect introduction commences upon reaching a critical indium concentration as a result of compositional pulling. Upon further increase of the indium content, this relaxation mode was again gradually succeeded by the increase in the density of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface, leading eventually to the suppression of the strained InGaN layer and basal stacking faults.

  4. Manipulation of morphology and structure of the top of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Pan, Dong; Yu, Xuezhe; So, Hyok; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-10-01

    Self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. The effect of different closing sequences of the Ga and As cell shutters on the morphology and structural phase of GaAs NWs is investigated. For the sequences of closing the Ga and As cell shutters simultaneously or closing the As cell shutter 1 min after closing the Ga cell shutter, the NWs grow vertically to the substrate surface. In contrast, when the As cell shutter is closed first, maintaining the Ga flux is found to be critical for the following growth of GaAs NWs, which can change the growth direction from [111] to . The evolution of the morphology and structural phase transition at the tips of these GaAs NWs confirm that the triple-phase-line shift mode is at work even for the growth with different cell shutter closing sequences. Our work will provide new insights for better understanding of the growth mechanism and realizing of the morphology and structure control of the GaAs NWs. Project supported partly by the MOST of China (No. 2015CB921503), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61504133, 61334006, 61404127), and Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (No. 2017156).

  5. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sheng-Joue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111 substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods.

  6. Structural, electrical, and optical characterization of coalescent p-n GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolkovsky, Vl. [Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K. [Institute of Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32-46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Korona, K. P. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-12-14

    The electrical, structural, and optical properties of coalescent p-n GaN nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si (111) substrate are investigated. From photoluminescence measurements the full width at half maximum of bound exciton peaks AX and DA is found as 1.3 and 1.2 meV, respectively. These values are lower than those reported previously in the literature. The current-voltage characteristics show the rectification ratio of about 10{sup 2} and the leakage current of about 10{sup −4} A/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. We demonstrate that the thermionic mechanism is not dominant in these samples and spatial inhomogeneties and tunneling processes through a ∼2 nm thick SiN{sub x} layer between GaN and Si could be responsible for deviation from the ideal diode behavior. The free carrier concentration in GaN NWs determined by capacitance-voltage measurements is about 4 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3}. Two deep levels (H190 and E250) are found in the structures. We attribute H190 to an extended defect located at the interface between the substrate and the SiN{sub x} interlayer or near the sidewalls at the bottom of the NWs, whereas E250 is tentatively assigned to a gallium-vacancy- or nitrogen interstitials-related defect.

  7. A dominant electron trap in molecular beam epitaxial InAlN lattice-matched to GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ayush; Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Cheng, Shaobo; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Mi, Zetian; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2018-04-01

    Deep levels in lattice-matched undoped and Si-doped InAlN/GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been identified and characterized by capacitance and photocapacitance measurements. From x-ray diffraction, reflectance measurements, electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy it is evident that the material has two distinct phases with different compositions. These correspond to In compositions of 18.1% and 25.8%, with corresponding bandgaps of 4.6 eV and 4.1 eV, respectively. The lower bandgap material is present as columnar microstructures in the form of quantum wires. A dominant electron trap with an activation energy of 0.293  ±  0.01 eV, a small capture cross-section of (1.54  ±  0.25)  ×  10-18 cm2, and density increasing linearly with Si doping density is identified in all the samples. The characteristics of the electron trap and variation of diode capacitance are discussed in the context of carrier dynamics involving the dominant trap level and the quantum wires.

  8. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH3-molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH 3 flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures

  9. Behaviors of beryllium compensation doping in InGaAsP grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. G.; Gu, Y.; Xi, S. P.; Chen, X. Y.; Liang, Baolai; Juang, Bor-Chau; Huffaker, Diana L.; Du, B.; Shao, X. M.; Fang, J. X.

    2017-07-01

    We report structural properties as well as electrical and optical behaviors of beryllium (Be)-doped InGaAsP lattice-matched to InP grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. P type layers present a high degree of compensation on the order of 1018 cm-3, and for Be densities below 9.5×1017 cm-3, they are found to be n type. Enhanced incorporation of oxygen during Be doping is observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Be in forms of interstitial donors or donor-like Be-O complexes for cell temperatures below 800°C is proposed to account for such anomalous compensation behaviors. A constant photoluminescence energy of 0.98 eV without any Moss-Burstein shift for Be doping levels up to 1018 cm-3 along with increased emission intensity due to passivation effect of Be is also observed. An increasing number of minority carriers tend to relax via Be defect state-related Shockley-Read-Hall recombination with the increase of Be doping density.

  10. Ellipsometry of rough CdTe(211)B-Ge(211) surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badano, Giacomo; Ballet, Philippe; Zanatta, Jean-Paul; Baudry, Xavier; Million, Alain; Garland, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the ellipsometric response of semiconductor surfaces is investigated. CdTe(211)B layers were grown on Ge(211) by molecular beam epitaxy using less than optimal growth conditions to enhance the formation of surface roughness. Their optical properties, measured by rotating-compensator ellipsometry, showed small but significant sample-to-sample differences not explainable in terms of nanometer-scale roughness. A critical-point analysis established that the critical-point structure of the dielectric function was the same for all samples. This result suggested that the observed sample-to-sample variations were due to macroscopic roughness, which scatters off-specular light into the detector, thereby causing errors. We introduced tentative corrections for off-specular reflection that fitted the observed differences and thus supported the idea that off-specular reflection was responsible for the observed differences. These results were obtained using CdTe but are easily extensible to other rough opaque materials

  11. P-type ZnO thin films prepared by plasma molecular beam epitaxy using radical NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, H.W.; Lu, Y.M.; Shen, D.Z.; Liu, Y.C.; Yan, J.F.; Li, B.H.; Zhang, Z.Z.; Zhang, J.Y.; Fan, X.W. [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dongnanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China); Shan, C.X. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-05-01

    N-doped p-type ZnO thin films were grown by plasma molecular beam epitaxy (P-MBE) on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) using radical NO as oxygen source and nitrogen dopant. The reproducible ZnO thin films have maximum net hole concentration (N{sub A}-N{sub D}) of 1.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and minimum resistivity of 9.36 {omega} cm. The influence of N incorporation on the quality of the ZnO thin films was studied using X-ray diffraction and absorption spectra. The photoluminescence spectra at 77 K of p-type ZnO thin films are dominated by the emission from donor-acceptor pair recombination. The formation mechanism of p-type ZnO is explained by the optical emission spectra of radical N{sub 2} and radical NO. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of high electron mobility InAs/AlSb deep quantum well structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Juan; Wang Guowei; Xu Yingqiang; Xing Junliang; Xiang Wei; Tang Bao; Zhu Yan; Ren Zhengwei; He Zhenhong; Niu Zhichuan [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-07-07

    InAs/AlSb deep quantum well (QW) structures with high electron mobility were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on semi-insulating GaAs substrates. AlSb and Al{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}Sb buffer layers were grown to accommodate the lattice mismatch (7%) between the InAs/AlSb QW active region and GaAs substrate. Transmission electron microscopy shows abrupt interface and atomic force microscopy measurements display smooth surface morphology. Growth conditions of AlSb and Al{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}Sb buffer were optimized. Al{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}Sb is better than AlSb as a buffer layer as indicated. The sample with optimal Al{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}Sb buffer layer shows a smooth surface morphology with root-mean-square roughness of 6.67 A. The electron mobility has reached as high as 27 000 cm{sup 2}/Vs with a sheet density of 4.54 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 2} at room temperature.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of high electron mobility InAs/AlSb deep quantum well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juan; Wang Guowei; Xu Yingqiang; Xing Junliang; Xiang Wei; Tang Bao; Zhu Yan; Ren Zhengwei; He Zhenhong; Niu Zhichuan

    2013-01-01

    InAs/AlSb deep quantum well (QW) structures with high electron mobility were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on semi-insulating GaAs substrates. AlSb and Al 0.75 Ga 0.25 Sb buffer layers were grown to accommodate the lattice mismatch (7%) between the InAs/AlSb QW active region and GaAs substrate. Transmission electron microscopy shows abrupt interface and atomic force microscopy measurements display smooth surface morphology. Growth conditions of AlSb and Al 0.75 Ga 0.25 Sb buffer were optimized. Al 0.75 Ga 0.25 Sb is better than AlSb as a buffer layer as indicated. The sample with optimal Al 0.75 Ga 0.25 Sb buffer layer shows a smooth surface morphology with root-mean-square roughness of 6.67 Å. The electron mobility has reached as high as 27 000 cm 2 /Vs with a sheet density of 4.54 × 10 11 /cm 2 at room temperature

  14. Three-dimensional lattice rotation in GaAs nanowire growth on hydrogen-silsesquioxane covered GaAs (001) using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dat Q.; Pham, Huyen T.; Higashimine, Koichi; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Akabori, Masashi

    2018-05-01

    We report on crystallographic behaviors of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs) self-crystallized on GaAs (001) substrate. The NWs were grown on hydrogen-silsesquioxane (HSQ) covered substrates using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Commonly, the epitaxial growth of GaAs B (B-polar) NWs is prominently observed on GaAs (001); however, we yielded a remarkable number of epitaxially grown GaAs A (A-polar) NWs in addition to the majorly obtained B-polar NWs. Such NW orientations are always accompanied by a typical inclined angle of 35° from (001) plane. NWs with another inclined angle of 74° were additionally observed and attributed to be -oriented, not in direct epitaxial relation with the substrate. Such 74° NWs' existence is related to first-order three-dimensional (3D) lattice rotation taking place at the very beginning of the growth. It turns out that spatially 60° lattice rotation around directions at GaAs seeds is essentially in charge of A- and B-polar 74° NWs. Transmission electron microscope observations reveal a high density of twinning in the B-polar NWs and twin-free characteristic in the A-polar NWs.

  15. Strain Induced Magnetism in SrRuO3 Epitaxial Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grutter, A.; Wong, F.; Arenholz, E.; Liberati, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-01-10

    Epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} thin films were grown on SrTiO{sub 3}, (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(SrAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.7} and LaAlO{sub 3} substrates inducing different biaxial compressive strains. Coherently strained SrRuO{sub 3} films exhibit enhanced magnetization compared to previously reported bulk and thin film values of 1.1-1.6 {micro}{sub B} per formula unit. A comparison of (001) and (110) SrRuO{sub 3} films on each substrate indicates that films on (110) oriented have consistently higher saturated moments than corresponding (001) films. These observations indicate the importance of lattice distortions in controlling the magnetic ground state in this transitional metal oxide.

  16. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  17. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, J. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Umananda, M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Nuclear Science Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Dev, B.N. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Akimoto, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ito, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Emoto, T. [Toyota National College of Technology, 2-1, Toyota, Aichi 471-8525 (Japan); Satyam, P.V. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)]. E-mail: satyam@iopb.res.in

    2006-03-15

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} and C{sup 2+} ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed.

  18. Electron transport in unipolar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Browne, David A.

    2015-05-14

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Unipolar-light emitting diode like structures were grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy on c plane (0001) GaN on sapphire templates. Studies were performed to experimentally examine the effect of random alloy fluctuations on electron transport through quantum well active regions. These unipolar structures served as a test vehicle to test our 2D model of the effect of compositional fluctuations on polarization-induced barriers. Variables that were systematically studied included varying quantum well number from 0 to 5, well thickness of 1.5 nm, 3 nm, and 4.5 nm, and well compositions of In0.14Ga0.86N and In0.19Ga0.81N. Diode-like current voltage behavior was clearly observed due to the polarization-induced conduction band barrier in the quantum well region. Increasing quantum well width and number were shown to have a significant impact on increasing the turn-on voltage of each device. Temperature dependent IV measurements clearly revealed the dominant effect of thermionic behavior for temperatures from room temperature and above. Atom probe tomography was used to directly analyze parameters of the alloy fluctuations in the quantum wells including amplitude and length scale of compositional variation. A drift diffusion Schrödinger Poisson method accounting for two dimensional indium fluctuations (both in the growth direction and within the wells) was used to correctly model the turn-on voltages of the devices as compared to traditional 1D simulation models.

  19. Investigation of the growth of In2O3 on Y-stabilized ZrO2(100) by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourlange, A.; Payne, D.J.; Palgrave, R.G.; Foord, J.S.; Egdell, R.G.; Jacobs, R.M.J.; Schertel, A.; Hutchison, J.L.; Dobson, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of In 2 O 3 have been grown on Y-stabilised ZrO 2 (100) substrates by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy over a range of substrate temperatures between 650 o C and 900 o C. Growth at 650 o C leads to continuous but granular films and complete extinction of substrate core level structure in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. However with increasing substrate temperature the films break up into a series of discrete micrometer sized islands. Both the continuous and the island films have excellent epitaxial relationship with the substrate as gauged by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction and lattice imaging in high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyok; Pan, Dong; Li, Lixia; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial high-quality InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires are of great interest due to their distinct advantages in fundamental research as well as applications in semiconductor electronic and quantum devices. Currently, nearly all the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is assisted with foreign catalysts such as Au, and work on foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is lacking. Here we report on the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy without using any foreign catalysts. The Sb/In beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio is found to have important influence on the heterostructure nanowire morphology, and InSb nanowires can be epitaxially grown on InAs nanowire stems with a hexagonal prism and nanosheet-like shapes when the Sb/In BEP ratio varies from 10 to 20. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the InAs nanowire stems have a mixture of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structures, while InSb nanowire parts have a pure ZB crystal structure free of stacking faults. Composition analysis of axial heterostructure nanowires provides clear evidence that the InSb nanowires are epitaxially grown on InAs nanowires in an In self-assisted vapor-liquid-solid manner. This study paves a new route for growing narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures with strong spin-orbit interaction for the study of topological states, and the growth manner presented here is expected to be used to grow other In-based axial heterostructure nanowires.

  1. Epitaxy physical principles and technical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Herman, Marian A; Sitter, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Epitaxy provides readers with a comprehensive treatment of the modern models and modifications of epitaxy, together with the relevant experimental and technological framework. This advanced textbook describes all important aspects of the epitaxial growth processes of solid films on crystalline substrates, including a section on heteroepitaxy. It covers and discusses in details the most important epitaxial growth techniques, which are currently widely used in basic research as well as in manufacturing processes of devices, namely solid-phase epitaxy, liquid-phase epitaxy, vapor-phase epitaxy, including metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular-beam epitaxy. Epitaxy’s coverage of science and texhnology thin-film is intended to fill the need for a comprehensive reference and text examining the variety of problems related to the physical foundations and technical implementation of epitaxial crystallization. It is intended for undergraduate students, PhD students, research scientists, lecturers and practic...

  2. Structural characterization and magnetic properties of L10-MnAl films grown on different underlayers by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Fumiya; Gushi, Toshiki; Anzai, Akihito; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    We grow MnAl films on different underlayers by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and investigate their structural and magnetic properties. L10-ordered MnAl films were successfully grown both on an MgO(0 0 1) single-crystalline substrate and on an Mn4N(0 0 1) buffer layer formed on MgO(0 0 1) and SrTiO3(0 0 1) substrates. For the MgO substrate, post rapid thermal annealing (RTA) drastically improved the crystalline quality and the degree of L10-ordering, whereas no improvement in the crystallinity was achieved by altering the substrate temperature (TS) during MBE growth. However, high-quality L10-MnAl films were formed on the Mn4N buffer layer by simply varying TS. Structural analysis using X-ray diffraction showed MnAl on an MgO substrate had a cubic structure whereas MnAl on the Mn4N buffer had a tetragonal structure. This difference in crystal structure affected the magnetic properties of the MnAl films. The uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (Ku) was drastically improved by inserting an Mn4N buffer layer. We achieved a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Ku = 5.0 ± 0.7 Merg/cm3 for MnAl/Mn4N film on MgO and 6.0 ± 0.2 Merg/cm3 on STO. These results suggest that Mn4N has potential as an underlayer for L10-MnAl.

  3. Electrical and photovoltaic properties of CdTe/ZnTe n-i-p junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielony, E., E-mail: eunika.zielony@pwr.edu.pl; Płaczek-Popko, E.; Racino, A.; Gumienny, Z. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Olender, K.; Wosiński, T.; Karczewski, G.; Chusnutdinow, S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-28

    Preliminary studies have been performed on photoelectrical properties of CdTe/ZnTe n-i-p junctions grown using the molecular beam epitaxy technique. Photovoltaic properties of the cells have been investigated by the measurements of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics under 1-sun illumination. I-V characteristics yield efficiencies of the cells varying from 3.4% to 4.9%. The low efficiency can be due to the presence of electrically active defects. In order to study the origin of defects in CdTe/ZnTe photovoltaic junctions, space charge techniques (C-V and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS)) have been applied. From the C-V measurements, a doping profile was calculated confirming charge accumulation in the i-CdTe layer. The results of the DLTS studies revealed the presence of four traps within a temperature range from 77–420 K. Three of them with activation energies equal to 0.22 eV, 0.45 eV, and 0.78 eV have been ascribed to the hole traps present in the i-CdTe material and their possible origin has been discussed. The fourth, high-temperature DLTS peak observed at ∼350 K has been attributed to extended defects as its amplitude and temperature position depends on the value of the filling pulse width. It is assumed that the defects related to the trap are either located in the i-CdTe layer or at the i-CdTe/ZnTe interface. However, it was found that the trap exhibits twofold nature: it behaves as a majority or as a minority trap, depending on the filling pulse height, which is a characteristic feature of recombination centers. This trap is presumably responsible for the low efficiency of the cells.

  4. Defect properties of InGaAsN layers grown as sub-monolayer digital alloys by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Artem I.; Gudovskikh, Alexander S.; Kudryashov, Dmitry A.; Lazarenko, Alexandra A.; Morozov, Ivan A.; Mozharov, Alexey M.; Nikitina, Ekaterina V.; Pirogov, Evgeny V.; Sobolev, Maxim S.; Zelentsov, Kirill S.; Egorov, Anton Yu.; Darga, Arouna; Le Gall, Sylvain; Kleider, Jean-Paul

    2018-04-01

    The defect properties of InGaAsN dilute nitrides grown as sub-monolayer digital alloys (SDAs) by molecular beam epitaxy for photovoltaic application were studied by space charge capacitance spectroscopy. Alloys of i-InGaAsN (Eg = 1.03 eV) were lattice-matched grown on GaAs wafers as a superlattice of InAs/GaAsN with one monolayer of InAs (solar cells. Low p-type background doping was demonstrated at room temperature in samples with InGaAsN layers 900 nm and 1200 nm thick (less 1 × 1015 cm-3). According to admittance spectroscopy and deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, the SDA approach leads to defect-free growth up to a thickness of 900 nm. An increase in thickness to 1200 nm leads to the formation of non-radiative recombination centers with an activation energy of 0.5 eV (NT = 8.4 × 1014 cm-3) and a shallow defect level at 0.20 eV. The last one leads to the appearance of additional doping, but its concentration is low (NT = 5 × 1014 cm-3) so it does not affect the photoelectric properties. However, further increase in thickness to 1600 nm, leads to significant growth of its concentration to (3-5) × 1015 cm-3, while the concentration of deep levels becomes 1.3 × 1015 cm-3. Therefore, additional free charge carriers appearing due to ionization of the shallow level change the band diagram from p-i-n to p-n junction at room temperature. It leads to a drop of the external quantum efficiency due to the effect of pulling electric field decrease in the p-n junction and an increased number of non-radiative recombination centers that negatively impact lifetimes in InGaAsN.

  5. Growth and characterization of metamorphic InAs/GaSb tunnel heterojunction on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jheng-Sin; Clavel, Michael B.; Hudait, Mantu K., E-mail: mantu.hudait@vt.edu [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Pandey, Rahul [Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Datta, Suman [Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Meeker, Michael; Khodaparast, Giti A. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-06-28

    The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical transport characteristics of a metamorphic, broken-gap InAs/GaSb p-i-n tunnel diode structure, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs, were demonstrated. Precise shutter sequences were implemented for the strain-balanced InAs/GaSb active layer growth on GaAs, as corroborated by high-resolution X-ray analysis. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and detailed micrograph analysis demonstrated strain relaxation primarily via the formation of 90° Lomer misfit dislocations (MDs) exhibiting a 5.6 nm spacing and intermittent 60° MDs at the GaSb/GaAs heterointerface, which was further supported by a minimal lattice tilt of 180 arc sec observed during X-ray analysis. Selective area diffraction and Fast Fourier Transform patterns confirmed the full relaxation of the GaSb buffer layer and quasi-ideal, strain-balanced InAs/GaSb heteroepitaxy. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements demonstrated the optical band gap of the GaSb layer. Strong optical signal at room temperature from this structure supports a high-quality material synthesis. Current–voltage characteristics of fabricated InAs/GaSb p-i-n tunnel diodes measured at 77 K and 290 K demonstrated two bias-dependent transport mechanisms. The Shockley–Read–Hall generation–recombination mechanism at low bias and band-to-band tunneling transport at high bias confirmed the p-i-n tunnel diode operation. This elucidated the importance of defect control in metamorphic InAs/GaSb tunnel diodes for the implementation of low-voltage and high-performance tunnel field effect transistor applications.

  6. InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru-Chevallier, C; El Akra, A; Pelloux-Gervais, D; Dumont, H; Canut, B; Chauvin, N; Regreny, P; Gendry, M; Patriarche, G; Jancu, J M; Even, J; Noe, P; Calvo, V; Salem, B

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve homogeneous, high density and dislocation free InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on silicon substrates. This work is part of a project which aims at overcoming the severe limitation suffered by silicon regarding its optoelectronic applications, especially efficient light emission device. For this study, one of the key points is to overcome the expected type II InGaAs/Si interface by inserting the InGaAs quantum dots inside a thin silicon quantum well in SiO2 fabricated on a SOI substrate. Confinement effects of the Si/SiO2 quantum well are expected to heighten the indirect silicon bandgap and then give rise to a type I interface with the InGaAs quantum dots. Band structure and optical properties are modeled within the tight binding approximation: direct energy bandgap is demonstrated in SiO2/Si/InAs/Si/SiO2 heterostructures for very thin Si layers and absorption coefficient is calculated. Thinned SOI substrates are successfully prepared using successive etching process resulting in a 2 nm-thick Si layer on top of silica. Another key point to get light emission from InGaAs quantum dots is to avoid any dislocations or defects in the quantum dots. We investigate the quantum dot size distribution, density and structural quality at different V/III beam equivalent pressure ratios, different growth temperatures and as a function of the amount of deposited material. This study was performed for InGaAs quantum dots grown on Si(001) substrates. The capping of InGaAs quantum dots by a silicon epilayer is performed in order to get efficient photoluminescence emission from quantum dots. Scanning transmission electronic microscopy images are used to study the structural quality of the quantum dots. Dislocation free In50Ga50As QDs are successfully obtained on a (001) silicon substrate. The analysis of QDs capped with silicon by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in a channeling geometry is also presented.

  7. A six-circle diffractometer system for synchrotron X-ray studies of surfaces and thin film growth by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hawoong; Chiang, T.-C.

    2007-01-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface diffractometer system equipped with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) capabilities has been developed. It has a versatile 6-circle configuration for defining the diffraction geometry, and a three-axis translation stage for controlling the sample position. Rugged mechanical components are employed in the design to allow accurate diffraction measurements. Sample cooling is facilitated by passing liquid nitrogen into a reservoir in the base of a sample mount. The sample can be heated to very high temperatures by either direct current heating or electron beam bombardment. During film growth and processing, the sample temperature, monitored by thermocouples, can be continuously and rapidly varied between ∼110 K to above room temperature. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera, attached to the μ circle, allows rapid reciprocal space mapping for real time studies of sample growth and evolution during deposition and annealing. A beam stop and a baffle are implemented to minimize stray scattered radiation

  8. Selective-area growth of GaN nanowires on SiO{sub 2}-masked Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. E.; Doundoulakis, G. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Lymperakis, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Eftychis, S.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Konstantinidis, G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Olziersky, A.; Dimitrakis, P.; Ioannou-Sougleridis, V.; Normand, P. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR Demokritos, Patriarchou Grigoriou and Neapoleos 27, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Koukoula, T.; Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2016-06-14

    We analyze a method to selectively grow straight, vertical gallium nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at sites specified by a silicon oxide mask, which is thermally grown on silicon (111) substrates and patterned by electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching. The investigated method requires only one single molecular beam epitaxy MBE growth process, i.e., the SiO{sub 2} mask is formed on silicon instead of on a previously grown GaN or AlN buffer layer. We present a systematic and analytical study involving various mask patterns, characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, as well as numerical simulations, to evaluate how the dimensions (window diameter and spacing) of the mask affect the distribution of the nanowires, their morphology, and alignment, as well as their photonic properties. Capabilities and limitations for this method of selective-area growth of nanowires have been identified. A window diameter less than 50 nm and a window spacing larger than 500 nm can provide single nanowire nucleation in nearly all mask windows. The results are consistent with a Ga diffusion length on the silicon dioxide surface in the order of approximately 1 μm.

  9. High quantum efficiency ultraviolet/blue AlGaN /InGaN photocathodes grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, D. J.; Buckley, J. H.; Rebillot, P.

    2005-08-01

    Enormous technological breakthroughs have been made in optoelectronic devices through the use of advanced heteroepitaxial-semiconductor crystal-growth techniques. This technology is being extended toward enhanced ultraviolet/blue single-photon detection through the design and fabrication of atomically tailored heteroepitaxial GaAlN /GaInN photocathode device structures. The AlGaN /InGaN system is ideal because the band gap can be tailored over an energy range from 0.8 to 6.2 eV and epitaxial thin-film layers can be grown directly on optically transparent sapphire substrates. Although a single p-type GaN layer activated with cesium can produce reasonably high quantum efficiency in the ultraviolet wave band, a more complex design is necessary to achieve high levels extending into the blue region. In the present work, band-gap engineering concepts have been utilized to design heterostructure photocathodes. The increased level of sophistication offered by this approach has been exploited in an attempt to precisely control photoelectron transport to the photocathode surface. Thin heterostructure layers designed for transmission-mode detection were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy. A quantum efficiency of 40% at 250 nm was achieved using a thin, compositionally graded GaN /InGaN layer, epitaxially grown on a sapphire substrate. Further improvements are anticipated through continued optimization, defect reduction, and more complex photocathode designs.

  10. ZnTe-ZnO core-shell radial heterostructures grown by the combination of molecular beam epitaxy and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, E; Wachnicka, A; Guziewicz, E; Godlewski, M; Kret, S; Zaleszczyk, W; Dynowska, E; Presz, A; Karczewski, G; Wojtowicz, T

    2010-01-08

    ZnTe-ZnO core-shell radial heterostructures were grown using a new method of combining molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Zinc telluride nanowires (core) were grown on a GaAs substrate using gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. An atomic layer deposition technique using diethyl zinc and deionized water as precursors was applied for zinc oxide shell formation. The core-shell ZnTe-ZnO heterostructures thus obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaSb on GaAs substrates with AlSb/GaSb compound buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Ruiting; Deng Shukang; Shen Lanxian; Yang Peizhi; Tu Jielei; Liao Hua; Xu Yingqiang; Niu Zhichuan

    2010-01-01

    GaSb films with AlSb/GaSb compound buffer layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates. The crystal quality and optical properties were studied by high resolution transition electron microscopy and low temperature photoluminescence spectra (PL), respectively. It was found that the AlSb/GaSb compound buffer layers can restrict the dislocations into GaSb epilayers. The intensity of PL spectra of GaSb layer becomes large with the increasing the periods of AlSb/GaSb superlattices, indicating that the optical quality of GaSb films is improved.

  12. In situ study of self-assembled GaN nanowires nucleation on Si(111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hestroffer, K.; Daudin, B. [CEA-CNRS Group (Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs), Universite Joseph Fourier and CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Leclere, C.; Renevier, H. [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique, Grenoble INP--MINATEC, 3 parvis L. Neel, 38016 Grenoble (France); Cantelli, V. [' ' Nanostructures et Rayonnement Synchrotron' ' Group, CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Fondation Nanosciences, 23 rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Bougerol, C. [CEA-CNRS Group, ' ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' ' , Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-05-21

    Nucleation of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is studied through a combination of two in situ tools: grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high energy electron diffraction. Growth on bare Si(111) and on AlN/Si(111) is compared. A significantly larger delay at nucleation is observed for nanowires grown on bare Si(111). The difference in the nucleation delay is correlated to a dissimilarity of chemical reactivity between Al and Ga with nitrided Si(111).

  13. Investigation of microstructure and morphology for the Ge on porous silicon/Si substrate hetero-structure obtained by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouder, S. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France); Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Mahamdi, R. [Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Aouassa, M.; Escoubas, S.; Favre, L.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France)

    2014-01-01

    Thick porous silicon (PS) buffer layers are used as sacrificial layers to epitaxially grow planar and fully relaxed Ge membranes. The single crystal Ge layers have been deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on PS substrate. During deposition, the pore network of PS layers has been filled with Ge. We investigate the structure and morphology of PS as fabricated and after annealing at various temperatures. We show that the PS crystalline lattice is distorted and expanded in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane due to the presence of chemisorbed –OH. An annealing at high temperature (> 500 °C), greatly changes the PS morphology and structure. This change is marked by an increase of the pore diameter while the lattice parameter becomes tensily strained in the plane (compressed in the direction perpendicular). The morphology and structure of Ge layers are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy as a function of the deposition temperature and deposited thickness. The results show that the surface roughness, level of relaxation and Si-Ge intermixing (Ge content) depend on the growth temperature and deposited thickness. Two sub-layers are distinguished: the layer incorporated inside the PS pores (high level of intermixing) and the layer on top of the PS surface (low level of intermixing). When deposited at temperature > 500 °C, the Ge layers are fully relaxed with a top Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} layer x = 0.74 and a very flat surface. Such layer can serve as fully relaxed ultra-thin SiGe pseudo-substrate with high Ge content. The epitaxy of Ge on sacrificial soft PS pseudo-substrate in the experimental conditions described here provides an easy way to fabricate fully relaxed SiGe pseudo-substrates. Moreover, Ge thin films epitaxially deposited by MBE on PS could be used as relaxed pseudo-substrate in conventional microelectronic technology. - Highlights: • We have developed a rapid

  14. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuto, H., E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Musumeci, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania 95123 (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania 95123 (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  15. Radiation-induced defects in GaN bulk grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-09-08

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in thick free-standing GaN layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy. In as-grown materials, six electron traps, labeled D2 (E{sub C}–0.24 eV), D3 (E{sub C}–0.60 eV), D4 (E{sub C}–0.69 eV), D5 (E{sub C}–0.96 eV), D7 (E{sub C}–1.19 eV), and D8, were observed. After 2 MeV electron irradiation at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, three deep electron traps, labeled D1 (E{sub C}–0.12 eV), D5I (E{sub C}–0.89 eV), and D6 (E{sub C}–1.14 eV), were detected. The trap D1 has previously been reported and considered as being related to the nitrogen vacancy. From the annealing behavior and a high introduction rate, the D5I and D6 centers are suggested to be related to primary intrinsic defects.

  16. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  17. Magnetically induced martensite transition in freestanding epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Thomas, M.; Niemann, R.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 15 (2009), 152513/1-152513/3 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : epitaxial growth * Ni-Mn-Ga alloys * magnetic epitaxial layers * magnetic transitions * martensitic transformations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.554, year: 2009 http://link.aip.org/link/?APPLAB/94/152513/1

  18. Impact of N-plasma and Ga-irradiation on MoS2 layer in molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2017-01-03

    Recent interest in two-dimensional materials has resulted in ultra-thin devices based on the transfer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) onto other TMDs or III-nitride materials. In this investigation, we realized p-type monolayer (ML) MoS2, and intrinsic GaN/p-type MoS2 heterojunction by the GaN overgrowth on ML-MoS2/c-sapphire using the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A systematic nitrogen plasma (N∗2N2*) and gallium (Ga) irradiation studies are employed to understand the individual effect on the doping levels of ML-MoS2, which is evaluated by micro-Raman and high-resolution X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS) measurements. With both methods, p-type doping was attained and was verified by softening and strengthening of characteristics phonon modes E12gE2g1 and A1gA1g from Raman spectroscopy. With adequate N∗2N2*-irradiation (3 min), respective shift of 1.79 cm−1 for A1gA1g and 1.11 cm−1 for E12gE2g1 are obtained while short term Ga-irradiated (30 s) exhibits the shift of 1.51 cm−1 for A1gA1g and 0.93 cm−1 for E12gE2g1. Moreover, in HRXPS valence band spectra analysis, the position of valence band maximum measured with respect to the Fermi level is determined to evaluate the type of doping levels in ML-MoS2. The observed values of valance band maximum are reduced to 0.5, and 0.2 eV from the intrinsic value of ≈1.0 eV for N∗2N2*- and Ga-irradiated MoS2 layers, which confirms the p-type doping of ML-MoS2. Further p-type doping is verified by Hall effect measurements. Thus, by GaN overgrowth, we attained the building block of intrinsic GaN/p-type MoS2 heterojunction. Through this work, we have provided the platform for the realization of dissimilar heterostructure via monolithic approach.

  19. Inverted vertical algan deep ultraviolet leds grown on p-SiC substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothern, Denis Maurice

    Deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) are an important emerging technology for a number of applications such as water/air/surface disinfection, communications, and epoxy curing. However, as of yet, deep UV LEDs grown on sapphire substrates are neither efficient enough nor powerful enough to fully serve these and other potential applications. The majority of UV LEDs reported so far in the literature are grown on sapphire substrates and their design consists of AlGaN quantum wells (QWs) embedded in an AlGaN p-i-n junction with the n-type layer on the sapphire. These devices suffer from a high concentration of threading defects originating from the large lattice mismatch between the sapphire substrate and AlGaN alloys. Other issues include the poor doping efficiency of the n- and particularly the p-AlGaN alloys, the extraction of light through the sapphire substrate, and the heat dissipation through the thermally insulating sapphire substrate. These problems have historically limited the internal quantum efficiency (IQE), injection efficiency (IE), and light extraction efficiency (EE) of devices. As a means of addressing these efficiency and power challenges, I have contributed to the development of a novel inverted vertical deep UV LED design based on AlGaN grown on p-SiC substrates. Starting with a p-SiC substrate that serves as the p-type side of the p-i-n junction largely eliminates the necessity for the notoriously difficult p-type doping of AlGaN alloys, and allows for efficient heat dissipation through the highly thermally conductive SiC substrate. UV light absorption in the SiC substrate can be addressed by first growing p-type doped distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) on top of the substrate prior to the deposition of the active region of the device. A number of n-AlGaN films, AlGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells, and p-type doped AlGaN DBRs were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). These were characterized in situ by reflected high energy electron

  20. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, R.K. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Ray, S.K., E-mail: physkr@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: We have elaborately explained the individual Ge QD charging phenomena and current transport, which is very important to understand the Ge/Si nano devices. This paper will give a flavor to properly understand these phenomena linked together along with the photocurrent mechanism which is related to the Ge/Si valence band offset. • Both the CAFM and KPFM techniques point out the functionality of doping nature of the underneath Si substrate on the aforementioned characteristics of Ge QDs. • Analysis of the surface potential mapping using KPFM technique yields an approximate valence band offset measurement which is required to understand the intra-valence transition of holes for the realization of long wavelength infrared photodetector. • KPFM and CAFM can be utilized to explore the charging/discharging phenomena of dots and their composition variations. • Current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of the individual Ge QD strongly depends on the individual QD size. • Energy band diagrams for diamond tip and Ge QD shows the higher barrier for electrons and lower barrier for holes allowing the easy tunneling for holes to dominate the transport. - Abstract: It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation

  1. High power ultraviolet light emitting diodes based on GaN/AlGaN quantum wells produced by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalu, J. S.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Thomidis, C.; Friel, I.; Moustakas, T. D.; Collins, C. J.; Komninou, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and fabrication of high power nitride-based ultraviolet light emitting diodes emitting in the spectral range between 340 and 350 nm. The devices were grown on (0001) sapphire substrates via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth of the light emitting diode (LED) structures was preceded by detailed materials studies of the bottom n-AlGaN contact layer, as well as the GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. Specifically, kinetic conditions were identified for the growth of the thick n-AlGaN films to be both smooth and to have fewer defects at the surface. Transmission-electron microscopy studies on identical GaN/AlGaN MQWs showed good quality and well-defined interfaces between wells and barriers. Large area mesa devices (800x800 μm 2 ) were fabricated and were designed for backside light extraction. The LEDs were flip-chip bonded onto a Si submount for better heat sinking. For devices emitting at 340 nm, the measured differential on-series resistance is 3 Ω with electroluminescence spectrum full width at half maximum of 18 nm. The output power under dc bias saturates at 0.5 mW, while under pulsed operation it saturates at approximately 700 mA to a value of 3 mW, suggesting that thermal heating limits the efficiency of these devices. The output power of the investigated devices was found to be equivalent with those produced by the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and hydride vapor-phase epitaxy methods. The devices emitting at 350 nm were investigated under dc operation and the output power saturates at 4.5 mW under 200 mA drive current

  2. Improving surface smoothness and photoluminescence of CdTe(1 1 1)A on Si(1 1 1) substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy using Mn atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jyh-Shyang; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chang-Wei; Dai, Zi-Yuan; Tong, Shih-Chang; Yang, Chu-Shou; Wu, Chih-Hung; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Shen, Ji-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CdTe(1 1 1)A epilayers were grown on Si(1 1 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. • We report an enhanced growth using Mn atoms. • The significant improvements in surface quality and optical properties were found. - Abstract: This work demonstrates an improvement of the molecular beam epitaxial growth of CdTe(1 1 1)A epilayer on Si(1 1 1) substrates using Mn atoms. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns show that the involvement of some Mn atoms in the growth of CdTe(1 1 1)A is even more effective than the use of a buffer layer with a smooth surface for forming good CdTe(1 1 1)A epilayers. 10 K Photoluminescence spectra show that the incorporation of only 2% Mn significantly reduced the intensity of defect-related emissions and considerably increased the integral intensity of exciton-related emissions by a large factor of about 400

  3. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  4. Electron beam induced conductivity in 'PET' and 'FEP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzade, S.J.; Jog, J.P.; Dake, S.B.; Bhoraskar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Electron Beam Induced Conductivity (EBIC), classified into EBIC (bulk) and EBIC (surface) have been measured in PET and FEP respectively. The peculiar oscillatory nature of the induced gain versus beam energy variations is explained in terms of the spatial distributions of the trapping centres near the surface of the polymers. (author)

  5. Buffer-layer enhanced crystal growth of BaB{sub 6} (1 0 0) thin films on MgO (1 0 0) substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yushi; Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Arai, Hideki; Tan, Geng [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J2-46, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Tsuchimine, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Susumu [Toshima Manufacturing Company Limited, 1414 Shimonomoto, Higashimatsuyama-shi, Saitama 355-0036 (Japan); Saeki, Kazuhiko; Takezawa, Nobutaka [Department of Materials Technology, Industrial Technology Center of Tochigi Prefecture, 367-1 Karinuma, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-3224 (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Masahiko; Kaneko, Satoru [Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center, Kanagawa Prefectural Government, 705-1 Shimo-Imaizumi, Ebina, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Mamoru, E-mail: yoshimoto.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J2-46, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Patent Attorney, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J2-46, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Crystalline BaB{sub 6} (1 0 0) thin films can be fabricated on MgO (1 0 0) substrates by inserting a 2-3 nm-thick epitaxial SrB{sub 6} (1 0 0) buffer layer by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in ultra-high vacuum (i.e., laser molecular beam epitaxy). Reflection high-energy electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements indicated the heteroepitaxial structure of BaB{sub 6} (1 0 0)/SrB{sub 6} (1 0 0)/MgO (1 0 0) with the single domain of the epitaxial relationship. Conversely, BaB{sub 6} thin films without the buffer layer were not epitaxial instead they developed as polycrystalline films with a random in-plane configuration and some impurity phases. As a result, the buffer layer is considered to greatly affect the initial growth of epitaxial BaB{sub 6} thin films; therefore, in this study, buffering effects have been discussed. From the conventional four-probe measurement, it was observed that BaB{sub 6} epitaxial thin films exhibit n-type semiconducting behavior with a resistivity of 2.90 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} {Omega} cm at room temperature.

  6. Investigation of CuGaSe2/CuInSe2 double heterojunction interfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiabama Thiru

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED observation and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on heterojunction interfaces of CuGaSe2/CnInSe2/CuGaSe2 grown on GaAs (001 using migration-enhanced epitaxy. The streaky RHEED pattern and persistent RHEED intensity oscillations caused by the alternate deposition of migration-enhanced epitaxy sequence are observed and the growths of smooth surfaces are confirmed. RHEED observation results also confirmed constituent material interdiffusion at the heterointerface. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed a flat and abrupt heterointerface when the substrate temperature is as low as 400 °C. These have been confirmed even by X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements.

  7. Interfacial Exchange Coupling Induced Anomalous Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Epitaxial γ′-Fe 4 N/CoN Bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zirun

    2015-02-02

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of the facing-target reactively sputtered epitaxial γ′-Fe4N/CoN bilayers is investigated. The phase shift and rectangular-like AMR appears at low temperatures, which can be ascribed to the interfacial exchange coupling. The phase shift comes from the exchange bias (EB) that makes the magnetization lag behind a small field. When the γ′-Fe4N thickness increases, the rectangular-like AMR appears. The rectangular-like AMR should be from the combined contributions including the EB-induced unidirectional anisotropy, intrinsic AMR of γ′-Fe4N layer and interfacial spin scattering.

  8. Growth of Ge films by cluster beam deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J L; Feng, J Y

    2002-01-01

    Ge epitaxial layers with reasonable quality were grown on the Si(1 1 1) substrates by cluster beam deposition (CBD) process. The growth temperature plays a dominant role in the epitaxial growth of Ge films. The substrate temperature for epitaxial growth is about 500 deg. C, which is lower than the reported critical temperature of Ge epitaxial growth by MBE and CVD. A stress induced phase transition of Ge lattice from cubic to tetragonal is also observed in the CBD process, and the mechanism is discussed.

  9. Self-Catalyzed Growth of Axial GaAs/GaAsSb Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy for Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    spectroscopy et al. Et al. FWHM Full width half maxima GaAs Gallium arsenide GaAsSb Gallium arsenide antimonide HRXRD High...MOVPE Metal organic vapor phase epitaxy NCA Nano Channel Aluminum NW Nanowire PL Photoluminescence PMMA Poly methyl methacrylate...B.M. and L.-E. Wernersson, Synthesis and properties of antimonide nanowires. Nanotechnology, 2013. 24(20): p. 202001. 11. Hadfield, R.H., et al

  10. Electron-diffraction and spectroscopical characterisation of ultrathin ZnS films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaP(0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Szargan, R.; Chasse, T.

    2004-01-01

    ZnS films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy employing a single compound effusion cell on GaP(0 0 1) substrate at different temperatures, and characterised by means of low energy electron diffraction, X-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, angle-resolved ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy. The GaP(0 0 1) substrate exhibits a (4x2) reconstruction after Ar ion sputtering and annealing at 370 deg. C. Crystal quality of the ZnS films depends on both film thickness and growth temperature. Thinner films grown at higher temperatures and thicker films grown at lower temperatures have better crystal quality. The layer-by-layer growth mode of the ZnS films at lower (25, 80 and 100 deg. C) temperatures changes to layer-by-layer-plus-island mode at higher temperatures (120, 150 and 180 deg. C). A chemical reaction takes place and is confined to the interface. The valence band offset of the ZnS-GaP heterojunction was determined to be 0.8±0.1 eV. Sulphur L 2,3 emission spectra of ZnS powder raw material and the epitaxial ZnS films display the same features, regardless of the existence of the Ga-S bonding in the film samples

  11. Domain structure and magnetic properties of epitaxial SrRuO sub 3 films grown on SrTiO sub 3 (100) substrates by ion beam sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, S H

    2000-01-01

    The domain structure of epitaxial SrRuO sub 3 thin films grown on SrTiO sub 3 (100) substrates by using ion beam sputtering has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The SrRuO sub 3 films grown in the present study revealed a unique cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship, i.e., (100) sub S sub R sub O ll (100) sub S sub T sub O , [010] sub S sub R sub O ll [101] sub S sub T sub O , prevailing with a cubic single-domain structure. The cubic SrRuO sub 3 thin films that were inherently with free from RuO sub 6 octahedron tilting exhibited higher resistivity with suppressed magnetic properties. The Curie temperature of the thin films was suppressed by 60 K from 160 K for the bulk specimen, and the saturation magnetic moment was reduced by a significant amount. The tetragonal distortion of the SrRuO sub 3 thin films due to coherent growth with the substrate seemed to result in a strong magnetic anisotropy.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattices: Toward artificial B20 skyrmion materials with tunable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Esser, Bryan D.; Rowland, James; McComb, David W.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-06-01

    Skyrmions are localized magnetic spin textures whose stability has been shown theoretically to depend on material parameters including bulk Dresselhaus spin orbit coupling (SOC), interfacial Rashba SOC, and magnetic anisotropy. Here, we establish the growth of a new class of artificial skyrmion materials, namely B20 superlattices, where these parameters could be systematically tuned. Specifically, we report the successful growth of B20 superlattices comprised of single crystal thin films of FeGe, MnGe, and CrGe on Si(1 1 1) substrates. Thin films and superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are characterized through a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) distinguishes layers by elemental mapping and indicates good interface quality with relatively low levels of intermixing in the [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattice. This demonstration of epitaxial, single-crystalline B20 superlattices is a significant advance toward tunable skyrmion systems for fundamental scientific studies and applications in magnetic storage and logic.

  13. Photoelectrical characteristics of metal–insulator–semiconductor structures based on graded-gap HgCdTe grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitsekhovskii, A.V., E-mail: vav@elefot.tsu.ru [Department of Radiophysics, Tomsk State University, Lenin av., 36, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Optical Electronics, Siberian Physical Technical Institute TSU, Novosobornaya sq., 1, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nesmelov, S.N., E-mail: nes@elefot.tsu.ru [Laboratory of Optical Electronics, Siberian Physical Technical Institute TSU, Novosobornaya sq., 1, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyadukh, S.M. [Laboratory of Optical Electronics, Siberian Physical Technical Institute TSU, Novosobornaya sq., 1, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-31

    Metal–insulator–semiconductor structures based on HgCdTe are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Near-surface graded-gap layers with high CdTe content are formed on both sides of the epitaxial HgCdTe film. Photoelectrical characteristics of these structures are studied experimentally and theoretically. For structures based on n-Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x = 0.21–0.23), the formation of a near-surface graded-gap layer leads to an increase in the differential resistance of the space charge region due to the suppression of tunneling. The temperature dependences of the differential resistance calculated with account to different mechanisms of generation of minority charge carriers are similar to the experimental dependences of the photoelectromotive force. - Highlights: • The metal–insulator–semiconductor structures based on HgCdTe were studied. • Photoelectrical properties of such structures were investigated. • Mechanisms of generation of minority carriers were studied. • Creation of near-surface graded-gap layers suppresses tunneling.

  14. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  15. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  16. Dependence of the Mg-related acceptor ionization energy with the acceptor concentration in p-type GaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochen, Stéphane; Brault, Julien; Chenot, Sébastien; Dussaigne, Amélie; Leroux, Mathieu; Damilano, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Hall effect and capacitance-voltage C(V) measurements were performed on p-type GaN:Mg layers grown on GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy with a high range of Mg-doping concentrations. The free hole density and the effective dopant concentration N A −N D as a function of magnesium incorporation measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy clearly reveal both a magnesium doping efficiency up to 90% and a strong dependence of the acceptor ionization energy Ea with the acceptor concentration N A . These experimental observations highlight an isolated acceptor binding energy of 245±25 meV compatible, at high acceptor concentration, with the achievement of p-type GaN:Mg layers with a hole concentration at room temperature close to 10 19 cm −3

  17. Magnetic properties of Fe0.4Mn0.6/Co2FeAl bilayers grown on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, K. K.; Nie, S. H.; Yu, X. Z.; Wang, S. L.; Zhao, J. H.; Yan, W. S.

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline Fe 0.4 Mn 0.6 layers with the different thickness are deposited on 4-nm-thick single-crystalline Co 2 FeAl layers, which are grown on GaAs (001) substrates at room temperature by molecular-beam epitaxy. Both the exchange bias and the in-plane magnetic anisotropies of the bilayers are strongly dependent on the thickness of the Fe 0.4 Mn 0.6 layer. The former is described using a granular level model. A modified Stoner-Wohlfarth model is used to explain the in-plane magnetic anisotropies observed at 5 K, while one possible reason for the magnetic anisotropies measured at 300 K is the complex interfacial magnetic properties proved by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements.

  18. Vertical transport through AlGaN barriers in heterostructures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, David A.; Fireman, Micha N.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Kuritzky, Leah Y.; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Speck, James S.

    2017-02-01

    The results of vertical transport through AlGaN heterobarriers are presented for ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) on c-plane GaN on sapphire templates and on m-plane bulk GaN substrates, as well as by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on m-plane bulk GaN substrates. Experiments were performed to determine the role of the AlGaN alloy as an effective barrier to vertical transport, which is an essential component of both optoelectronic and power electronic devices. The alloy composition, thickness, and doping levels of the AlGaN layers, as well as substrate orientation, were systematically varied to examine their influence on electron transport. Atom probe tomography (APT) was used to directly determine the alloy composition at the atomic scale to reveal the presence of random alloy fluctuations which provides insight into the nature of the observed transport.

  19. Study of the structural and optical properties of GaP(N) layers synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(100) 4° substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Polubavkina, Yu. S.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Nikitina, E. V.; Lazarenko, A. A.; Egorov, A. Yu.; Maximov, M. V.; Moiseev, E. I.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of GaP and GaPN layers synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(100) substrates misoriented by 4° are studied. The possibility of producing GaP buffer layers that exhibit a high degree of heterointerface planarity and an outcropping dislocation density of no higher than ~2 × 10 8 cm –2 is shown. Emission from the Si/GaP/GaPN structure in the spectral range of 630–640 nm at room temperature is observed. Annealing during growth of the Si/GaP/GaPN structure makes it possible to enhance the room-temperature photoluminescence intensity by a factor of 2.6, with no shift of the maximum of the emission line.

  20. Plasmas for the low-temperature growth of high-quality GaN films by molecular beam epitaxy and remote plasma MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G. [Plasmachemistry Research Center, CNR, Bari (Italy); Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (United States). School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronic Research Center

    2002-03-16

    GaN heteroepitaxial growth on sapphire (0001) substrates was carried out by both radio-frequency (rf) remote plasma metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (RP-MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). A multistep growth process including substrate plasma cleaning and nitridation, buffer growth, its subsequent annealing and epilayer growth was used. In order to achieve a better understanding of the GaN growth, in-situ real time investigation of the surface chemistry is performed for all the steps using the conventional reflection high-energy electron spectroscopy (RHEED) during the MBE process, while laser reflectance interferometry (LRI) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), which do not require UHV conditions, are used for the monitoring of the RP-MOCVD process. The chemistry of the rf N{sub 2} plasma sapphire nitridation and its effect on the epilayer growth and quality are discussed in both MBE and RP-MOCVD. (orig.)

  1. Room temperature photoluminescence from In{sub x}Al{sub (1−x)}N films deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, W., E-mail: wei.kong@duke.edu; Jiao, W. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Brown, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Mohanta, A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Participation Program, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Roberts, A. T. [Charles Bowden Research Lab, Army Aviation and Missile RD and E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Fournelle, J. [Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Losurdo, M. [Plasma Chemistry Research Center-CNR, via Orabona, 4-70126 Bari (Italy); Everitt, H. O. [Charles Bowden Research Lab, Army Aviation and Missile RD and E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-09-29

    InAlN films deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy exhibited a lateral composition modulation characterized by 10–12 nm diameter, honeycomb-shaped, columnar domains with Al-rich cores and In-rich boundaries. To ascertain the effect of this microstructure on its optical properties, room temperature absorption and photoluminescence characteristics of In{sub x}Al{sub (1−x)}N were comparatively investigated for indium compositions ranging from x = 0.092 to 0.235, including x = 0.166 lattice matched to GaN. The Stokes shift of the emission was significantly greater than reported for films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, possibly due to the phase separation in these nanocolumnar domains. The room temperature photoluminescence also provided evidence of carrier transfer from the InAlN film to the GaN template.

  2. Tunable twin Airy beams induced by binary phase patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongtao; Wei, Jingsong; Ma, Jianyong; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yiqun

    2013-04-15

    In this work, we theoretically and experimentally study the physical process of Airy beams induced by binary phase patterns combined with a slope factor. Theoretical simulations show that the binary phase patterns generate a pair of symmetrically inverted twin Airy beams. The slope factor can regulate the spacing between the two Airy beam peaks, decrease the error induced by the binarization process, and adjust the position of the focus formed by the twin Airy beams. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical ones.

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  4. Strain induced ionic conductivity enhancement in epitaxial Ce0.9Gd0.1O22d

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant, K. Mohan; Esposito, Vincenzo; Pryds, Nini

    2012-01-01

    -plane ionic conductivity in CGO epitaxial thin films. The ionic conductivity is found to increase with decrease in buffer layer thickness. The tailored ionic conductivity enhancement is explained in terms of close relationships among epitaxy, strain, and ionic conductivity....

  5. FY 1997 report on the study on lamination control technology for functional multi-element oxide thin films by complex beam epitaxy (CxBE) process; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (sakutaisen epitaxy (CxBE) ho ni yoru kinosei tagenso sankabutsu usumaku no sekiso seigyo gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Complex beam epitaxy (CxBE) process was proposed and demonstrated as new deposition process of multi-element oxide thin films. This process radiates excimer laser onto a metal complex target of ethylenediamine-tetraacetate complex under reduced pressure oxygen atmosphere condition in a reaction vessel to supply raw material onto a heated substrate. This process allowed deposition of YBCO123 phase hetero-epitaxial film onto a single-crystalline SrTiO3 substrate. This process was proved to be promising through study on crystal orientation, composition transcription and surface smoothness of the obtained oxide thin films. In addition, epitaxial ZnO film was also deposited onto a single crystalline Al2O3 substrate by this process. The relation between the obtained film and substrate epitaxy was examined, and photoluminescence of specimens was measured by triple wave of Nd:YAG laser. As a result, it was clarified that the epitaxial ZnO film prepared by this process is useful as laser material. 60 refs., 48 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm

  7. Electrical Characterisation of electron beam exposure induced Defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danga, Helga T., E-mail: helga.danga@up.ac.za; Auret, Francois D.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2016-01-01

    The defects introduced in epitaxially grown p-type silicon (Si) during electron beam exposure were electrically characterised using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high resolution Laplace-DLTS. In this process, Si samples were first exposed to the conditions of electron beam deposition (EBD) without metal deposition. This is called electron beam exposure (EBE) herein. After 50 minutes of EBE, nickel (Ni) Schottky contacts were fabricated using the resistive deposition method. The defect level observed using the Ni contacts had an activation energy of H(0.55). This defect has an activation energy similar to that of the I-defect. The defect level is similar to that of the HB4, a boron related defect. DLTS depth profiling revealed that H(0.55) could be detected up to a depth of 0.8 μm below the junction. We found that exposing the samples to EBD conditions without metal deposition introduced a defect which was not introduced by the EBD method. We also observed that the damage caused by EBE extended deeper into the material compared to that caused by EBD.

  8. Focused-ion-beam induced damage in thin films of complex oxide BiFeO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Siemons

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An unexpected, strong deterioration of crystal quality is observed in epitaxial perovskite BiFeO3 films in which microscale features have been patterned by focused-ion-beam (FIB milling. Specifically, synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction shows that the damaged region extends to tens of μm, but does not result in measureable changes to morphology or stoichiometry. Therefore, this change would go undetected with standard laboratory equipment, but can significantly influence local material properties and must be taken into account when using a FIB to manufacture nanostructures. The damage is significantly reduced when a thin metallic layer is present on top of the film during the milling process, clearly indicating that the reduced crystallinity is caused by ion beam induced charging.

  9. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    -effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  10. First LHC beam induced tracks reconstructed in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, C; Bates, A; Eklund, L; Gersabeck, M; Marinho, F; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rodrigues, E; Szumlak, T; Affolder, A; Bowcock, T; Casse, G; Donleavy, S; Hennessy, K; Huse, T; Hutchcroft, D; Mylroie-Smith, J; Noor, A; Patel, G; Rinnert, K; Smith, N A; Shears, T; Tobin, M; John, M; Bay, A; Frei, R; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Anderson, J; McNulty, R; Traynor, S; Basiladze, S; Leflat, A; Artuso, M; Borgia, A; Lefeuvre, G; Mountain, R; Wang, J; Akiba, K; van Beuzekom, M; Jans, E; Ketel, T; Mous, I; Papadelis, A; Van Lysebetten, A; Verlaat, B; de Vries, H; Behrendt, O; Buytaert, J; de Capua, S; Collins, P; Ferro-Luzzi, M

    2009-01-01

    The Vertex Locator of the LHCb experiment has been used to fully reconstruct beam induced tracks at the LHC. A beam of protons was collided with a beam absorber during the LHC synchronisation test of the anti-clockwise beam on the weekend 22nd–24th August 2008. The resulting particles have been observed by the Vertex Locator. The LHCb Vertex Locator is a silicon micro-strip detector containing 21 planes of modules. Tracks were observed passing through up to 19 modules (38 silicon sensors). A total of over 700 tracks were reconstructed, and are being used to study the calibration and alignment of the detector.

  11. Effects of Ga ion irradiation on growth of GaN on SiN substrates by electron cyclotron resonance-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, J. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan) and Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan) and CREST-JST, Kawaguchi Center Building, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)]. E-mail: yanagisawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Fukuyama, T. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Shiraishi, Y. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Yodo, T. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Akasaka, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of forming GaN layers on Ga-implanted SiN surfaces was investigated using electron cyclotron resonance-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the GaN layer initially formed on the SiN surface by Ga implantation at room temperature was amorphous-like, but become to polycrystalline after annealing at 650 deg. C for 3 min in vacuum. After the MBE growth of GaN, a grain structure of h-GaN was observed on the Ga-implanted SiN surface. The crystallinity of the GaN grown was, however, decreased upon increasing the Ga ion fluence on the SiN surface, which might be due, at least partly, to the formation of Ga clusters by the excess Ga implanted. The present results indicate the possibility of forming patterned GaN layers on SiN by selective Ga implantation on the SiN substrate, using a focused ion beam.

  12. Flexoelectricity induced increase of critical thickness in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hao; Hong Jiawang; Zhang Yihui; Li Faxin; Pei Yongmao; Fang Daining

    2012-01-01

    Flexoelectricity describes the coupling between polarization and strain/stress gradients in insulating crystals. In this paper, using the Landau-Ginsburg-Devonshire phenomenological approach, we found that flexoelectricity could increase the theoretical critical thickness in epitaxial BaTiO 3 thin films, below which the switchable spontaneous polarization vanishes. This increase is remarkable in tensile films while trivial in compressive films due to the electrostriction caused decrease of potential barrier, which can be easily destroyed by the flexoelectricity, between the ferroelectric state and the paraelectric state in tensile films. In addition, the films are still in a uni-polar state even below the critical thickness due to the flexoelectric effect.

  13. Antiphase boundaries induced exchange coupling in epitaxial Fe3O4 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, S.K.; Sofin, R.G.S.; Nolan, A.; Shvets, I.V.

    2005-01-01

    We have observed an exchange bias effect on field cooling of epitaxial magnetite, Fe 3 O 4 , films on MgO (1 0 0) substrates. We attribute this effect to the presence of antiphase boundaries (APBs). Magnitude of the exchange bias field (H e ) strongly depends on the thermo-magnetic history of the sample. The strength of the H e was found to increase with an increase in film thickness and is attributed to the strain driven redistribution of atoms in the vicinity of APBs leading to enhanced antiferromagnetic exchange interactions

  14. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  15. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  16. On the evolution of InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the GaAs(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures are currently of high interest for a wide variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications. A large number of devices, in particular for the optical data transmission in the long-wavelength range, essential in modern communication, are based on InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures. Though the properties of the InAs/GaAs QDs have been extensively studied, only little is known about the formation and structure of the wetting layer (WL) yet. In the present work, the pathway of the InAs WL evolution is studied in detail. For this purpose, InAs thin films in the range of one monolayer (ML) are deposited on the GaAs(001) surface by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and studied by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and in particular by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The InAs thin films are grown in both typical growth regimes, on the GaAs-c(4 x 4) and the GaAs-β2(2 x 4) reconstructed surface, in a variety of thicknesses starting from submonolayers with 0.09 ML of InAs up to 1.65 ML of InAs exceeding the critical thickness for QD growth. In principle, three growth stages are found. At low InAs coverages, the indium adsorbs in agglomerations of typically eight In atoms at energetically preferable surface sites. In the STM images, the signatures of these In agglomerations appear with a clear bright contrast. A structural model for the initial formation of these signatures is presented, and its electronic and strain related properties are discussed. At an InAs coverage of about 0.67ML the initial surface transforms into a (4 x 3) reconstructed In 2/3 Ga 1/3 As ML and the detailed structure and strain properties of this surface are unraveled. On top of the InGaAs ML further deposited InAs forms a second layer, characterized by a typical zig-zag alignment of (2 x 4) reconstructed unit cells, with an alternating α2/α2-m configuration. In contrast to the previous surface reconstructions, where structural strain is

  17. On the evolution of InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the GaAs(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, Jan

    2010-12-14

    Semiconductor nanostructures are currently of high interest for a wide variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications. A large number of devices, in particular for the optical data transmission in the long-wavelength range, essential in modern communication, are based on InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures. Though the properties of the InAs/GaAs QDs have been extensively studied, only little is known about the formation and structure of the wetting layer (WL) yet. In the present work, the pathway of the InAs WL evolution is studied in detail. For this purpose, InAs thin films in the range of one monolayer (ML) are deposited on the GaAs(001) surface by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and studied by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and in particular by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The InAs thin films are grown in both typical growth regimes, on the GaAs-c(4 x 4) and the GaAs-{beta}2(2 x 4) reconstructed surface, in a variety of thicknesses starting from submonolayers with 0.09 ML of InAs up to 1.65 ML of InAs exceeding the critical thickness for QD growth. In principle, three growth stages are found. At low InAs coverages, the indium adsorbs in agglomerations of typically eight In atoms at energetically preferable surface sites. In the STM images, the signatures of these In agglomerations appear with a clear bright contrast. A structural model for the initial formation of these signatures is presented, and its electronic and strain related properties are discussed. At an InAs coverage of about 0.67ML the initial surface transforms into a (4 x 3) reconstructed In{sub 2/3}Ga{sub 1/3}As ML and the detailed structure and strain properties of this surface are unraveled. On top of the InGaAs ML further deposited InAs forms a second layer, characterized by a typical zig-zag alignment of (2 x 4) reconstructed unit cells, with an alternating {alpha}2/{alpha}2-m configuration. In contrast to the previous surface reconstructions, where

  18. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  19. Strain induced room temperature ferromagnetism in epitaxial magnesium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Zhenghe; Kim, Ki Wook [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nori, Sudhakar; Lee, Yi-Fang; Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Kumar, D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Carolina A & T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Wu, Fan [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Prater, J. T. [Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We report on the epitaxial growth and room-temperature ferromagnetic properties of MgO thin films deposited on hexagonal c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The epitaxial nature of the films has been confirmed by both θ-2θ and φ-scans of X-ray diffraction pattern. Even though bulk MgO is a nonmagnetic insulator, we have found that the MgO films exhibit ferromagnetism and hysteresis loops yielding a maximum saturation magnetization up to 17 emu/cc and large coercivity, H{sub c} = 1200 Oe. We have also found that the saturation magnetization gets enhanced and that the crystallization degraded with decreased growth temperature, suggesting that the origin of our magnetic coupling could be point defects manifested by the strain in the films. X-ray (θ-2θ) diffraction peak shift and strain analysis clearly support the presence of strain in films resulting from the presence of point defects. Based on careful investigations using secondary ion mass spectrometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies, we have ruled out the possibility of the presence of any external magnetic impurities. We discuss the critical role of microstructural characteristics and associated strain on the physical properties of the MgO films and establish a correlation between defects and magnetic properties.

  20. Resistance switching of epitaxial VO2/Al2O3 heterostructure at room temperature induced by organic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied using organic liquids (cyclohexane, n-butanol, and ethylene glycol to modulate the transport properties at room temperature of an epitaxial VO2 film on a VO2/Al2O3 heterostructure. The resistance of the VO2 film increased when coated with cyclohexane or n-butanol, with maximum changes of 31% and 3.8%, respectively. In contrast, it decreased when coated with ethylene glycol, with a maximum change of −7.7%. In all cases, the resistance recovered to its original value after removing the organic liquid. This organic-liquid-induced reversible resistance switching suggests that VO2 films can be used as organic molecular sensors.

  1. Flexoelectricity induced increase of critical thickness in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Hao [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hong Jiawang; Zhang Yihui [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Faxin [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Pei Yongmao, E-mail: peiym@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fang Daining, E-mail: fangdn@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Flexoelectricity describes the coupling between polarization and strain/stress gradients in insulating crystals. In this paper, using the Landau-Ginsburg-Devonshire phenomenological approach, we found that flexoelectricity could increase the theoretical critical thickness in epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3} thin films, below which the switchable spontaneous polarization vanishes. This increase is remarkable in tensile films while trivial in compressive films due to the electrostriction caused decrease of potential barrier, which can be easily destroyed by the flexoelectricity, between the ferroelectric state and the paraelectric state in tensile films. In addition, the films are still in a uni-polar state even below the critical thickness due to the flexoelectric effect.

  2. Stability of beam-induced tensor pressure tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.A.; Nelson, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Kammash, T.

    1979-10-01

    Necessary and sufficient criteria are obtained for the high toroidal mode number stability of a guiding center plasma in low aspect ratio, D-shaped, beam-induced tensor pressure tokamaks. The difference between the two criteria is significant for interchange stability, while the difference is small for ballooning stability. The critical β value imposed by stability to ballooning modes is higher for perpendicular than for parallel beam injection

  3. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Classification of Ge hut clusters in arrays formed by molecular beam epitaxy at low temperatures on the Si(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A.

    2010-06-01

    Ge hut clusters forming quantum dot arrays on the Si(001) surface in the process of low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum molecular beam epitaxy are morphologically investigated and classified using in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. It is found that two main Ge hut cluster types—pyramidal and wedge-shaped—have different atomic structures, and it is concluded that shape transitions between the two are impossible. Derivative cluster species — obelisks (or truncated wedges) and accreted wedges — are revealed and investigated for the first time and shown to start dominating at high Ge coverages. The uniformity of cluster arrays is shown to be controlled by the scatter in the lengths of wedge-like clusters. At low growth temperatures (360 °C), cluster nucleation during the growth of the array is observed for all values of Ge coverage except for a particular point at which the arrays are more uniform than at higher or lower coverages. At higher temperatures (530 °C), no cluster nucleation is observed after the initial formation of the array.

  4. Reflectance-anisotropy study of the dynamics of molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs and InGaAs on GaAs(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Reflectance-Anisotropy (RA) observations during the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth of zincblende semiconductors films were carried out using the E 1 optical transition as a probe. We follow the kinetics of the deposition of GaAs and In 0.3 Ga 0.7 As on GaAs(001) at growth rates of 0.2 and 0.25 ML/s, respectively. During growth we used a constant As 4 or As 2 flux pressure of 5 x 10 -6 Torr. Clear RA-oscillations were observed during growth with a period that nearly coincides with the growth period for a Ga-As bilayer. RHEED was used as an auxiliary technique in order to obtain a correlation between RHEED and RA oscillations. On the basis of our results, we argue that RAS oscillations are mainly associated to periodic changes in surface atomic structure. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Epitaxial metastable Ge1-yCy (y≤0.02) alloys grown on Ge(001) from hyperthermal beams: C incorporation and lattice sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arcy-Gall, J.; Desjardins, P.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Paultre, J.-E.; Masut, R. A.; Gujrathi, S. C.; Roorda, S.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial metastable Ge 1-y C y alloy layers with y≤0.02 were grown on Ge(001) at temperatures T s =200-550 degree sign C using hyperthermal Ge and C beams with average energies of 16 and 24 eV, respectively, in order to investigate C incorporation pathways in the Ge lattice. High-resolution reciprocal lattice maps show that all as-deposited alloy layers are fully coherent with the substrate. Layers grown at T s ≤350 degree sign C are in compression due to higher C concentrations in interstitial than in substitutional sites. The compressive strain decreases (i.e., the substitutional C concentration increases) with increasing T s within this temperature range. At higher growth temperatures, as-deposited alloys are nearly strain free since the majority of the incorporated C is trapped at extended defects. Annealing the Ge 1-y C y layers at T a =450 and 550 degree sign C leads to a significant increase, proportional to the strain in the as-deposited films, in compressive strain. Further annealing at T a =650 degree sign C results in the formation of dislocation loops which act as sinks for interstitial and substitutional C atoms and thus relieves residual macroscopic strain. Finally, we show that the large compressive strain associated with interstitial C atoms must be accounted for in order to determine the total incorporated C fraction from diffraction analyses. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  6. Schottky barrier height of Ni to β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3 with different compositions grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Oshima, Yuichi; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.

    2017-03-01

    Coherent β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3 films (x = 0, 0.038, 0.084, 0.164) were grown successfully on a Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 (010) substrate using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atom probe tomography, transmission electron microscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction were used to verify the alloy composition and high quality of the films. Schottky diodes were then fabricated using Ni as the Schottky metal. Capacitance-voltage measurements revealed a very low (current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed at temperatures varying from 300 K to 500 K on the Schottky diodes. These measurements revealed that the apparent Schottky barrier height could have similar values for different compositions of β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3. We believe this is attributed to the lateral fluctuation in the alloy’s composition. This results in a lateral variation in the barrier height. Therefore, the average Schottky barrier height extracted from I-V measurements could be similar for β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3 films with different compositions.

  7. Reflectance-anisotropy study of the dynamics of molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs and InGaAs on GaAs(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi. Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Balderas-Navarro, R.E. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi. Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi. Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Reflectance-Anisotropy (RA) observations during the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth of zincblende semiconductors films were carried out using the E{sub 1} optical transition as a probe. We follow the kinetics of the deposition of GaAs and In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As on GaAs(001) at growth rates of 0.2 and 0.25 ML/s, respectively. During growth we used a constant As{sub 4} or As{sub 2} flux pressure of 5 x 10{sup -6} Torr. Clear RA-oscillations were observed during growth with a period that nearly coincides with the growth period for a Ga-As bilayer. RHEED was used as an auxiliary technique in order to obtain a correlation between RHEED and RA oscillations. On the basis of our results, we argue that RAS oscillations are mainly associated to periodic changes in surface atomic structure. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Spontaneous core–shell elemental distribution in In-rich InxGa1−xN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Gómez, M; Garro, N; Cantarero, A; Mengistu, H T; García-Cristóbal, A; Murcia-Mascarós, S; Segura-Ruiz, J; Martinez-Criado, G; Denker, C; Malindretos, J; Rizzi, A

    2014-01-01

    The elemental distribution of self-organized In-rich In x Ga 1−x N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated using three different techniques with spatial resolution on the nanoscale. Two-dimensional images and elemental profiles of single nanowires obtained by x-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively, have revealed a radial gradient in the alloy composition of each individual nanowire. The spectral selectivity of resonant Raman scattering has been used to enhance the signal from very small volumes with different elemental composition within single nanowires. The combination of the three techniques has provided sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to prove the spontaneous formation of a core–shell nanowire and to quantify the thicknesses and alloy compositions of the core and shell regions. A theoretical model based on continuum elastic theory has been used to estimate the strain fields present in such inhomogeneous nanowires. These results suggest new strategies for achieving high quality non-polar heterostructures. (paper)

  9. Spontaneous core-shell elemental distribution in In-rich InxGa1-xN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, M.; Garro, N.; Segura-Ruiz, J.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Cantarero, A.; Mengistu, H. T.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Murcia-Mascarós, S.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2014-02-01

    The elemental distribution of self-organized In-rich InxGa1-xN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated using three different techniques with spatial resolution on the nanoscale. Two-dimensional images and elemental profiles of single nanowires obtained by x-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively, have revealed a radial gradient in the alloy composition of each individual nanowire. The spectral selectivity of resonant Raman scattering has been used to enhance the signal from very small volumes with different elemental composition within single nanowires. The combination of the three techniques has provided sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to prove the spontaneous formation of a core-shell nanowire and to quantify the thicknesses and alloy compositions of the core and shell regions. A theoretical model based on continuum elastic theory has been used to estimate the strain fields present in such inhomogeneous nanowires. These results suggest new strategies for achieving high quality non-polar heterostructures.

  10. Spontaneous core–shell elemental distribution in In-rich In(x)Ga1-xN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, M; Garro, N; Segura-Ruiz, J; Martinez-Criado, G; Cantarero, A; Mengistu, H T; García-Cristóbal, A; Murcia-Mascarós, S; Denker, C; Malindretos, J; Rizzi, A

    2014-02-21

    The elemental distribution of self-organized In-rich In(x)Ga1-xN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated using three different techniques with spatial resolution on the nanoscale. Two-dimensional images and elemental profiles of single nanowires obtained by x-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively, have revealed a radial gradient in the alloy composition of each individual nanowire. The spectral selectivity of resonant Raman scattering has been used to enhance the signal from very small volumes with different elemental composition within single nanowires. The combination of the three techniques has provided sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to prove the spontaneous formation of a core–shell nanowire and to quantify the thicknesses and alloy compositions of the core and shell regions. A theoretical model based on continuum elastic theory has been used to estimate the strain fields present in such inhomogeneous nanowires. These results suggest new strategies for achieving high quality nonpolar heterostructures.

  11. Oxygen flux influence on the morphological, structural and optical properties of Zn1-xMgxO thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Zhang, Z.Z.; Li, B.H.; Shen, D.Z.; Yao, B.; Zhang, J.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Fan, X.W.

    2008-01-01

    The Zn 1-x Mg x O thin films were grown on Al 2 O 3 substrate with various O 2 flow rates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (P-MBE). The growth conditions were optimized by the characterizations of morphology, structural and optical properties. The Mg content of the Zn 1-x Mg x O thin film increases monotonously with decreasing the oxygen flux. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) measurements show that all the thin films are preferred (0 0 2) orientated. By transmittance and absorption measurements, it was found that the band gap of the film decreases gradually with increasing oxygen flow rate. The surface morphology dependent on the oxygen flow rate was also studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The surface roughness became significant with increasing oxygen flow rate, and the nanostructures were formed at the larger flow rate. The relationship between the morphology and the oxygen flow rate of Zn 1-x Mg x O films was discussed

  12. On the optical and microstrain analysis of graded InGaN/GaN MQWs based on plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, c-plane stepped- and graded- InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) by in situ surface stoichiometry monitoring (i-SSM). Such a technique considerably reduces the strain build-up due to indium clustering within and across graded-MQWs; especially for QW closer to the top which results in mitigation of the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE). This is validated by a reduced power dependent photoluminescence blueshift of 10 meV in graded-MQWs as compared to a blueshift of 17 meV for stepped-MQWs. We further analyze microstrain within the MQWs, using Raman spectroscopy and geometrical phase analysis (GPA) on high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of stepped- and graded-MQWs, highlighting the reduction of ~1% strain in graded-MQWs over stepped-MQWs. Our analysis provides direct evidence of the advantage of graded-MQWs for the commercially viable c-plane light-emitting and laser diodes. © 2016 Optical Society of America.

  13. Electron Traps in GaAs Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on On-axis (100 and Off-axis Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sarmiento

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS was used to characterize the electron traps present in the bulkGaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on on-axis (100 and off-axis (4° towards the (111 Adirection substrates. Two electron traps were obtained for each sample having identical correspondingpeak locations in the DLTS spectra. The layer grown on the on-axis substrate has electron traps withactivation energies of EC–0.454 eV and EC–0.643 eV and capture cross-sections of 1.205 x 10-14 cm2 and3.88 x 10-15 cm2, respectively. The layer grown on the off-axis substrate has traps with activation energiesof EC–0.454 eV and EC–0.723 eV and capture cross-sections of 2.060 x 10-14 cm2 and 4.40 x 10-14 cm2.The electron traps are possibly the M4 (or EL3 and EL2 (or EB4 traps commonly found in GaAs layers.Due to the high trap concentrations obtained and to the non-uniform trap concentration profile, Asdesorption may be considerable during growth.

  14. Hole traps associated with high-concentration residual carriers in p-type GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elleuch, Omar, E-mail: mr.omar.elleuch@gmail.com; Wang, Li; Lee, Kan-Hua; Demizu, Koshiro; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2015-01-28

    The hole traps associated with high background doping in p-type GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy are studied based on the changes of carrier concentration, junction capacitance, and hole traps properties due to the annealing. The carrier concentration was increased dramatically with annealing time, based on capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurement. In addition, the temperature dependence of the junction capacitance (C–T) was increased rapidly two times. Such behavior is explained by the thermal ionization of two acceptor states. These acceptors are the main cause of high background doping in the film, since the estimated carrier concentration from C–T results explains the measured carrier concentration at room temperature using C–V method. The acceptor states became shallower after annealing, and hence their structures are thermally unstable. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) showed that the HC2 hole trap was composed of two signals, labeled HC21 and HC22. These defects correspond to the acceptor levels, as their energy levels obtained from DLTS are similar to those deduced from C–T. The capture cross sections of HC21 and HC22 are larger than those of single acceptors. In addition, their energy levels and capture cross sections change in the same way due to the annealing. This tendency suggests that HC21 and HC22 signals originate from the same defect which acts as a double acceptor.

  15. Exceptionally large migration length of carbon and topographically-facilitated self-limiting molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaut, Annette S.; Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Wang, Sheng; Levy, Antonio L.; Fernandes dos Santos, Lara; Wang, Lei; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Dean, Cory R.; Hone, James; Pinczuk, Aron; Garcia, Jorge M.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate growth of single-layer graphene (SLG) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), only limited in area by the finite size of the h-BN flakes. Using atomic force microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy, we show that for growth over a wide range of temperatures (500 °C – 1000 °C) the deposited carbon atoms spill off the edge of the h-BN flakes. We attribute this spillage to the very high mobility of the carbon atoms on the BN basal plane, consistent with van der Waals MBE. The h-BN flakes vary in size from 30 μm to 100 μm, thus demonstrating that the migration length of carbon atoms on h-BN is greater than 100 μm. When sufficient carbon is supplied to compensate for this loss, which is largely due to this fast migration of the carbon atoms to and off the edges of the h-BN flake, we find that the best growth temperature for MBE SLG on h-BN is ~950 °C. Self-limiting graphene growth appears to be facilitated by topographic h-BN surface features: We have thereby grown MBE self-limited SLG on an h-BN ridge. This opens up future avenues for precisely tailored fabrication of nano- and hetero-structures on pre-patterned h-BN surfaces for device applications.

  16. Physicochemical analysis of Bi2Te3 – (Fe, Eu – Bi2Te3 junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Balin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Topological insulators (TI are a class of materials gaining in importance due to their unique spin/electronic properties, which may allow for the generation of quasiparticles and electronic states which are not accessible in classical condensed-matter systems. Not surprisingly, TI are considered as promising materials for multiple applications in next generation electronic or spintronic devices, as well as for applications in energy conversion, such as thermo-electrics. In this study, we examined the practical challenges associated with the formation of a well-defined junction between a model 3D topological insulator, Bi2Te3, and a metal, Fe or Eu, from which spin injection could potentially be realized. The properties of multilayer systems grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, with Fe or Eu thin films sandwiched between two Bi2Te3 layers, were studied in-situ using electron diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy. Their magnetic properties were measured using a SQUID magnetometer, while the in-depth chemical structure was assessed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. An examination of impact of Bi2Te3 structure on chemical stability of the junction area has been realized. For Fe, we found that despite room temperature growth, a reaction between the Fe film and Bi2Te3 takes place, leading to the formation of FeTe and also the precipitation of metallic Bi. For the Eu tri-layer, a reaction also occurs, but the Te chemical state remains intact.

  17. High-electron-mobility GaN grown on free-standing GaN templates by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Erin C. H., E-mail: erinkyle@umail.ucsb.edu; Kaun, Stephen W.; Burke, Peter G.; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wu, Yuh-Renn [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-21

    The dependence of electron mobility on growth conditions and threading dislocation density (TDD) was studied for n{sup −}-GaN layers grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. Electron mobility was found to strongly depend on TDD, growth temperature, and Si-doping concentration. Temperature-dependent Hall data were fit to established transport and charge-balance equations. Dislocation scattering was analyzed over a wide range of TDDs (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} to ∼2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}) on GaN films grown under similar conditions. A correlation between TDD and fitted acceptor states was observed, corresponding to an acceptor state for almost every c lattice translation along each threading dislocation. Optimized GaN growth on free-standing GaN templates with a low TDD (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}) resulted in electron mobilities of 1265 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 296 K and 3327 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 113 K.

  18. Properties of InSbN grown on GaAs by radio frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K P; Yoon, S F; Pham, H T

    2009-01-01

    We report the growth of InSbN on a lattice-mismatched GaAs substrate using radio frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The effects of a two-step thin InSb buffer layer grown at 330 and 380 deg. C and substrate temperature (270-380 deg. C) on the properties of the InSbN are studied. The crystalline quality of the InSbN is significantly improved by the two-step buffer layer due to defect suppression. The shifting in the absorption edge of the InSbN from ∼5 to 8 μm following an increase in the substrate temperature is correlated with the reduction in free carrier concentration from ∼10 18 to 10 16 cm -3 and increase in concentration of N substituting Sb from ∼0.2 to 1%. These results will be beneficial to those working on the pseudo-monolithic integration of InSbN detectors on a GaAs platform.

  19. Fe-doped semi-insulating GaN with solid Fe source grown on (110) Si substrates by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young Kyun; Lee, Sang Tae; Kim, Moon Deock; Oh, Jae Eung

    2017-02-01

    Iron doped GaN layers were grown on (110) Si substrates by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using solid elemental iron as a source. Specular films with concentrations up to 1×1020 cm-3, as determined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, were grown, unlike a limited incorporation of Fe into GaN by metal-rich rf plasma MBE. The Fe concentration in the film showed an exponential dependence on the inverse of source temperature with an activation energy of 3.4 eV, which agrees well to the reported value for the sublimation of Fe. A 1.5 μm thick GaN film with a sheet resistance of 1 GΩ/sq. was obtained by compensating unintentional residual donors with a small Fe concentration of 1×1017 cm-3. X-ray diffraction rocking curves indicated high crystalline quality, very similar to an undoped film, showing that the Fe incorporation required to obtain the semi-insulating film properties did not affect the structural properties of the film. The low-temperature PL spectra of highly resistive and semi-insulating Fe:GaN in the range of 1017 1018 cm-3 show dominant exciton emissions and enhanced donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) emissions, implying that Fe ions contribute to the DAP transition between donor levels and Fe-related acceptor levels, possibly compensating the residual donors to achieve the semi-insulating electrical properties.

  20. Hole traps associated with high-concentration residual carriers in p-type GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleuch, Omar; Wang, Li; Lee, Kan-Hua; Demizu, Koshiro; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The hole traps associated with high background doping in p-type GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy are studied based on the changes of carrier concentration, junction capacitance, and hole traps properties due to the annealing. The carrier concentration was increased dramatically with annealing time, based on capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurement. In addition, the temperature dependence of the junction capacitance (C–T) was increased rapidly two times. Such behavior is explained by the thermal ionization of two acceptor states. These acceptors are the main cause of high background doping in the film, since the estimated carrier concentration from C–T results explains the measured carrier concentration at room temperature using C–V method. The acceptor states became shallower after annealing, and hence their structures are thermally unstable. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) showed that the HC2 hole trap was composed of two signals, labeled HC21 and HC22. These defects correspond to the acceptor levels, as their energy levels obtained from DLTS are similar to those deduced from C–T. The capture cross sections of HC21 and HC22 are larger than those of single acceptors. In addition, their energy levels and capture cross sections change in the same way due to the annealing. This tendency suggests that HC21 and HC22 signals originate from the same defect which acts as a double acceptor

  1. Transport and optical properties of c-axis oriented wedge shaped GaN nanowall network grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasker, H. P.; Thakur, Varun; Kesaria, Manoj; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Dhar, S.

    2014-02-01

    The transport and optical properties of wedge-shaped nanowall network of GaN grown spontaneously on cplane sapphire substrate by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PAMBE) show interesting behavior. The electron mobility at room temperature in these samples is found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of a continuous film. Our study reveals a strong correlation between the mobility and the band gap in these nanowall network samples. However, it is seen that when the thickness of the tips of the walls increases to an extent such that more than 70% of the film area is covered, it behaves close to a flat sample. In the sample with lower surface coverage (≈40% and ≈60%), it was observed that the conductivity, mobility as well as the band gap increase with the decrease in the average tip width of the walls. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments show a strong and broad band edge emission with a large (as high as ≈ 90 meV) blue shift, compared to that of a continuous film, suggesting a confinement of carriers on the top edges of the nanowalls. The PL peak width remains wide at all temperatures suggesting the existence of a high density of tail states at the band edge, which is further supported by the photoconductivity result. The high conductivity and mobility observed in these samples is believed to be due to a "dissipation less" transport of carriers, which are localized at the top edges (edge states) of the nanowalls.

  2. Growth kinetics of AlN and GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on R-plane sapphire substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T. D.; Ozcan, A. S.; Ludwig, K. F.; Zhou, L.; Smith, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of AlN and GaN thin films on R-plane sapphire substrates. Contrary to previous findings that GaN grows with its (1120) A-plane parallel to the (1102) R-plane of sapphire, our results indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films is strongly dependent on the kinetic conditions of growth for the GaN or AlN buffer layers. Thus, group III-rich conditions for growth of either GaN or AlN buffers result in nitride films having (1120) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, and basal-plane stacking faults parallel to the growth direction. The growth of these buffers under N-rich conditions instead leads to nitride films with (1126) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, with inclined c-plane stacking faults that often terminate threading dislocations. Moreover, electron microscope observations indicate that slight miscut (∼0.5 deg. ) of the R-plane sapphire substrate almost completely suppresses the formation of twinning defects in the (1126) GaN films.

  3. Properties of ZnO/ZnMgO nanostructures grown on r-plane Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzyk, M.A., E-mail: pietrzyk@ifpan.edu.pl; Stachowicz, M.; Jarosz, D.; Minikayev, R.; Zielinski, M.; Dluzewski, P.; Kozanecki, A.

    2015-11-25

    Growths of ZnMgO/ZnO/ZnMgO multiple quantum well (MQW) structures were performed on semi-polar r-plane sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. It has been shown that it is possible to grow self-organized ZnMgO nanocolumns with MQW structures at a temperature of 550 °C without employing a catalyst. The nanocolumns are symmetrically tilted at an angle of 62° to the substrate surface. Deposition of a low-temperature (450 °C) ZnO buffer layer prior to the growth of ZnO/ZnMgO MQWs results in good quality planar structures. The crystalline quality of the nanostructures was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Luminescence properties of ZnO/ZnMgO heterostructures and MQWs were studied. The luminescence was dominated by localized exciton emissions below 100 K, while free exciton recombination was the most intense emission at temperatures above 100 K. - Highlights: • First observation of self-organized growth of ZnMgO nanocolumns on r-plane Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} without any catalyst is demonstrated. • Nanocolumns exhibit high crystallographic quality and they are tilted 62° to the substrate. • Deposition of a low temperature ZnO buffer layer results in planar growth of the structures. • The MQWs reveal excitonic near-band edge emission at low and room temperatures.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowires by means of molecular beam epitaxy; Herstellung und Charakterisierung von Silizium-Nanodraehten mittels Molekularstrahlepitaxie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Luise

    2007-06-19

    In this work, basic processes of silicon whisker growth were examined. For the first time, Si nanowhiskers were produced under UHV conditions by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and characterized by different analysis methods afterwards. The existence of Au/Si droplets on a Si(111) substrate surface is a precondition of this growth method. Analyses of the temporal development of the Au/Si droplets during the whisker growth show a decrease of the number of small droplets resp. whiskers during the whisker growth with increasing growth time. This behaviour, i.e. the dissolution of smaller droplets/whiskers and the growth of larger ones in parallel can be explained by Ostwald ripenning. The diffusion-determined material transition of gold, which occurs during this process, is theoretically described by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW)-Theory. After this theory only whiskers grow which radii are larger than the critical radius. The whisker radii are temperature dependend whereas analogous whisker radii exist for identical growth times. Electron microscopy analysis show that all whiskers possess a hexagonal but no cylindrical habitus. The planes that form during the growth are crystallographic (111) planes. The growth of Si nanowhiskers under MBE conditions is determined by the Vapour Liquid Solid (VLS) mechanism and by surface diffusion of Si atoms. (orig.)

  5. Remarkable strain-induced magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial Co2MnGa (0 0 1) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechan, Michael J.; Yu, Chengtao; Carr, David; Palmstroem, Chris J.

    2005-01-01

    Remarkably large, strain-induced anisotropy is observed in the thin-film Heusler alloy Co 2 MnGa. 30 nm Co 2 MnGa (0 0 1) films have been epitaxially grown on different interlayers/substrates with varied strain, and investigated with ferromagnetic resonance. The film grown on ErAs/InGaAs/InP experiences tension strain, resulting in an out-of-plane strain-induced anisotropy (∼1.1x10 6 erg/cm 3 ) adding to the effects of shape anisotropy. In contrast, the film grown on ScErAs/GaAs, experiences a compression strain, resulting in an out-of-plane strain-induced anisotropy (∼3.3x10 6 erg/cm 3 ) which almost totally cancels the effects of shape anisotropy, thus rendering the film virtually isotropic. This results in the formation of stripe domains in remanence. In addition, small, but well-defined 2-fold and 4-fold in-plane anisotropy coexist in each sample with weak, but interesting strain dependence. Transport measurement shows small (<1%) magnetoresistance effects in the compression film, but negligible magnetoresistance in the relaxed and tension strained samples

  6. Beam test results of a monolithic pixel sensor in the 0.18 μm tower-jazz technology with high resistivity epitaxial layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattiazzo, S., E-mail: serena.mattiazzo@pd.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova IT 35131 (Italy); Aimo, I. [Politecnico di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Torino, Torino IT 10129 (Italy); Baudot, J. [Universitè de Strasbourg, IPHC, Strasbourg F67037 (France); CNRS, MMR7178, Strasbourg F67037 (France); Bedda, C. [Politecnico di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Torino, Torino IT 10129 (Italy); La Rocca, P. [Università di Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Catania, Catania IT 95123 (Italy); Perez, A. [Universitè de Strasbourg, IPHC, Strasbourg F67037 (France); CNRS, MMR7178, Strasbourg F67037 (France); Riggi, F. [Università di Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Catania, Catania IT 95123 (Italy); Spiriti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati and Sezione di Roma 3, Roma IT 00146 (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade in the second Long LHC Shutdown in the years 2018–2019; this upgrade includes the full replacement of the Inner Tracking System (ITS), deploying seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). For the development of the new ALICE ITS, the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process has been chosen as it is possible to use full CMOS in the pixel and different silicon wafers (including high resistivity epitaxial layers). A large test campaign has been carried out on several small prototype chips, designed to optimize the pixel sensor layout and the front-end electronics. Results match the target requirements both in terms of performance and of radiation hardness. Following this development, the first full scale chips have been designed, submitted and are currently under test, with promising results. A telescope composed of 4 planes of Mimosa-28 and 2 planes of Mimosa-18 chips is under development at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) in Italy with the final goal to perform a comparative test of the full scale prototypes. The telescope has been recently used to test a Mimosa-22THRb chip (a monolithic pixel sensor built in the 0.18 μm Tower-Jazz process) and we foresee to perform tests on the full scale chips for the ALICE ITS upgrade at the beginning of 2015. In this contribution we will describe some first measurements of spatial resolution, fake hit rate and detection efficiency of the Mimosa-22THRb chip obtained at the BTF facility in June 2014 with an electron beam of 500 MeV.

  7. Beam-Induced Damage Mechanisms and their Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid interaction of highly energetic particle beams with matter induces dynamic responses in the impacted component. If the beam pulse is sufficiently intense, extreme conditions can be reached, such as very high pressures, changes of material density, phase transitions, intense stress waves, material fragmentation and explosions. Even at lower intensities and longer time-scales, significant effects may be induced, such as vibrations, large oscillations, and permanent deformation of the impacted components. These lectures provide an introduction to the mechanisms that govern the thermomechanical phenomena induced by the interaction between particle beams and solids and to the analytical and numerical methods that are available for assessing the response of impacted components. An overview of the design principles of such devices is also provided, along with descriptions of material selection guidelines and the experimental tests that are required to validate materials and components exposed to interactio...

  8. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miniati, Francesco [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Elyiv, Andrii, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs nanowires and their sustainability for optoelectronic applications. Comparing Au- and self-assisted growth methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Steffen

    2011-09-28

    In this work the synthesis of GaAs nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is investigated. A comparison between Au- and self-assisted VLS growth is at the centre of this thesis. While the Au-assisted method is established as a versatile tool for nanowire growth, the recently developed self-assisted variation results from the exchange of Au by Ga droplets and thus eliminates any possibility of Au incorporation. By both methods, we achieve nanowires with epitaxial alignment to the Si(111) substrates. Caused by differences during nanowire nucleation, a parasitic planar layer grows between the nanowires by the Au-assisted method, but can be avoided by the self-assisted method. Au-assisted nanowires grow predominantly in the metastable wurtzite crystal structure, while their self-assisted counterparts have the zincblende structure. All GaAs nanowires are fully relaxed and the strain arising from the lattice mismatch between GaAs and Si of 4.1 % is accommodated by misfit dislocations at the interface. Self-assisted GaAs nanowires are generally found to have vertical and non-polar side facets, while tilted and polar nanofacets were described for Au-assisted GaAs nanowires. We employ VLS nucleation theory to understand the effect of the droplet material on the lateral facets. Optoelectronic applications require long minority carrier lifetimes at room temperature. We fabricate GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires and analyse them by transient photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results are 2.5 ns for the self-assisted nanowires as well as 9 ps for the Au-assisted nanowires. By temperature-dependent PL measurements we find a characteristic activation energy of 77 meV that is present only in the Au-assisted nanowires. We conclude that most likely Au is incorporated from the droplets into the GaAs nanowires and acts as a deep, non-radiative recombination centre.

  10. Electron-beam induced conduction in some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Yasuo; Mizutani, Teruyoshi; Ieda, Masayuki

    1976-01-01

    The charge signal induced by pulsed electron beam consists of two components, i.e. the fast and the slow components. The slow component which corresponds to carrier transport via shallow traps exhibited an asymmetry with respect to the bias field polarity. The asymmetry revealed that the main carriers which drifted via shallow traps were electrons in PET, both electrons and holes in PEN, and holes in PS. TSC spectra of electron-beam induced electrets proved directly the existence of electron shallow traps in PET and both electron and hole traps in PEN. Their trap energies were 0.1 to 0.2 eV. (auth.)

  11. Analysis of the beam induced heat loads on the LHC arc beam screens during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    During Run 2 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been routinely operated with 25 ns bunch spacing. In these conditions large heat loads have been measured on the beam screens of the superconducting magnets, together with other observations indicating that an electron cloud develops in the beam chambers. The analysis of these heat loads has revealed several interesting features allowing to pinpoint peculiar characteristics of the observed beam-induced heating. This document describes the main findings of this analysis including the evolution taking place during the run, the observed dependence on the beam conditions and the results from special tests and dedicated instrumentation. The differences observed in the behavior of the eight LHC arcs are also discussed.

  12. Band Gap Opening Induced by the Structural Periodicity in Epitaxial Graphene Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Nair, Maya; Palacio, Irene; Celis, Arlensiú; Zobelli, Alberto; Gloter, Alexandre; Kubsky, Stefan; Turmaud, Jean-Philippe; Conrad, Matthew; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Conrad, Edward H; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Tejeda, Antonio

    2017-04-12

    The epitaxial graphene buffer layer on the Si face of hexagonal SiC shows a promising band gap, of which the precise origin remains to be understood. In this work, we correlate the electronic to the atomic structure of the buffer layer by combining angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM). We show that the band structure in the buffer has an electronic periodicity related to the structural periodicity observed in STM images and published X-ray diffraction. Our HR-STEM measurements show the bonding of the buffer layer to the SiC at specific locations separated by 1.5 nm. This is consistent with the quasi 6 × 6 periodic corrugation observed in the STM images. The distance between buffer C and SiC is 1.9 Å in the bonded regions and up to 2.8 Å in the decoupled regions, corresponding to a 0.9 Å corrugation of the buffer layer. The decoupled regions are sp 2 hybridized. Density functional tight binding (DFTB) calculations demonstrate the presence of a gap at the Dirac point everywhere in the buffer layer, even in the decoupled regions where the buffer layer has an atomic structure close to that of graphene. The surface periodicity also promotes band in the superperiodic Brillouin zone edges as seen by photoemission and confirmed by our calculations.

  13. Nanoscale Phase Separation in Fe3O4(111) Films on Sapphire(0001) and Phase Stability of Fe3O4(001) Films on MgO(001) Grown by Oxygen-Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-25

    We report a phase instability in oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films on sapphire (0001) substrates. Under a wide range of growth conditions, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) films phase separate, on a nanometer length scale, into Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe0 and metallic Fe, which is attributed to formation of the thermodynamically unstable phase Fe0 in the initial stages of (111) growth. In contrast, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (001) films, grown simultaneously on MgO(001) substrates, do not exhibit this phase instability. We specify growth conditions for which single-phase, epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) films can be grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy or by reactive evaporation of Fe in molecular oxygen. Film orientation and phase separation strongly influence magnetic properties. Single-phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) films are much more difficult to magnetize than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (001) films and phase separation makes the films even more difficult to magnetize.

  14. Interlayer exchange coupling, crystalline and magnetic structure in Fe/CsCl-FeSi multilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekoster, J.; Degroote, S.; Meersschaut, J.; Moons, R.; Vantomme, A. [K.U. Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica (Belgium); Bottyan, L.; Deak, L.; Szilagyi, E.; Nagy, D.L. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Baron, A.Q.R. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (France); Langouche, G. [K.U. Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica (Belgium)

    1999-09-15

    Crystalline and magnetic structure as well as the interlayer exchange coupling in MBE grown Fe/FeSi multilayers are investigated. From conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and ion beam channeling measurements the spacer FeSi material is found to be stabilized in a crystalline metastable metallic FeSi phase with the CsCl structure. Strong non-oscillatory interlayer exchange coupling is identified with magnetometry and synchrotron Moessbauer reflectometry. From the fits of the time spectrum and the resonant {phi}-{phi} scans a model for the sublayer magnetization of the multilayer is deduced.

  15. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  16. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  17. Study of ion beam induced depolymerization using positron annihilation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O. E-mail: opuglisi@dipchi.unict.it; Fragala, M.E.; Lynn, K.G.; Petkov, M.; Weber, M.; Somoza, A.; Dupasquier, A.; Quasso, F

    2001-04-01

    Ion beam induced depolymerization of polymers is a special class of ion beam induced chemical reaction which gives rise to catastrophic 'unzipping' of macromolecules with production of large amounts of the monomer, of the order of many hundreds monomer molecules per each macromolecule. The possible modification of the density at microscopic level prompted us to undertake a study of this effect utilizing positron annihilation techniques in Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) before and after bombardment with He{sup +} 300 keV ions at 200 deg. C. Preliminary results shown here indicate that before bombardment there is a reproducible dependence of nano-hole distribution on the sample history. Moreover at 200 deg. C we do not detect formation of new cavities as a consequence of the strong depolymerization that occurs under the ion beam. The possible correlation of these findings with transport properties of PMMA at temperature higher than the glass transition temperature will be discussed.

  18. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators on GaAs (111 substrates: a potential route to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoquan Zeng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111 substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111 substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111 substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111 substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

  19. Role of dislocations and carrier concentration in limiting the electron mobility of InN films grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; De, Arpan; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy growth of device quality InN films on GaN epilayer and nano-wall network (NWN) templates deposited on c-sapphire by varying the film thickness up to 1 μm. The careful experiments are directed towards obtaining high mobility InN layers having a low band gap with improved crystal quality. The dislocation density is quantified by using high resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve broadening values of symmetric and asymmetric reflections, respectively. We observe that the dislocation density of the InN films grown on GaN NWN is less than that of the films grown on the GaN epilayer. This is attributed to the nanoepitaxial lateral overlayer growth (ELOG) process, where the presence of voids at the interface of InN/GaN NWN prevents the propagation of dislocation lines into the InN epilayers, thereby causing less defects in the overgrown InN films. Thus, this new adaptation of the nano-ELOG growth process enables us to prepare InN layers with high electron mobility. The obtained electron mobility of 2121 cm2/Vs for 1 μm thick InN/GaN NWN is comparable with the literature values of similar thickness InN films. Furthermore, in order to understand the reasons that limit electron mobility, the charge neutrality condition is employed to study the variation of electron mobility as a function of dislocation density and carrier concentration. Overall, this study provides a route to attaining improved crystal quality and electronic properties of InN films.

  20. Influence of the Compositional Grading on Concentration of Majority Charge Carriers in Near-Surface Layers of n(p)-HgCdTe Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    The capacitive characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures based on the compositionally graded Hg1-xCdxTe created by molecular beam epitaxy have been experimentally investigated in a wide temperature range (8-77 K). A program has been developed for numerical simulation of ideal capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics in the low-frequency and high-frequency approximations. The concentrations of the majority carriers in the near-surface semiconductor layer are determined from the values of the capacitances in the minima of low-frequency C-V curves. For MIS structures based on p-Hg1-xCdxTe, the effect of the presence of the compositionally graded layer on the hole concentration in the near-surface semiconductor layer, determined from capacitive measurements, has not been established. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the concentration of holes in the near-surface layer largely depends on the type of dielectric coating and the regimes of its application. For MIS structures based on n-Hg1-x Cd x Te (x = 0.22-0.23) without a graded-gap layer, the electron concentration determined by the proposed method is close to the average concentration determined by the Hall measurements. The electron concentration in the near-surface semiconductor layer of the compositionally graded n-Hg1-x Cd x Te (x = 0.22-0.23) found from the minimum capacitance value is much higher than the average electron concentration determined by the Hall measurements. The results are qualitatively explained by the creation of additional intrinsic donor-type defects in the near-surface compositionally graded layer of n-Hg1-x Cd x Te.

  1. GaAsBi/GaAs multi-quantum well LED grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisan Patil, Pallavi; Luna, Esperanza; Matsuda, Teruyoshi; Yamada, Kohki; Kamiya, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Shimomura, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    We report a GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diode (LED) grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature (TST) technique. In particular, the QWs and the barriers in the intrinsic region were grown at the different temperatures of {T}{{GaAsBi}} = 350 °C and {T}{{GaAs}} = 550 ^\\circ {{C}}, respectively. Investigations of the microstructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal homogeneous MQWs free of extended defects. Furthermore, the local determination of the Bi distribution profile across the MQWs region using TEM techniques confirm the uniform Bi distribution, while revealing a slightly chemically graded GaAs-on-GaAsBi interface due to Bi surface segregation. Despite this small broadening, we found that Bi segregation is significantly reduced (up to 18% reduction) compared to previous reports on Bi segregation in GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs. Hence, the TST procedure proves as a very efficient method to reduce Bi segregation and thus increase the quality of the layers and interfaces. These improvements positively reflect in the optical properties. Room temperature photoluminescence and electroluminescence (EL) at 1.23 μm emission wavelength are successfully demonstrated using TST MQWs containing less Bi content than in previous reports. Finally, LED fabricated using the present TST technique show current-voltage (I-V) curves with a forward voltage of 3.3 V at an injection current of 130 mA under 1.0 kA cm-2 current excitation. These results not only demonstrate that TST technique provides optical device quality GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs but highlight the relevance of TST-based growth techniques on the fabrication of future heterostructure devices based on dilute bismides.

  2. Growth of GaP and AlGaP on GaP(1 1 1)B using gas-source molecular-beam-epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, J.-B.; Dadgostar, S.; Hestroffer, K.; Bierwagen, O.; Trampert, A.; Hatami, F.

    2017-11-01

    We present an initial study of the influence of the growth parameters on the surface morphology and on the interface quality of homoepitaxial GaP(1 1 1) and heteroepitaxial GaP/AlGaP(1 1 1) grown on GaP(1 1 1)B substrates using Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy (GSMBE). Three different surface reconstructions are identified in the RHEED patterns during the growth runs. The Root Mean Square (RMS) surface roughness measured post-growth by AFM ranges from 3 to 10 nm over 10 × 10 μm2 areas, for a film thickness of 100-600 nm. The results of 2θ-ω XRD scans on (1 1 1) and (3 1 1) planes reveal a stacking disorder in the AlGaP layer and further XRD phi-scan measurements on GaP (3 1 1) show strong peaks with 3-fold rotational symmetry and additional of 3-fold weak peaks indicating only a negligible fraction of the twinned crystal orientation in the substrate. TEM images of these samples show a smooth interface between the AlGaP layer and GaP substrate, and reveal the presence of a high density of extended defects such as stacking faults, twinning and dislocations lines in AlGaP layer whereas the GaP layer appears as pure Zinc-Blende. Further TEM analysis reveals composition and local strain variations for GaP/AlGaP samples associated with an undulated surface.

  3. Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E2H phonon modes of InxAl1-xN nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Tangi, Malleswararao

    2016-07-26

    The dislocation free Inx Al 1-xN nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si(111) by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature regime of 490 °C–610 °C yielding In composition ranges over 0.50 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. We study the optical properties of these NWs by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopies since they possesses minimal strain with reduced defects comparative to the planar films. The optical bandgap measurements of Inx Al 1-xN NWs are demonstrated by SE where the absorption edges of the NW samples are evaluated irrespective of substrate transparency. A systematic Stoke shift of 0.04–0.27 eV with increasing x was observed when comparing the micro-photoluminescence spectra with the Tauc plot derived from SE. The micro-Raman spectra in the NWs with x = 0.5 showed two-mode behavior for A1(LO) phonons and single mode behavior for E2 H phonons. As for x = 0.17, i.e., high Al content, we observed a peculiar E2 H phonon mode splitting. Further, we observe composition dependent frequency shifts. The 77 to 600 K micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show that both AlN- and InN-like modes of A1(LO) and E2 H phonons in Inx Al 1-xN NWs are redshifted with increasing temperature, similar to that of the binary III group nitride semiconductors. These studies of the optical properties of the technologically important Inx Al 1-xN nanowires will path the way towards lasers and light-emitting diodes in the wavelength of the ultra-violet and visible range.

  4. ZnMgSe/ZnCdSe and ZnMgSe/ZnSeTe distributed Bragg reflectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, F. C.; Lee, S.; Bindley, U.; Furdyna, J. K.

    1999-07-01

    This article investigates distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) based on two wide-gap II-VI semiconductor alloy combinations: ZnMgSe/ZnCdSe and ZnMgSe/ZnSeTe. Prior to fabrication of the DBRs, a prism coupler technique was used to determine the indices of refraction n of the above ternary alloys of various compositions prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Using these values of n, two DBR systems, Zn0.66Mg0.34Se/Zn0.74Cd0.20Se and Zn0.62Mg0.38Se/ZnSe0.56Te0.44, were fabricated, each with a relatively large difference in the indices of refraction between its layer materials. It was found that although a higher reflectivity could be achieved using the ZnMgSe/ZnSeTe combination (since it manifests a larger difference in their indices of refraction Δn=0.35), the number of periods which can be deposited in this DBR system is limited due to growth difficulties that arise when combining ZnMgSe and ZnSeTe. Therefore the ZnMgSe/ZnSeTe DBR system, which was restricted to just 10 periods, yielded a modest reflectivity of 85%. On the other hand, although Δn in the ZnMgSe/ZnCdSe DBR system is smaller (Δn=0.20), it poses fewer growth difficulties, making it possible to grow DBR stacks consisting of a large number of layers without compromising the crystal quality of the structure. By growing 20 periods of the ZnMgSe/ZnCdSe DBR system, we obtained a DBR with a reflectivity as high as 98%.

  5. The formation of hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk on GaN-nanowire observed in plasma source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tien Khee; Gasim, Anwar; Cha, Dongkyu; Janjua, Bilal; Yang, Yang; Jahangir, Shafat; Zhao, Chao; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Ooi, Boon Siew

    2014-03-01

    We report on the properties and growth kinetics of defect-free, photoluminescence (PL) efficient mushroom-like nanowires (MNWs) in the form of ~30nm thick hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk on GaN nanowires, coexisting with the conventional rod-like InGaN-on-GaN nanowires (RNWs) on (111)-silicon-substrate. When characterized using confocal microscopy (CFM) with 458nm laser excitation, while measuring spontaneous-emission at fixed detection wavelengths, the spatial intensity map evolved from having uniform pixelated emission, to having only an emission ring, and then a round emission spot. This corresponds to the PL emission with increasing indium composition; starting from emission mainly from the RNW, and then the 540 nm emission from one MNWs ensemble, followed by the 590 nm emission from a different MNW ensemble, respectively. These hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nano-disks ensembles were obtained during molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) growth. On the other hand, the regular rod-like InGaN-on-GaN nanowires (RNWs) were emitting at a shorter peak wavelength of 490 nm. While the formation of InGaN rod-like nanowire is well-understood, the formation of the hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk-on-GaN-nanowire requires further investigation. It was postulated to arise from the highly sensitive growth kinetics during plasma-assisted MBE of InGaN at low temperature, i.e. when the substrate temperature was reduced from 800 °C (GaN growth) to <600 °C (InGaN growth), during which sparsely populated metal-droplet formation prevails and further accumulated more indium adatoms due to a higher cohesive bond between metallic molecules.

  6. Calcium impurity as a source of non-radiative recombination in (In,Ga)N layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Young, E. C.

    2016-11-23

    Ca as an unintentional impurity has been investigated in III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that Ca originates from the substrate surface, even if careful cleaning and rinsing procedures are applied. The initial Ca surface coverage is ∼1012 cm−2, which is consistent with previous reports on GaAs and silicon wafers. At the onset of growth, the Ca species segregates at the growth front while incorporating at low levels. The incorporation rate is strongly temperature dependent. It is about 0.03% at 820 °C and increases by two orders of magnitude when the temperature is reduced to 600 °C, which is the typical growth temperature for InGaN alloy. Consequently, [Ca] is as high as 1018 cm−3 in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. Such a huge concentration might be detrimental for the efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) if one considers that Ca is potentially a source of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. We thus developed a specific growth strategy to reduce [Ca] in the MBE grown LEDs, which consisted of burying Ca in a low temperature InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) before the growth of the active region. Finally, two LED samples with and without an SL were fabricated. An increase in the output power by one order of magnitude was achieved when Ca was reduced in the LED active region, providing evidence for the role of Ca in the SRH recombination.

  7. The formation of hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk on GaN-nanowire observed in plasma source molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2014-03-08

    We report on the properties and growth kinetics of defect-free, photoluminescence (PL) efficient mushroom-like nanowires (MNWs) in the form of ~30nm thick hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk on GaN nanowires, coexisting with the conventional rod-like InGaN-on-GaN nanowires (RNWs) on (111)-silicon-substrate. When characterized using confocal microscopy (CFM) with 458nm laser excitation, while measuring spontaneous-emission at fixed detection wavelengths, the spatial intensity map evolved from having uniform pixelated emission, to having only an emission ring, and then a round emission spot. This corresponds to the PL emission with increasing indium composition; starting from emission mainly from the RNW, and then the 540 nm emission from one MNWs ensemble, followed by the 590 nm emission from a different MNW ensemble, respectively. These hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nano-disks ensembles were obtained during molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) growth. On the other hand, the regular rod-like InGaN-on-GaN nanowires (RNWs) were emitting at a shorter peak wavelength of 490 nm. While the formation of InGaN rod-like nanowire is well-understood, the formation of the hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk-on-GaN-nanowire requires further investigation. It was postulated to arise from the highly sensitive growth kinetics during plasma-assisted MBE of InGaN at low temperature, i.e. when the substrate temperature was reduced from 800 °C (GaN growth) to <600 °C (InGaN growth), during which sparsely populated metal-droplet formation prevails and further accumulated more indium adatoms due to a higher cohesive bond between metallic molecules. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  8. Capacitance–voltage and current–voltage characteristics for the study of high background doping and conduction mechanisms in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The cause of high background doping was confirmed and characterized. ► The current–voltage characteristics deviate from the thermionic emission. ► The recombination current is attributed to a hole trap (E V + 0.52 eV). ► The hole trap (E V + 0.52 eV) was confirmed by DLTS measurements. -- Abstract: The temperature dependence of capacitance–voltage (C–V) and current voltage (I–V) characteristics were used to study the cause of high background doping and the underlying current transport mechanisms in GaAsN Schottky diode grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). In one hand, a nitrogen-related sigmoid increase of junction capacitance and ionized acceptor concentration was observed in the temperature range 70–100 K and was attributed to the thermal ionization of a nitrogen–hydrogen-related deep acceptor-state, with thermal activation energy of approximately 0.11 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM) of GaAsN. This acceptor state is mainly responsible for the high background doping in unintentionally doped GaAsN grown by CBE. On the other hand, the I–V characteristics at different temperatures were found to deviate from the well known pure thermionic-emission mechanism. Based on their fitting at each temperature, the recombination current in the space charge region of GaAsN Schottky diode was mainly attributed to a hole trap, localized at 0.51 eV above the VBM. Given the accuracy of measurements, this result was confirmed by deep level transient spectroscopy measurements. Nevertheless, considering the Shockley–Read–Hall model of generation-recombination, the recombination activity of this defect was quantified and qualified to be weak compared with the markedly degradation of minority carrier lifetime in GaAsN material

  9. Double carriers pulse DLTS for the characterization of electron-hole recombination process in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    A nitrogen-related electron trap (E1), located approximately 0.33 eV from the conduction band minimum of GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy, was confirmed by investigating the dependence of its density with N concentration. This level exhibits a high capture cross section compared with that of native defects in GaAs. Its density increases significantly with N concentration, persists following post-thermal annealing, and was found to be quasi-uniformly distributed. These results indicate that E1 is a stable defect that is formed during growth to compensate for the tensile strain caused by N. Furthermore, E1 was confirmed to act as a recombination center by comparing its activation energy with that of the recombination current in the depletion region of the alloy. However, this technique cannot characterize the electron-hole (e-h) recombination process. For that, double carrier pulse deep level transient spectroscopy is used to confirm the non-radiative e-h recombination process through E1, to estimate the capture cross section of holes, and to evaluate the energy of multi-phonon emission. Furthermore, a configuration coordinate diagram is modeled based on the physical parameters of E1. -- Research Highlights: → Double carrier pulse DLTS method confirms the existence of SRH center. → The recombination center in GaAsN depends on nitrogen concentration. → Minority carrier lifetime in GaAsN is less than 1 ns. → A non-radiative recombination center exits in GaAsN.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Orsel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  11. Semiconductors and semimetals epitaxial microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Gossard, Arthur C

    1994-01-01

    Newly developed semiconductor microstructures can now guide light and electrons resulting in important consequences for state-of-the-art electronic and photonic devices. This volume introduces a new generation of epitaxial microstructures. Special emphasis has been given to atomic control during growth and the interrelationship between the atomic arrangements and the properties of the structures.Key Features* Atomic-level control of semiconductor microstructures* Molecular beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition* Quantum wells and quantum wires* Lasers, photon(IR)detectors, heterostructure transistors

  12. Electron Beam Induced Functionalization of Fluoropolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappan, U.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation affects the properties of polymers by chain scission and cross-linking reactions. One process will usually predominate, depending on the chemical structure of the polymer and the irradiation conditions such as temperature and atmosphere. Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and the perfluorinated copolymers poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (FEP) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropylvinyl ether) (PFA) undergo predominantly chain scission, if the irradiation is performed at room temperature. This shortcoming is exploited by converting PTFE into low molecular weight micropowders. The irradiation of PTFE in the presence of air results in micropowders functionalized with oxygen-containing groups. The concentration of end groups was investigated by FTIR and 19F solid-state NMR. The data were used to calculate number-average molecular weights. It was demonstrated that PTFE can be cross-linked by irradiation above its crystalline melting temperature in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Evidence for cross-links in PTFE was derived directly from structural information using 19 F solid-state NMR. FEP is understood to undergo cross-linking by irradiation above the glass transition temperature. It was found that also PFA can be branched and cross-linked by irradiation under special conditions. Radiation-induced grafting of styrene into fluoropolymer films and subsequent sulfonation offers an attractive way to prepare proton exchange membranes. Recently, radiation-induced grafting into cross-linked PTFE was reported. Modified FEP, PFA and ETFE films have been used as base material in this study. The modified films have been prepared by irradiation in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures up to temperatures above the melting temperature of the fluoropolymer

  13. Limits for Beam Induced Damage: Reckless or too Cautious?

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Accidental events implying direct beam impacts on collimators are of the utmost importance as they may lead to serious limitations of the overall LHC Performance. In order to assess damage threshold of components impacted by high energy density beams, entailing changes of phase and extreme pressures, state-of-the-art numerical simulation methods are required. In this paper, a review of the different dynamic response regimes induced by particle beams is given along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each regime. Particular attention is paid to the most critical case, that of shock waves, for which standard Finite Element codes are totally unfit. A novel category of numerical tools, named Hydrocodes, has been adapted and used to analyse the consequences of an asynchronous beam abort on Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT). A number of simulations has been carried out with varying beam energy, number of bunches and bunch sizes allowing to identify different damage levels for the TCT up to catastr...

  14. Electrically induced insulator to metal transition in epitaxial SmNiO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Nikhil, E-mail: nss152@psu.edu; Dasgupta, Sandeepan; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Joshi, Toyanath; Borisov, Pavel; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We report on the electrically induced insulator to metal transition (IMT) in SmNiO{sub 3} thin films grown on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. The behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature suggests that the primary transport mechanism in the SmNiO{sub 3} insulating state is dominated by Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping (ES-VRH). Additionally, the magnetic transition in the insulating state of SmNiO{sub 3} modifies the characteristics of the ES-VRH transport. Systematic DC and pulsed current-voltage measurements indicate that current-induced joule heating is the fundamental mechanism driving the electrically induced IMT in SmNiO{sub 3}. These transport properties are explained in context of the IMT in SmNiO{sub 3} being related to the strong electron-lattice coupling.

  15. (d,p)-transfer induced fission of heavy radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, Martin

    2012-01-01

    (d,p)-transfer induced fission is proposed as a tool to study low energy fission of exotic heavy nuclei. Primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission offers a possibility for systematic study the low energy fission of heavy exotic nuclei at the ISOLDE.

  16. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  17. Epitaxial Crystallization of Precisely Methyl-Substituted Polyethylene Induced by Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Miao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available How large of a substituent/branch a polyethylene possesses that can still be induced by nanofillers to form ordered chain structures is interesting, but uncertain. To solve this problem, precisely methyl-substituted polyethylene (PE21M was chosen as a model to prepare its one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene via solution crystallization. It is shown that kebab-like and rod-like nanofiller-induced crystals were separately observed on the surfaces of CNTs and graphene and the density of rod-like crystals is significantly less than kebab-like ones. The results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD reveal that CNTs and graphene cannot induce polymers with the substituent volume greater than, or equal to, 2 Å (methyl to form ordered lattice structure, but CNTs exhibit the better nucleation effect, providing us with guidance to manipulate the physical performance of polymer composites on the basis of the size of the substituent and the type of nanofiller.

  18. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, T; Tomasulo, S; Lang, JR; Lee, ML

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated similar to 2.0 eV (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P and similar to 1.9 eV Ga0.51In0.49P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V-oc) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga0.51In0.49P cells, and 1.35-1.37 V for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W-oc = E-g/q - V-oc) of Ga0.51In0.49P cells to decrease from similar to 575 mV to similar to 565 mV, while that of (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant Woc as a function of substrate offcut for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga0.51In0.49P devices. In addition to larger Woc values, the (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga0.51In0.49P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  19. Identification of N–H related acceptor defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy using hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elleuch, Omar, E-mail: mr.omar.elleuch@gmail.com; Wang, Li; Lee, Kan-Hua; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-11-15

    The N–H related acceptor defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) are studied by hydrogen isotopes, H and D. When the films are grown by a conventional arsenic source, deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) reveals two energy levels at 0.11 and 0.19 eV above the valence band. These levels were considered to act as a double acceptor in the literature. When the films are grown by a deuterated arsenic source, new signals appear in DLTS spectra at 0.15 and 0.23 eV. This indicates that the new signals are originated from D-related defects. The energy differences between 0.15 and 0.11 eV, and that between 0.23 and 0.19 eV are same (0.04 eV). Although these energy levels become deeper with increasing the growth temperature, the energy differences are almost constant independent of the growth condition. In addition, the intensity ratios of the peaks at 0.15 (0.23) eV to that at 0.11 (0.19) eV have a good correlation with the isotopic concentration ratio of D to H in the grown films. Therefore, we conclude that the energy differences and intensity ratios of the DLTS peaks occur due to the structural change from N–H to N−D in the same type of defect, and that this acceptor is an N–H related defect. - Highlights: • The DLTS signals at 0.11 and 0.19 eV originate from a double acceptor. • Growth by D-TDMAAs: new defects that contain D are generated at 0.15 and 0.23 eV. • Energy differences between 0.15 (0.23) eV and 0.11 (0.19) eV: same, independent of T{sub G}. • Intensity ratios of peaks at 0.15 (0.23) eV to that at 0.11 (0.19) eV ≈ [D]/{[H]+[D]}. • Therefore, this acceptor is related to H.

  20. Ultrahigh B doping (≤1022 cm-3) during Si(001) gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy: B incorporation, electrical activation, and hole transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, G.; Kim, H.; Desjardins, P.; Taylor, N.; Spila, T.; Lu, Q.; Greene, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    Si(001) layers doped with B concentrations C B between 1x10 17 and 1.2x10 22 cm -3 (24 at %) were grown on Si(001)2x1 at temperatures T s =500-850 degree sign C by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy from Si 2 H 6 and B 2 H 6 . C B increases linearly with the incident precursor flux ratio J B 2 H 6 /J Si 2 H 6 and B is incorporated into substitutional electrically active sites at concentrations up to C B * (T s ) which, for T s =600 degree sign C, is 2.5x10 20 cm -3 . At higher B concentrations, C B increases faster than J B 2 H 6 /J Si 2 H 6 and there is a large and discontinuous decrease in the activated fraction of incorporated B. However, the total activated B concentration continues to increase and reaches a value of N B =1.3x10 21 cm -3 with C B =1.2x10 22 cm -3 . High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and reciprocal space mapping measurements show that all films, irrespective of C B and T s , are fully strained. No B precipitates or misfit dislocations were detected by HR-XRD or transmission electron microscopy. The lattice constant in the film growth direction a (perpendicular sign) decreases linearly with increasing C B up to the limit of full electrical activation and continues to decrease, but nonlinearly, with C B >C B * . Room-temperature resistivity and conductivity mobility values are in good agreement with theoretical values for B concentrations up to C B =2.5x10 20 and 2x10 21 cm -3 , respectively. All results can be explained on the basis of a model which accounts for strong B surface segregation to the second-layer with a saturation coverage θ B,sat of 0.5 ML (corresponding to C B =C B * ). At higher C B (i.e., θ B >θ B,sat ), B accumulates in the upper layer as shown by thermally programmed desorption measurements, and a parallel incorporation channel becomes available in which B is incorporated into substitutional sites as B pairs that are electrically inactive but have a low charge-scattering cross section. (c) 2000 The American Physical

  1. n-type dopants in (001) β-Ga2O3 grown on (001) β-Ga2O3 substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Heon; Mauze, Akhil; Ahmadi, Elaheh; Mates, Tom; Oshima, Yuichi; Speck, James S.

    2018-04-01

    Ge and Sn as n-type dopants in (001) β-Ga2O3 films were investigated using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The Ge concentration showed a strong dependence on the growth temperature, whereas the Sn concentration remains independent of the growth temperature. The maximum growth temperature at which a wide range of Ge concentrations (from 1017 to 1020 cm-3) could be achieved was 675 °C while the same range of Sn concentration could be achieved at growth temperature of 750 °C. Atomic force microscopy results revealed that higher growth temperature shows better surface morphology. Therefore, our study reveals a tradeoff between higher Ge doping concentration and high quality surface morphology on (001) β-Ga2O3 films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The Ge doped films had an electron mobility of 26.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 at the electron concentration of 6.7 × 1017 cm-3 whereas the Sn doped films had an electron mobility of 25.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 at the electron concentration of 1.1 × 1018 cm-3.

  2. m-plane GaN layers grown by rf-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy with varying Ga/N flux ratios on m-plane 4H-SiC substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, R.; Horita, M.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2007-01-01

    A series of m-plane GaN layers with the Ga beam-equivalent pressure (BEP) as the only varied parameter was grown by rf-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on m-plane 4H-SiC substrates using AlN buffer layers. The smoothest growth surfaces and most complete film coalescence were found for the highest Ga BEP corresponding to the Ga droplet accumulation regime. However, better structural quality as assessed by x-ray rocking curves was observed for growth at a lower Ga BEP value below the droplet limit. The variation of rocking curve widths for planes inclined with respect to the epilayer c axis followed a different trend with Ga BEP than those of reflections parallel to the c axis. The GaN layers were found to exhibit a large residual compressive strain along the a axis

  3. Induced focusing and conversion of a Gaussian beam into an elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among several important findings, the finding that a very week probe beam can be guided and focused when power of both beams are well below their individual threshold for self-focusing, is a noteworthy one. It has been found that induced focusing is not possible for laser beams of any wavelength and beam radius.

  4. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  5. Ar plasma induced deep levels in epitaxial n-GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, A.; Nyamhere, C.; Botha, J. R.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Meyer, W. E.; Coelho, S. M. M.; Kolkovsky, V. l.

    2012-01-01

    Ar plasma etching of n-type (Si doped) GaAs introduces several electron traps (E c - 0.04 eV, E c - 0.07 eV, E c - 0.19 eV, E c - 0.31 eV, E c - 0.53 eV, and E c - 0.61 eV). The trap, E c - 0.04 eV, labelled E1' and having a trap signature similar to irradiation induced defect E1, appears to be metastable. E c - 0.31 eV and E c - 0.61 eV are metastable too and they are similar to the M3/M4 defect configuration present in hydrogen plasma exposed n-GaAs.

  6. Ar plasma induced deep levels in epitaxial n-GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, A.; Nyamhere, C.; Botha, J. R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Meyer, W. E.; Coelho, S. M. M. [Department of Physics, University of the Pretoria, Lynnwood Road, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Kolkovsky, V. l. [Technische Universitaet, Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    Ar plasma etching of n-type (Si doped) GaAs introduces several electron traps (E{sub c} - 0.04 eV, E{sub c} - 0.07 eV, E{sub c} - 0.19 eV, E{sub c} - 0.31 eV, E{sub c} - 0.53 eV, and E{sub c} - 0.61 eV). The trap, E{sub c} - 0.04 eV, labelled E1' and having a trap signature similar to irradiation induced defect E1, appears to be metastable. E{sub c} - 0.31 eV and E{sub c} - 0.61 eV are metastable too and they are similar to the M3/M4 defect configuration present in hydrogen plasma exposed n-GaAs.

  7. Growth of low disorder GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy for the study of correlated electron phases in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John D.

    The unparalleled quality of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy has enabled a wide range of experiments probing interaction effects in two-dimensional electron and hole gases. This dissertation presents work aimed at further understanding the key material-related issues currently limiting the quality of these 2D systems, particularly in relation to the fractional quantum Hall effect in the 2nd Landau level and spin-based implementations of quantum computation. The manuscript begins with a theoretical introduction to the quantum Hall effect which outlines the experimental conditions necessary to study the physics of interest and motivates the use of the semiconductor growth and cryogenic measurement techniques outlined in chapters 2 and 3, respectively. In addition to a generic introduction to the molecular beam epitaxy growth technique, chapter 2 summarizes some of what was learned about the material purity issues currently limiting the low temperature electron mobility. Finally, a series of appendices are included which detail the experimental methods used over the course of the research. Chapter 4 presents an experiment examining transport in a low density two-dimensional hole system in which the hole density could be varied by means of an evaporated back gate. At low temperature, the mobility reached a maximum of 2.6 x 106 cm2/Vs at a density of 6.2 x 1010 cm-2 which is the highest reported mobility in a two-dimensional hole system to date. In addition, it was found that the mobility as a function of density did not follow a power law with a single exponent. Instead, it was found that the power law varied with density, indicating a cross-over between dominant scattering mechanisms at low density and high density. At low density the mobility was found to be limited by remote ionized impurity scattering, while at high density the dominant scattering mechanism was found to be background impurity scattering. Chapter 5 details an experiment

  8. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J.C.; Salomon, J.; Tonezzer, M.; Scian, C.; Beck, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Della Mea, G.

    2008-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H + beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO

  9. Memory effect on ion beam-induced depolymerization of PMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnini, G.; Angilella, G.G.N. E-mail: giuseppe.angilella@ct.infn.it; Raudino, A.; Puglisi, O. E-mail: opuglisi@dipchi.unict.it

    2001-04-01

    Recently a new ion beam-induced phenomenology - depolymerization of macromolecular target - has been found and studied in our laboratory. This has been observed in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) using He{sup +} 300 keV ion beam, in a temperature range much lower than that required for thermal depolymerization. Here we report an in situ monitoring of PMMA depolymerization performed by mass spectrometry. We have found that at a given temperature the monomer flux due to depolymerization of the bombarded polymer is much more intense when the temperature is quenched, with respect to the same temperature during heating. The results have been rationalized by using an accurate model that involves initiation and propagation kinetics followed by the diffusion process. The use of the model allowed us to exclude any influence of transport properties of PMMA on this effect but indicates that the hysteresis phenomenon detected at macroscopic level has a microscopic counterpart linked to the chemical yields of the depolymerization kinetics.

  10. Ion and laser beam induced metastable alloy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westendorp, J.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with ion and laser beam induced thin film mixing. It describes the development of an Ultra High Vacuum apparatus for deposition, ion irradiation and in situ analysis of thin film sandwiches. This chamber has been developed in close collaboration with High Voltage Engineering Europa. Thin films can be deposited by an e-gun evaporator. The atom flux is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A comparison is made between ion beam and laser mixing of Cu with Au and Cu with W. The comparison provides a better understanding of the relative importance of purely collisional mixing, the role of thermodynamic effects and the contribution of diffusion due to defect generation and migration. (Auth.)

  11. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    pumps can be taken into account. This method can be extended to any desorption experiment employing the single shot method for measurement. Of special interest for the operation of the SIS100 at high intensities is the minimization of desorption from cryogenic surfaces. A previous examination of this topic found a breakdown of the familiar scaling of the desorption yield with the beam's energy loss for cryogenic targets. Further examination of this effect with the techniques described above is another goal of this thesis. Simultaneously, desorption measurements at room temperature for several other targets have been conducted. An unexpected result of these experiments is the influence of target surface properties, which was found to be very weak in comparison to previous results. The methods developed during this thesis, along with the results gained by their application, represent another step towards the comprehension of (heavy) ion beam induced desorption.

  12. Comparison of the mid-infrared magneto-otical response of GaMnAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and ion implantation and pulsed laser melting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acbas, G.; Sinova, J.; Scarpulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Cukr, Miroslav; Novák, Vít; Cerne, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 20, - (2007), s. 457-460 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/1519 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : epitaxy * diluted magnetic semiconductors * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.425, year: 2007

  13. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  14. Optical beam induced current microscopy at DC and radio frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fu-Jen

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept and technique of optical beam induced current (OBIC) generation at radio frequencies. The method is combined with lateral raster scanning of a tightly focused spot so as to generate a mapping of high spatial resolution. We demonstrate experimentally that if a mode-locked laser is used to excite the sample then the frequency transfer function of the optically active device is readily obtained with at least 1 µm spatial resolution, in real time. In addition, with the help of an appropriate electronic arrangement, we demonstrate how to obtain pseudocolored OBIC images of the sample.

  15. Soft X-ray beam induced current technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, B; Ade, H [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Queen, D; Hellman, F [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kilcoyne, A L D; Tyliszczak, T, E-mail: benjamin.watts@gmail.co [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Direct mapping of the charge transport efficiency of polymer solar cell devices using a soft X-ray beam induced current (SoXBIC) method is described. By fabricating a polymer solar cell on an x-ray transparent substrate, we demonstrate the ability to map polymer composition and nanoscale structure within an operating solar cell device and to simultaneously measure the local charge transport efficiency via the short-circuit current. A simple model is calculated and compared to experimental SoXBIC data of a PFB:F8BT bulk-heterojunction device in order to gain greater insight into the device operation and physics.

  16. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Taizo, E-mail: taizo.masuda@yale.edu; Tomasulo, Stephanie; Lang, Jordan R.; Lee, Minjoo Larry [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated ∼2.0 eV (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P and ∼1.9 eV Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells, and 1.35–1.37 V for (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W{sub oc} = E{sub g}/q − V{sub oc}) of Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells to decrease from ∼575 mV to ∼565 mV, while that of (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant W{sub oc} as a function of substrate offcut for (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P devices. In addition to larger W{sub oc} values, the (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells.

  17. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  18. Electron beam induced heat flow transient in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Rose, L.F.D.; Brotto, R.

    1983-01-01

    On the basis of a numerically solved heat diffusion equation, the structure of the thermal transient induced in an aluminium sample by an electron beam pulse is described in terms of slush zone formation, molten depth, liquid phase duration, and melt front history. The heat flow dynamics, as determined by monochromatic (electron energy ranging between 5 and 25 keV) and ultrashort (15 ns fwhm) pulses, is contrasted with the ruby laser induced one. Accessible absorbed energy intervals for sample surface melting are given as a function of electron energy; heating of the sample interior at values higher than those attained at the surface is shown to occur only at higher electron energies, for a given pulse duration. The general dependence of the present results on the pulse duration and the effects produced by polychromatic pulses are also discussed. (author)

  19. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  20. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Generalized melting criterion for beam-induced amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, Paul R.

    1993-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the mean-square static atomic displacements provide a generic measure of the enthalpy stored in the lattice in the form of chemical and topological disorder, and that the effect of the displacements on the softening of shear elastic constants is identical to that of heating. This finding lends support to a generalized form of the Lindemann phenomenological melting criterion and leads to a natural interpretion of crystalline-to-amorphous transformations as defect-induced melting of metastable crystals driven beyond a critical state of disorder where the melting temperature falls below the glass-transition temperature. Application of the generalized Lindemann criterion to both the crystalline and amorphous phases indicates that the enthalpies of the two phases become identical when their shear moduli become equal. This thermo-elastic rule provides a basis for predicting the relative susceptibility of compounds to amorphization in terms of their elastic properties as measured by Debye temperatures. The present approach can explain many of the basic findings on beam-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds as well as amorphous phase formation associated with ion implantation, ion-beam mixing and other solid-state processes

  2. Structure and magnetism of single-phase epitaxial gamma '-Fe4N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa-Kramer, JL; Borsa, DM; Garcia-Martin, JM; Martin-Gonzalez, MS; Boerma, DO; Briones, F

    Single phase epitaxial pure gamma(')-Fe4N films are grown on MgO (001) by molecular beam epitaxy of iron in the presence of nitrogen obtained from a radio frequency atomic source. The epitaxial, single phase nature of the films is revealed by x-ray diffraction and by the local magnetic environment

  3. Tensile strain induced changes in the optical spectra of SrTiO.sub.3./sub. epitaxial thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Tyunina, M.; Narkilahti, J.; Levoska, J.; Chvostová, Dagmar; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Trepakov, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 10 (2010), 2082-2089 ISSN 1063-7834 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1009; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : SrTiO 3 epitaxial thin films * effect of biaxial tensile strains on optical spectra Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.727, year: 2010

  4. Growth of high mobility GaN and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on 4H-SiC by ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, James B.; Tang, H.; Bardwell, J. A.; Coleridge, P.

    2001-01-01

    Ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy has been used to grow high-quality epilayers of GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistor (HFET) structures on insulating 4H-SiC. The growth process, which used a magnetron sputter epitaxy deposited buffer layer of AlN, has been described previously. Ex situ pretreatment of the SiC substrate was found to be unnecessary. For a single 2.0 μm thick silicon doped epilayer, a room temperature (RT) electron mobility of 500 cm2/Vs was measured at a carrier density of 6.6x10 16 cm -3 . For the HFET structure, a room temperature mobility of 1300 cm2/Vs at a sheet carrier density of 3.3x10 12 cm -2 was observed, increasing to 11000 cm2/Vs at 77 K. The surface morphology of the layers indicated a coalesced mesa structure similar to what we observed for growth on sapphire, but with a lower overall defect density and correspondingly larger grain size. The observation of well-resolved Shubnikov de Haas oscillations at fields as low as 3 T indicated a relatively smooth interface. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Photoluminescence of heterostructures with GaP1−xNx and GaP1−x−yNxAsy layers grown on GaP and Si substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Sobolev, M. S.; Pirogov, E. V.; Denisov, D. V.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of heterostructures containing GaP 1−x N x ternary and GaP 1−x−y N x As y quaternary alloy layers are discussed. The heterostructures are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaP and Si substrates. The structures are studied by the high-resolution X-ray diffraction technique and photoluminescence measurements in a wide temperature range from 10 to 300 K. In the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra of the alloys with a low nitrogen fraction (x < 0.007), two clearly resolved narrow lines attributed to the localized states of nitrogen pairs and the phonon replicas of these lines are observed

  6. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-15

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  7. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  8. Induced focusing and conversion of a Gaussian beam into an elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have presented an investigation of the induced focusing in Kerr media of two laser beams, the pump beam and ... in nonlinear media has been confined to cylindrical Gaussian beams. In a few re- cent publications .... Inserting suitable chosen trial functions in the variational principle, we can obtain a reduced variational ...

  9. Ion beam induced charge microscopy studies of power diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmeck, M; Balk, L J; Osipowicz, T; Watt, F; Phang, J C H; Khambadkone, A M; Niedernostheide, F-J; Schulze, H-J

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge microscopy (IBIC microscopy) has been established recently as an analytical tool for the characterization of various types of semiconductor devices. In this paper the potential of IBIC microscopy for the analysis of deeply buried structures of high power devices under biases of more than 2 kV is discussed. Such data are useful in the design process of high power devices because excessive fields at device edge regions or within protection elements (e.g. field ring structures) can be avoided. Since charge collection efficiency within depleted pn junctions is typically 100% for IBIC analysis, the contrast due to E-field variations within the large depletion regions of high power devices is limited. Here we will introduce a new approach for enhancing this contrast by using the temporal information from the IBIC signals gained with a transient IBIC set-up. Simulations and experimental data will be compared to evaluate the suitability of the new approach. The device used here is a high voltage diode with a field ring structure which was analysed using a 2 MeV proton beam

  10. An optimized nanoparticle separator enabled by electron beam induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowlkes, J D; Rack, P D; Doktycz, M J

    2010-01-01

    Size-based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct-write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism for depositing/etching nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam-interaction region. Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub-50 nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular-sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects) and (2) preserved the fidelity of the spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size-based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  11. A laser beam quality definition based on induced temperature rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harold C

    2012-12-17

    Laser beam quality metrics like M(2) can be used to describe the spot sizes and propagation behavior of a wide variety of non-ideal laser beams. However, for beams that have been diffracted by limiting apertures in the near-field, or those with unusual near-field profiles, the conventional metrics can lead to an inconsistent or incomplete description of far-field performance. This paper motivates an alternative laser beam quality definition that can be used with any beam. The approach uses a consideration of the intrinsic ability of a laser beam profile to heat a material. Comparisons are made with conventional beam quality metrics. An analysis on an asymmetric Gaussian beam is used to establish a connection with the invariant beam propagation ratio.

  12. Formation of GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs nanorings by droplet molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Z.; Niu, Z.C.; Huang, S.S.; Fang, Z.D.; Sun, B.Q.; Xia, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    GaAs/AlGaAs lattice-matched nanorings are formed on GaAs (100) substrates by droplet epitaxy. The crucial step in the formation of nanorings is annealing Ga droplets under As flux for proper time. The observed morphologic evolution of Ga droplets during annealing does not support the hypothesis that As atoms preferentially react with Ga around the periphery of the droplets, but somehow relates to a dewetting process similar to that of unstable films. Photoluminescene (PL) test results confirm the quantum-confinement effect of these GaAs nanorings. Using similar methods, we have fabricated InGaAs/GaAs lattice-mismatched rings

  13. Organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stringfellow, Gerald B

    1989-01-01

    Here is one of the first single-author treatments of organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)--a leading technique for the fabrication of semiconductor materials and devices. Also included are metal-organic molecular-beam epitaxy (MOMBE) and chemical-beam epitaxy (CBE) ultra-high-vacuum deposition techniques using organometallic source molecules. Of interest to researchers, students, and people in the semiconductor industry, this book provides a basic foundation for understanding the technique and the application of OMVPE for the growth of both III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials and the

  14. Interfacial-strain-induced structural and polarization evolutions in epitaxial multiferroic BiFeO3 (001) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haizhong; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Jin, Kui-Juan; Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Yang, Zhenzhong; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Le; He, Xu; Gu, Junxing; Wan, Qian; Wang, Can; Lu, Huibin; Ge, Chen; He, Meng; Yang, Guozhen

    2015-02-04

    Varying the film thickness is a precise route to tune the interfacial strain to manipulate the properties of the multiferroic materials. Here, to explore the effects of the interfacial strain on the properties of the multiferroic BiFeO3 films, we investigated thickness-dependent structural and polarization evolutions of the BiFeO3 films. The epitaxial growth with an atomic stacking sequence of BiO/TiO2 at the interface was confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Combining X-ray diffraction experiments and first-principles calculations, a thickness-dependent structural evolution was observed from a fully strained tetragonality to a partially relaxed one without any structural phase transition or rotated twins. The tetragonality (c/a) of the BiFeO3 films increases as the film thickness decreases, while the polarization is in contrast with this trend, and the size effect including the depolarization field plays a crucial role in this contradiction in thinner films. These findings offer an alternative strategy to manipulate structural and polarization properties by tuning the interfacial strain in epitaxial multiferroic thin films.

  15. Elimination of macrostep-induced current flow nonuniformity in vertical GaN PN diode using carbon-free drift layer grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Hajime; Hayashi, Kentaro; Horikiri, Fumimasa; Narita, Yoshinobu; Konno, Taichiro; Yoshida, Takehiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Mishima, Tomoyoshi

    2018-04-01

    In vertical GaN PN diodes (PNDs) grown entirely by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), large current nonuniformity was observed. This nonuniformity was induced by macrosteps on the GaN surface through modulation of carbon incorporation into the n-GaN crystal. It was eliminated in a hybrid PND consisting of a carbon-free n-GaN layer grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and an MOCVD-regrown p-GaN layer. The hybrid PND showed a fairly low on-resistance (2 mΩ cm2) and high breakdown voltage (2 kV) even without a field plate electrode. These results clearly indicated the strong advantages of the HVPE-grown drift layer for improving power device performance, uniformity, and yield.

  16. Reactions induced by 11Be beam at Rex-Isolde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppesen H.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The collision induced by the three Beryllium isotopes, 9,10,11Be, on a 64Zn target were investigated at Ec.m. ≈ 1.4 the Coulomb barrier. The experiments with the radioactive 10,11Be beams were performed at the Rex-Isolde facility at CERN. In the case of 9,10Be, elastic scattering angular distributions were measured whereas, in the 11Be case, the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. A strong damping of the quasielastic cross-section was observed in the 11Be case, in the angular range around the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. In this latter case a large total-reaction cross-section is found. Such a cross-section is more than a factor of two larger than the ones extracted in the reactions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the 11Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  17. Beam-induced temperature changes in HVEM irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Thomas, L.E.; Gelles, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The peak value of the temperature distribution induced by energy loss of 1.0 MeV electrons in traversing a typical HVEM irradiation specimen can be very substantial. The origin and various features of this distribution were analyzed for a variety of specimen geometries. The major parametric dependencies are shown to be relatively independent of specimen geometry, however, and allow the definition of a scaling relationship that can be employed to predict temperature rises in materials that cannot be measured directly. The use of this scaling relationship requires that the experimenter minimize perturbations of the heat flow due to proximity of the central hole in the specimen. An experimental method of determining directly the magnitude and distribution of beam-induced temperature profiles was developed which utilizes the order-disorder transformation in Fe 3 Al and Cu 3 Au. Scaling of experimentally determined temperature changes leads to more realistic estimates of the total temperature rise than are currently available in various literature tabulations. The factors which determine the optimum selection of irradiation parameters for a given experiment are also discussed

  18. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  19. Comparative study on the roles of anisotropic epitaxial strain and chemical doping in inducing the antiferromagnetic insulator phase in manganite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Feng, Qiyuan; Guo, Zhuang; Lan, Da; Wang, Lingfei; Gao, Guanyin; Xu, Haoran; Chen, Binbin; Chen, Feng; Lu, Qingyou; Wu, Wenbin

    2017-11-01

    Epitaxial strain and chemical doping are two different methods that are commonly used to tune the physical properties of epitaxial perovskite oxide films, but their cooperative effects are less addressed. Here we try to tune the phase separation (PS) in (La1-xP rx) 2 /3C a1 /3Mn O3 (0 ≤x ≤0.4 , LPCMO) films via cooperatively controlling the anisotropic epitaxial strain (AES) and the Pr doping. These films are grown simultaneously on NdGa O3(110 ) ,(LaAlO3) 0.3(SrAl0.5Ta0.5O3 ) 0.7(001 ) , and NdGa O3(001 ) substrates with progressively increased in-plane AES, and probed by x-ray diffraction, magnetotransport, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Although it is known that for x =0 the AES can enhance the orthorhombicity of the films yielding a phase diagram with the antiferromagnetic charge-ordered insulator (AF-COI) state induced, which is quite different from the bulk one, we illustrate that the Pr doping can further drive the films towards a more robust COI state. This cooperative effect is reflected by the increasing magnetic fields needed to melt the COI phase as a function of AES and the doping level. More strikingly, by directly imaging the phase competition morphology of the LPCMO /NdGa O3(001 ) films via MFM, we find that during COI melting the PS domain structure is subject to both AES and the quenched disorder. However, in the reverse process, as the magnetic field is decreased, the COI phase reappears and the AES dominates leaving a crystalline-orientation determined self-organized microstructure. This finding suggests that the PS states and the domain configurations can be selectively controlled by the AES and/or the quenched disorder, which may shed some light on the engineering of PS domains for device fabrications.

  20. Vortex phase-induced changes of the statistical properties of a partially coherent radially polarized beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lina; Chen, Yahong; Liu, Xianlong; Liu, Lin; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-06-27

    Partially coherent radially polarized (PCRP) beam was introduced and generated in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the statistical properties of a PCRP beam embedded with a vortex phase (i.e., PCRP vortex beam). We derive the analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of a PCRP vortex beam propagating through a paraxial ABCD optical system and analyze the statistical properties of a PCRP vortex beam focused by a thin lens. It is found that the statistical properties of a PCRP vortex beam on propagation are much different from those of a PCRP beam. The vortex phase induces not only the rotation of the beam spot, but also the changes of the beam shape, the degree of polarization and the state of polarization. We also find that the vortex phase plays a role of resisting the coherence-induced degradation of the intensity distribution and the coherence-induced depolarization. Furthermore, we report experimental generation of a PCRP vortex beam for the first time. Our results will be useful for trapping and rotating particles, free-space optical communications and detection of phase object.

  1. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS)...

  2. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metamorphic (KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.

    2015-09-01

    © 2015. In this paper we demonstrate ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on metamorphic AlGaN buffers on freestanding GaN (202-1) substrates by ammonia assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Misfit and related threading dislocations were confined to the stress relaxed, compositionally graded buffer layers, and single quantum well devices emitting at 355, 310 and 274. nm were grown on top of the graded buffers. The devices showed excellent structural and electrical (I-. V) characteristics.

  3. Beam-induced heat loads on the beam screens of the inner triplets for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Skripka, Galina; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    The expected heat load induced on the beam screens has been evaluated for the triplet assemblies in the four experimental Insertion Regions (IRs) of the HL-LHC. The contribution from electron cloud effects has been estimated using PyECLOUD macroparticle simulations. The presence of a surface treatment for the reduction of the Secondary Electron Yield has been taken into account. The contribution from the impedance of the beam screen has been evaluated taking into account the impact of the temperature and of the magnetic field on the resistivity of the surface.

  4. The status and new trends of ion beam induced charge technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Rongrong; Qiu Huiyuan; Zhu Dezhang

    2002-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge technique (IBIC) with low beam current (fA level) and high efficiency is a new development of nuclear microscopy. It has been widely applied to the fields of semiconductor and microelectronic materials. The principle and the experimental method of the IBIC technique were described and reviewed its status and new trends were reviewed

  5. Magnetic surface domain imaging of uncapped epitaxial FeRh(001 thin films across the temperature-induced metamagnetic transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianzhong Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface magnetic domain structure of uncapped epitaxial FeRh/MgO(001 thin films was imaged by in-situ scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA at various temperatures between 122 and 450 K. This temperature range covers the temperature-driven antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition in the body of the films that was observed in-situ by means of the more depth-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr effect. The SEMPA images confirm that the interfacial ferromagnetism coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase inside the film is an intrinsic property of the FeRh(001 surface. Furthermore, the SEMPA data display a reduction of the in-plane magnetization occuring well above the phase transition temperature which, thus, is not related to the volume expansion at the phase transition. This observation is interpreted as a spin reorientation of the surface magnetization for which we propose a possible mechanism based on temperature-dependent tetragonal distortion due to different thermal expansion coefficients of MgO and FeRh.

  6. Oxygen vacancy induced structural evolution of SrFeO3 -x epitaxial thin film from brownmillerite to perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Seulki; Lee, Seokbae; Lee, Myounghoon; Seo, Yu-Seong; Khare, Amit; Yoo, Taesup; Woo, Sungmin; Choi, Woo Seok; Hwang, Jungseek; Glamazda, A.; Choi, K.-Y.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated SrFeO3 -x thin films on a SrTiO3 (001) substrate prepared via pulsed laser epitaxy using an optical spectroscopy technique. The oxygen vacancy level (x ) was controlled by post-annealing processes at different oxygen partial pressures. We achieved a brownmillerite (BM) structure at x =0.5 and observed the evolution of the crystal structure from BM into perovskite (PV) as the oxygen concentration increased. We observed the evolution of infrared-active phonons with respect to the oxygen concentration, which was closely related to the structural evolution observed via x-ray diffraction. We identified the phonons using the shell-model calculation. Furthermore, we studied temperature-dependent behaviors of the phonon modes of three representative samples: PV and two BMs (BMoop and BMip) with different orientations of the oxygen vacancy channel. In the BMoop sample, we observed a phonon mode, which exhibited an unusual redshift with decreasing temperature; this behavior may have been due to the apical oxygen instability in the FeO6 octahedron. Our results provide important information regarding the ionic conduction mechanism in SrFeO3 -x material systems.

  7. A new time-dependent analytic model for radiation-induced photocurrent in finite 1D epitaxial diodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verley, Jason C.; Axness, Carl L.; Hembree, Charles Edward; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM)

    2012-04-01

    Photocurrent generated by ionizing radiation represents a threat to microelectronics in radiation environments. Circuit simulation tools such as SPICE [1] can be used to analyze these threats, and typically rely on compact models for individual electrical components such as transistors and diodes. Compact models consist of a handful of differential and/or algebraic equations, and are derived by making simplifying assumptions to any of the many semiconductor transport equations. Historically, many photocurrent compact models have suffered from accuracy issues due to the use of qualitative approximation, rather than mathematically correct solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation. A practical consequence of this inaccuracy is that a given model calibration is trustworthy over only a narrow range of operating conditions. This report describes work to produce improved compact models for photocurrent. Specifically, an analytic model is developed for epitaxial diode structures that have a highly doped subcollector. The analytic model is compared with both numerical TCAD calculations, as well as the compact model described in reference [2]. The new analytic model compares well against TCAD over a wide range of operating conditions, and is shown to be superior to the compact model from reference [2].

  8. Low-voltage InAsP/InAs HBT and metamorphic InAs BJT devices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, K. L.; Wu, X.; Koch, M. W.; Wicks, G. W.

    2003-04-01

    Two advances in InAs-based bipolar transistor technology are reported. Metamorphic InAs bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), grown on semi-insulating GaAs substrates, are reported for the first time, showing current gains comparable to similar structures grown homoepitaxially on InAs substrates. Measurements by atomic force microscopy report root-mean-square surface roughness as low as 0.661 nm, for a metamorphic BJT structure with a 5 μm thick InAs buffer. The quality of the epitaxial structure was investigated as a function of the buffer layer thickness, by measuring the reverse-leakage current density of metamorphic BJTs of 1, 2, and 5 μm InAs buffer layers, showing improved electrical characteristics with increasing buffer layer thickness. A second technological advance is also reported, concerning the development of a heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT), with a strained, pseudomorphic InAs 1- yP y ternary for the wide-gap emitter. The common emitter current gain of a control BJT device was measured at β=110, and the HBT device, of identical doping structure achieved β=180.

  9. Elastic strain relief in nitridated Ga metal buffer layers for epitaxial GaN growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yihwan; Shapiro, Noad A.; Feick, Henning; Armitage, Robert; Weber, Eicke R.; Yang, Yi; Cerrina, Franco

    2001-01-01

    Gallium nitride epitaxial layers were grown on sapphire by molecular-beam epitaxy using nitridated gallium metal films as buffer layers. The mechanical properties of the buffer layers were investigated and correlated with their chemical composition as determined by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. Biaxial tension experiments were performed by bending the substrates in a pressure cell designed for simultaneous photoluminescence measurements. The shift of the excitonic luminescence peak was used to determine the stress induced in the main GaN epilayer. The fraction of stress transferred from substrate to main layer was as low as 27% for samples grown on nitridated metal buffer layers, compared to nearly 100% for samples on conventional low-temperature GaN buffer layers. The efficiency of stress relief increased in proportion to the fraction of metallic Ga in the nitridated metal buffer layers. These findings suggest GaN films containing residual metallic Ga may serve as compliant buffer layers for heteroepitaxy

  10. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  11. Underling modification in ion beam induced Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Chini, T.K.; Sanyal, M.K.; Grenzer, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface (amorphous-crystalline interface) structure of keV ion beam modified Si(001) wafers was studied for the first time using non-destructive technique and compared with that of the top one. Ion-beam modifications of the Si samples were done using state-of-art high-current ion implanter facility at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics by changing energy, dose and angle of incidence of the Ar + ion beam. To bring out the underlying modification depth-resolved x-ray grazing incidence diffraction has been carried out using synchrotron radiation facility, while the structure of the top surface was studied through atomic force microscopy

  12. Proton induced radioactivity estimation and radiological safety aspects of materials science beam line at medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Sarangapani, R.

    2012-01-01

    A medical cyclotron facility is under development in Kolkata. This medical cyclotron would deliver 15 - 30 MeV H + ions with beam current up to 500 μA. Though this facility will be mainly used for production of medically useful isotopes, a beam line has been also provided for materials science research. The materials science beam line will be used to study radiation damage in nuclear materials. Apart from radiation damage studies, material science beam line will be used for thin layer activation analysis, charged particle activation analysis and production of special isotopes. High intensity proton beam in this energy regime can induce high level of radioactivity in the target material and other beam line components. Hence it is necessary to calculate the induced radioactivity for a variety of materials, so as to find a suitable candidate for use in beam line components, to design radiation shielding and to design proper target handling devices and shielding arrangements. There are two ways by which radioactivity in beam line components can be induced, either by direct interaction of proton beam or by neutrons emitted from target during irradiation. The cross-section of production of various radionuclides and neutrons at different energies produced as a result of nuclear reaction between proton and target atoms has been generated using ALICE code. These cross-sections are used to calculate concentration of radionuclides and emitted neutron spectrum. The decay scheme of radionuclides is taken from Universal Nuclide Chart. Neutron induced activity in target chamber is estimated using MCNP code. These calculations have found to be very useful in the material selection for beam line components and designing radiation shielding. Various aspects of radioactivity calculations and radiological safety on material science beam line will be discussed. (author)

  13. Initiating the explosive decomposition of heavy metal azides by electron-beam-induced electric discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Damamme, G.; Malys, D.; Lisitsyn, V. M.

    2009-10-01

    The explosive decomposition of heavy metal azides (HMAs) initiated by the electric (streamer) discharge induced by a nanosecond electron beam has been experimentally studied. A physical model is proposed that describes the initiation of an electron-beam-induced HMA explosion, which involves the formation of a strong electric field in a sample and its neutralization by a supersonic anode discharge. The propagating streamer front generates hot spots in a condensed reactive substance, from which the foci of explosive decomposition are formed.

  14. Laser beam shaping for studying thermally induced damage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of a laser beam shaping system for both heating a diamond tool and measuring the resulting temperature optically. The influence the initial laser parameters have on the resultant temperature profiles is shown...

  15. Metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy of InP on GaAs-substrates for the production of metamorphic high-frequency transistors; Metallorganische Molekularstrahlepitaxie von InP auf GaAS-Substraten fuer die Herstellung metamorpher Hochfrequenztransistoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.

    2001-12-01

    The present contribution is concerned with the highly lattice-mismatched growth of InP on GaAs-substrates by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) using TMIn and precracked phosphine as the source materials. Here the objective was to deposit device-suitable InP-layers with low surface roughness, dislocation density and electrical conductivity. Growth-optimization of InP on GaAs was carried out by applying a multitude of characterization methods, amongst others atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence spectroscopy and Hall-effect-measurements. In particular, for the first time the dependence of the surface morphology on the growth parameters was investigated systematically. A growth model was formulated in order to explain the corresponding observations. Furthermore, the influence of both the growth parameters and a post-growth anneal on the optical and structural properties of the deposited InP-layers was investigated. Finally AlInAs/GaInAs-HEMT-structures (High Electron Mobility Transistors) were deposited and processed for the first time on the InP buffer-layers optimized as described above, which demonstrated the device-suitability of the deposited InP/GaAs-heterostructures. All in all a contribution was achieved in solving the main problem for the implementation of InP-based devices on GaAs-substrates. The predestination of the growth-method MOMBE for highly lattice-mismatched systems was also demonstrated. (orig.)

  16. Effects of AlN buffer layers on the structural and the optical properties of GaN epilayers grown on Al2O3 substrates by using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Heechang; Lee, Seungjoo; Kumar, Sunil; Kang, Taewon; Lee, Namhyun; Kim, Taewhan

    2014-01-01

    GaN epilayers on AlN buffer layers with various thicknesses were grown on sapphire substrates by using plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. The GaN epilayer with an AlN buffer layer was much smaller than the GaN epilayer without an AlN buffer layer. The crystal quality of the GaN active layer was improved by utilizing an AlN layer, which acted as a nucleation layer. The reduced defect density promoted GaN coalition. The double-crystal rocking curves and the photoluminescence spectra showed that the GaN epilayer grown on a 4-nm AlN buffer layer had the best quality among the several kinds of samples. The photoluminescence intensity of the GaN epilayer which is related to the density of the crystal defects was lower when an AlN buffer layer was used the thin AlN nucleation layer protected against stain propagation. These results indicate that GaN epilayers grown on AIN buffer layers hold promise for applications in short-wavelength optoelectronic devices.

  17. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Jiang, Jian; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Chang; Wei, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  18. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories, Professor Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-06-14

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires.

  19. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M

    2006-01-01

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires

  20. Disorder-induced enhancement of indirect absorption in a GeSn photodetector grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Chang, C.; Cheng, H. H.; Sun, G.; Soref, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report an investigation on the absorption mechanism of a GeSn photodetector with 2.4% Sn composition in the active region. Responsivity is measured and absorption coefficient is calculated. Square root of absorption coefficient linearly depends on photon energy indicating an indirect transition. However, the absorption coefficient is found to be at least one order of magnitude higher than that of most other indirect materials, suggesting that the indirect optical absorption transition cannot be assisted only by phonon. Our analysis of absorption measurements by other groups on the same material system showed the values of absorption coefficient on the same order of magnitude. Our study reveals that the strong enhancement of absorption for the indirect optical transition is the result of alloy disorder from the incorporation of the much larger Sn atoms into the Ge lattice that are randomly distributed.

  1. Impact of large beam-induced heat loads on the transient operation of the beam screens and the cryogenic plants of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Rodrigues, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) under study at CERN will produce 50-TeV high-energy proton beams. The high-energy particle beams are bent by 16-T superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K and distributed over a circumference of 80 km. The circulating beams induce 5 MW of dynamic heat loads by several processes such as synchrotron radiation, resistive dissipation of beam image currents and electron clouds. These beam-induced heat loads will be intercepted by beam screens operating between 40 and 60 K and induce transients during beam injection. Energy ramp-up and beam dumping on the distributed beam-screen cooling loops, the sector cryogenic plants and the dedicated circulators. Based on the current baseline parameters, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the cryogenic distribution system during a beam operation cycle were performed. The effects of the thermal inertia of the headers on the helium flow temperature at the cryogenic plant inlet as well as the temperature gradient experienced by the beam screen has been assessed. Additionally, this work enabled a thorough exergetic analysis of different cryogenic plant configurations and laid the building-block for establishing design specification of cold and warm circulators.

  2. Strain induced ferromagnetism and large magnetoresistance of epitaxial La1.5Sr0.5CoMnO6 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Jyotsna, G.; N, Nileena; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the structural, magnetic, and magneto-transport properties of La1.5Sr0.5CoMnO6 (LSCMO) thin films deposited on a SrTiO3 (001) substrate were investigated. A normal θ/2θ x-ray diffraction, rocking curve, ϕ-scan, and reciprocal space mapping data showed that prepared LSCMO thin films are single phase and highly strained with epitaxial nature. Temperature vs. magnetization of LSCMO films exhibits strain-induced ferromagnetic ordering with TC ˜ 165 K. In contrast to the bulk samples, there was no exchange bias and canted type antiferromagnetic and spin glass behavior in films having thickness (t) ≤ 26 nm. Temperature dependent resistivity data were explained using Schnakenberg's model and the polaron hopping conduction process. The slope change in resistivity and magnetoresistance maximum (˜65%) around TC indicates the existence of a weak double exchange mechanism between the mixed valence states of transition metal ions. Suppression of spin dependent scattering with the magnetic field is attributed for the large negative magnetoresistance in LSCMO films.

  3. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  4. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  5. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083092; Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  6. Observation of helium flow induced beam orbit oscillations at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bonati, R.; Brennan, J.M.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Ganetis, G.; He, P.; Hirzel, W.; Jia, L.X.; Koello, P.; Louie, W.; McIntyre, G.; Nicoletti, A.; Rank, J.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Schmalzle, J.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Sondericker, J.; Tallerico, T.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal beam orbit jitter at frequencies around 10 Hz has been observed at RHIC for several years. The distinct frequencies of this jitter have been found at superconducting low-beta quadrupole triplet magnets around the ring, where they coincide with mechanical vibration modes of the cold masses. Recently, we have identified liquid helium flow as the driving force of these oscillations

  7. Ion beam induced surface graphitization of CVD diamond for x-ray beam position monitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chian; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wen, L.; Melendres, C.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at ANL is a third-generation synchrotron facility that generates powerful x-ray beams on its undulator beamlines. It is important to know the position and angle of the x- ray beam during experiments. Due to very high heat flux levels, several patented x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) exploiting chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have been developed. These XBPMs have a thin layer of low-atomic-mass metallic coating so that photoemission from the x rays generate a minute but measurable current for position determination. Graphitization of the CVD diamond surface creates a very thin, intrinsic and conducting layer that can stand much higher temperatures and minimal x-ray transmission losses compared to the coated metallic layers. In this paper, a laboratory sputter ion source was used to transform selected surfaces of a CVD diamond substrate into graphite. The effect of 1-5 keV argon ion bombardment on CVD diamond surfaces at various target temperatures from 200 to 500 C was studied using Auger electron spectroscopy and in-situ electrical resistivity measurements. Graphitization after the ion bombardment has been confirmed and optimum conditions for graphitization studied. Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the overall diamond structure in the bulk of CVD diamond substrate after the ion bombardments. It was found that target temperature plays an important role in stability and electrical conductivity of the irradiated CVD diamonds

  8. Thin epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stab, L.

    1989-01-01

    Manufacturing procedures of thin epitaxial surface barriers will be given. Some improvements have been obtained: larger areas, lower leakage currents and better resolutions. New planar epitaxial dE/dX detectors, made in a collaboration work with ENERTEC-INTERTECHNIQUE, and a new application of these thin planar diodes to EXAFS measurements, made in a collaboration work with LURE (CNRS,CEA,MEN) will also be reported

  9. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au)

  10. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au) 14 tabs.; 58 ills., 96 refs.

  11. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiljeva, I.V.; Mjakin, S.V.; Makarov, A.V.; Krasovsky, A.N.; Varlamov, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy)

  12. Stacking InAs quantum dots over ErAs semimetal nanoparticles on GaAs (0 0 1) using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanchang; Eyink, Kurt G.; Grazulis, Lawrence; Hill, Madelyn; Peoples, Joseph; Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are known to elicit an enhanced optical response. We study the directed alignment of ErAs metal nanoparticle (NP) and InAs quantum dot (QD) using molecular beam eptaxy (MBE) in a GaAs matrix. Due to high surface free energy caused by the crystal structure difference, overgrowth of an ErAs NP with GaAs forms a depression that condenses subsequent InAs adatoms to form an inverted QD self-aligned to the underlying ErAs NP. The ErAs NP growth, GaAs overgrowth, and InAs QD deposition were carefully controlled and studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate their effects on the QD-NP alignment.

  13. Beam diagnostics for Laser-induced proton generation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Heun; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae; Chan, Young Ho; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yoo, Byeong Duk

    2005-01-01

    With an advent of femto-second lasers, a laseraccelerated ion generation has been world-widely studied for medical and nuclear applications. It is known that protons with the energy from several tens MeV to a few hundreds MeV require for a cancer therapy and nuclear reaction. Even though, up to present, the maximum energy of laser-accelerated proton is about 60 MeV, it is expected that the energy of protons generated can be obtained at least up to 150 MeV. According to theoretical and experimental works, it turns out the energy distribution and the flux of ions strongly depends on the intensity of a fs laser at a target. However, physics on laser-plasma interaction is still not clear. The precise measurements of parameters of a fs laser and ions are important to figure out the physics and develop the theoretical interpretation. Typically, beam diagnostic system includes measurements and/or monitoring of the temporal and spatial profiles of lasers at the target as well as the energy spectrum and density profile of protons, which are critical for the analysis of mechanism and the characterization of protons generated. We fabricated and installed the target chamber for laser-accelerated proton generation and are now integrating beam diagnostic system. For laser diagnostics, beam monitoring and alignment system has been installed. For a charged particle, CR-39 detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and Si charged particle detectors are installed for density profile and energy spectrum. In this paper, we discuss the laser beam monitoring and alignment system. We also estimates expected spectrum of protons from Thomson parabola spectrometer, depending on the parameters of protons

  14. Beam-Induced Multipactoring and Electron-Cloud Effects in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Scandale, Walter; Zimmermann, F

    2009-01-01

    In the beam pipe of high-energy proton or positron accelerators an “electron cloud” can be generated by a variety of processes, e.g. by residual-gas ionization, by photoemission from synchrotron radiation, and, most importantly, by secondary emission via a beam-induced multipactoring process. The electron cloud commonly leads to a degradation of the beam vacuum by several orders of magnitude, to fast beam instabilities, to beam-size increases, and to fast or slow beam losses. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the cloud electrons could also give rise to an additional heat load inside cold superconducting magnets. In addition to the direct heat deposition from incoherently moving electrons, a potential “magnetron effect” has been conjectured, where electrons would radiate coherently when moving in a strong magnetic field under the simultaneous influence of a beam-induced electric “wake” field that may become resonant with the cyclotron frequency. Electron-cloud effects are already being observed w...

  15. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P. [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F. [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada); Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  16. Beam energy spread in FERMI(at)elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI(at)elettra electron gun

  17. Extrinsic Influence of Environment-Induced Degradation on Load Carrying Capacity of Steel Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Sunil; Patnaik, A.; Payer, J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of a study aimed at evaluating the strength of wide-flanged beams subjected to corrosion-induced damage, modeled using a standard finite element program (ABAQUS) is presented and discussed. Typical beams in consideration were subjected to different cases of corrosion-induced damage, such as non-uniform and varying degree of material loss that simulates pitting corrosion. Many variables, such as (a) shape of pitting damage, (b) location of pits along the length of the beam, (c) number of pits, and (d) depth of pits, were considered to facilitate a better understanding of the load carrying capacity of steel I-beams having damage quite similar to pitting damage to the web. The results are compared with an "as-new" beam for purpose of evaluation of the reduction in strength due to environment-induced deterioration. A "corrosion strength reduction factor (CSRF)" is introduced to help identify the reduction in load carrying capacity as a consequence of both height and depth of the damage due to corrosion. The results are presented in charts for purpose of practical beam design.

  18. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Asahi-ku, Ohmiya, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Harada, Y. [Applied Physics, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1, Asahi-ku, Ohmiya, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan)

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide ({beta}-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal ({alpha})-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although {beta}-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N{sub 2} annealing, they were not easily formed in N{sub 2}-annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N{sub 2}-annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]{<=}0.5%). Although [O]{proportional_to}1% could be estimated by investigating In{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains formed in N{sub 2}-annealed InN films, [O]{<=}0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains formed by H{sub 2} annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O{sub 2}, using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. High-efficiency silicon doping of InP and In0.53Ga0.47As in gas source and metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using silicon tetrabromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, S.L.; Fresina, M.T.; Baker, J.E.; Stillman, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Efficient vapor source Si doping of InP and In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As have been demonstrated using SiBr 4 as the Si source for both gas source (GSMBE) and metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE). Net electron concentrations ranging from n=2x10 17 to 6.8x10 19 cm -3 and from 9x10 16 to 3x10 19 cm -3 have been obtained for InP and In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As, respectively. Comparison of these data with those for Si 2 H 6 indicate that the Si incorporation efficiency with SiBr 4 is more than 10 000 times greater than with Si 2 H 6 for substrate temperatures in the range of 475≤T s ≤500 degree C. Specular surface morphologies were obtained, even for the most heavily doped samples. While [Si] as high as 1.8x10 20 cm -3 was obtained in InP, the net electron concentrations and 300 K Hall mobilities decrease with increasing [Si] for [Si]>6.8x10 19 cm -3 . Contact resistances as low as R c =3x10 -8 Ω cm 2 were obtained using a nonalloyed Ti/Pt/Au contact to InP layers doped to n=6.3x10 19 cm -3 . During GSMBE growth, an increased Si background concentration ([Si]∼2x10 17 cm -3 ) was observed after extended use of the SiBr 4 source for these heavy doping concentrations. This increased background was not observed in MOMBE-grown material. Depth profiles of pulse-doped structures indicate the absence of memory effects for structures grown by MOMBE

  20. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  1. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  2. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Phil S.

    2007-01-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  3. GaN/NbN epitaxial semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rusen; Khalsa, Guru; Vishwanath, Suresh; Han, Yimo; Wright, John; Rouvimov, Sergei; Katzer, D. Scott; Nepal, Neeraj; Downey, Brian P.; Muller, David A.; Xing, Huili G.; Meyer, David J.; Jena, Debdeep

    2018-03-01

    Epitaxy is a process by which a thin layer of one crystal is deposited in an ordered fashion onto a substrate crystal. The direct epitaxial growth of semiconductor heterostructures on top of crystalline superconductors has proved challenging. Here, however, we report the successful use of molecular beam epitaxy to grow and integrate niobium nitride (NbN)-based superconductors with the wide-bandgap family of semiconductors—silicon carbide, gallium nitride (GaN) and aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN). We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow an AlGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure directly on top of an ultrathin crystalline NbN superconductor. The resulting high-mobility, two-dimensional electron gas in the semiconductor exhibits quantum oscillations, and thus enables a semiconductor transistor—an electronic gain element—to be grown and fabricated directly on a crystalline superconductor. Using the epitaxial superconductor as the source load of the transistor, we observe in the transistor output characteristics a negative differential resistance—a feature often used in amplifiers and oscillators. Our demonstration of the direct epitaxial growth of high-quality semiconductor heterostructures and devices on crystalline nitride superconductors opens up the possibility of combining the macroscopic quantum effects of superconductors with the electronic, photonic and piezoelectric properties of the group III/nitride semiconductor family.

  4. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  5. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1 a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2 a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200  MeV/u up to 1  GeV/u.

  6. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  7. Effects induced by LHC high energy beam in copper structures

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Dallocchio, A

    2011-01-01

    This study is performed in order to estimate the damage on copper components due to the impact of a 7 TeV proton beam in the Large Hadron Collider. The case study represents an accidental case consequent to an abnormal release of the beam, in which eight bunches impact directly the copper. The energy delivered on the components is calculated by the FLUKA Team at CERN using their Monte-Carlo code for calculation of particle transport and interactions with matter. The energy maps are used by the authors as input for the structural simulations carried out via the FEM code LS-DYNA. The evolution of the phenomenon is quite similar to what might happen during an explosion. The impacted part of the component reaches extremely high values of pressure and temperature and undergoes changes of state. The sudden increase in pressure originates outgoing shockwaves that, travelling through the component, lead to a substantial density reduction in the impacted part. The energy delivered on the component is sufficient to sev...

  8. Flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budhani, R.C.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report some transport measurements carried out to study flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 films. Our results show that in these in situ deposited films containing a large concentration of defects frozen-in at the time of film growth, a marginal enhancement in critical current density occurs when the density of linear defects 10 /cm 2 , and their diameter of the order of coherence length. This criterion is satisfied by Ag +21 ions. The damage due to Au +24 ions is much too severe to improve the J c

  9. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  10. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  11. Experiments on the margin of beam induced quenches a superconducting quadrupole magnet in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Bednarek, M J; Nebot Del Busto, E; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    Protection of LHC equipment relies on a complex system of collimators to capture injected and circulating beam in case of LHC kicker magnet failures. However, for specific failures of the injection kickers, the beam can graze the injection protection collimators and induce quenches of downstream superconducting magnets. This occurred twice during 2011 operation and cannot be excluded during future operation. Tests were performed during Machine Development periods of the LHC to assess the quench margin of the quadrupole located just downstream of the last injection protection collimator in point 8. In addition to the existing Quench Protection System, a special monitoring instrumentation was installed at this magnet to detect any resistance increase below the quench limit. The correlation between the magnet and Beam Loss Monitor signals was analysed for different beam intensities and magnet currents. The results of the experiments are presented.

  12. Annealing induced oxidation and transformation of Zr thin film prepared by ion beam sputtering deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, S.-W. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, T.-Y. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, H.-L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chinese Military Academy, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Gan Dershin [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-Mail: dgan@mail.nsysu.edu.tw; Shen Pouyan [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2007-04-15

    Nanocrystalline {alpha}-Zr condensates deposited by ion beam sputtering on the NaCl (1 0 0) surfaces and then annealed at 100-750 deg. C in air. The phases present were identified by transmission electron microscopy to be nanometer-size {alpha}-Zr + ZrO, {alpha}-Zr + ZrO + c-ZrO{sub 2}, c-ZrO{sub 2}, c- + t-ZrO{sub 2}, t-ZrO{sub 2}, and t- + m-ZrO{sub 2} phase assemblages with increasing annealing temperature. The ZrO{sub 2} showed strong {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} preferred orientation due to parallel epitaxy with NaCl (1 0 0) when annealed between 150 and 500 deg. C in air. The c- and t-ZrO{sub 2} condensates also showed (1 1 1)-specific coalescence among themselves. The c- and/or t-ZrO{sub 2} formation can be accounted for by the small grain size, the presence of low-valence Zr cation and the lateral constraint of the neighboring grains.

  13. Compositional changes in industrial hemp biomass (Cannabis sativa L.) induced by electron beam irradiation Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Yong Joo; Shin, Soo-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical decomposition of industrial hemp biomass were evaluated at doses of 150, 300, and 450 kGy. The quantity of decomposed components was indirectly estimated by measuring changes in alkaline extraction. The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation doses resulted in larger amounts of alkaline extract. Carbohydrate compositional analysis using 1 H-NMR spectroscopy was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the polysaccharides of the industrial hemp. The xylose peak intensity in the NMR spectra decreased with increasing electron irradiation dose, indicating that xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose. -- Highlights: → The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation. → Carbohydrate analysis was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the industrial hemp. → Xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose.

  14. Modeling of Low Frequency MHD Induced Beam Ion Transport In NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Medley, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    Beam ion transport in the presence of low frequency MHD activity in National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) plasma is modeled numerically and analyzed theoretically in order to understand basic underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed fast ion redistribution and losses. Numerical modeling of the beam ions flux into the NPA in NSTX shows that after the onset of low frequency MHD activity high energy part of beam ion distribution, E b > 40keV, is redistributed radially due to stochastic diffusion. Such diffusion is caused by high order harmonics of the transit frequency resonance overlap in the phase space. Large drift orbit radial width induces such high order resonances. Characteristic confinement time is deduced from the measured NPA energy spectrum and is typically ∼ 4msec. Considered MHD activity may induce losses on the order of 10% at the internal magnetic field perturbation (delta)B/B = Ο (10 -3 ), which is comparable to the prompt orbit losses

  15. Epitaxial growth of indium oxyfluoride thin films by reactive pulsed laser deposition: Structural change induced by fluorine insertion into vacancy sites in bixbyite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Sohei; Hirose, Yasushi; Nakao, Shoichiro; Yang, Chang; Harayama, Isao; Sekiba, Daiichiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    InO x F y thin films were epitaxially grown on Y-stabilized ZrO 2 (111) substrates by reactive pulsed laser deposition. By changing the substrate temperature (T S ), we were able to control the fluorine content of the film. Phase-pure epitaxial thin films with bixbyite-like ordering in the anion-site occupancy were obtained at high T S (≥ 240 °C), where fluorine was inserted into the vacancy sites in the bixbyite lattice up to y / (x + y) ∼ 0.3. By decreasing T S , y / (x + y) increased and the bixbyite-like ordering disappeared; simultaneously, fluorine-rich and fluorine-poor subphases emerged. The films grown at T S ≤ 150 °C were amorphous and exhibited higher optical absorbance and electrical resistivity than the epitaxial films. - Highlights: • InO x F y epitaxial thin films with high fluorine concentration were grown on Y:ZrO 2 . • Anion composition and structural, optical and transport properties were studied. • Fluorine is topotactically inserted into the oxygen vacancy sites in bixbyite cell. • Bixbyite-like ordering of the anion site occupancy was conserved in y / (x + y) ≤ ∼ 0.3

  16. Epitaxial growth of indium oxyfluoride thin films by reactive pulsed laser deposition: Structural change induced by fluorine insertion into vacancy sites in bixbyite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Sohei [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirose, Yasushi, E-mail: hirose@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakao, Shoichiro [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yang, Chang [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harayama, Isao; Sekiba, Daiichiro [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-05-30

    InO{sub x}F{sub y} thin films were epitaxially grown on Y-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (111) substrates by reactive pulsed laser deposition. By changing the substrate temperature (T{sub S}), we were able to control the fluorine content of the film. Phase-pure epitaxial thin films with bixbyite-like ordering in the anion-site occupancy were obtained at high T{sub S} (≥ 240 °C), where fluorine was inserted into the vacancy sites in the bixbyite lattice up to y / (x + y) ∼ 0.3. By decreasing T{sub S}, y / (x + y) increased and the bixbyite-like ordering disappeared; simultaneously, fluorine-rich and fluorine-poor subphases emerged. The films grown at T{sub S} ≤ 150 °C were amorphous and exhibited higher optical absorbance and electrical resistivity than the epitaxial films. - Highlights: • InO{sub x}F{sub y} epitaxial thin films with high fluorine concentration were grown on Y:ZrO{sub 2}. • Anion composition and structural, optical and transport properties were studied. • Fluorine is topotactically inserted into the oxygen vacancy sites in bixbyite cell. • Bixbyite-like ordering of the anion site occupancy was conserved in y / (x + y) ≤ ∼ 0.3.

  17. Radioprotective efficacy of bisarylidene cyclopentanone on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darshan Raj, C.G.; Sarojini, B.K.; Musthafa Khaleel, V.; Ramesh, S.R.; Ramakrishna, M.K.; Narayana, B.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Present study was carried out for evaluating the radioprotective effect of bischalcone (2E, 5E) - 2,5-bis (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzylidene) cyclopentanone (curcumin analog (CA)), on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster adults. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants included superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The oxidative stress was induced at 1.5 Gy. (author)

  18. Vibration induced sliding: theory and experiment for a beam with a spring-loaded mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Erik; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    1998-01-01

    , and contributes to a further understanding of this nonlinear phenomenon. A mathematical model is set up to describe vibration induced sliding for a base-excited cantilever beam with a spring-loaded pointmass. Approximations simplify the model into two nonlinear ordinary differential equations, describing motions...

  19. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  20. Crosslinking of oriented polyethylene by electron beam radiation. Influence of morphology induced by drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Crevecoeur, G.; Lemstra, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of drawing on the crosslinking efficiency for electron beam radiation is reported for solution-crystallized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. A maximum in crosslinking efficiency is found at a draw ratio of approximately five, indicating an optimum morphology for inducing crosslinks during the hot-drawing process. (author)

  1. Beam-induced radiation in the compact muon solenoid tracker at the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The intense radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN at a design energy of. √ s = 14 TeV ... situated only a few centimeters from the interaction point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. .... fluences beyond 1 × 1015 cm−2 for minimum ionizing protons [6]. So we expect the pixel detectors to ...

  2. Ion-beam-induced amorphization and order-disorder transition in the murataite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Jie; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Yudintsev, Sergey V.; Stefanovsky, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    Murataite (A 3 B 6 C 2 O 22-x/2 ,F43m), a derivative of an anion-deficient fluorite structure, has been synthesized as different polytypes as a result of cation ordering. Ion-beam-induced amorphization has been investigated by 1-MeV Kr 2+ ion irradiation with in situ transmission electron microscopy. The critical amorphization dose was determined as a function of temperature and the degree of structural disordering. A lower critical amorphization temperature (∼860 K) was obtained for the disordered murataite as compared with that of the murataite superstructure (930 to 1060 K). An ion-beam-induced ordered murataite to a disordered fluorite transition occurred in the murataite superstructure, similar to that observed in the closely related pyrochlore structure-type, A 2 B 2 O 7 . The ion-beam-induced defect fluorite structure is more energetically stable in the murataite structure with a higher degree of structural disordering, as compared with the murataite superstructure. This suggests that the degree of intrinsic structural disorder has a significant effect on the energetics of structural disordering process; this affects the tendency toward the order-disorder structural transition for fluorite-related compounds and their response to ion-beam-induced amorphization

  3. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing: the effect of substrate thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F; Lazic, Ivan; Beyer, André

    2011-01-01

    It is often suggested that the growth in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is caused not only by primary electrons, but also (and even predominantly) by secondary electrons (SEs). If that is true, the growth rate for FEBIP can be changed by modifying the SE yield. Results from our ...

  4. Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon modes of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Prabaswara, Aditya; Ooi, Boon S., E-mail: boon.ooi@kaust.edu.sa [Photonics Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Anjum, Dalaver H.; Yang, Yang [Adavanced nanofabrication Imaging and characterization, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Albadri, Abdulrahman M.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M. [National Center for Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh 11442-6086 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-28

    The dislocation free In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si(111) by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature regime of 490 °C–610 °C yielding In composition ranges over 0.50 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. We study the optical properties of these NWs by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopies since they possesses minimal strain with reduced defects comparative to the planar films. The optical bandgap measurements of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N NWs are demonstrated by SE where the absorption edges of the NW samples are evaluated irrespective of substrate transparency. A systematic Stoke shift of 0.04–0.27 eV with increasing x was observed when comparing the micro-photoluminescence spectra with the Tauc plot derived from SE. The micro-Raman spectra in the NWs with x = 0.5 showed two-mode behavior for A{sub 1}(LO) phonons and single mode behavior for E{sub 2}{sup H} phonons. As for x = 0.17, i.e., high Al content, we observed a peculiar E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon mode splitting. Further, we observe composition dependent frequency shifts. The 77 to 600 K micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show that both AlN- and InN-like modes of A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}{sup H} phonons in In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N NWs are redshifted with increasing temperature, similar to that of the binary III group nitride semiconductors. These studies of the optical properties of the technologically important In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires will path the way towards lasers and light-emitting diodes in the wavelength of the ultra-violet and visible range.

  5. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  6. Epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew Tye; Deshpande, Girish; Lin, Wen-Yi; Jan, Tzyy-Jiuan

    2006-04-25

    Epitatial thin films for use as buffer layers for high temperature superconductors, electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), gas separation membranes or dielectric material in electronic devices, are disclosed. By using CCVD, CACVD or any other suitable deposition process, epitaxial films having pore-free, ideal grain boundaries, and dense structure can be formed. Several different types of materials are disclosed for use as buffer layers in high temperature superconductors. In addition, the use of epitaxial thin films for electrolytes and electrode formation in SOFCs results in densification for pore-free and ideal gain boundary/interface microstructure. Gas separation membranes for the production of oxygen and hydrogen are also disclosed. These semipermeable membranes are formed by high-quality, dense, gas-tight, pinhole free sub-micro scale layers of mixed-conducting oxides on porous ceramic substrates. Epitaxial thin films as dielectric material in capacitors are also taught herein. Capacitors are utilized according to their capacitance values which are dependent on their physical structure and dielectric permittivity. The epitaxial thin films of the current invention form low-loss dielectric layers with extremely high permittivity. This high permittivity allows for the formation of capacitors that can have their capacitance adjusted by applying a DC bias between their electrodes.

  7. Microwave dynamics of YBCO bi-epitaxial Josephson structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K. Y.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Mashtakov, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    The processes of interaction of microwaves (frequency View the MathML source) with a single high-Tc superconducting YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO) bi-epitaxial grain-boundary junction and with an array of two junctions connected in series, have been investigated experimentally at temperatures T = 4.2− 77 K......, as well as the subharmonic detector response at weak magnetic fields φ microwave field induced frequency synchronization of two series connected bi-epitaxial YBCO junctions....

  8. Multi-bunch energy spread induced by beam loading in standing wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction of a relativistic beam with the modes of the TM 010 pass-band of a multicell cavity does not cause any problem: although all the modes are excited by the RF (radiofrequency) generator, resulting in different cell excitations during the cavity filling and the beam pulse, the net accelerating field exhibits negligible fluctuations from bunch to bunch. However, when the beam is not fully relativistic, this is no more true. The phase slippage occurring in the first cells, between the non relativistic beam and the lower pass-band modes, produces an effective enhancement of the shunt impedances, which is usually negligible for a relativistic beam in a well tuned cavity. Moreover, the voltage jumps (amplitude and phase) occurring at each bunch passage, as well as the beam detuning caused by the off-crest bunches, vary from cell to cell. These effects enhance dramatically the fluctuation of the accelerating voltage, with a dominant beating provided by the pass-band mode nearest to the pi-mode. The induced beam energy spread has been estimated by the help of two distinct codes, developed at Frascati (Italy) and (Saclay), with results in good agreement. While an interaction integral is computed at each bunch passage, the cavity refilling is calculated by solving coupled differential equations of the modes of the pass-band, driven by a generator linked to one end-cell. It is shown also that the intermode coupling arises from the external Q of the drive end-cell, and not from the wall losses. For illustration, the authors applied the method to the beam-loading problem in the SC capture cavity of the low charge injector of the TESLA test facility installed at DESY

  9. Influence of substrate pre-deposition annealing on step edges-induced magnetoresistance in epitaxial magnetite films grown on vicinal MgO (1 0 0) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofin, R.G.S.; Arora, S.K.; Shvets, I.V.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) properties of epitaxial magnetite, Fe 3 O 4 , films grown on vicinal MgO (1 0 0) substrates show an enhancement and anisotropy in the MR in the direction across the step edges compared to the direction along the step edges. The observed enhancement in low-field MR response and MR anisotropy of epitaxial Fe 3 O 4 films is explained by the enhanced spin scattering introduced due to the presence of atomic height steps, which leads to the formation of a greater number of antiphase boundaries (APBs) with out-of-plane shift vectors. We found that the optimum annealing duration required to observe maximum MR anisotropy is between 5 and 9 h. Longer annealing time leads to segregation of Ca impurities on the MgO surface which lead to a decrease in APB density and MR anisotropy

  10. Selected immobilization of individual nanoparticles by spot-exposure electron-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbridge, Daniel J; Crampin, Simon; Gordeev, Sergey N [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Viau, Guillaume [Departement de Genie Physique, INSA de Toulouse, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-01-29

    The use of spot-exposure electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) to immobilize targeted nanoparticles on a substrate is demonstrated, and investigated using experiment and simulation. Nanoparticles are secured in place through the build-up of carbonaceous material that forms in the region between a particle and substrate when an energetic electron beam is focused onto the particle and projected through to the substrate. Material build-up directly affects the strength of adhesion to the surface, and can be controlled through electron dosage and beam energy. By selectively immobilizing specific particles within surface agglomerations and removing the excess, we illustrate the potential for spot-exposure EBID as a new technique for nanofabrication.

  11. Electron-beam-induced segregation in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, J.P.; Ross, I.M.; Cullis, A.G.; Wang, T.; Parbrook, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report a study of the morphology and composition of In x Ga 1-x N/GaN multiple-quantum-well structures and their sensitivity to electron-beam damage. We have employed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural analysis was performed to investigate the dynamical effects of electron-beam irradiation on the relative indium distribution within the quantum wells. Exposure to relatively low incident beam illumination, corresponding to current densities at the specimen of ∼100 pA/cm 2 , was found to induce significant nanoclustering of indium within the multiple-quantum wells. These findings highlight the need for caution when reporting the presence of indium-rich clusters within InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum wells studied in the transmission electron microscope

  12. Proton-induced knockout reactions with polarized and unpolarized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasa, T.; Ogata, K.; Noro, T.

    2017-09-01

    Proton-induced knockout reactions provide a direct means of studying the single particle or cluster structures of target nuclei. In addition, these knockout reactions are expected to play a unique role in investigations of the effects of the nuclear medium on nucleon-nucleon interactions as well as the properties of nucleons and mesons. However, due to the nature of hadron probes, these reactions can suffer significant disturbances from the nuclear surroundings and the quantitative theoretical treatment of such processes can also be challenging. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical progress in this field, particularly focusing on the use of these reactions as a spectroscopic tool and as a way to examine the medium modification of nucleon-nucleon interactions. With regard to the former aspect, the review presents a semi-quantitative evaluation of these reactions based on existing experimental data. In terms of the latter point, we introduce a significant body of evidence that suggests, although does not conclusively prove, the existence of medium effects. In addition, this paper also provides information and comments on other related subjects.

  13. Anisotropic-strain-relaxation-induced crosshatch morphology in epitaxial SrTiO3/NdGaO3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Tan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the strain relaxation and surface morphology of epitaxial SrTiO3 (STO films grown on (001O and (110O planes of orthorhombic NdGaO3 (NGO, and (001 plane of cubic (LaAlO30.3(Sr2AlTaO60.7 (LSAT substrates. Although the average lattice mismatches are similar, strikingly regular crosshatched surface patterns can be found on STO/NGO(001O[(110O] films, contrary to the uniform surface of STO/LSAT(001. Based on the orientation and thickness dependent patterns and high-resolution x-ray diffractions, we ascribe the crosshatch morphology to the anisotropic strain relaxation with possibly the 60° misfit dislocation formation and lateral surface step flow in STO/NGO films, while an isotropic strain relaxation in STO/LSAT. Further, we show that the crosshatched STO/NGO(110O surface could be utilized as a template to modify the magnetotransport properties of epitaxial La0.6Ca0.4MnO3 films. This study highlights the crucial role of symmetry mismatch in determining the surface morphology of the perovskite oxide films, in addition to their epitaxial strain states, and offers a different route for designing and fabricating functional perovskite-oxide devices.

  14. Tuning of thermally induced first-order semiconductor-to-metal transition in pulsed laser deposited VO2 epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Makhes K.; Pradhan, Dhiren K.; Pradhan, Sangram K.; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2017-12-01

    Vanadium oxide (VO2) thin films have drawn significant research and development interest in recent years because of their intriguing physical origin and wide range of functionalities useful for many potential applications, including infrared imaging, smart windows, and energy and information technologies. However, the growth of highly epitaxial films of VO2, with a sharp and distinct controllable transition, has remained a challenge. Here, we report the structural and electronic properties of high quality and reproducible epitaxial thin films of VO2, grown on c-axis oriented sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition at different deposition pressures and temperatures, followed by various annealing schedules. Our results demonstrate that the annealing of epitaxial VO2 films significantly enhances the Semiconductor to Metal Transition (SMT) to that of bulk VO2 transition. The effect of oxygen partial pressure during the growth of VO2 films creates a significant modulation of the SMT from around room temperature to as high as the theoretical value of 68 °C. We obtained a bulk order transition ≥104 while reducing the transition temperature close to 60 °C, which is comparatively less than the theoretical value of 68 °C, demonstrating a clear and drastic improvement in the SMT switching characteristics. The results reported here will open the door to fundamental studies of VO2, along with tuning of the transition temperatures for potential applications for multifunctional devices.

  15. Beam induced heat loads on the beam-screens of the twin-bore magnets in the IRs of the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The expected heat load induced on the beam screens has been evaluated for all the twin-bore magnets in the Insertion Regions (IRs) of the HL-LHC. The contribution from the impedance of the beam screen has been evaluated taking into account the presence of a longitudinal weld in the beam screen and the impact of the temperature and of the magnetic field on the resistivity of the surface. The contribution coming from electron cloud effects has been evaluated for different values of the Secondary Electron Yield of the surface based PyECLOUD build-up simulations.

  16. Analysis of radiation pressure force exerted on a biological cell induced by high-order Bessel beams using Debye series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Renxian; Ren, Kuan Fang; Han, Xiang'e; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Shuxi

    2013-01-01

    Debye series expansion (DSE) is employed to the analysis of radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted on biological cells induced by high-order Bessel beams (BB). The beam shape coefficients (BSCs) for high-order Bessel beams are calculated using analytical expressions obtained by the integral localized approximation (ILA). Different types of cells, including a real Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell and a lymphocyte which are respectively modeled by a coated and five-layered sphere, are considered. The RPF induced by high-order Bessel beams is compared with that by Gaussian beams and zeroth-order Bessel beams, and the effect of different scattering processes on RPF is studied. Numerical calculations show that high-order Bessel beams with zero central intensity can also transversely trap particle in the beam center, and some scattering processes can provide longitudinal pulling force. -- Highlights: ► BSCs for high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) is derived using ILA. ► DSE is employed to study the RPF induced by HOBB exerted on multilayered cells. ► RPF is decided by radius relative to the interval of peaks in intensity profile. ► HOBB can also transversely trap high-index particle in the vicinity of beam axis. ► RPF for some scattering processes can longitudinally pull particles back

  17. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based on single beam splitting and geometric configuration for effective signal enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-05

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS.

  18. Decomposition of organic pollutants in industrial Effluent induced by advanced oxidation process with Electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, C.L.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Rela, P.R.; Oikawa, H.; Silveira, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) by electron beam irradiation induce the decomposition of pollutants in industrial effluent. Experiments were conducted using a Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1.5 MeV energy and 37 Kew power. Experiments were conducted using samples from a Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) that receives about 20% of industrial wastewater, with the objective of use the electrons beam technology to destroy the refractory organic pollutants. Samples from WTP main Industrial Receiver Unit influent (IRU), Coarse Bar Screens effluent (CBS), Medium Bar Screens effluent (MBS), Primary Sedimentation effluent (PS) and Final Effluent (FE), were collected and irradiated in the electron beam accelerator in a batch system. The delivered doses were 5.0kGy, 10.0kGy and 20.0kGy. The electron beam irradiation showed be efficient on destroying the organic compounds delivered in these effluents mainly chloroform, dichloroethane, methyl isobutyl ketone, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol. The necessary dose to remove 90% of the most organic compounds from industry effluent was 20 kGy. The removal of organic compounds from this complex mixture were described by the destruction G value (Gd) that were obtained for those compounds in different initial concentration and compared with literature

  19. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  20. Novel Programmable Shape Memory Polystyrene Film: A Thermally Induced Beam-power Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Han, Yu; Wang, Wenxin; Liu, Yanju; Jin, Peng; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-03-01

    Micro/nanophotonic structures that are capable of optical wave-front shaping are implemented in optical waveguides and passive optical devices to alter the phase of the light propagating through them. The beam division directions and beam power distribution depend on the design of the micro/nanostructures. The ultimate potential of advanced micro/nanophotonic structures is limited by their structurally rigid, functional singleness and not tunable against external impact. Here, we propose a thermally induced optical beam-power splitter concept based on a shape memory polystyrene film with programmable micropatterns. The smooth film exhibits excellent transparency with a transmittance of 95% in the visible spectrum and optical stability during a continuous heating process up to 90 °C. By patterning double sided shape memory polystyrene film into erasable and switchable micro-groove gratings, the transmission light switches from one designed light divided directions and beam-power distribution to another because of the optical diffraction effect of the shape changing micro gratings during the whole thermal activated recovery process. The experimental and theoretical results demonstrate a proof-of-principle of the beam-power splitter. Our results can be adapted to further extend the applications of micro/nanophotonic devices and implement new features in the nanophotonics.

  1. An epitaxial ferroelectric tunnel junction on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Guo, Xiao; Lu, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Zaoli; Song, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shaobo; Bosman, Michel; Zhu, Jing; Dong, Zhili; Zhu, Weiguang

    2014-11-12

    Epitaxially grown functional perovskites on silicon (001) and the ferroelectricity of a 3.2 nm thick BaTiO3 barrier layer are demonstrated. The polarization-switching-induced change in tunneling resistance is measured to be two orders of magnitude. The obtained results suggest the possibility of integrating ferroelectric tunnel junctions as binary data storage media in non-volatile memory cells on a silicon platform. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Toward sensitive graphene nanoribbon-nanopore devices by preventing electron beam-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Balan, Adrian; Drndić, Marija

    2013-12-23

    Graphene-based nanopore devices are promising candidates for next-generation DNA sequencing. Here we fabricated graphene nanoribbon-nanopore (GNR-NP) sensors for DNA detection. Nanopores with diameters in the range 2-10 nm were formed at the edge or in the center of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), with widths between 20 and 250 nm and lengths of 600 nm, on 40 nm thick silicon nitride (SiN(x)) membranes. GNR conductance was monitored in situ during electron irradiation-induced nanopore formation inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) operating at 200 kV. We show that GNR resistance increases linearly with electron dose and that GNR conductance and mobility decrease by a factor of 10 or more when GNRs are imaged at relatively high magnification with a broad beam prior to making a nanopore. By operating the TEM in scanning TEM (STEM) mode, in which the position of the converged electron beam can be controlled with high spatial precision via automated feedback, we were able to prevent electron beam-induced damage and make nanopores in highly conducting GNR sensors. This method minimizes the exposure of the GNRs to the beam before and during nanopore formation. The resulting GNRs with unchanged resistances after nanopore formation can sustain microampere currents at low voltages (∼50 mV) in buffered electrolyte solution and exhibit high sensitivity, with a large relative change of resistance upon changes of gate voltage, similar to pristine GNRs without nanopores.

  3. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Wu Xin; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Liu Qingfang; He Jinyu; Jing Xigang; Ding Nan; Dai Zhongying; Zhou Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  4. Epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoliang; Chen, Junze; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are a class of materials that are typically composed of two or more different components, in which each component has at least one dimension on the nanoscale. The rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures are of great importance in enabling the fine tuning of their properties and functions. Epitaxial growth is a promising approach to the controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures with desired structures, crystal phases, exposed facets and/or interfaces. This Review provides a critical summary of the state of the art in the field of epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures. We discuss the historical development, architectures and compositions, epitaxy methods, characterization techniques and advantages of epitaxial hybrid nanostructures. Finally, we provide insight into future research directions in this area, which include the epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures from a wider range of materials, the study of the underlying mechanism and determining the role of epitaxial growth in influencing the properties and application performance of hybrid nanostructures.

  5. Advanced ion beam analysis of materials using ion-induced fast electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Ishihara, Toyoyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-energy shadowing effect using ion-induced electron spectroscopy is reported with emphasis on a possibility of determination of local electronic structure in solids, which has been a difficult problem to approach with other experimental techniques. We demonstrate real-space determination of covalent-bond electron distribution in Si crystal. The analysis technique may provide a new field of ion beam analysis of solids. (author)

  6. Selfsupported epitaxial silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarovici, D.; Popescu, A.

    1975-01-01

    The methods of removing the p or p + support of an n-type epitaxial silicon layer using electrochemical etching are described. So far, only n + -n junctions have been processed. The condition of anodic dissolution for some values of the support and layer resistivity are given. By this method very thin single crystal selfsupported targets of convenient areas can be obtained for channeling - blocking experiments

  7. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Trapping induced nonlinear behavior of backward stimulated Raman scattering in multi-speckled laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Langdon, A. B.; Michel, P.

    2012-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion experiments, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) occurs when electron density fluctuations are amplified resonantly by the incident laser beams and scattered light. These beams comprise several thousands of individual laser speckles. We have found in single-speckle studies that electron trapping lowers the threshold intensity for SRS onset to a value below that from linear theory and enhances scattering. The trapping-induced plasma-wave frequency shift leads to wave-front bowing and filamentation processes that saturate SRS and limit scattering within a speckle. With large-scale simulations, we have now examined how laser speckles interact with one another through three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of two interacting speckles and 2D PIC simulations of ensembles of laser speckles (hundreds of speckles). Our work shows that kinetic trapping physics also governs the onset and saturation of SRS in ensembles of speckles. Speckles interact in a manner that is nonlinear and nonlocal: An intense speckle can destabilize its neighbors through transport of hot electrons and SRS waves, resulting in enhanced emission of particles and waves that, in turn, act upon the original speckle. In this manner, speckles below threshold when in isolation can be above the threshold in multi-speckled beams under conditions for laser-driven fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and ensembles of speckles are thus found to collectively lower the SRS onset threshold. Simulations of the hohlraum interior where laser beams overlap show that multi-speckled laser beams at low average intensity (a few times 10 14 W/cm 2 ) have correspondingly lower thresholds for enhanced SRS and that the sub-ps bursts of SRS saturate through trapping induced nonlinearities. Because of electron trapping effects, SRS reflectivity grows slowly with average laser intensity. While SRS reflectivity saturates under NIF conditions, SRS hot electron

  9. Swift heavy ion-beam induced amorphization and recrystallization of yttrium iron garnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Beuneu, François; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2015-12-16

    Pure and (Ca and Si)-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12 or YIG) epitaxial layers and amorphous films on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, or GGG) single crystal substrates were irradiated by 50 MeV (32)Si and 50 MeV (or 60 MeV) (63)Cu ions for electronic stopping powers larger than the threshold value (~4 MeV μm(-1)) for amorphous track formation in YIG crystals. Conductivity data of crystalline samples in a broad ion fluence range (10(11)-10(16) cm(-2)) are modeled with a set of rate equations corresponding to the amorphization and recrystallization induced in ion tracks by electronic excitations. The data for amorphous layers confirm that a recrystallization process takes place above ~10(14) cm(-2). Cross sections for both processes deduced from this analysis are discussed in comparison to previous determinations with reference to the inelastic thermal-spike model of track formation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was also used to follow the related structural modifications. Raman spectra show the progressive vanishing and randomization of crystal phonon modes in relation to the ion-induced damage. For crystalline samples irradiated at high fluences (⩾10(14) cm(-2)), only two prominent broad bands remain like for amorphous films, thereby reflecting the phonon density of states of the disordered solid, regardless of samples and irradiation conditions. The main band peaked at ~660 cm(-1) is assigned to vibration modes of randomized bonds in tetrahedral (FeO4) units.

  10. New Insights into the Origins of Sb-Induced Effects on Self-Catalyzed GaAsSb Nanowire Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dingding; Dheeraj, Dasa L.; Jin, Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    the development of high-performance nanowire devices based on such ternaries. Here, we report on the origins of Sb-induced effects affecting the morphology and crystal structure of self-catalyzed GaAsSb nanowire arrays. The, nanowire growth by molecular beam epitaxy is changed both kinetically...

  11. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  12. In-beam PET measurement of $^{7}Li^{3+}$ irradiation induced $\\beta^+}$-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Priegnitz, M; Parodi, K; Sommerer, F; Fiedler, F; Enghardt, W

    2008-01-01

    At present positron emission tomography (PET) is the only feasible method of an in situ and non-invasive monitoring of patient irradiation with ions. At the experimental carbon ion treatment facility of the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt an in-beam PET scanner has been integrated into the treatment site and lead to a considerable quality improvement of the therapy. Since ions other than carbon are expected to come into operation in future patient treatment facilities, it is highly desirable to extend in-beam PET also to other therapeutic relevant ions, e.g. 7Li. Therefore, by means of the in-beam PET scanner at GSI the β+-activity induced by 7Li3+ ions has been investigated for the first time. Targets of PMMA, water, graphite and polyethylene were irradiated with monoenergetic, pencil-like beams of 7Li3+ with energies between 129.1 A MeV and 205.3 A MeV and intensities ranging from 3.0 × 107 to 1.9 × 108 ions s−1. This paper presents the measured β+-activity profiles as well as d...

  13. Time-of-flight MeV-SIMS with beam induced secondary electron trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte-Borchers, Martina, E-mail: marschul@phys.ethz.ch; Döbeli, Max; Müller, Arnold Milenko; George, Matthias; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2016-08-01

    A new Time-of-flight MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) setup was developed to be used with a capillary microprobe for molecular imaging with heavy primary ions at MeV energies. Due to the low output current of the ion collimating capillary a Time-of-flight (ToF) measurement method with high duty cycle is necessary. Secondary electrons from the sample surface and transmitted ions were studied as start signals. They enable measurements with a continuous primary beam and unpulsed ToF spectrometer. Tests with various primary ion beams and sample types have shown that a secondary electron signal is obtained from 30% to 40% of incident MeV particles. This provides a ToF start signal with considerably better time resolution than the one obtained from transmitted primary ions detected in a radiation hard gas ionization detector. Beam induced secondary electrons therefore allow for MeV-SIMS measurements with reasonable mass resolution at primary ion beam currents in the low fA range.

  14. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongliang; Tang, Jihua; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping; Tian, Shuangqi

    2009-08-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism.

  15. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X-band choke-mode cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The X-band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns.

  16. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X -band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  17. Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-07-17

    This paper presents a summary of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector and discusses methods to tag and remove background contaminated events in data. Trigger-rate based monitoring of beam-related backgrounds is presented. The correlations of backgrounds with machine conditions, such as residual pressure in the beam-pipe, are discussed. Results from dedicated beam-background simulations are shown, and their qualitative agreement with data is evaluated. Data taken during the passage of unpaired, i.e. non-colliding, proton bunches is used to obtain background-enriched data samples. These are used to identify characteristic features of beam-induced backgrounds, which then are exploited to develop dedicated background tagging tools. These tools, based on observables in the Pixel detector, the muon spectrometer and the calorimeters, are described in detail and their efficiencies are evaluated. Finally an example of an application of these techniques to a monojet analysis is given, which demonstra...

  18. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  19. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  20. In situ transmission electron microscopy analysis of electron beam induced crystallization of amorphous marks in phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.; Pieterson, L. van; Verheijen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallization of amorphous data marks in crystalline Ga 15 Sb 85 and Ge,In doped SbTe phase-change material was studied in situ in a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Electron irradiation induced crystallization was obtained at room temperature using a 120 kV beam. In general, electron beam (e - beam) induced crystallization started from the amorphous-crystalline interface and was growth dominated for both materials. A dependence of growth velocity on electron beam intensity and crystal direction was observed. A comparison with laser-crystallized amorphous marks was made. For laser-induced crystallization also crystal growth from the amorphous-crystalline interface was seen. However, differences in morphology between the e - -beam and laser-recrystallized data marks of the GaSb phase-change material were observed. The electron beam erased data marks contained crystals with (extremely) large periodicities found in three dimensions. For the Ge,In doped SbTe phase-change material identical morphologies were observed for the e - -beam and laser-recrystallized data marks. Both methods that induce crystallization displayed a rhombohedral Sb structure, the same structure as the laser-crystallized surroundings

  1. Effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene non-woven fabric induced by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Young; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric induced by electron beam. The electron beam irradiations on PP non-woven fabric were carried out over a range of irradiation doses from 25 to 100 kGy to make free radicals on fabric surface. The radical measurement was established by electron spin resonance (ESR) for confirming the changes of the alkyl radical and peroxy radical according to effect of storage time, storage temperature and atmosphere. It was observed that the free radicals were increased with irradiation dose and decreased with storage time due to the continuous oxidation. However, the radical extinction was significantly delayed due to reduced mobility of radicals at extremely low temperature. The degree of graft based on the analysis of ESR was investigated. The conditions of graft reaction were set at a temperature: 60 degrees Celcius, reaction time: 6 hours and styrene monomer concentration: 20 wt%

  2. Modification of some properties of polyamide-6 by electron beam induced grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timus, D.M.; Cincu, C.; Bradley, D.A.; Craciun, G.; Mateescu, E.

    2000-01-01

    Electron irradiation, applied on its own or in combination with other physical and chemical treatments, can result in radiation damage to materials. One category of such pursuits is electron beam radiation processing technologies, the intent being to produce favourable modification of materials. Study has been made herein of the use of accelerator-generated electron beams for the induced grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acids and acrylamide onto polyamide-6, the latter being popularly used in the textiles industry. Samples of polyamide-6, in the form of rectangular sheets of dimension, 10 cm x 10 cm or granules, have been irradiated using a 3 GHz travelling wave electron accelerator of energy 6.5 MeV. Results show that the degree of grafting is dependent upon radiation dose and extent of monomers dilution. Modifications have been observed in the melting temperature of the crystalline phase, glass transition temperature, mechanical parameters and the reticulation of polyamide

  3. High resolution laser beam induced current focusing for photoactive surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Lorenzo, C. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)]. E-mail: concha.fernandez@uca.es; Poce-Fatou, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alcantara, R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Navas, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Martin, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    The micro-characterization of several surface properties of the solar cells can be accomplished using high-resolution laser beam induced current images. For obtaining these images, a very precise laser beam focusing on the photoactive surface is required. For this purpose, a methodology for obtaining the best focalization associated to the maximum of a peak curve has been developed. In this paper, a data set, obtained from the inner photoconversion properties of the system, has been evaluated with three different numerical analysis techniques: (a) derivative (b) length and (c) Fourier Transform, in order to get the finest possible peak distribution. Then, an amount of 13 analytical peak curves using the Levenberg Marquardt algorithm to find the best curve that adjusts the data distribution have been analyzed.

  4. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett B. Lewis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IVMe3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  5. Analysis of art objects by means of ion beam induced luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, A; Dran, J C; Salomon, J; Pivin, J C; Vomiero, A; Tonezzer, M; Maggioni, G; Carturan, S; Mea, G Della

    2006-01-01

    The impact of energetic ions on solid samples gives rise to the emission of visible light owing to the electronic excitation of intrinsic defects or extrinsic impurities. The intensity and position of the emission features provide information on the nature of the luminescence centers and on their chemical environments. This makes ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) a useful complement to other ion beam analyses, like PIXE, in the cultural heritage field in characterizing the composition and the provenience of art objects. In the present paper, IBIL measurements have been performed on inorganic pigments for underlying the complementary role played by IBIL in the analysis of artistic works. Some blue and red pigment has been presented as case study

  6. Effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene non-woven fabric induced by electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Young; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun [Radiation Research Dvision for Industry and Environment, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we fabricated effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric induced by electron beam. The electron beam irradiations on PP non-woven fabric were carried out over a range of irradiation doses from 25 to 100 kGy to make free radicals on fabric surface. The radical measurement was established by electron spin resonance (ESR) for confirming the changes of the alkyl radical and peroxy radical according to effect of storage time, storage temperature and atmosphere. It was observed that the free radicals were increased with irradiation dose and decreased with storage time due to the continuous oxidation. However, the radical extinction was significantly delayed due to reduced mobility of radicals at extremely low temperature. The degree of graft based on the analysis of ESR was investigated. The conditions of graft reaction were set at a temperature: 60 degrees Celcius, reaction time: 6 hours and styrene monomer concentration: 20 wt%.

  7. DNA damage and chromosome aberration induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kahoru; Funada, Aya; Aoki, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human cells (human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells and GM05389 human normal fibroblasts) irradiated with heavy ion beams on the basis of linear energy transfer (LET) values. The LET dependences of cell death were observed for the both cells by the method of colony assay. The LET dependences of the chromosomal aberrations, breaks and gaps, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were also observed for the both cells using the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. From these results it is suggested that exchange formation is essential for the cell death caused by heavy ion beam irradiation. It is suspected that the densely ionizing track structure of hight LET heavy ions inhibits the effective repair in the chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks and finally induce much exchange in the cells, which should be essential cause of cell death. (author)

  8. Electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of amorphous solid phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Wu, Liangcai; Wen, Lin; Ma, Liya; Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Song, Zhitang

    2018-04-01

    The electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of phase change materials in a nano sized area was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Amorphous phase change materials changed to a polycrystalline state after being irradiated with a 200 kV electron beam for a long time. The results indicate that the crystallization temperature strongly depends on the difference in the heteronuclear bond enthalpy of the phase change materials. The selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that Ge2Sb2Te5 is a nucleation-dominated material, when Si2Sb2Te3 and Ti0.5Sb2Te3 are growth-dominated materials.

  9. Optical beam induced current measurements: principles and applications to SiC device characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynaud, Christophe; Nguyen, Duy-Minh; Dheilly, Nicolas; Tournier, Dominique; Brosselard, Pierre; Lazar, Mihai; Planson, Dominique [Ampere Laboratory UMR CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-10-15

    This paper deals with the characterization of SiC devices by optical beam induced currents (OBIC). OBIC is a technique that measures a photocurrent in response to a fine UV laser beam that is scanned laterally over the surface of the device. In this way a number of important material and device parameters can be derived. We concentrate here on three aspects, the field profile in reverse biased diodes with particular emphasis on field terminating issues at the device edges under high reverse voltages; the minority carrier lifetimes in 6H-SiC; and the determination of ionization coefficients for electrons and holes in 6H-SiC. The latter are important material parameters for the modelling of high power devices and determine their break-through voltage. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Epitaxial semiconductor quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Chen, Y H; Wang, Z G

    2008-07-01

    The investigation on the direct epitaxial quantum wires (QWR) using MBE or MOCVD has been persuited for more than two decades, more lengthy in history as compared with its quantum dot counterpart. Up to now, QWRs with various structural configurations have been produced with different growth methods. This is a reviewing article consisting mainly of two parts. The first part discusses QWRs of various configurations, together with laser devices based on them, in terms of the two growth mechanisms, self-ordering and self-assembling. The second part gives a brief review of the electrical and optical properties of QWRs.

  11. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium; Ionenstrahlinduzierte Strukturmodifikationen in amorphem Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-05-03

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy {epsilon}{sub n} deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 {mu}m thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of {epsilon}{sub e}{sup HRF}=(10.5{+-}1.0) kev nm{sup -1} was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation {epsilon}{sub e}{sup S{sub a}}=(12{+-}2) keV nm{sup -1} for the first

  12. Parallel nanogap fabrication with nanometer size control using III-V semiconductor epitaxial technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-MartInez, Ivan; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Briones, Fernando [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8 PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: ivan@imm.cnm.csic.es

    2008-07-09

    A nanogap fabrication process using strained epitaxial III-V beams is reported. The process is highly reproducible, allowing parallel fabrication and nanogap size control. The beams are fabricated from MBE-grown (GaAs/GaP)/AlGaAs strained heterostructures, standard e-beam lithography and wet etching. During the wet etching process, the relaxation of the accumulated stress at the epitaxial heterostructure produces a controlled beam breakage at the previously defined beam notch. After the breakage, the relaxed strain is proportional to the beam length, allowing nanogap size control. The starting structure is similar to a mechanically adjustable break junction but the stress causing the breakage is, in this case, built into the beam. This novel technique should be useful for molecular-scale electronic devices.

  13. Cylindrical shock waves and dynamic phenomena induced in solids by intense proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertarelli, Alessandro; Carra, Federico; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Guinchard, Michael; Mariani, Nicola; Peroni, Lorenzo; Redaelli, Stefano; Scapin, Martina

    2013-06-01

    The accidental impact of hadron beams on matter can induce intense shockwaves along with complex dynamic phenomena (phase transitions, extended density changes, explosions and fragment projections). These events have been successfully modeled resorting to wave propagation codes; to produce accurate results, however, these programs require reliable material constitutive models that are often scarce and inaccurate. A complex and innovative experiment was carried out at CERN to benchmark existing material constitutive models and possibly derive new ones. The test setup, aimed at the characterization of six different materials impacted by 440 GeV intense proton pulses, allowed to generate cylindrical shockwaves on material specimens and to observe the effects induced by their propagation. This method, a combination between numerical simulations and an experimental technique, permitting to tune the intensity, location and timing of the beam-deposited energy, may allow to study the effects induced by internal, quasi-instantaneous loadings in domains well beyond particle physics (accidents in nuclear facilities, internal explosions, high pressure blasts etc.), particularly when relatively little explored cylindrical shockwaves are generated. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission under the FP7 Research Infrastructures project EuCARD, grant agreement no. 227579.

  14. Improved single particle potential for transport model simulations of nuclear reactions induced by rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account more accurately the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the in-medium many-body force term of the Gogny effective interaction, new expressions for the single-nucleon potential and the symmetry energy are derived. Effects of both the spin (isospin) and the density dependence of nuclear effective interactions on the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy are examined. It is shown that they both play a crucial role in determining the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities. The improved single-nucleon potential will be useful for more accurate simulation of nuclear reactions induced by rare-isotope beams within transport models.

  15. Radiation induced synthesis of gold/iron-oxide composite nanoparticles using high-energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kojima, Takao; Taniguci, Ryoichi; Okuda, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2008-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of gold and iron oxide were synthesized in aqueous solution systems by using a high-energy electron beam. The electron irradiation induces radiation-chemical reaction to form metallic gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles. Surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles are almost fully coated with fine gold nanoparticles. The size of these gold nanoparticles depended on the concentrations of gold ions, polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in the solutions before the irradiation.

  16. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  17. Ion desorption induced by charged particle beams: mechanisms and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, E.F. da; Schweikert, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis, through desorption, induced by fast particles, is presented and discussed. The stopping of projectils is essentially made by collisions with the target electrons. The desorbed particles are generally emmited with kinetic energy from 0.1 to 20 eV. Mass, charge, velocity and emission angle give information about the surface components, its structure as well as beam-solid interaction processes. Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of desorbed ions, determine the mass of organic macromolecules and biomolecules. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  18. Substrate induced tuning of compressive strain and phonon modes in large area MoS2 and WS2 van der Waals epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rajib; Radhakrishnan, Dhanya; Vishal, Badri; Negi, Devendra Singh; Sil, Anomitra; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Datta, Ranjan

    2017-07-01

    Large area MoS2 and WS2 van der Waals epitaxial thin films with control over number of layers including monolayer is grown by pulsed laser deposition utilizing slower growth kinetics. The films grown on c-plane sapphire show stiffening of A1g and E12g phonon modes with decreasing number of layers for both MoS2 and WS2. The observed stiffening translate into the compressive strain of 0.52% & 0.53% with accompanying increase in fundamental direct band gap to 1.74 and 1.68 eV for monolayer MoS2 and WS2, respectively. The strain decays with the number of layers. HRTEM imaging directly reveals the nature of atomic registry of van der Waals layers with the substrate and the associated compressive strain. The results demonstrate a practical route to stabilize and engineer strain for this class of material over large area device fabrication.

  19. Magneto-Transport Characterization Of E-Beam-Induced Damage In GaAs-AlGaAs Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Tobin; Smith, Doran D.; Braddock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of electron irradiation as a function of energy on the 2D EG transport properties of high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures at liquid helium temperature was measured. High mobility HEMT structures were molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown with a 2D EG channel approximately 850 A below the surface. A Cambridge EBMF 10.5 was used for electron irradiation with electron energies between 2.5 and 20 keV. The HEMT structures were fabricated into Hall bar geometry. Damage is assessed by changes in the 2D EG concentrations, as determined from Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations in a magnetic field from 0 to 8.5 Telsa, and changes in the zero field Hall mobilities. For electron energies from 5.0 to 12.5 keV, the electron dose produced a degradation of the Hall mobility. No -damage effect was observed for electron energies at 2.5 keV and 15 keV and above. This result could be attributed to the penetration depth and damage distribution. Electron damage introduced parallel conduction which was exhibited in the magnetoresistance curves. The results of this work will be useful in reducing damage from electron beam proCessing of submicron devices.

  20. Gamma and electron beam radiation induced physico-chemical modifications of poly(propylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoubi, N.; Peron, R.; Legendre, B.; Grossiord, J. L.; Ferrier, D.

    1999-05-01

    The homopolymer PP, a plastic material used as packaging and for medical products, must be subjected to a form of sterilization. Nowadays, one kind of this technology uses ionising radiation, which can be γ-rays or electron beams. In order to study the structural modifications of polymer syringes which could occur following these treatments at different doses (25-150 kGy), several analytical techniques have been used. DSC provided information on changes in the cristallinity of the polymer. The thermal evaluation was supplemented by testing the rheological properties of polypropylene. In addition, Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with a quaternary elution gradient was carried out for the evaluation of the degradation of the additives. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared (TGA/FTIR) was used to measure the desorption of food simulating liquid (CH 2Cl 2). First, the results obtained proved that the γ-rays as well as the electron beam induced degradation of the polymer and its additives. Next, we compared the effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation to determine which of these two processes better maintained the integrity of the irradiated product.