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Sample records for beam induced current

  1. Soft X-ray beam induced current technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, B; Ade, H [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Queen, D; Hellman, F [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kilcoyne, A L D; Tyliszczak, T, E-mail: benjamin.watts@gmail.co [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Direct mapping of the charge transport efficiency of polymer solar cell devices using a soft X-ray beam induced current (SoXBIC) method is described. By fabricating a polymer solar cell on an x-ray transparent substrate, we demonstrate the ability to map polymer composition and nanoscale structure within an operating solar cell device and to simultaneously measure the local charge transport efficiency via the short-circuit current. A simple model is calculated and compared to experimental SoXBIC data of a PFB:F8BT bulk-heterojunction device in order to gain greater insight into the device operation and physics.

  2. Optical beam induced current microscopy at DC and radio frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fu-Jen

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept and technique of optical beam induced current (OBIC) generation at radio frequencies. The method is combined with lateral raster scanning of a tightly focused spot so as to generate a mapping of high spatial resolution. We demonstrate experimentally that if a mode-locked laser is used to excite the sample then the frequency transfer function of the optically active device is readily obtained with at least 1 µm spatial resolution, in real time. In addition, with the help of an appropriate electronic arrangement, we demonstrate how to obtain pseudocolored OBIC images of the sample.

  3. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  4. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  5. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  6. High resolution laser beam induced current focusing for photoactive surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Lorenzo, C. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)]. E-mail: concha.fernandez@uca.es; Poce-Fatou, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alcantara, R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Navas, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Martin, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apartado de Correos 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    The micro-characterization of several surface properties of the solar cells can be accomplished using high-resolution laser beam induced current images. For obtaining these images, a very precise laser beam focusing on the photoactive surface is required. For this purpose, a methodology for obtaining the best focalization associated to the maximum of a peak curve has been developed. In this paper, a data set, obtained from the inner photoconversion properties of the system, has been evaluated with three different numerical analysis techniques: (a) derivative (b) length and (c) Fourier Transform, in order to get the finest possible peak distribution. Then, an amount of 13 analytical peak curves using the Levenberg Marquardt algorithm to find the best curve that adjusts the data distribution have been analyzed.

  7. Optical beam induced current measurements: principles and applications to SiC device characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynaud, Christophe; Nguyen, Duy-Minh; Dheilly, Nicolas; Tournier, Dominique; Brosselard, Pierre; Lazar, Mihai; Planson, Dominique [Ampere Laboratory UMR CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-10-15

    This paper deals with the characterization of SiC devices by optical beam induced currents (OBIC). OBIC is a technique that measures a photocurrent in response to a fine UV laser beam that is scanned laterally over the surface of the device. In this way a number of important material and device parameters can be derived. We concentrate here on three aspects, the field profile in reverse biased diodes with particular emphasis on field terminating issues at the device edges under high reverse voltages; the minority carrier lifetimes in 6H-SiC; and the determination of ionization coefficients for electrons and holes in 6H-SiC. The latter are important material parameters for the modelling of high power devices and determine their break-through voltage. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Dian; Tang, Guangze; Ma, Xinxin; Gu, Le; Sun, Mingren; Wang, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm 2 . Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm 2 ) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation

  9. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  10. High resolution laser beam induced current images under trichromatic laser radiation: approximation to the solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, F J; Alcántara, R; Fernández-Lorenzo, C; Martín-Calleja, J

    2010-03-01

    A laser beam induced current (LBIC) map of a photoactive surface is a very useful tool when it is necessary to study the spatial variability of properties such as photoconverter efficiency or factors connected with the recombination of carriers. Obtaining high spatial resolution LBIC maps involves irradiating the photoactive surface with a photonic beam with Gaussian power distribution and with a low dispersion coefficient. Laser emission fulfils these characteristics, but against it is the fact that it is highly monochromatic and therefore has a spectral distribution different to solar emissions. This work presents an instrumental system and procedure to obtain high spatial resolution LBIC maps in conditions approximating solar irradiation. The methodology developed consists of a trichromatic irradiation system based on three sources of laser excitation with emission in the red, green, and blue zones of the electromagnetic spectrum. The relative irradiation powers are determined by either solar spectrum distribution or Planck's emission formula which provides information approximate to the behavior of the system if it were under solar irradiation. In turn, an algorithm and a procedure have been developed to be able to form images based on the scans performed by the three lasers, providing information about the photoconverter efficiency of photovoltaic devices under the irradiation conditions used. This system has been checked with three photosensitive devices based on three different technologies: a commercial silicon photodiode, a commercial photoresistor, and a dye-sensitized solar cell. These devices make it possible to check how the superficial quantum efficiency has areas dependent upon the excitation wavelength while it has been possible to measure global incident photon-to-current efficiency values approximating those that would be obtained under irradiation conditions with sunlight.

  11. Study on Nanostructures Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four techniques using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB were proposed to obtain surface nanostructure of metal and alloys. The first method involves the distribution of several fine Mg nanoparticles on the top surface of treated samples by evaporation of pure Mg with low boiling point. The second technique uses superfast heating, melting, and cooling induced by HCPEB irradiation to refine the primary phase or the second phase in alloys to nanosized uniform distributed phases in the matrix, such as the quasicrystal phase Mg30Zn60Y10 in the quasicrystal alloy Mg67Zn30Y3. The third technique involves the refinement of eutectic silicon phase in hypereutectic Al-15Si alloys to fine particles with the size of several nanometers through solid solution and precipitation refinement. Finally, in the deformation zone induced by HCPEB irradiation, the grain size can be refined to several hundred nanometers, such as the grain size of the hypereutectic Al-15Si alloys in the deformation zone, which can reach ~400 nm after HCPEB treatment for 25 pulses. Therefore, HCPEB technology is an efficient way to obtain surface nanostructure.

  12. Beam current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  13. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe

  14. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  15. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Myung-Geun, E-mail: mghan@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Garlow, Joseph A. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marshall, Matthew S.J.; Tiano, Amanda L. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) are demonstrated in STEM mode combined with in situ electrical biasing in a TEM. • Electrostatic potential maps in ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC data. • Simultaneous EBIC and active SE-VC performed with atomic resolution STEM are demonstrated. - Abstract: The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fields and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.

  16. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L.; Stone, Jon M.; Krantz, Patrick W.; Royston, John M.; Zeller, Ryan M.; Mapes, Meghan R.; Roland, Paul J.; Dorogi, Mark D.; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T.; Ellingson, Randy J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm2) can be produced in a ˜40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm2) to full modules (1 m2). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  17. Optical beam induced current measurements based on two-photon absorption process in 4H-SiC bipolar diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, H.; Raynaud, C.; Bevilacqua, P.; Tournier, D.; Planson, D. [Ampère Laboratory - UMR 5005, 21, Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Vergne, B. [Franco-Allemand Institute of Saint-Louis ISL, 5, Rue du Général Cassagnou, 68300 Saint-Louis (France)

    2014-02-24

    Using a pulsed green laser with a wavelength of 532 nm, a duration pulse of ∼1 ns, and a mean power varying between 1 and 100 mW, induced photocurrents have been measured in 4H-SiC bipolar diodes. Considering the photon energy (2.33 eV) and the bandgap of 4H-SiC (3.2 eV), the generation of electron-hole pair by the conventional single photon absorption process should be negligible. The intensity of the measured photocurrents depends quadratically on the power beam intensity. This clearly shows that they are generated using two-photon absorption process. As in conventional OBIC (Optical Beam Induced Current), the measurements give an image of the electric field distribution in the structure under test, and the minority carrier lifetime can be extracted from the decrease of the photocurrent at the edge of the structure. The extracted minority carrier lifetime of 210 ns is consistent with results obtained in case of single photon absorption.

  18. Optical beam induced current measurements based on two-photon absorption process in 4H-SiC bipolar diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, H.; Raynaud, C.; Bevilacqua, P.; Tournier, D.; Planson, D.; Vergne, B.

    2014-01-01

    Using a pulsed green laser with a wavelength of 532 nm, a duration pulse of ∼1 ns, and a mean power varying between 1 and 100 mW, induced photocurrents have been measured in 4H-SiC bipolar diodes. Considering the photon energy (2.33 eV) and the bandgap of 4H-SiC (3.2 eV), the generation of electron-hole pair by the conventional single photon absorption process should be negligible. The intensity of the measured photocurrents depends quadratically on the power beam intensity. This clearly shows that they are generated using two-photon absorption process. As in conventional OBIC (Optical Beam Induced Current), the measurements give an image of the electric field distribution in the structure under test, and the minority carrier lifetime can be extracted from the decrease of the photocurrent at the edge of the structure. The extracted minority carrier lifetime of 210 ns is consistent with results obtained in case of single photon absorption

  19. Tutorial on beam current monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a tutorial level review covering a wide range of aspects related to charged particle beam current measurement. The tutorial begins with a look at the characteristics of the beam as a signal source, the associated electromagnetic fields, the influence of the typical accelerator environment on those fields, and the usual means of modifying and controlling that environment to facilitate beam current measurement. Short descriptions of three quite different types of current monitors are presented and a quantitative review of the classical transformer circuit is given. Recognizing that environmental noise pick-up may present a large source of error in quantitative measurements, signal handling considerations are given considerable attention using real-life examples. An example of a successful transport line beam current monitor implementation is presented and the tutorial concludes with a few comments about signal processing and current monitor calibration issues

  20. Detection and characterization of stacking faults by light beam induced current mapping and scanning infrared microscopy in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vève-Fossati, C.; Martinuzzi, S.

    1998-08-01

    Non destructive techniques like scanning infrared microscopy and light beam induced current mapping are used to reveal the presence of stacking faults in heat treated Czochralski grown silicon wafers. In oxidized or contaminated samples, scanning infrared microscopy reveals that stacking faults grow around oxygen precipitates. This could be due to an aggregation of silicon self-interstitials emitted by the growing precipitates in the (111) plane. Light beam induced current maps show that the dislocations which surround the stacking faults are the main source of recombination centers, especially when they are decorated by a fast diffuser like copper. Des techniques non destructives telles que la microscopie infrarouge à balayage et la cartographie de photocourant induit par un spot lumineux ont été utilisées pour révéler la présence de fautes d'empilement après traitements thermiques, dans des plaquettes de silicium préparées par tirage Czochralski. Dans des échantillons oxydés ou contaminés, la microscopie infrarouge à balayage révèle des fautes d'empilement qui se développent autour des précipités d'oxygène. Cela peut être dû à la formation d'un agglomérat d'auto-interstitiels de silicium émis par la croissance des précipités dans les plans (111). Les cartographies de photocourant montrent que les dislocations qui entourent les fautes d'empilement sont la principale source de centres de recombinaison, et cela tout particulièrement quand ces fautes sont décorées par un diffuseur rapide tel que le cuivre.

  1. Digitally compensated beam current transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesselman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is being built by a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors (BCMs) will be used to record the current of H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60A fully accumulated in the Ring and dumped to the load as a single pulse in the Ring to Beam Target (RTBT). The time structure of these beams ranges from 645 ns 'mini' bunches at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 ms long macro-pulse. The requirements for the BCMs will depend upon their location within the system. The need to measure individual mini-pulses, examine the characteristics of the chopper edge, as well as the longer average current pulse of the macropulse, or long duration pulses during Linac tuning place wide requirements upon the response of current transformers. To obtain the desired accuracy and resolution, current transformers must have <1 ns rise time and droops of 0.1%/ms. This places a significant design burden on the current transformer; such a design is almost impossible to achieve. Extremely large expensive cores are needed to meet the low droop, while leakage inductance increases with size, thereby reducing the achievable rise time. In this paper, I discuss a digital compensation approach [M. Kesselman, Spallation neutron source beam current monitor electronics, PAC2001 June 18-22, 2001, Chicago, IL.] that extends the lower cut-off frequency of the current transformer, optimized for high frequency response, so that it can be used in this application with improvements in droop of the order of 1000:1. Transformer saturation (current-time product) is a separate issue and the transformer must be designed to handle the current-time product of the signal to assure it does not saturate

  2. High current DC ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubaly, M.R.; de Jong, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Development of high-current cw accelerators such as ZEBRA and FMIT, use of high current dc ion beams in industry for sputtering and material treatment, and scientific applications such as heavy-ion fusion and plasma physics diagnostics have provided the impetus for ion source development programs at many laboratories. At Chalk River, development of efficient plasma generators and reliable extraction columns to provide high quality beams of hydrogen, nitrogen, argon and xenon is underway. DC beams of up to 850 mA (limited by available power supplies) of hydrogen, 200 mA of nitrogen, 155 mA of argon and 100 mA of xenon have been produced with good reliability. DuoPIGatrons, with and without magnetic cusps, are used to generate a high density, reasonably quiescent plasma. Multi-aperture accel-decel columns are used for extraction with shaped apertures and beamlet steering to improve beam quality. This paper describes the performance of these sources and identifies some of the remaining problems. Guidelines for extraction column design, and experience with transporting high current beams are also presented

  3. A beam position monitor for low current dc beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adderley, P.; Barry, W.; Heefner, J.; Kloeppel, P.; Rossmanith, R.; Wise, M.; Jachim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The 4 GeV recirculating linac, CEBAF, if presently under construction and will produce a CW beam with average current between.1 and 200 μA. In order to measure beam position, the beam current will be amplitude modulated at a frequency of 10 MHz. The modulation is detected by an inductive loop type monitor with electronics sensitive only to the modulation frequency. The first test with beam from the CEBAF injector indicate that beam position can be measured with an accuracy of .1 mm at a modulated beam current of 1 μA. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua; Ma, Xinxin; Wang, Liqin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ta alloying layer are fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam. • Nano-scaled TaC precipitates forms within the δ-Fe grain after tempering treatment. • The mean diameter of TaC particles is about 5–8 nm. • The hardness of alloying layer increased by over 50% after formation of nano-scaled TaC particle. - Abstract: In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5–8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  5. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin, E-mail: maxin@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ta alloying layer are fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam. • Nano-scaled TaC precipitates forms within the δ-Fe grain after tempering treatment. • The mean diameter of TaC particles is about 5–8 nm. • The hardness of alloying layer increased by over 50% after formation of nano-scaled TaC particle. - Abstract: In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5–8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  6. The effect of electron range on electron beam induced current collection and a simple method to extract an electron range for any generation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahreche, A.; Beggah, Y.; Corkish, R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electron range on electron beam induced current (EBIC) is demonstrated and the problem of the choice of the optimal electron ranges to use with simple uniform and point generation function models is resolved by proposing a method to extract an electron range-energy relationship (ERER). The results show that the use of these extracted electron ranges remove the previous disagreement between the EBIC curves computed with simple forms of generation model and those based on a more realistic generation model. The impact of these extracted electron ranges on the extraction of diffusion length, surface recombination velocity and EBIC contrast of defects is discussed. It is also demonstrated that, for the case of uniform generation, the computed EBIC current is independent of the assumed shape of the generation volume. -- Highlights: → Effect of electron ranges on modeling electron beam induced current is shown. → A method to extract an electron range for simple form of generation is proposed. → For uniform generation the EBIC current is independent of the choice of it shape. → Uses of the extracted electron ranges remove some existing literature ambiguity.

  7. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, S.Z., E-mail: ebeam@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Xu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin 123000 (China); Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T. [Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Dong, C. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)

    2013-11-15

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC{sub 1−x}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 9}C{sub 4}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 3}C phases and graphite precipitate domains ∼50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ∼0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10{sup −5} mm{sup 3}/min to 6.3 × 10{sup −6} mm{sup 3}/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  8. Multigigahertz beam-current and position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.L.; Stout, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    A self-integrating magnetic-loop device having a risetime of less than 175 ps has been developed to monitor the temporal behavior of the electron beam current and position within each 3.3-ns micropulse generated by the PHERMEX rf linear accelerator. Beam current is measured with a 2-GHz bandwidth by combining these loops in a four-port hybrid summer. Another application of these loops uses two 180 0 hybrids to give 2-GHz time-resolved beam position to an accuracy of 1 mm. These sensors are nonintrusive to the propagating beam and allow ultrafast beam measurements previously restricted to the technique of recording the Cerenkov-light emission from an intercepting Kapton foil using a streak camera

  9. Beam Induced Pressure Rise at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Y; Bai, Mei; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Gullotta, Justin; He, Ping; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Peggs, Steve; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smart, Loralie; Snydstrup, Louis; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Zeno, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Beam induced pressure rise in RHIC warm sections is currently one of the machine intensity and luminosity limits. This pressure rise is mainly due to electron cloud effects. The RHIC warm section electron cloud is associated with longer bunch spacings compared with other machines, and is distributed non-uniformly around the ring. In addition to the countermeasures for normal electron cloud, such as the NEG coated pipe, solenoids, beam scrubbing, bunch gaps, and larger bunch spacing, other studies and beam tests toward the understanding and counteracting RHIC warm electron cloud are of interest. These include the ion desorption studies and the test of anti-grazing ridges. For high bunch intensities and the shortest bunch spacings, pressure rises at certain locations in the cryogenic region have been observed during the past two runs. Beam studies are planned for the current 2005 run and the results will be reported.

  10. Investigation of rough surfaces on Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4 monograin layers using light beam induced current measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Christian; Babatas, Ertug; Meissner, Dieter

    2017-11-01

    Monograin technology has proven to be a successful way of manufacturing low cost photovoltaic applications using the pentanary Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4 (CZTSSe) as an absorber material in an industrial roll-to-roll process. For high efficient CZTSSe monograin device fabrication a thorough understanding of the impacts of the device characteristics and surface structure is important. A new evaluation method of Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) images had to be developed to distinguish between different effects resulting from different surface orientations, grain sizes, packing densities and contacting areas. In this work we will show that with LBIC measurements it is possible to evaluate the quality and differences in produced CZTSSe monograin cells in a post-production and non-destructive step. The high spatial resolution evaluation allows investigating the homogeneity of single crystalline grains as well as certain areas of a CZTSSe device. By introducing a statistical method the active area as a major factor for the current density of a device will be calculated and evaluated. The results show that with LBIC measurements the active area can be quantified, which differs for the investigated cells up to 9%. Additionally, the homogeneity of short circuit current densities of the monograins and also of certain areas of a cell can be detected and quantified.

  11. Absolute beam current monitoring in endstation c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochna, C.

    1995-01-01

    The first few experiments at CEBAF require approximately 1% absolute measurements of beam currents expected to range from 10-25μA. This represents errors of 100-250 nA. The initial complement of beam current monitors are of the non intercepting type. CEBAF accelerator division has provided a stripline monitor and a cavity monitor, and the authors have installed an Unser monitor (parametric current transformer or PCT). After calibrating the Unser monitor with a precision current reference, the authors plan to transfer this calibration using CW beam to the stripline monitors and cavity monitors. It is important that this be done fairly rapidly because while the gain of the Unser monitor is quite stable, the offset may drift on the order of .5μA per hour. A summary of what the authors have learned about the linearity, zero drift, and gain drift of each type of current monitor will be presented

  12. Noise reduction in the beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki.

    1982-02-01

    A simple noise reduction system using a pulse transformer and a pair of L C low pass filters has been introduced to the beam current monitor of a current transformer type at the INS electron linac. With this system, the pick-up noise has been reduced to be 1% of the noise without noise reduction. Signal deformation caused by this system is relatively small and the beam current pulse down to 20 mA is successfully monitored in the actual accelerator operation. (author)

  13. FMIT direct-current beam monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brousseau, A.T.; Chamberlin, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype injector section for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory requires that beam parameters be noninterceptively monitored. This report describes the application of a single toroidal core, coupled with very simple circuitry, that results in the production of a simple instrument, and eliminates the problems inherent in the Faraday cup technique for the current measurements of the FMIT injector beam

  14. Correlation between morphological defects, electron beam-induced current imaging, and the electrical properties of 4H-SiC Schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Ali, G.N.; Mikhov, M.K.; Vaidyanathan, V.; Skromme, B.J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Defects in SiC degrade the electrical properties and yield of devices made from this material. This article examines morphological defects in 4H-SiC and defects visible in electron beam-induced current (EBIC) images and their effects on the electrical characteristics of Schottky diodes. Optical Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the morphological defects, which are classified into 26 types based on appearance alone. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics were used to extract barrier heights, ideality factors, and breakdown voltages. Barrier heights decrease about linearly with increasing ideality factor, which is explained by discrete patches of low barrier height within the main contact. Barrier height, ideality, and breakdown voltage all degrade with increasing device diameter, suggesting that discrete defects are responsible. Electroluminescence was observed under reverse bias from microplasmas associated with defects containing micropipes. EBIC measurements reveal several types of features corresponding to recombination centers. The density of dark spots observed by EBIC correlates strongly with ideality factor and barrier height. Most morphological defects do not affect the reverse characteristics when no micropipes are present, but lower the barrier height and worsen the ideality factor. However, certain multiple-tailed defects, irregularly shaped defects and triangular defects with 3C inclusions substantially degrade both breakdown voltage and barrier height, and account for most of the bad devices that do not contain micropipes. Micropipes in these wafers are also frequently found to be of Type II, which do not run parallel to the c axis

  15. Induced current heating probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Ferguson, B.G.; Winstanley, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    An induced current heating probe is of thimble form and has an outer conducting sheath and a water flooded flux-generating unit formed from a stack of ferrite rings coaxially disposed in the sheath. The energising coil is made of solid wire which connects at one end with a coaxial water current tube and at the other end with the sheath. The stack of ferrite rings may include non-magnetic insulating rings which help to shape the flux. (author)

  16. The physics of high current beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    An outline is presented of paraxial charged particle optics in the presence of self-fields arising from the space-charge and current carried by the beam. Solutions of the envelope equations for beams with finite emittance are considered for a number of specific situations, with the approximation that the density profile of the beam is uniform with a sharp edge, so that the focusing remains linear. More realistic beams are then considered, and the problems of matching, emittance growth and stability are discussed. An attempt is made to emphasize physical principles and physical ideas rather than to present the detailed mathematical techniques required for specific problems. The approach is a tutorial one, and several 'exercises' are included in the text. Most of the material is treated in more depth in the author's forthcoming book. (author)

  17. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  18. Beam-current monitor for FMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, D.D.; Brousseau, A.T.

    1981-03-01

    The application of a single toroidal core, coupled with very simple circuitry, that results in the production of a simple instrument, and eliminates the problems inherent in the Faraday cup technique for the current measurements of the FMIT injector beam is described

  19. Beam current monitors at the UNILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, N.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most basic linac operation tools is a beam current transformer. Using outstanding materials, the latest low-noise amplifiers, and some good ideas, a universal current monitoring system has been developed and installed at the UNILAC at GSI. With a dynamic range of 112 dB, covering the low-current range down to 100 nA peak to peak at S/N=1, as well as 25 mA pulses, provided for high-current injection to the SIS synchrotron, a well-accepted diagnostic instrument could be placed at the disposal of the operaters

  20. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed

  1. Pulsed high current ion beam processing equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Perry, A.

    1995-01-01

    A pulsed high voltage ion source is considered for use in ion beam processing for the surface modification of materials, and deposition of conducting films on different substrates. The source consists of an Arkad'ev-Marx high voltage generator, a vacuum ion diode based on explosive ion emission, and a vacuum chamber as substrate holder. The ion diode allows conducting films to be deposited from metal or allow sources, with ion beam mixing, onto substrates held at a pre-selected temperature. The main variables can be set in the ranges: voltage 100-700 kV, pulse length 0.3 μs, beam current 1-200 A depending on the ion chosen. The applications of this technology are discussed in semiconductor, superconductor and metallizing applications as well as the direction of future development and cost of these devices for commercial application. 14 refs., 6 figs

  2. Microstructure cantilever beam for current measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T.E. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microelectromechanical systems (MEMS sensors are based on the microcantilever technology, which uses a broad range of design materials and structures. The benefit ofMEMStechnology is in developing devices with a lower cost, lower power consumption, higher performance and greater integration. A free-end cantilever beam with a magnetic material mass has been designed using MEMS software tools. The magnetic material was used to improve the sensitivity of the cantilever beam to an externally-applied magnetic field. The cantilever was designed to form a capacitance transducer, which consisted of variable capacitance where electrical and mechanical energies were exchanged. The aim of this paper was to analyse the system design of the microcantilever when subjected to a magnetic field produced by a current-carrying conductor. When the signal, a sinusoidal current with a constant frequency, was applied, the cantilever beam exhibited a vibration motion along the vertical axis when placed closer to the line current. This motion created corresponding capacitance changes and generated a voltage output proportional to the capacitive change in the signal-processing circuitry attached to the microcantilever. The equivalent massspring system theory was used to describe and analyse the effect of the natural frequency of the system vibrations and motion due to the applied magnetic field, in a single-degree of freedom. The main application of this microcantilever is in current measurements to develop a non-contact current sensor mote.

  3. Cryogenic current comparators for precise ion beam current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurian, Febin

    2015-01-01

    The planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI has to cope with a wide range of beam intensities in its high-energy beam transport systems and in the storage rings. To meet the requirements of a non-intercepting intensity measurement down to nA range, it is planned to install a number of Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) units at different locations in the FAIR beamlines. In this work, the first CCC system for intensity measurement of heavy ion beams, which was developed at GSI, was re-commissioned and upgraded to be used as a 'GSI - CCC prototype' for extensive optimization and development of an improved CCC for FAIR. After installation of a new SQUID sensor and related electronics, as well as implementation of improved data acquisition components, successful beam current measurements were performed at a SIS18 extraction line. The measured intensity values were compared with those of a Secondary Electron Monitor (SEM). Furthermore, the spill-structure of a slowly extracted beam was measured and analyzed, investigating its improvement due to bunching during the slow-extraction process. Due to the extreme sensitivity of the superconducting sensor, the determined intensity values as well as the adjustment of the system for optimal performance are strongly influenced by the numerous noise sources of the accelerators environment. For this reason, detailed studies of different effects caused by noise have been carried out, which are presented together with proposals to reduce them. Similarly, studies were performed to increase the dynamic range and overcome slew rate limitations, the results of which are illustrated and discussed as well. By combining the various optimizations and characterizations of the GSI CCC prototype with the experiences made during beam operation, criteria for a more efficient CCC System could be worked out, which are presented in this work. The details of this new design are worked out with respect to the

  4. Precision intercomparison of beam current monitors at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, R.; Dunham, B.; Krafft, G.A.; Legg, R.; Liang, C.; Sinclair, C.; Mamosser, J.

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator delivers a CW electron beam at fundamental 1497 MHz, with average beam current up to 200 μA. Accurate, stable nonintercepting beam current monitors are required for: setup/control, monitoring of beam current and beam losses for machine protection and personnel safety, and providing beam current information to experimental users. Fundamental frequency stainless steel RF cavities have been chosen for these beam current monitors. This paper reports on precision intercomparison between two such RF cavities, an Unser monitor, and two Faraday cups, all located in the injector area. At the low beam energy in the injector, it is straightforward to verify the high efficiency of the Faraday cups, and the Unser monitor included a wire through it to permit an absolute calibration. The cavity intensity monitors have proven capable of stable, high precision monitoring of the beam current

  5. Charge carrier transport in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar-cells studied by electron beam induced current and temperature and illumination dependent current voltage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichterwitz, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This work contributes to the understanding of generation dependent charge-carrier transport properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe)/ CdS/ ZnO solar cells and a consistent model for the electronic band diagram of the heterojunction region of the device is developed. Cross section electron-beam induced current (EBIC) and temperature and illumination dependent current voltage (IV) measurements are performed on CIGSe solar cells with varying absorber layer compositions and CdS thickness. For a better understanding of possibilities and limitations of EBIC measurements applied on CIGSe solar cells, detailed numerical simulations of cross section EBIC profiles for varying electron beam and solar cell parameters are performed and compared to profiles obtained from an analytical description. Especially the effects of high injection conditions are considered. Even though the collection function of the solar cell is not independent of the generation function of the electron beam, the local electron diffusion length in CIGSe can still be extracted. Grain specific values ranging from (480±70) nm to (2.3±0.2) μm are determined for a CuInSe 2 absorber layer and a value of (2.8±0.3) μm for CIGSe with a Ga-content of 0.3. There are several models discussed in literature to explain generation dependent charge carrier transport, all assuming a high acceptor density either located in the CIGSe layer close to the CIGSe/CdS interface (p + layer), within the CdS layer or at the CdS/ZnO interface. In all models, a change in charge carrier collection properties is caused by a generation dependent occupation probability of the acceptor type defect state and the resulting potential distribution throughout the device. Numerical simulations of EBIC and IV data are performed with parameters according to these models. The model that explains the experimental data best is that of a p + layer at the CIGSe/CdS interface and acceptor type defect states at the CdS/ZnO interface. The p + layer leads

  6. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  7. LAMPF experimental-area beam current monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and operational performance of a wide- range current monitor system used to measure charged-particle currents in the experimental areas of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a proton accelerator. The major features of the system are high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and the ability to withstand high levels of radiation. The current pulses detected are from 50 μs to 1 ms in duration at repetition rates of from 1 to 120 Hz. The pulse amplitude varies from 1 μA to 17 mA of protons or H - ions. Both real-time and integrated outputs are available, and the minimum detectable currents are 1 μA at the video output and 50 nA at the integrated output. The basic system is comprised of toroids, preamplifiers, signal conditioners, voltage-to-frequency converters, and digital accumulators. The entire system is spread out over 1 km of beam pipe. Provision is made for calibration and for sending the outputs to remote users. The system is normally controlled by a small digital computer, which allows the system to be quite flexible in operation. The design features of the toroids and the associated electronics are discussed in detail, with emphasis on the steps taken to reduce noise and make the toroids temperature and radiation resistant

  8. Digital DC beam current measurement on SSRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Liang; Yin Chongxian; Liu Ming; Chen Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Both DC current transformer (DCCT) and integrating current transformer (ICT) can be used in DC beam current measurement. The ICT has strong capability of resisting electromagnetic interference, but its measurement accuracy cannot satisfy the DC beam current measurement requirement when using traditional high speed A/D. With high resolution A/D and equivalent sampling system, DC beam current measuring system based on ICT can reach high accuracy compared with DCCT system. In this paper, the ICT-based DC beam current measurement, equivalent sampling method and testing results at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility(SSRF) is described. (authors)

  9. Beam current control system for a high-voltage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razin, G.I.; Val'tman, D.S.; Timofeev, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    A flowsheet of the beam current control system for commercial accelerators is given. Setting and stabilization of a given beam current value are accomplished by the automatic change of a current of a diode electron gun heater or potential of a qrid of three-electrode gun. Beam current coming to an electron-optical converter generates a control signal supplying electron gun. The system operates in the beam current stabilization regime as well as in the radiation dose stabilization regime. The system response amounts to [ru

  10. rf beam-current, -phase, and -position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype rf beam monitor has been tested on the Racetrack Microtron's (RTM) 100 kV injector beam line at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). This beam monitor is capable of measuring the current, the relative phase, and the position of the beam. The beam is bunched at 2380 MHz for acceleration by the linac in the injector beam line. This train of beam bunches passing through the beam monitor cavities excites the cavities at this resonance frequency of 2380 MHz. Probes in the cavities couple some of the beam-excited rf power out of the cavities. This rf power can be amplified if necessary and then analyzed by a double balanced mixer (DBM). The DBM can also be used as a phase detector. The effective shunt impedance of the cavities was measured with the CW beam. For the position monitor cavity, the shunt impedance is proportional to the displacement from the axis. The measured response of the prototype rf beam current monitor setup is a linear function of beam current. Response of the rf beam-position monitor is also shown

  11. Online diagnoses of high current-density beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for production of tritium or transmutation of nuclear waste with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm 2 . The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is provision of sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam-diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Noninterceptive techniques must be used for diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies due to the large quantity of power deposited in an interceptive diagnostic device by the beam. Transverse and longitudinal centroid measurements have been developed for bunched beams by measuring and processing image currents on the accelerator walls. Transverse beam-profile measurement-techniques have also been developed using the interaction of the particle beam with the background gases near the beam region. This paper will discuss these noninterceptive diagnostic Techniques

  12. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  13. Study on the nanostructure formation mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaob@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Liang [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Li, Shi-wei [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Hao, Yi [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang, Yu-dong [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France); Tu, Gan-feng [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Grosdidier, Thierry [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France)

    2015-08-15

    This work investigates the nanostructure forming mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy associated with the high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment with increasing number of pulses by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and SEM. The surface layers were melted and resolidified rapidly. The treated surfaces show different structural characteristics in different compositions and distribution zones. The top melted-layer zone can be divided into three zones: Si-rich, Ai-rich, and intermediate zone. The Al-rich zone has a nano-cellular microstructure with a diameter of ∼100 nm. The microstructure in the Si-rich zone consists of fine, dispersive, and spherical nano-sized Si crystals surrounded by α(Al) cells. Some superfine eutectic structures form in the boundary of the two zones. With the increase of number of pulses, the proportion of Si-rich zone to the whole top surface increases, and more cellular substructures are transformed to fine equiaxed grain. In other words, with increasing number of pulses, more Si elements diffuse to the Al-rich zone and provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, and Al grains are refined dramatically. Moreover, the relationship between the substrate Si phase and crystalline phase is determined by EBSD; that is, (1 1 1){sub Al}//(0 0 1){sub Si} with a value of disregistry δ at approximately 5%. The HCPEB technique is a versatile technique for refining the surface microstructure of hypereutectic Al–Si alloys.

  14. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. April 2016 physics pp. 847–860. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron by optimizing the transport line beam propagation ... method. The measured parameters have been used for beam transport line optimization and twiss parameters ... model WATEC 127 LH (CCIR) has been used.

  15. Current neutralization in ballistic transport of light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Ottinger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense light ion beams are being considered as drivers to ignite fusion targets in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Ballistic transport of these beams from the diode to the target is possible only if the beam current is almost completely neutralized by plasma currents. This paper summarizes related work on relativistic electron beam and heavy ion beam propagation and describes a simple simulation model (DYNAPROP) which has been modified to treat light ion beam propagation. DYNAPROP uses an envelope equation to treat beam dynamics and uses rate equations to describe plasma and conductivity generation. The model has been applied both to the high current, 30 MeV Li +3 beams for LMF as well as low current, 1.2 MeV proton beams which are currently being studied on GAMBLE B at the Naval Research Laboratory. The predicted ratio of net currents to beam current is ∼0.1--0.2 for the GAMBLE experiment and ∼0.01 for LMF. The implications of these results for LMF and the GAMBLE experiments art discussed in some detail. The simple resistive model in DYNAPROP has well-known limitations in the 1 torr regime which arise primarily from the neglect of plasma electron transport. Alternative methods for treating the plasma response are discussed

  16. High current precision long pulse electron beam position monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Fessenden, T J; Holmes, C

    2000-01-01

    Precision high current long pulse electron beam position monitoring has typically experienced problems with high Q sensors, sensors damped to the point of lack of precision, or sensors that interact substantially with any beam halo thus obscuring the desired signal. As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using transverse electromagnetic stripline kicker technology, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams for accurate beam position control (6 - 40 MeV, 1 - 4 kA, 2 μs beam pulse, sub millimeter beam position accuracy.) The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (< 20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt position measurements.

  17. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  18. Simulation of extraction of high current uranium beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, W.; Spaedtke, P.; Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Heymach, F.

    2005-01-01

    To generate uranium ion beam with high current and high brightness to fill up the heavy ion synchrotron SIS to its space charge limit, the behavior of the uranium ion beam in the extraction system and the postacceleration system for a high current metal vapor vacuum arc ion source has been investigated using the KOBRA3-INP code. The beam trajectory and space charge map in the extraction system as well as space profiles and the emittance diagrams of the ion beam along the beam line are presented. The influences of degree of the space charge compensation on the characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. The results show that the ion beam has to be space charge compensated from the screening electrode to the entrance of the acceleration gap; otherwise the transport would not be possible. Simulation also quantitatively supports the experimental results under the assumption of the full space charge compensation in the drift sections

  19. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  20. Geometric continuum mechanics and induced beam theories

    CERN Document Server

    R Eugster, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This research monograph discusses novel approaches to geometric continuum mechanics and introduces beams as constraint continuous bodies. In the coordinate free and metric independent geometric formulation of continuum mechanics as well as for beam theories, the principle of virtual work serves as the fundamental principle of mechanics. Based on the perception of analytical mechanics that forces of a mechanical system are defined as dual quantities to the kinematical description, the virtual work approach is a systematic way to treat arbitrary mechanical systems. Whereas this methodology is very convenient to formulate induced beam theories, it is essential in geometric continuum mechanics when the assumptions on the physical space are relaxed and the space is modeled as a smooth manifold. The book addresses researcher and graduate students in engineering and mathematics interested in recent developments of a geometric formulation of continuum mechanics and a hierarchical development of induced beam theories.

  1. Computer simulation of high current uranium beams for the injection beam line of the UNILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, W.; Spaedtke, P.; Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Heymach, F.

    2004-07-01

    In an attempt to generate an ion beam with high current and high brightness for the design ion, the computer code KOBRA3-INP has been used to evaluate the extraction system, the DC post-acceleration system as well as the quadrupole transport beam line, and to study the behavior of the ion beam in the combined system. (orig.)

  2. On the limiting stationary currents of relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavchuk, V.N.; Kondratenko, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The problem on electron beam transport in the system of different configurations both vacuum and filled with gas or plasma is connected with the problem of the limiting current, which can conduct such systems. Two models of a vacuum relativistic electron beam (REB) are considered. It is shown that there is upper limit for the value of the external magnetic field, H 0 , in the model of isovelocity REB with the constant longitudinal beam particle rate, β z =const. Estimation of the limiting current of REB as a series of inverse power H 0 is obtained. Estimations of the limiting current of magnetized hallow REB with thin walls are obtained in another model with β z ≠ const. Determination used in this case of the limiting current is directly connected with ''trapping'' of the beam central part due to formation of a virtual cathode and based on consideration of uniflux electron motion in the beam. Such an approach allows to obtain estimations of the limiting current of the thin-wall hallow beam. In this case an upper limit for the thickness of the beam wall is connected with the bottom limit for the value of the external magnetic field providing radial beam equilibrium

  3. The development of beam current monitors in the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Lenkszus, F.; Rotela, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source. The precision measurement of beam current is a challenging task in high energy accelerators, such as the APS, with a wide range of beam parameters and complicated noise, radiation, and thermal environments. The beam pulses in the APS injector and storage ring have charge ranging from 50pC to 25nC with pulse durations varying from 30ps to 30ns. A total of nine non- intercepting beam current monitors have been installed in the APS facility (excluding those in the linac) for general current measurement. In addition, several independent current monitors with specially designed redundant interlock electronics are installed for personnel safety and machine protection. This paper documents the design and development of current monitors in the APS,. discusses the commissioning experience in the past year, and presents the results of recent operations

  4. ACCELERATORS: Design and simulation of a beam position monitor for the high current proton linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yu-Fang; Xu, Tao-Guang; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the 2-D electrostatic field software, POISSON, is used to calculate the characteristic impedance of a BPM (beam position monitor) for a high current proton linac. Furthermore, the time-domain 3-D module of MAFIA with a beam microbunch at a varying offset from the axis is used to compute the induced voltage on the electrodes as a function of time. Finally, the effect of low β beams on the induced voltage, the sensitivity and the signal dynamic range of the BPM are discussed.

  5. High-current beam transport in electrostatic accelerator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramian, G.; Elais, L.

    1987-01-01

    The UCSB Free Electron Laser (FEL) has successfully demonstrated the use of a commercial 6 megavolt electrostatic accelerator as a high current beam source in a recirculating configuration. The accelerator, manufactured by National Electrostatics Corp. (NEC), Middleton WI, uses two standard high gradient accelerator tubes. Suppression of ion multiplication was accomplished by NEC with apertures and a shaped electrostatic field. This field shaping has fortuitously provided a periodically reversing radial field component with sufficient focusing strength to transport electron beams of up to 3 Amps current. Present two-stage FEL work requires a 20 Amp beam and proposed very high voltage FEL designs require currents as high as 100 Amps. A plan to permit transport of such high current beams by the addition of solenoidal focussing elements is described

  6. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  7. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, J. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Umananda, M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Nuclear Science Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Dev, B.N. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Akimoto, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ito, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Emoto, T. [Toyota National College of Technology, 2-1, Toyota, Aichi 471-8525 (Japan); Satyam, P.V. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)]. E-mail: satyam@iopb.res.in

    2006-03-15

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} and C{sup 2+} ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed.

  8. Current density monitor for intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, R.B.; Raleigh, M.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new type of electric probe which is capable of measuring the time-resolved current density profile of a stable, reproducible, high-energy (>4-MeV) high-current (>1-kA) electron beam. The sensing element of this probe is an open-ended but capped-off 50-Ω coaxial line constructed of graphite. The graphite sensor is 4.3 mm in diameter, 6 cm long, and is range thin to the primary beam electrons. The probe produces a signal proportional to the intercepted beam current. When the sensor is scanned radially through the beam during repeated pulses, a curve of signal versus depth of insertion is produced from which the radial current density profile can be determined. Measurements are presented of the profile of the electron beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (4.5 MeV, 10 kA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement is shown between measurements made with this probe and the beam radius as predicted by transport codes. The advantage of the electric probe lies in its ruggedness, simplicity, inherent fast rise time, and low cost. In contrast to other systems it requires no radiation shielding, water cooling, or auxiliary support equipment to operate in an intense beam environment

  9. A low-cost non-intercepting beam current and phase monitor for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    A low cost ion beam measurement system has been developed for use at ATLAS. The system provides nondestructive phase and intensity measurement of passing ion beam bunches by sensing their electric fields. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum jacket where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by the master oscillator. The resulting difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop to stabilize phase readings during microsecond beam drop outs. The other channel uses a linear full-wave active rectifier circuit which converts sine wave signal amplitude to a DC voltage representing beam current. Plans are in progress to install this new diagnostic at several locations in ATLAS which should help shorten the tuning cycle of new ion species

  10. Current Correlations in a Majorana Beam Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Arbel; Berg, Erez; von Oppen, Felix; Oreg, Yuval

    We study current correlations in a T-junction composed of a grounded topological superconductor and of two normal-metal leads which are biased at a voltage V. We show that the existence of an isolated Majorana zero mode in the junction dictates a universal behavior for the cross correlation of the currents through the two normal-metal leads of the junction. The cross correlation is negative and approaches zero at high bias voltages as - 1 / V . This behavior is robust in the presence of disorder and multiple transverse channels, and persists at finite temperatures. In contrast, an accidental low-energy Andreev bound state gives rise to non-universal behavior of the cross correlation. We employ numerical transport simulations to corroborate our conclusions.

  11. Beam divergence and ion current in multiaperture ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.; Penningsfeld, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    Two different measurements of the divergence of high-current ion beams formed in a multiaperture ion source have been made. The current dependence of both measurements shows characteristic differences which are explained as a result of an inhomogeneity of the current density across the emission area. The model of Coupland et al. with a spherical beam geometry in the acceleration gap is reexamined. It is shown that a rigorous application of this model gives a beamlet defocusing in the decel electrode which is stronger by a factor of 1.35 than assumed hitherto. The implications on offset steering are discussed. (orig.)

  12. The emittance of high current heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, N.R.; Devaney, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantation is the main application for high current heavy ion beams. Transfer ratio is defined as the ratio of the total ion current leaving the ion source to the current delivered to the endstation. This ratio is monitored and logged and its importance is explained. It is also affected by other factors, such as the isotopic and molecular composition of the total ion beam. The transfer ratio reveals the fraction of ions which are intercepted by parts of the beamline system. The effects of these ions are discussed in two categories: processing purity and reliability. In discussing the emittance of ribbon beams, the two orthogonal planes are usually considered separately. Longitudinal emittance is determined by slot length and by plasma ion temperature. It has already been revealed that the longitudinal divergence of the beams from BF3 is perhaps double that of the beam from arsenic vapour or argon, at the same total perveance from the ion source. This poses the question: why is the ion temperature higher for BF3 than for As or Ar? The transverse emittance is in practical terms dominated by the divergence. It is the most fruitful area for improvement in most real-world systems. There is an intrinsic divergence arising from initial ion energies within the plasma, and there is emittance growth that can occur as a result of aberration in the beam extraction optics. (N.K.)

  13. Geomagnetically induced currents in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljanen Ari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in the European high-voltage power grids based on 1-min geomagnetic recordings in 1996–2008 and on 1-D models of the ground conductivity have been derived in the EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents. The simplified yet realistic power grid model indicates that large GIC can occur anywhere in Europe. However, geomagnetic variations are clearly larger in North Europe, so it is the likely region of significant GIC events. Additionally, there are areas in the North with especially low ground conductivities, which further tend to increase GIC. The largest modelled GIC values at single substations in 1996–2008 are about 400 A in the Nordic Countries, about 100 A in the British Isles, about 80 A in the Baltic Countries, and less than 50 A in Central and South Europe. The largest GIC event in the period studied is the Halloween storm on 29–30 October 2003, and the next largest ones occurred on 15 July 2000 and 9 November 2004.

  14. Ion collective acceleration and high current beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomenskij, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of investigation of high-current beam (HCB) transport in vacuum channels with dielectric walls (VCDW) are presented. It is shown, that HCB transport can be realized not only in rectilinear dielectric channels, but also in curvili also in curvilitear oges. In particular, it proved to be possible to bend the beam with parameters 50 kA, 400 keV by 90 deg. A problem of negative ion intense beam production is considered. It is shown, that in magnetic insulation diodes hydrogen ion currents of about several kA are obtained at current densities 10 A/cm 2 . Results of collective ion acceleration in VCDW are given. Two regions with different physical mechanisms of ion acceleration should be distinguished. In the first region (''plasma''), corresponding to HCB motion in VCDW ion generation and their acceleration in quasipotential field of HCB up to the energy of the order of electrons or less takes place. In the second region (''beam''), corresponding to joint motion of ''extracted'' ions and HCB electrons, ion acceleration takes place in the fields of waves, which can be excited due to the mechanism of two-beam instability type. Considerable contribution can also be made by stochastic mechanism of ion acceleration

  15. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuto, H., E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Musumeci, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania 95123 (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania 95123 (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  16. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  17. Beam position dependence of a wall-current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, K.; Asami, A.; Suwada, T.; Urano, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    It was pointed out recently that there exists an appreciable beam position dependence in the wall-current monitor widely used in electron accelerators. Detailed study of this dependence is performed on a test bench varying the pulse width and the frequency of the input signal simulating the beam. The results of experiments show that when the pulse width becomes shorter more appreciable becomes the dependence, and it approaches to that of calculated from the method of images. A unified analysis is under way. (author)

  18. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the 'seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs

  19. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  20. Aberrations due to solenoid focusing of a multiply charged high-current ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, G; Lisi, N; Schnuriger, J C; Scrivens, R; Tambini, J

    2000-01-01

    At the output of a laser ion source, a high current of highly charged ions with a large range of charge states is available. The focusing of such a beam by magnetic elements causes a nonlinear space-charge field to develop which can induce large aberrations and emittance growth in the beam. Simulation of the beam from the CERN laser ion source will be presented for an ideal magnetic and electrostatic system using a radially symmetric model. In addition, the three dimensional software KOBRA3 is used for the simulation of the solenoid line. The results of these simulations will be compared with experiments performed on the CERN laser ion source with solenoids (resulting in a hollow beam) and a series of gridded electrostatic lenses. (5 refs).

  1. The status and new trends of ion beam induced charge technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Rongrong; Qiu Huiyuan; Zhu Dezhang

    2002-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge technique (IBIC) with low beam current (fA level) and high efficiency is a new development of nuclear microscopy. It has been widely applied to the fields of semiconductor and microelectronic materials. The principle and the experimental method of the IBIC technique were described and reviewed its status and new trends were reviewed

  2. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  3. Electron beam induced conductivity in 'PET' and 'FEP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzade, S.J.; Jog, J.P.; Dake, S.B.; Bhoraskar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Electron Beam Induced Conductivity (EBIC), classified into EBIC (bulk) and EBIC (surface) have been measured in PET and FEP respectively. The peculiar oscillatory nature of the induced gain versus beam energy variations is explained in terms of the spatial distributions of the trapping centres near the surface of the polymers. (author)

  4. Optical fiber Cherenkov detector for beam current monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pishchulin, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.G.; Romashkin, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained in calculation of an optical fiber Cherenkov detector for accelerated beam current monitoring are presented. The technique of beam parameters monitoring is based on Cherenkov radiation excitation by accelerated electrons in the optical fiber. The formulas for calculations of optical power and time dependence of Cherenkov radiation pulse are given. The detector sensitivity and time resolution dependence on the fiber material characteristics are investigated. Parameters of a 10μm one-mode quartz optical fiber detector for the free electron laser photoinjector are calculated. The structure of a monitoring system with the optical fiber Cherenkov detector is considered. Possible applications of this technique are discussed and some recommendations are given

  5. Beam current transformer (BCT) for experiment WA1/2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In experiment WA1/2, a 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS was directed at a target, downstream of which a hadron line selected, in several narrow momentum bands, a beam of either pi+ and K+ or pi- and K-. These neutrino-parent particles, before entering a 292 m long decay tunnel, passed through a set of 2 BCTs of a design seen here. They measured the hadron intensity (10^10 to 10^11 particles/pulse) with a precision of the order of 1%. There were 2 of them, for enhanced precision and confidence. After the discovery of neutral currents in the Gargamelle-experiment, WA1/2 was the first follow-up, high-precision experiment (Z.Phys.C35, 443-452, 1987 and Z.Phys.C45, 361-379, 1990). See also 7706516X.

  6. High current nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Hoff

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A gigawatt-class nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver is experimentally demonstrated. Four experimental series, each with a different Marx bank charge voltage (15, 20, 25, and 30 kV, were completed. Within each experimental series, shots at peak frequencies ranging from 950 MHz to 1.45 GHz were performed. Peak amplitude modulations of the NLTL output voltage signal were found to range between 18% and 35% for the lowest frequency shots and between 5% and 20% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage. Peak amplitude modulations of the electron beam current were found to range between 10% and 20% for the lowest frequency shots and between 2% and 7% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage.

  7. High current nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, B. W.; French, D. M.; Simon, D. S.; Lepell, P. D.; Montoya, T.; Heidger, S. L.

    2017-10-01

    A gigawatt-class nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver is experimentally demonstrated. Four experimental series, each with a different Marx bank charge voltage (15, 20, 25, and 30 kV), were completed. Within each experimental series, shots at peak frequencies ranging from 950 MHz to 1.45 GHz were performed. Peak amplitude modulations of the NLTL output voltage signal were found to range between 18% and 35% for the lowest frequency shots and between 5% and 20% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage). Peak amplitude modulations of the electron beam current were found to range between 10% and 20% for the lowest frequency shots and between 2% and 7% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage).

  8. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm 2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  9. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  10. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  11. Tunable twin Airy beams induced by binary phase patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongtao; Wei, Jingsong; Ma, Jianyong; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yiqun

    2013-04-15

    In this work, we theoretically and experimentally study the physical process of Airy beams induced by binary phase patterns combined with a slope factor. Theoretical simulations show that the binary phase patterns generate a pair of symmetrically inverted twin Airy beams. The slope factor can regulate the spacing between the two Airy beam peaks, decrease the error induced by the binarization process, and adjust the position of the focus formed by the twin Airy beams. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical ones.

  12. Impact of large beam-induced heat loads on the transient operation of the beam screens and the cryogenic plants of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Rodrigues, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) under study at CERN will produce 50-TeV high-energy proton beams. The high-energy particle beams are bent by 16-T superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K and distributed over a circumference of 80 km. The circulating beams induce 5 MW of dynamic heat loads by several processes such as synchrotron radiation, resistive dissipation of beam image currents and electron clouds. These beam-induced heat loads will be intercepted by beam screens operating between 40 and 60 K and induce transients during beam injection. Energy ramp-up and beam dumping on the distributed beam-screen cooling loops, the sector cryogenic plants and the dedicated circulators. Based on the current baseline parameters, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the cryogenic distribution system during a beam operation cycle were performed. The effects of the thermal inertia of the headers on the helium flow temperature at the cryogenic plant inlet as well as the temperature gradient experienced by the beam screen has been assessed. Additionally, this work enabled a thorough exergetic analysis of different cryogenic plant configurations and laid the building-block for establishing design specification of cold and warm circulators.

  13. Photoinduced current and emission induced by current in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 3. Photoinduced current and emission induced by current in a nanowire transistor: Temperature dependence. Darehdor Mahvash Arabi Shahtahmassebi Nasser. Regular Volume 86 Issue 3 March 2016 pp ...

  14. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  15. Superconducting quantum interference monitor of charged particle beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsev, K.F.; Mikheev, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Description and test results of the monitor of charged particle beam current on the base of the high-frequency superconducting quantum interference detector with lead slotted shield are presented. The toroidal superconducting coil, which covers the measured beam has 16 turns wound by the lead belt of 7 mm width with 0.5 mm gaps between the turns. A superconducting low-coupling monitor having two holes and point oxidated niobium contact has been used in the mode of quanta counting of magnetic flux. The lead point shield was 2 mm thick and it had 30 mm aperture. The coefficient of background shielding within 0-200 Hz frequency range constituted more than 10 8 . The threshold current resolution of the monitor had the value less than 01 μA √Hz. The suggested monitor requires helium cooling. The proposed design of the monitor is applicable for mounting on the vacuum chamber when it is surrounded by helium conductor. In other cases mounting of low-powerful autonomic system or cryostat of helium storage up to several weeks is possible [ru

  16. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on these measured beam parameters, beam optics of a transport line was optimized and its results are alsodiscussed in this paper. This beam transport line is used to transport the electron beam from the 20MeV microtron to the booster synchrotron. The booster synchrotron works as a main injector for Indus-1 and ...

  17. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams

  18. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm

  19. Vertical blow-up in a low-current, stored, laser-cooled ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N; Siegfried, L E; Hangst, J S; Nielsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Using a novel technique for real-time transverse beam profile diagnostics of a stored ion beam, we have observed the transverse size of a stored, laser-cooled ion beam. Earlier we observed that the density of the beam is independent of the beam current. At very low currents we observe an abrupt change in this behavior: the vertical beam size increases suddenly by about an order of magnitude. This observation implies a sudden change in the indirect vertical cooling mediated by intrabeam scattering. Our results have serious implications for the ultimate beam quality attainable by laser- cooling. (12 refs).

  20. Low-current, vertical blowup in a stored laser-cooled ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N; Nielsen, S; Siegfried, L E; Hangst, J S

    2001-01-01

    Using a novel technique for real-time transverse beam profile diagnostics of a stored ion beam, we have observed the transverse size of a stored laser-cooled ion beam. Earlier we observed that the density of the beam is independent of the beam current. At very low currents, we observe an abrupt change in this behavior: The vertical beam size increases suddenly by about an order of magnitude. This observation implies a sudden change in the indirect vertical cooling mediated by intrabeam scattering. Our results have serious implications for the ultimate beam quality attainable by laser cooling. (11 refs).

  1. A ns-pulsed high-current electron beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Gexin; Li, Youzhi; Pan, Yuli

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of a pulse electron beam source which is composed of a gun and pulse system depends on not only the time characteristics of the gun and the pulser, but also their combination. This point become apparent if effects of the electron tansit-time between electrodes are studied. A ferrite transmission line (FTL) pulser is used as a grid driver in this source. It has advantages of providing fast risetime, large peak power output and good loading characteristics. It is these advantages of the pulser that compensates the absence of some technological conditions of manufacturing gun and makes the source better. Our testing showed that the cooperation of both the gun and the pulser produced peak currents in the range of 1 to 9 amps with widths of 2 to 2.5 ns (FWHM) at cathode-to-anode potential of 60 to 82 kv, while the grid drives are about in the range of 1 to 3 kv. In addition, the results of the testing instructed that effects of electron transit-time cannot be ignored when the pulses with widths of several nanoseconds are used as a grid drive. Based on the results, electron transit-time effects on the design of the gun and the beam performances are briefly descussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    -effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  3. First LHC beam induced tracks reconstructed in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, C; Bates, A; Eklund, L; Gersabeck, M; Marinho, F; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rodrigues, E; Szumlak, T; Affolder, A; Bowcock, T; Casse, G; Donleavy, S; Hennessy, K; Huse, T; Hutchcroft, D; Mylroie-Smith, J; Noor, A; Patel, G; Rinnert, K; Smith, N A; Shears, T; Tobin, M; John, M; Bay, A; Frei, R; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Anderson, J; McNulty, R; Traynor, S; Basiladze, S; Leflat, A; Artuso, M; Borgia, A; Lefeuvre, G; Mountain, R; Wang, J; Akiba, K; van Beuzekom, M; Jans, E; Ketel, T; Mous, I; Papadelis, A; Van Lysebetten, A; Verlaat, B; de Vries, H; Behrendt, O; Buytaert, J; de Capua, S; Collins, P; Ferro-Luzzi, M

    2009-01-01

    The Vertex Locator of the LHCb experiment has been used to fully reconstruct beam induced tracks at the LHC. A beam of protons was collided with a beam absorber during the LHC synchronisation test of the anti-clockwise beam on the weekend 22nd–24th August 2008. The resulting particles have been observed by the Vertex Locator. The LHCb Vertex Locator is a silicon micro-strip detector containing 21 planes of modules. Tracks were observed passing through up to 19 modules (38 silicon sensors). A total of over 700 tracks were reconstructed, and are being used to study the calibration and alignment of the detector.

  4. Development of high current beam ns pulsed system

    CERN Document Server

    Shen Guan Ren; Gao Fu; Guan Xia Ling; LiuNaiYi

    2001-01-01

    The development of high current beam ns pulsed system of CPNG and its characteristic, main technological performance and application are introduced. Firstly, important parameters of the system are calculated using theoretical model, the design requirements of some important parts are understood. Some mistakes in physics conception are corrected. Second, the chopper is designed for parallel plate deflector, chopping aperture and sine wave voltage sweeping device. It is emphasized that the conception of parallel plate load impedance is the capacitance load, but not the 50 ohm load impedance. The dynamic capacitance value has been measured. The output emphasizes the output voltage amplitude, but not the output power for sweeping device. The display system of output sweeping voltage was set up and it is sure that the maximum output voltage(V-V) is >=4000 V. The klystron buncher are re-designed. It is emphasized to overcome difficulty of support high voltage electrode in the klystron and insulator of input sine wa...

  5. An accurate low current measurement circuit for heavy iron beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chaoyang; Su Hong; Mao Ruishi; Dong Chengfu; Qian Yi; Kong Jie

    2012-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams at 10 6 particles per second have been applied to the treatment of deep-seated inoperable tumors in the therapy terminal of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) which is located at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS). An accurate low current measurement circuit following a Faraday cup was developed to monitor the beam current at pA range. The circuit consisted of a picoammeter with a bandwidth of 1 kHz and a gated integrator (GI). A low input bias current precision amplifier and new guarding and shielding techniques were used in the picoammeter circuit which allowed as to measure current less than 1 pA with a current gain of 0.22 V/pA and noise less than 10 fA. This paper will also describe a novel compensation approach which reduced the charge injection from switches in the GI to 10 −18 C, and a T-switch configuration which was used to eliminate leakage current in the reset switch.

  6. Proton induced radioactivity estimation and radiological safety aspects of materials science beam line at medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Sarangapani, R.

    2012-01-01

    A medical cyclotron facility is under development in Kolkata. This medical cyclotron would deliver 15 - 30 MeV H + ions with beam current up to 500 μA. Though this facility will be mainly used for production of medically useful isotopes, a beam line has been also provided for materials science research. The materials science beam line will be used to study radiation damage in nuclear materials. Apart from radiation damage studies, material science beam line will be used for thin layer activation analysis, charged particle activation analysis and production of special isotopes. High intensity proton beam in this energy regime can induce high level of radioactivity in the target material and other beam line components. Hence it is necessary to calculate the induced radioactivity for a variety of materials, so as to find a suitable candidate for use in beam line components, to design radiation shielding and to design proper target handling devices and shielding arrangements. There are two ways by which radioactivity in beam line components can be induced, either by direct interaction of proton beam or by neutrons emitted from target during irradiation. The cross-section of production of various radionuclides and neutrons at different energies produced as a result of nuclear reaction between proton and target atoms has been generated using ALICE code. These cross-sections are used to calculate concentration of radionuclides and emitted neutron spectrum. The decay scheme of radionuclides is taken from Universal Nuclide Chart. Neutron induced activity in target chamber is estimated using MCNP code. These calculations have found to be very useful in the material selection for beam line components and designing radiation shielding. Various aspects of radioactivity calculations and radiological safety on material science beam line will be discussed. (author)

  7. Test beam results of a heavily irradiated Current Injected Detector (CID)

    CERN Document Server

    Harkonen, J; Tuominen, E; Moilanen, H; Maenpaa, T; Verbitskaya, E; Eremin, V; Czellar, S; Dierlamm, A; Tuovinen, E; Lampen, T; Frey, M; Li, Z; Luukka, P

    2010-01-01

    A heavily irradiated (3 x 10(15) 1 MeV n(eq)/cm(2)) Current Injected Detector (CID) was tested with 225 GeV muon beam at CERN H2 beam line. In the CID concept the current is limited by the space charge. The injected carriers will be trapped by the deep levels and this induces a stable electric field through the entire bulk regardless of the irradiation fluence the detector has been exposed to. The steady-state density of the trapped charge is defined by the balance between the trapping and the emission rates of charge carriers (detrapping). Thus, the amount of charge injection needed for the electric field stabilization depends on the temperature. AC-coupled 16 cm(2) detector was processed on high resistivity n-type magnetic Czochralski silicon, and it had 768 strips, 50 mu m pitch, 10 mu m strip width and 3.9 cm strip length. The beam test was carried out using a silicon beam telescope that is based on the CMS detector readout prototype components, APV25 readout chips, and eight strip sensors made by Hamamat...

  8. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  9. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  10. Geomagnetic Induced Current Effects on Power Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    Røen, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Solar storms are inevitable and have a number of negative effects on technological systems, the power grid being no exception. High geoelectric field values due to severe geomagnetic storms cause geomagnetic induced currents to flow in conducting structures of the power system. The geomagnetic induced currents will enter and leave the power grid through the neutral grounding of power transformers. This may cause half-cycle saturation of the transformer core, which in turn leads to high levels...

  11. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description.

  12. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  13. Development of capacitive beam position, beam current and Schottky-signal monitors for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, Felix

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis novel techniques based on capacitive pickups for the determination of the beam current, the beam position and the Schottky-signal in storage rings have been developed. Beam current measurements at the heavy ion storage ring TSR with a capacitive pickup have been found in very good agreement with the theory. Using this device the accurate measurement of beam currents at the TSR far below 1 μA is now possible. This method will also be used at the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at which beam currents in the range of 1 nA-1 μA are expected. For the first time, position measurements with a resonant amplifier system for capacitive pickups have been examined at the TSR for later use of this technique in the CSR. With this method an increased signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved using a parallel inductance. A comparison with measurements using the rest gas beam profile monitor has shown very good agreement even at very low intensities. Experiments with the cryo-capable electronics for the CSR beam position monitors have shown an achievable quality factor of Q=500, resulting in the prospect of precise position measurements at the CSR even at very low beam currents. The CSR Schottky-Pickup will also be equipped with a resonant amplifier system with a comparable quality factor. An estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio suggests a detection limit of a few protons. (orig.)

  14. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Stevens, R.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Zaugg, T.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H 2 gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos is given

  15. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm 2 . Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 14 cm -3 . Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode

  16. Experimental Verification of Current Shear Design Equations for HSRC Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attaullah Shah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research on the shear capacity of HSRC (High Strength Reinforced Concrete beams is relatively very limited as compared to the NSRC (Normal Strength Reinforced Concrete beams. Most of the Building Codes determine the shear strength of HSRC with the help of empirical equations based on experimental work of NSRC beams and hence these equations are generally regarded as un-conservative for HSRC beams particularly at low level of longitudinal reinforcement. In this paper, 42 beams have been tested in two sets, such that in 21 beams no transverse reinforcement has been used, whereas in the remaining 21 beams, minimum transverse reinforcement has been used as per ACI-318 (American Concrete Institute provisions. Two values of compressive strength 52 and 61 MPa, three values of longitudinal steel ratio and seven values of shear span to depth ratio have been have been used. The beams were tested under concentrated load at the mid span. The results are compared with the equations proposed by different international building codes like ACI, AASHTO LRFD, EC (Euro Code, Canadian Code and Japanese Code for shear strength of HSRC beams.From comparison, it has been observed that some codes are less conservative for shear design of HSRC beams and further research is required to rationalize these equations.

  17. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-15

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  18. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  19. Temperature calculations of heat loads in rotating target wheels exposed to high beam currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, John P.; Gabor, Rachel; Neubauer, Janelle

    2001-01-01

    In heavy-ion physics, high beam currents can eventually melt or destroy the target. Tightly focused beams on stationary targets of modest melting point will exhibit short lifetimes. Defocused or 'wobbled' beams are employed to enhance target survival. Rotating targets using large diameter wheels can help overcome target melting and allow for higher beam currents to be used in experiments. The purpose of the calculations in this work is to try and predict the safe maximum beam currents which produce heat loads below the melting point of the target material

  20. Measurements of high-current electron beams from X pinches and wire array Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Bell, K. S.; Hammer, D. A.; Agafonov, A. V.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch cross point to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups are discussed. Results of computer simulation of electron beam propagation from the pinch to the Faraday cup give limits for the measured current for beams having different energy spreads. The beam is partially neutralized as it propagates from the X pinch to a diagnostic system, but within a Faraday cup diagnostic, space charge effects can be very important. Experimental results show evidence of such effects.

  1. Stability of beam-induced tensor pressure tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.A.; Nelson, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Kammash, T.

    1979-10-01

    Necessary and sufficient criteria are obtained for the high toroidal mode number stability of a guiding center plasma in low aspect ratio, D-shaped, beam-induced tensor pressure tokamaks. The difference between the two criteria is significant for interchange stability, while the difference is small for ballooning stability. The critical β value imposed by stability to ballooning modes is higher for perpendicular than for parallel beam injection

  2. Fast-ion transport and neutral beam current drive in ASDEX upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, B.; Weiland, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2015-01-01

    The neutral beam current drive efficiency has been investigated in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by replacing on-axis neutral beams with tangential off-axis beams. A clear modification of the radial fast-ion profiles is observed with a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic that measures centrally peaked profiles...

  3. Beam-Induced Damage Mechanisms and their Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid interaction of highly energetic particle beams with matter induces dynamic responses in the impacted component. If the beam pulse is sufficiently intense, extreme conditions can be reached, such as very high pressures, changes of material density, phase transitions, intense stress waves, material fragmentation and explosions. Even at lower intensities and longer time-scales, significant effects may be induced, such as vibrations, large oscillations, and permanent deformation of the impacted components. These lectures provide an introduction to the mechanisms that govern the thermomechanical phenomena induced by the interaction between particle beams and solids and to the analytical and numerical methods that are available for assessing the response of impacted components. An overview of the design principles of such devices is also provided, along with descriptions of material selection guidelines and the experimental tests that are required to validate materials and components exposed to interactio...

  4. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Barth

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36  μs duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum. The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH_{3} beam, cracked (and stripped in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 100  μs pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  5. Beam-induced temperature changes in HVEM irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Thomas, L.E.; Gelles, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The peak value of the temperature distribution induced by energy loss of 1.0 MeV electrons in traversing a typical HVEM irradiation specimen can be very substantial. The origin and various features of this distribution were analyzed for a variety of specimen geometries. The major parametric dependencies are shown to be relatively independent of specimen geometry, however, and allow the definition of a scaling relationship that can be employed to predict temperature rises in materials that cannot be measured directly. The use of this scaling relationship requires that the experimenter minimize perturbations of the heat flow due to proximity of the central hole in the specimen. An experimental method of determining directly the magnitude and distribution of beam-induced temperature profiles was developed which utilizes the order-disorder transformation in Fe 3 Al and Cu 3 Au. Scaling of experimentally determined temperature changes leads to more realistic estimates of the total temperature rise than are currently available in various literature tabulations. The factors which determine the optimum selection of irradiation parameters for a given experiment are also discussed

  6. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miniati, Francesco [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Elyiv, Andrii, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  7. Electron-beam induced conduction in some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Yasuo; Mizutani, Teruyoshi; Ieda, Masayuki

    1976-01-01

    The charge signal induced by pulsed electron beam consists of two components, i.e. the fast and the slow components. The slow component which corresponds to carrier transport via shallow traps exhibited an asymmetry with respect to the bias field polarity. The asymmetry revealed that the main carriers which drifted via shallow traps were electrons in PET, both electrons and holes in PEN, and holes in PS. TSC spectra of electron-beam induced electrets proved directly the existence of electron shallow traps in PET and both electron and hole traps in PEN. Their trap energies were 0.1 to 0.2 eV. (auth.)

  8. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gies of 450 MeV and 2.5 GeV, respectively. There is a common beam injector for these .... The line profile data at the centroid position are fitted with a Gaussian function to find beam size. The fitting ... 2856 MHz frequency is placed in the microtron at the position of common tangent point to all orbits. A cathode of lanthanum ...

  9. Analysis of the beam induced heat loads on the LHC arc beam screens during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    During Run 2 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been routinely operated with 25 ns bunch spacing. In these conditions large heat loads have been measured on the beam screens of the superconducting magnets, together with other observations indicating that an electron cloud develops in the beam chambers. The analysis of these heat loads has revealed several interesting features allowing to pinpoint peculiar characteristics of the observed beam-induced heating. This document describes the main findings of this analysis including the evolution taking place during the run, the observed dependence on the beam conditions and the results from special tests and dedicated instrumentation. The differences observed in the behavior of the eight LHC arcs are also discussed.

  10. Underling modification in ion beam induced Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Chini, T.K.; Sanyal, M.K.; Grenzer, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface (amorphous-crystalline interface) structure of keV ion beam modified Si(001) wafers was studied for the first time using non-destructive technique and compared with that of the top one. Ion-beam modifications of the Si samples were done using state-of-art high-current ion implanter facility at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics by changing energy, dose and angle of incidence of the Ar + ion beam. To bring out the underlying modification depth-resolved x-ray grazing incidence diffraction has been carried out using synchrotron radiation facility, while the structure of the top surface was studied through atomic force microscopy

  11. Design and initial tests of beam current monitoring systems for the APS transport lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xucheng.

    1992-01-01

    The non-intercepting beam current monitoring systems suitable for a wide, range of beam parameters have been developed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) low energy transport lines and high energy transport line. The positron or electron beam pulse in the transport lines wig have peak beam currents ranging from 8 mA to 29 A with pulse widths varying from 120 ps to 30 ns and pulse repetition rates from 2 Hz to 60 Hz. The peak beam current or total beam charge is measured with the fast or integrating current transformer, respectively, manufactured by Bergoz. In-house high speed beam signal processing electronics provide a DC level output proportional to the peak current or total charge for the digitizer input. The prototype systems were tested on the linacs which have beam pulse structures similar to that of the APS transport lines. This paper describes the design of beam signal processing electronics and grounding and shielding methods for current transformers. The results of the initial operations are presented. A short introduction on the preliminary design of current monitoring systems for the APS rings is also included

  12. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  13. Maximum current density and beam brightness achievable by laser-driven electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippetto, D.; Musumeci, P.; Zolotorev, M.; Stupakov, G.

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the extension to different electron beam aspect ratio of the Child-Langmuir law for the maximum achievable current density in electron guns. Using a simple model, we derive quantitative formulas in good agreement with simulation codes. The new scaling laws for the peak current density of temporally long and transversely narrow initial beam distributions can be used to estimate the maximum beam brightness and suggest new paths for injector optimization.

  14. Maximum current density and beam brightness achievable by laser-driven electron sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Filippetto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the extension to different electron beam aspect ratio of the Child-Langmuir law for the maximum achievable current density in electron guns. Using a simple model, we derive quantitative formulas in good agreement with simulation codes. The new scaling laws for the peak current density of temporally long and transversely narrow initial beam distributions can be used to estimate the maximum beam brightness and suggest new paths for injector optimization.

  15. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  16. Study of ion beam induced depolymerization using positron annihilation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O. E-mail: opuglisi@dipchi.unict.it; Fragala, M.E.; Lynn, K.G.; Petkov, M.; Weber, M.; Somoza, A.; Dupasquier, A.; Quasso, F

    2001-04-01

    Ion beam induced depolymerization of polymers is a special class of ion beam induced chemical reaction which gives rise to catastrophic 'unzipping' of macromolecules with production of large amounts of the monomer, of the order of many hundreds monomer molecules per each macromolecule. The possible modification of the density at microscopic level prompted us to undertake a study of this effect utilizing positron annihilation techniques in Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) before and after bombardment with He{sup +} 300 keV ions at 200 deg. C. Preliminary results shown here indicate that before bombardment there is a reproducible dependence of nano-hole distribution on the sample history. Moreover at 200 deg. C we do not detect formation of new cavities as a consequence of the strong depolymerization that occurs under the ion beam. The possible correlation of these findings with transport properties of PMMA at temperature higher than the glass transition temperature will be discussed.

  17. Beam physics design strategy for a high-current rf linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The high average beam power of an rf linac system for transmutation of nuclear waste puts very stringent requirements on beam quality and beam control. Fractional beam losses along the accelerator must be kept at extremely low levels to assure {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} maintenance. Hence, halo formation and large-amplitude tails in the particle distribution due to beam mismatch and equipartitioning effects must be avoided. This implies that the beam should ideally be in near-perfect thermal equilibrium from injection to full energy - in contrast to existing rf linacs in which the transverse temperature, T {sub {perpendicular}}, is higher than the longitudinal temperature, T{sub {parallel}}. The physics and parameter scaling for such a system will be reviewed using the results of recent work on high-intensity bunched beams. A design strategy for a high-current rf linac with equilibrated beam will be proposed.

  18. Transdusers for measuring currents and coordinates of subnanosecond accelerated electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocheshnikov, N.I.; Reprintsev, L.V.; Syumak, V.N.; Fedotov, I.F.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of monitors using eddy currents induced in the walls of an electronic channel by electron clusters have been developed. Monitors of the first type use, instead of the resistor belt, the input resistance of a wide-band transformer whose low-resistance input is connected to the break in the electron channel and the high-resistance output - to the output cable. The monitor is used in an electron storage ring. To increase the fast response of second-type monitors the brake in the electron channel is loaded with a low-resistance strip line. The signal from this line is taken near the place of its connection to the brake. The monitors are supposed to be used for resolution of the fine structure of a high-current electron linear accelerator beam. The achieved rise time constituted 0.15 - 0.2 ns

  19. High precision electron beam diagnostic system for high current long pulse beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y J; Fessenden, T; Holmes, C; Nelson, S D; Selchow, N.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using stripline kicker technology for DARHT II applications, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams (6-40 MeV, 1-4 kA, 2 microseconds) for accurate position control. The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (<20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt measurements performed using capacitive pick-off probes. Likewise, transmission line traveling wave probes have problems with multi-bounce effects due to these longer pulse widths. Finally, the high energy densities experienced in these applications distort typical foil beam position measurements

  20. Harp, a short pulse, high current electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, K.R.

    1974-01-01

    A 3 MV, 800 kA, 24 ns electron beam accelerator is described and the results of initial switching experiments are discussed. The generator will provide a source for studying the physics of processes leading to electron beam driven, inertially confined fusion. The major components of the accelerator are two diodes with a common anode, twelve oil-dielectric Blumleins with low jitter (less than 2 ns) multichannel switches, three intermediate storage capacitors, a trigger pulse generator and two Marx generators. (U.S.)

  1. Current algorithms for computed electron beam dose planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and sometimes three-dimensional computer algorithms for electron beam irradiation are capable of taking all irregularities of the body cross-section and the properties of the various tissues into account. This is achieved by dividing the incoming broad beams into a number of narrow pencil beams, the penetration of which can be described by essentially one-dimensional formalisms. The constituent pencil beams are most often described by Gaussian, experimentally or theoretically derived distributions. The accuracy of different dose planning algorithms is discussed in some detail based on their ability to take the different physical interaction processes of high energy electrons into account. It is shown that those programs that take the deviations from the simple Gaussian model into account give the best agreement with experimental results. With such programs a dosimetric relative accuracy of about 5% is generally achieved except in the most complex inhomogeneity configurations. Finally, the present limitations and possible future developments of electron dose planning are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Experiments on the margin of beam induced quenches a superconducting quadrupole magnet in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Bednarek, M J; Nebot Del Busto, E; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    Protection of LHC equipment relies on a complex system of collimators to capture injected and circulating beam in case of LHC kicker magnet failures. However, for specific failures of the injection kickers, the beam can graze the injection protection collimators and induce quenches of downstream superconducting magnets. This occurred twice during 2011 operation and cannot be excluded during future operation. Tests were performed during Machine Development periods of the LHC to assess the quench margin of the quadrupole located just downstream of the last injection protection collimator in point 8. In addition to the existing Quench Protection System, a special monitoring instrumentation was installed at this magnet to detect any resistance increase below the quench limit. The correlation between the magnet and Beam Loss Monitor signals was analysed for different beam intensities and magnet currents. The results of the experiments are presented.

  3. Nonlinear Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Pre-formed Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Shvets, Gennady; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion beam in a cold pre-formed plasma is investigated. The outcome of the calculation is the quantitative prediction of the degree of charge and current neutralization of the ion beam pulse by the background plasma. The electric magnetic fields generated by the ion beam are studied analytically for the nonlinear case where the plasma density is comparable in size with the beam density. Particle-in-cell simulations and fluid calculations of current and charge neutralization have been performed for parameters relevant to heavy ion fusion assuming long, dense beams with el >> V(subscript b)/omega(subscript b), where V(subscript b) is the beam velocity and omega subscript b is the electron plasma frequency evaluated with the ion beam density. An important conclusion is that for long, nonrelativistic ion beams, charge neutralization is, for all practical purposes, complete even for very tenuous background plasmas. As a result, the self-magnetic force dominates the electric force and the beam ions are always pinched during beam propagation in a background plasma

  4. Electron Beam Induced Functionalization of Fluoropolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappan, U.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation affects the properties of polymers by chain scission and cross-linking reactions. One process will usually predominate, depending on the chemical structure of the polymer and the irradiation conditions such as temperature and atmosphere. Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and the perfluorinated copolymers poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (FEP) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropylvinyl ether) (PFA) undergo predominantly chain scission, if the irradiation is performed at room temperature. This shortcoming is exploited by converting PTFE into low molecular weight micropowders. The irradiation of PTFE in the presence of air results in micropowders functionalized with oxygen-containing groups. The concentration of end groups was investigated by FTIR and 19F solid-state NMR. The data were used to calculate number-average molecular weights. It was demonstrated that PTFE can be cross-linked by irradiation above its crystalline melting temperature in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Evidence for cross-links in PTFE was derived directly from structural information using 19 F solid-state NMR. FEP is understood to undergo cross-linking by irradiation above the glass transition temperature. It was found that also PFA can be branched and cross-linked by irradiation under special conditions. Radiation-induced grafting of styrene into fluoropolymer films and subsequent sulfonation offers an attractive way to prepare proton exchange membranes. Recently, radiation-induced grafting into cross-linked PTFE was reported. Modified FEP, PFA and ETFE films have been used as base material in this study. The modified films have been prepared by irradiation in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures up to temperatures above the melting temperature of the fluoropolymer

  5. Limiting and Fedosov's Currents of a Strongly Magnetized Electron Beam in Asymmetric Transportation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goikhman, M. B.; Gromov, A. V.; Kovalev, N. F.; V. Palitsin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the properties of thin-walled, strongly magnetized electron beams in closed evacuated transportation channels with arbitrary cross sections of the channel and the electron beam. Explicit precise formulas are obtained for the limiting and Fedosov's currents of such electron beams. The found relationships allow one to explain many observed phenomena and can serve as a basis for verification of the results of more complicated calculations.

  6. Limits for Beam Induced Damage: Reckless or too Cautious?

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Accidental events implying direct beam impacts on collimators are of the utmost importance as they may lead to serious limitations of the overall LHC Performance. In order to assess damage threshold of components impacted by high energy density beams, entailing changes of phase and extreme pressures, state-of-the-art numerical simulation methods are required. In this paper, a review of the different dynamic response regimes induced by particle beams is given along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each regime. Particular attention is paid to the most critical case, that of shock waves, for which standard Finite Element codes are totally unfit. A novel category of numerical tools, named Hydrocodes, has been adapted and used to analyse the consequences of an asynchronous beam abort on Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT). A number of simulations has been carried out with varying beam energy, number of bunches and bunch sizes allowing to identify different damage levels for the TCT up to catastr...

  7. Generation of Low-Energy High-Current Electron Beams in Plasma-Anode Electron Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozur, G. E.; Proskurovsky, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies on the generation of low-energy high-current electron beams in electron guns with a plasma anode and an explosive-emission cathode. The problems related to the initiation of explosive electron emission under plasma and the formation and transport of high-current electron beams in plasma-filled systems are discussed consecutively. Considerable attention is given to the nonstationary effects that occur in the space charge layers of plasma. Emphasis is also placed on the problem of providing a uniform energy density distribution over the beam cross section, which is of critical importance in using electron beams of this type for surface treatment of materials. Examples of facilities based on low-energy high-current electron beam sources are presented and their applications in materials science and practice are discussed.

  8. Formation of ion beam with high current density for micro irradiation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanenko, A.V.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2015-04-01

    The paper describes a study of the ion beam formation for irradiation of microareas of construction materials with individual grains. A numerical simulation of the microbeam formation was performed with profiles of current density distribution close to rectangular to obtain uniform dose. Ion beams with the total current on the target 10–100 nA were considered. An approach for beam focusing with energy variation without moving a sample was considered. The ability to create current density distributions close to uniform in the target plane was experimentally validated.

  9. (d,p)-transfer induced fission of heavy radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, Martin

    2012-01-01

    (d,p)-transfer induced fission is proposed as a tool to study low energy fission of exotic heavy nuclei. Primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission offers a possibility for systematic study the low energy fission of heavy exotic nuclei at the ISOLDE.

  10. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  11. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator

  12. Propagation of high-current fast electron beam in a dielectric target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimo, O.; Debayle, A.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. A relativistic electron beam with very high current density may be produced during the interaction of a short high intensity laser pulse with a solid target. In Fast Ignition approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion, such beam is supposed to heat a part of the precompressed DT fuel pellet to the conditions of an efficient ignition. For successful implementation of Fast Ignition understanding the propagation and energy deposition of the beam is crucial. A number of processes, mostly associated with the return current, are dissipating the energy of the beam or inhibiting its collimated transport, namely the filamentation. Weibel, two-stream or the recently proposed ionization instability. Ionization instability may develop in a solid dielectric target due to the dependence of the propagation velocity of the beam on the beam density. To study the propagation of high current electron beam in dielectric target, we use a one-dimensional relativistic electrostatic simulation code based on the Particle in Cell method. The code includes ionization processes in dielectric material and collisions of newly generated cold electrons. The current density of the relativistic electron beam used in this work is in the range 3-300 GA/cm 2 , while its length roughly corresponds to the beam, produced by a 40 fs laser pulse. Propagation of the beam in the polyethylene target is studied. The code is complemented by an analytical model, which is applicable og a wider range of beam parameters that are currently beyond our computational possibilities. When the head of the beam enters the plastic target, electric field grows rapidly in consequence of the charge separation and it starts to ionize atoms. In the maximum of the field, which is less than 10% of the atomic field, the density of new free electrons is two orders of magnitude higher than the beam density, which is enough for the current neutralization. Cold electrons are accelerated by the field

  13. Continental scale modelling of geomagnetically induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakharov Yaroslav

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents aims at deriving statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in the European high-voltage power grids. Such a continent-wide system of more than 1500 substations and transmission lines requires updates of the previous modelling, which has dealt with national grids in fairly small geographic areas. We present here how GIC modelling can be conveniently performed on a spherical surface with minor changes in the previous technique. We derive the exact formulation to calculate geovoltages on the surface of a sphere and show its practical approximation in a fast vectorised form. Using the model of the old Finnish power grid and a much larger prototype model of European high-voltage power grids, we validate the new technique by comparing it to the old one. We also compare model results to measured data in the following cases: geoelectric field at the Nagycenk observatory, Hungary; GIC at a Russian transformer; GIC along the Finnish natural gas pipeline. In all cases, the new method works reasonably well.

  14. An optimized Faraday cage design for electron beam current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.N.; Hausner, G.G.; Parsons, D.F.

    1975-01-01

    A Faraday cage detector is described for measuring electron beam intensity for use with energies up to 1.2 Mev, with the present data taken at 100 keV. The design features a readily changeable limiting aperture and detector cup geometry, and a secondary electron suppression grid. The detection efficiency of the cage is shown to be limited only by primary backscatter through the detector solid angle of escape, which is optimized with respect to primary backscattered electrons and secondary electron escape. The geometry and stopping material of the detection cup are varied, and the results show that for maximum detection efficiency with carbon as the stopping mateiral, the solid angle of escape must be equal to or less than 0.05πsr. The experimental results are consistent within the +-2% accuracy of the detection electronics, and are not limited by the Faraday cage detection efficiency. (author)

  15. Beam 25 program for numerical simulation of the processes of high-current electron beam shaping,acceleration and transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Gordeev, V S

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the description of a self-consistent difference scheme and numerical algorithm of a joint solution of Maxwell equations and equation of charge particle motion on a regular non-uniform mesh. The given algorithm is applied to calculate non-stationary electromagnetic processes in axially symmetric structures consisting of components with different electric and magnetic properties as well as to simulate numerically the processes of high-current electron beam shaping, acceleration and transportation. The example of the program use for the calculation of electron beam characteristics in a STRAUS-2 accelerator diode is given. The obtained coincidence of calculation and experimental data lies within the limits of +- 10%.

  16. Experimental study of the dependence of beam current on injection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ion current from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heavy ion source depends on the confining axial and radial magnetic fields. Some efforts were made by earlier workers to investigate magnetic field scaling on the performance of the ECR source. In order to study the dependence of the ion current on the injection ...

  17. Experimental study of the dependence of beam current on injection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The ion current from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heavy ion source depends on the confining axial and radial magnetic fields. Some efforts were made by earlier workers to investigate magnetic field scaling on the performance of the ECR source. In order to study the dependence of the ion current on the ...

  18. Methods for calculating energy and current requirements for industrial electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.; Farrell, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The practical problems of determining electron beam parameters for industrial irradiation processes are discussed. To assist the radiation engineer in this task, the physical aspects of electron beam absorption are briefly described. Formulas are derived for calculating the surface dose in the treated material using the electron energy, beam current and the area thruput rate of the conveyor. For thick absorbers electron transport results are used to obtain the depth-dose distributions. From these the average dose in the material, anti D, and the beam power utilization efficiency, F/sub p/, can be found by integration over the distributions. These concepts can be used to relate the electron beam power to the mass thruput rate. Qualitatively, the thickness of the material determines the beam energy, the area thruput rate and surface dose determine the beam current while the mass thruput rate and average depth-dose determine the beam power requirements. Graphs are presented showing these relationships as a function of electron energy from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV for polystyrene. With this information, the determination of electron energy and current requirements is a relatively simple procedure

  19. Induced focusing and conversion of a Gaussian beam into an elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among several important findings, the finding that a very week probe beam can be guided and focused when power of both beams are well below their individual threshold for self-focusing, is a noteworthy one. It has been found that induced focusing is not possible for laser beams of any wavelength and beam radius.

  20. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  1. Electron-beam-induced segregation in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, J.P.; Ross, I.M.; Cullis, A.G.; Wang, T.; Parbrook, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report a study of the morphology and composition of In x Ga 1-x N/GaN multiple-quantum-well structures and their sensitivity to electron-beam damage. We have employed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural analysis was performed to investigate the dynamical effects of electron-beam irradiation on the relative indium distribution within the quantum wells. Exposure to relatively low incident beam illumination, corresponding to current densities at the specimen of ∼100 pA/cm 2 , was found to induce significant nanoclustering of indium within the multiple-quantum wells. These findings highlight the need for caution when reporting the presence of indium-rich clusters within InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum wells studied in the transmission electron microscope

  2. Production of a high-current microsecond electron beam with a large cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullin, E.N.; Belomytsev, S.Ya.; Bugaev, S.P.; Gorbachev, S.I.; Zaslavskii, V.M.; Zorin, V.P.; Koval'chuk, B.M.; Loginov, S.V.; Matyukov, Yu.N.; Rasputin, R.M.; Tolkachev, V.S.; Shchanin, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Obtaining high-current wide-aperture electron beams is an important problem in the development of laser technology for controlled nuclear fusion and for solving ecological and technological problems. The main scheme for producing such beams involves the use of generators with intermediate energy storage devices and burst-emission vacuum diodes. Beam pinching is prevented by using an external magnetic field or sectioning the diode into magnetically insulated diodes with currents lower than the limiting current. The length of the electron-current pulse varies from tens to hundreds of nano-seconds and is limited by the parameters of the intermediate storage device. Here the authors study the formation of a high-current electron beam with a square cross section and a current of the order of the limiting current of the diode in the absence of an external magnetic field as well as a 'fast' storage device in the power supply circuit. These conditions as a whole correspond to a simpler electron-source circuit, but the beam forming becomes more complicated. The reason for this is that there is no external magnetic field and that the role of plasma processes in the diode is enhanced by the greater length of the electron-current pulses

  3. Development of a radio-frequency quadrupole cooler for high beam currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussaid, Ramzi; Ban, G.; Quéméner, G.; Merrer, Y.; Lorry, J.

    2017-12-01

    The SHIRaC prototype is a recently developed radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler with an improved optics design to deliver the required beam quality to a high resolution separator (HRS). For an isobaric separation of isotopes, the HRS demands beams with emittance not exceeding 3 π mm mrad and longitudinal energy spread ˜1 eV . Simulation studies showed a significant contribution of the buffer gas diffusion, space charge effect and mainly the rf fringe field to degrade the achieved beam quality at the RFQ exit. A miniature rf quadrupole (μ RFQ ) has been implemented at that exit to remove the degrading effects and provide beams with 1 eV of energy spread and around 1.75 π mm mrad of emittance for 4 Pa gas pressure. This solution enables also to transmit more than 60% of the incoming ions for currents up to 1 μ A . Detailed studies of this development are presented and discussed in this paper. Transport of beams from SHIRaC towards the HRS has been done with an electrostatic quadrupole triplet. Simulations and first experimental tests showed that more than 95% of ions can reach the HRS. Because SPIRAL-2 beams are of high current and very radioactive, the buffer gas will be highly contaminated. Safe maintenance of the SHIRaC beam line needs exceptional treatment of radioactive contaminants. For that, special vinyl sleep should be mounted on elements to be maintained. A detailed maintenance process will be presented.

  4. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams

  5. Novel Faraday cup for the simultaneous observation and measurement of ion-beam currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.; Seidman, D.N.

    1977-01-01

    A novel Faraday cup is described which allows the simultaneous observation and measurement of ion-beam currents. The Faraday cup is constructed around a Galileo channel electron multiplier array (CEMA), which serves as the basis of an internal image intensification system (a gain of >10 4 ) for the observation of the ion beam; the CEMA also acts as a collector for the ion current which is measured by a Keithley 602 electrometer. The ion current is integrated by a simple and inexpensive dosimeter; the electronic circuit for the dosimeter is described. The application of the Faraday cup to the observation and measurement of a 30-keV Ar + ion beam is presented as an illustrative example. We have also employed this Faraday cup to observe and measure 30-keV Cr + , Mo + , or W + , and 18-keV Au + ion beams employed for the in situ irradiation of field-ion microscope specimens

  6. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J.C.; Salomon, J.; Tonezzer, M.; Scian, C.; Beck, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Della Mea, G.

    2008-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H + beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO

  8. Memory effect on ion beam-induced depolymerization of PMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnini, G.; Angilella, G.G.N. E-mail: giuseppe.angilella@ct.infn.it; Raudino, A.; Puglisi, O. E-mail: opuglisi@dipchi.unict.it

    2001-04-01

    Recently a new ion beam-induced phenomenology - depolymerization of macromolecular target - has been found and studied in our laboratory. This has been observed in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) using He{sup +} 300 keV ion beam, in a temperature range much lower than that required for thermal depolymerization. Here we report an in situ monitoring of PMMA depolymerization performed by mass spectrometry. We have found that at a given temperature the monomer flux due to depolymerization of the bombarded polymer is much more intense when the temperature is quenched, with respect to the same temperature during heating. The results have been rationalized by using an accurate model that involves initiation and propagation kinetics followed by the diffusion process. The use of the model allowed us to exclude any influence of transport properties of PMMA on this effect but indicates that the hysteresis phenomenon detected at macroscopic level has a microscopic counterpart linked to the chemical yields of the depolymerization kinetics.

  9. Ion and laser beam induced metastable alloy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westendorp, J.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with ion and laser beam induced thin film mixing. It describes the development of an Ultra High Vacuum apparatus for deposition, ion irradiation and in situ analysis of thin film sandwiches. This chamber has been developed in close collaboration with High Voltage Engineering Europa. Thin films can be deposited by an e-gun evaporator. The atom flux is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A comparison is made between ion beam and laser mixing of Cu with Au and Cu with W. The comparison provides a better understanding of the relative importance of purely collisional mixing, the role of thermodynamic effects and the contribution of diffusion due to defect generation and migration. (Auth.)

  10. Wideband Precision Current Transformer for the Magnet Current of the Beam Extraction Kicker Magnet of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gräwer, G

    2004-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction system is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn of the collider and to safely dispose them on external absorbers. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The generator produces a magnet current pulse with 3 us rise time, 20 kA amplitude and 1.8 ms fall time, of which 90 us are needed to dump the beam. The beam extraction system requires a high level of reliability. To detect any change in the magnet current characteristics, which might indicate a slow degradation of the pulse generator, a high precision wideband current transformer will be installed. For redundancy reasons, the results obtained with this device will be cross-checked with a Rogowski coil, installed adjacent to the transformer. A prototype transformer has been successfully tested at nominal current levels and showed satisfactory results compared with the output of a high frequency resistive coaxial shunt. The annular core of the ring type transformer is composed of...

  11. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    pumps can be taken into account. This method can be extended to any desorption experiment employing the single shot method for measurement. Of special interest for the operation of the SIS100 at high intensities is the minimization of desorption from cryogenic surfaces. A previous examination of this topic found a breakdown of the familiar scaling of the desorption yield with the beam's energy loss for cryogenic targets. Further examination of this effect with the techniques described above is another goal of this thesis. Simultaneously, desorption measurements at room temperature for several other targets have been conducted. An unexpected result of these experiments is the influence of target surface properties, which was found to be very weak in comparison to previous results. The methods developed during this thesis, along with the results gained by their application, represent another step towards the comprehension of (heavy) ion beam induced desorption.

  12. Photoinduced current and emission induced by current in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... study shows that, the photoinduced current is due to the transfer of electrons from highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to the lowest unoccupied molecularorbital (LUMO). Thus, the separation of electron from the electron–hole pair creates a free electron which is responsible for the observed photoinduced current.

  13. Very Fast Current Diagnostic for Linear Pulsed Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, Vincenzo; Delle Side, Domenico; Turco, Vito

    2018-01-01

    Fast current pulses manage lasers and particle accelerators and require sophisticate systems to be detected. At today Rogowski coils are well known. They are designed and built with a toroidal structure. In recently application, flat transmission lines are imploded and for this reason we develop a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. To get deep information from the system, it was approached by means of the theory of the transmission lines. The coil we build presents a resistance but it doesn't influence the rise time of the response, instead the integrating time. We also studied the influence of the magnetic properties of coil support. The new device was able to record pulses of more hundred nanoseconds depending on the inductance, load impedance and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response was characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time ( 100 ps), The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the quality of the response depends both on the manufacture quality of the coil and on the magnetic core characteristics. In biophysical applications often, a double line is employed in order to have a sample as control and a sample stressed by a light source. So, in this case we build two equal plane lines by 100 Ω characteristic resistance connected in parallel. We diagnosed the current present in a line. The attenuation factor resulted to be 11,5 A/V.

  14. Very Fast Current Diagnostic for Linear Pulsed Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassisi Vincenzo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast current pulses manage lasers and particle accelerators and require sophisticate systems to be detected. At today Rogowski coils are well known. They are designed and built with a toroidal structure. In recently application, flat transmission lines are imploded and for this reason we develop a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. To get deep information from the system, it was approached by means of the theory of the transmission lines. The coil we build presents a resistance but it doesn’t influence the rise time of the response, instead the integrating time. We also studied the influence of the magnetic properties of coil support. The new device was able to record pulses of more hundred nanoseconds depending on the inductance, load impedance and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response was characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (~100 ps, The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the quality of the response depends both on the manufacture quality of the coil and on the magnetic core characteristics. In biophysical applications often, a double line is employed in order to have a sample as control and a sample stressed by a light source. So, in this case we build two equal plane lines by 100 Ω characteristic resistance connected in parallel. We diagnosed the current present in a line. The attenuation factor resulted to be 11,5 A/V.

  15. Electric field control photo-induced Hall currents in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2008-10-15

    We generate spin-polarized carrier populations in GaAs and low temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) by circularly polarized optical beams and pull them by external electric fields to create spin-polarized currents. In the presence of the optically generated spin currents, anomalous Hall currents with an enhancement with increasing doping are observed and found to be almost steady in moderate electric fields up to {approx}120 mV {mu}m{sup -1}, indicating that photo-induced spin orientation of electrons is preserved in these systems. However, a field {approx}300 mV {mu}m{sup -1} completely destroys the electron spin polarization due to an increase of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin precession frequency of the hot electrons. This suggests that high field carrier transport conditions might not be suitable for spin-based technology with GaAs and LT-GaAs. It is also demonstrated that the presence of the excess arsenic sites in LT-GaAs might not affect the spin relaxation by Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism owing to a large number of electrons in n-doped materials.

  16. Fast Kicker for High Current Beam Manipulation in Large Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Gambaryan, V

    2017-01-01

    The pulsed deflecting magnet (kicker) project was worked out in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The kicker design parameters are: impulsive force, 1 mT*m; pulse edge, 5 ns; impulse duration, 200 ns. The unconventional approach is that the plates must be replaced by a set of cylinders. The obtained magnet construction enables the field homogeneity to be controlled by changing current magnitudes in cylinders. Furthermore, we demonstrated the method of field optimization. In addition, measurement technique for the harmonic components was considered and the possibility of control harmonic components value was demonstrated.

  17. The effect of beam-driven return current instability on solar hard X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, D.; McQuillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    The problem of electrostatic wave generation by a return current driven by a small area electron beam during solar hard X-ray bursts is discussed. The marginal stability method is used to solve numerically the electron and ion heating equations for a prescribed beam current evolution. When ion-acoustic waves are considered, the method appears satisfactory and, following an initial phase of Coulomb resistivity in which Te/T sub i rise, predicts a rapid heating of substantial plasma volumes by anomalous ohmic dissipation. This hot plasma emits so much thermal bremsstrahlung that, contrary to previous expectations, the unstable beam-plasma system actually emits more hard X-rays than does the beam in the purely collisional thick target regime relevant to larger injection areas. Inclusion of ion-cyclotron waves results in ion-acoustic wave onset at lower Te/T sub i and a marginal stability treatment yields unphysical results.

  18. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  19. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiljeva, I.V.; Mjakin, S.V.; Makarov, A.V.; Krasovsky, A.N.; Varlamov, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy)

  20. Design of the beam shut-off current monitor upgrade for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietryla, A.; Decker, G.

    2000-01-01

    Plans to eliminate the positron accumulator ring (PAR) from the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector complex have created the need for a device to limit the allowable beam charge injected into the APS injector synchrotrons. The beam shut-off current monitor (BESOCM) was chosen to provide this function. This new application of the BESOCM provided the opportunity to explore new design philosophies. Two design goals were to de-emphasize reliance on external signals and to become insensitive to timing variations. Both of these goals were accomplished by deriving the trigger directly from the beam. This paper will discuss the features of the new BESOCM design and present data demonstrating its function

  1. Design and commissioning of the APS beam charge and current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Lenkszus, F.; Rotela, E.

    1994-01-01

    The non-intercepting charge and current monitors suitable for a wide range of beam parameters have been developed and installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) low energy transport lines, positron accumulator ring (PAR), and injector synchrotron. The positron or electron beam pulse in the APS has charge ranging from 100pC to l0nC with pulse width varying from 30ps to 30ns. The beam charge and current are measured with a current transformer and subsequent current monitoring electronics based on an ultrafast, high precision gated integrator. The signal processing electronics, data acquisition, and communication with the control system are managed by a VME-based system. This paper summarizes the hardware and software features of the systems. The results of recent operations are presented

  2. Current status of electron beam treatment of flue gas in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2006-01-01

    Fossil resource especially coal will remain the main energy resource in China over the next 3 ∼4 decades. Pollution of flue gas from fossil power station is one problem being desiderated to solve since 1990's. Electron beam treatment of flue gas as an advanced technique has been developed and used by some institutes and industries in China. The current status of flue gas treatment using electron beam and the development of electron accelerator in China are reviewed. (author)

  3. Measurements of current density distribution in shaped e-beam writers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bok, Jan; Horáček, Miroslav; Kolařík, Vladimír; Urbánek, Michal; Matějka, Milan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 149, JAN 5 (2016), s. 117-124 ISSN 0167-9317 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : shaped e-beam writer * electron beam * current density Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2016

  4. Trapping and manipulation of microparticles using laser-induced convection currents and photophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Flores, E; Torres-Hurtado, S A; Páez, R; Ruiz, U; Beltrán-Pérez, G; Neale, S L; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Ramos-García, R

    2015-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of microparticles suspended in water due to laser-induced convection currents. Convection currents are generated due to laser light absorption in an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a:Si-H) thin film. The particles are dragged towards the beam's center by the convection currents (Stokes drag force) allowing trapping with powers as low as 0.8 mW. However, for powers >3 mW trapped particles form a ring around the beam due to two competing forces: Stokes drag and thermo-photophoretic forces. Additionally, we show that dynamic beam shaping can be used to trap and manipulate multiple particles by photophotophoresis without the need of lithographically created resistive heaters.

  5. Trapping and manipulation of microparticles using laser-induced convection currents and photophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Flores, E.; Torres-Hurtado, S. A.; Páez, R.; Ruiz, U.; Beltrán-Pérez, G.; Neale, S. L.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-García, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of microparticles suspended in water due to laser-induced convection currents. Convection currents are generated due to laser light absorption in an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a:Si-H) thin film. The particles are dragged towards the beam's center by the convection currents (Stokes drag force) allowing trapping with powers as low as 0.8 mW. However, for powers >3 mW trapped particles form a ring around the beam due to two competing forces: Stokes drag and thermo-photophoretic forces. Additionally, we show that dynamic beam shaping can be used to trap and manipulate multiple particles by photophotophoresis without the need of lithographically created resistive heaters. PMID:26504655

  6. Toward sensitive graphene nanoribbon-nanopore devices by preventing electron beam-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Balan, Adrian; Drndić, Marija

    2013-12-23

    Graphene-based nanopore devices are promising candidates for next-generation DNA sequencing. Here we fabricated graphene nanoribbon-nanopore (GNR-NP) sensors for DNA detection. Nanopores with diameters in the range 2-10 nm were formed at the edge or in the center of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), with widths between 20 and 250 nm and lengths of 600 nm, on 40 nm thick silicon nitride (SiN(x)) membranes. GNR conductance was monitored in situ during electron irradiation-induced nanopore formation inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) operating at 200 kV. We show that GNR resistance increases linearly with electron dose and that GNR conductance and mobility decrease by a factor of 10 or more when GNRs are imaged at relatively high magnification with a broad beam prior to making a nanopore. By operating the TEM in scanning TEM (STEM) mode, in which the position of the converged electron beam can be controlled with high spatial precision via automated feedback, we were able to prevent electron beam-induced damage and make nanopores in highly conducting GNR sensors. This method minimizes the exposure of the GNRs to the beam before and during nanopore formation. The resulting GNRs with unchanged resistances after nanopore formation can sustain microampere currents at low voltages (∼50 mV) in buffered electrolyte solution and exhibit high sensitivity, with a large relative change of resistance upon changes of gate voltage, similar to pristine GNRs without nanopores.

  7. Ion beam induced surface graphitization of CVD diamond for x-ray beam position monitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chian; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wen, L.; Melendres, C.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at ANL is a third-generation synchrotron facility that generates powerful x-ray beams on its undulator beamlines. It is important to know the position and angle of the x- ray beam during experiments. Due to very high heat flux levels, several patented x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) exploiting chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have been developed. These XBPMs have a thin layer of low-atomic-mass metallic coating so that photoemission from the x rays generate a minute but measurable current for position determination. Graphitization of the CVD diamond surface creates a very thin, intrinsic and conducting layer that can stand much higher temperatures and minimal x-ray transmission losses compared to the coated metallic layers. In this paper, a laboratory sputter ion source was used to transform selected surfaces of a CVD diamond substrate into graphite. The effect of 1-5 keV argon ion bombardment on CVD diamond surfaces at various target temperatures from 200 to 500 C was studied using Auger electron spectroscopy and in-situ electrical resistivity measurements. Graphitization after the ion bombardment has been confirmed and optimum conditions for graphitization studied. Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the overall diamond structure in the bulk of CVD diamond substrate after the ion bombardments. It was found that target temperature plays an important role in stability and electrical conductivity of the irradiated CVD diamonds

  8. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  9. Electron beam induced heat flow transient in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Rose, L.F.D.; Brotto, R.

    1983-01-01

    On the basis of a numerically solved heat diffusion equation, the structure of the thermal transient induced in an aluminium sample by an electron beam pulse is described in terms of slush zone formation, molten depth, liquid phase duration, and melt front history. The heat flow dynamics, as determined by monochromatic (electron energy ranging between 5 and 25 keV) and ultrashort (15 ns fwhm) pulses, is contrasted with the ruby laser induced one. Accessible absorbed energy intervals for sample surface melting are given as a function of electron energy; heating of the sample interior at values higher than those attained at the surface is shown to occur only at higher electron energies, for a given pulse duration. The general dependence of the present results on the pulse duration and the effects produced by polychromatic pulses are also discussed. (author)

  10. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  11. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Generalized melting criterion for beam-induced amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, Paul R.

    1993-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the mean-square static atomic displacements provide a generic measure of the enthalpy stored in the lattice in the form of chemical and topological disorder, and that the effect of the displacements on the softening of shear elastic constants is identical to that of heating. This finding lends support to a generalized form of the Lindemann phenomenological melting criterion and leads to a natural interpretion of crystalline-to-amorphous transformations as defect-induced melting of metastable crystals driven beyond a critical state of disorder where the melting temperature falls below the glass-transition temperature. Application of the generalized Lindemann criterion to both the crystalline and amorphous phases indicates that the enthalpies of the two phases become identical when their shear moduli become equal. This thermo-elastic rule provides a basis for predicting the relative susceptibility of compounds to amorphization in terms of their elastic properties as measured by Debye temperatures. The present approach can explain many of the basic findings on beam-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds as well as amorphous phase formation associated with ion implantation, ion-beam mixing and other solid-state processes

  13. Linac beam dynamics calculations for low-current large-emittance beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, G.R.; Butler, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    The beam in PILAC, a superconducting linac for pions proposed at LAUFF, will have a lager momentum spread (7% dp/p) and occupy a larger transverse space (13 cm dia. bore) than is usual in high-beta linacs. To find the effects of this large phase space, a cavity element is being added to the MOTER code. With this addition, pions and other particles may be tracked through the injection line and the PILAC linac. In one option, the particles may be cell by cell through a multicell cavity using formulas. The formulas are derived by integrating the energy gain and transverse impulse from the fields in a cell along the path of the particle. What is new in this analysis is that the transverse momentum is considered to be a significant part of the total momentum. The effect of a difference in velocity from the design velocity of the structure is considered. In another option still under development, field information is specified, and the particles may be tracked by stepwise integration

  14. Time-of-flight MeV-SIMS with beam induced secondary electron trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte-Borchers, Martina, E-mail: marschul@phys.ethz.ch; Döbeli, Max; Müller, Arnold Milenko; George, Matthias; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2016-08-01

    A new Time-of-flight MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) setup was developed to be used with a capillary microprobe for molecular imaging with heavy primary ions at MeV energies. Due to the low output current of the ion collimating capillary a Time-of-flight (ToF) measurement method with high duty cycle is necessary. Secondary electrons from the sample surface and transmitted ions were studied as start signals. They enable measurements with a continuous primary beam and unpulsed ToF spectrometer. Tests with various primary ion beams and sample types have shown that a secondary electron signal is obtained from 30% to 40% of incident MeV particles. This provides a ToF start signal with considerably better time resolution than the one obtained from transmitted primary ions detected in a radiation hard gas ionization detector. Beam induced secondary electrons therefore allow for MeV-SIMS measurements with reasonable mass resolution at primary ion beam currents in the low fA range.

  15. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Ions Impact on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kireeff-Covo, Michel; Barnard, John J; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, C M; Cohen, Ronald; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kwan, Joe W; Lund, Steven M; Molvik, Arthur; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L; Westenskow, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The cost of accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) can be reduced by using the smallest possible clearance between the beam and the wall from the beamline. This increases beam loss to the walls, generating ion-induced electrons that could be trapped by beam space charge potential into an "electron cloud," which can cause degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanism of production of ion-induced electrons we have measured impact of K+ ions with energies up to 400 KeV on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the ion source test stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The electron yield will be discussed and compared with experimental measurements from 1 MeV K+ ions in the High-Current Experiment at LBNL.*

  16. Diagnosis and dynamics in a simple low energy medium current electron beam channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marghitu, S.; Marghitu, O.; Oproiu, C.; Marin, G.; Scarlat, Fl.

    2004-05-01

    We present a simple experimental setup and an associated method enabling both the non-destructive diagnosis and the calculation of the beam evolution in a low energy medium current electron beam channel, where the space-charge and emittance effects are comparable. The diagnosis makes use of an axially symmetric magnetic lens while a second lens is added to increase the flexibility in the beam processing. The paper emphasizes the three steps involved in the method: the evaluation of the lenses' magnetic field by numerical simulation, the beam diagnosis, and the computation of the beam envelope. The calculation of the magnetic field is based on the finite element method. Subsequently, the beam parameters at the electron source exit - emittance and cross-over radius and position - are found with the modified three gradient method. Finally, the beam dynamics are modeled with the K-V equation adapted for the particular case of axial symmetry. The results obtained in this paper can be used to optimize technological processes, such as welding, hardening, cladding, and surface alloying.

  17. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices

  18. In situ beam angle measurement in a multi-wafer high current ion implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freer, B.S.; Reece, R.N.; Graf, M.A.; Parrill, T.; Polner, D.

    2005-01-01

    Direct, in situ measurement of the average angle and angular content of an ion beam in a multi-wafer ion implanter is reported for the first time. A new type of structure and method are described. The structures are located on the spinning disk, allowing precise angular alignment to the wafers. Current that passes through the structures is known to be within a range of angles and is detected behind the disk. By varying the angle of the disk around two axes, beam current versus angle is mapped and the average angle and angular spread are calculated. The average angle measured in this way is found to be consistent with that obtained by other techniques, including beam centroid offset and wafer channeling methods. Average angle of low energy beams, for which it is difficult to use other direct methods, is explored. A 'pencil beam' system is shown to give average angle repeatability of 0.13 deg. (1σ) or less, for two low energy beams under normal tuning variations, even though no effort was made to control the angle

  19. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Phil S.

    2007-01-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  20. High Dynamic Magnetic Beam Current Measurements by Means of Optimised Magneto-Resistance (MR) Sensor Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hape, M; Ricken, W

    2005-01-01

    The GSI-FAIR project (facility for antiprotons and ion research) will comprehend DC currents up to around 5 A in the SIS 100 synchrotron and after bunch compression down to 50 ns pulse length the peak currents will reach up to 100 A. To meet these higher demands of beam current measurements new sensor techniques are foreseen. The measurement device itself will be designed in form of a clip-on ampere-meter. The air gap of the flux concentrator is assumed to be around 5 mm and thus, the estimated maximum field therein is around 30 mT for a beam current of 100 A peak. The resolution of this device is aimed to be 1 mA in beam current, corresponding to a system dynamic of around 105. This high demands of beam current measurement require more sophisticated sensor types than just using a Hall probe. The characteristics of AMR (anisotropic magneto-resistance), GMR (giant magneto-resistance) and GMI (giant magneto-impedance) sensors like hysteresis, linearity and sensitivity have been measured within the magnetic fiel...

  1. Recent Improvements to the Control of the CTF3 High-Current Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Constance, B; Gamba, D; Skowronski, P K

    2013-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC multiTeV linear collider option, the drive beam complex at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN is providing highcurrent electron pulses for a number of related experiments. By means of a system of electron pulse compression and bunch frequency multiplication, a fully loaded, 120 MeV linac is used to generate 140 ns electron pulses of around 28 Amperes. Subsequent deceleration of this high-current drive beam demonstrates principles behind the CLIC acceleration scheme, and produces 12 GHz RF power for experimental purposes. As the facility has progressed toward routine operation, a number of studies aimed at improving the drive beam performance have been carried out. Additional feedbacks, automated steering programs, and improved control of optics and dispersion have contributed to a more stable, reproducible drive beam with consequent benefits for the experiments.

  2. Current status and future prospect of electron beam sterilization in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Ichiro

    1998-01-01

    It seems that electron beam sterilization is being current topic among all applications in Japan and that this tendency will continue until when major companies interested in the technology complete introducing electron beam. Since the Ministry of Health and Welfare(MOHW) officially issued revised regulation on GMP for medical devices in 1995, EtO has become the method regarded as time and money consuming one. On the contrary, electron beam has become as relatively economical and desirable method to achieve same result by its characteristics such as high productivity, rather easy validation and consequent cost reduction, although less penetration limit the kind of products to be treated. Status and prospect of electron beam sterilization in Japan will be presented in the paper along with accelerator related technologies

  3. Picosecond stability of injection of parallel high-current pulsed electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Ul'Maskulov, M. R.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Klimov, A. I.; Rostov, V. V.; Mesyats, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    The stability of operation of parallel explosive-emission cathodes driven by a split high-voltage pulse with a subnanosecond leading front has been studied. It is established that, upon the training of graphite cathodes in vacuum with up to ˜104 pulses, the current pulse fronts of injected high-current electron beams exhibit a mutual temporal dispersion not exceeding ten picoseconds. The dynamics of this parameter during the training stage, the variation of the absolute spread, and the growth of a relative delay of the moments of beam injection have been investigated.

  4. Current and turbulence measurements at the FINO1 offshore wind energy site: analysis using 5-beam ADCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoday-Paskyabi, Mostafa; Fer, Ilker; Reuder, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    We report concurrent measurements of ocean currents and turbulence at two sites in the North Sea, one site at upwind of the FINO1 platform and the other 200-m downwind of the Alpha Ventus wind farm. At each site, mean currents, Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity and production of turbulent kinetic energy are obtained from two bottom-mounted 5-beam Nortek Signature1000s, high-frequency Doppler current profiler, at a water depth of approximately 30 m. Measurements from the two sites are compared to statistically identify the effects of wind farm and waves on ocean current variability and the turbulent structure in the water column. Profiles of Reynolds stresses are found to be sensible to both environmental forcing and the wind farm wake-induced distortions in both boundary layers near the surface and the seabed. Production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence intensity exhibit approximately similar, but less pronounced, patterns in the presence of farm wake effects.

  5. Development of a radio-frequency quadrupole cooler for high beam currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Boussaid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The SHIRaC prototype is a recently developed radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ beam cooler with an improved optics design to deliver the required beam quality to a high resolution separator (HRS. For an isobaric separation of isotopes, the HRS demands beams with emittance not exceeding 3π  mm mrad and longitudinal energy spread ∼1  eV. Simulation studies showed a significant contribution of the buffer gas diffusion, space charge effect and mainly the rf fringe field to degrade the achieved beam quality at the RFQ exit. A miniature rf quadrupole (μRFQ has been implemented at that exit to remove the degrading effects and provide beams with 1 eV of energy spread and around 1.75π  mm mrad of emittance for 4 Pa gas pressure. This solution enables also to transmit more than 60% of the incoming ions for currents up to 1  μA. Detailed studies of this development are presented and discussed in this paper. Transport of beams from SHIRaC towards the HRS has been done with an electrostatic quadrupole triplet. Simulations and first experimental tests showed that more than 95% of ions can reach the HRS. Because SPIRAL-2 beams are of high current and very radioactive, the buffer gas will be highly contaminated. Safe maintenance of the SHIRaC beam line needs exceptional treatment of radioactive contaminants. For that, special vinyl sleep should be mounted on elements to be maintained. A detailed maintenance process will be presented.

  6. A Four Channel Beam Current Monitor Data Acquisition System Using Embedded Processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheat, Jr., Robert Mitchell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-11

    Data acquisition from multiple beam current monitors is required for electron accelerator production of Mo-99. A two channel system capable of recording data from two beam current monitors has been developed, is currently in use, and is discussed below. The development of a cost-effective method of extending this system to more than two channels and integrating of these measurements into an accelerator control system is the main focus of this report. Data from these current monitors is digitized, processed, and stored by a digital data acquisition system. Limitations and drawbacks with the currently deployed digital data acquisition system have been identified as have been potential solutions, or at least improvements, to these problems. This report will discuss and document the efforts we've made in improving the flexibility and lowering the cost of the data acquisition system while maintaining the minimum requirements.

  7. Induced focusing and conversion of a Gaussian beam into an elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have presented an investigation of the induced focusing in Kerr media of two laser beams, the pump beam and ... in nonlinear media has been confined to cylindrical Gaussian beams. In a few re- cent publications .... Inserting suitable chosen trial functions in the variational principle, we can obtain a reduced variational ...

  8. VME computer monitoring system of KEK-PS fast pulsed magnet currents and beam intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, T.; Akiyama, A.; Kadokura, E.; Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    For beam transfer from the KEK-PS Linac to the Booster synchrotron ring and from the Booster to the Main ring, many pulse magnets have been installed. It is very important for the machine operation to monitor the firing time, rising time and peak value of the pulsed magnet currents. It is also very important for magnet tuning to obtain good injection efficiency of the Booster and the Main ring, and to observe the last circulating bunched beam in the Booster as well as the first circulating in the Main. These magnet currents and beam intensity signals are digitized by a digital oscilloscope with signal multiplexers, and then shown on a graphic display screen of the console via a VME computer. (author)

  9. Non-destructive elemental analysis of a carbonaceous chondrite with direct current Muon beam at MuSIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, K; Sato, A; Ninomiya, K; Kawashima, Y; Shimomura, K; Yoshida, G; Kawai, Y; Osawa, T; Tachibana, S

    2017-11-13

    Electron- or X-ray-induced characteristic X-ray analysis has been widely used to determine chemical compositions of materials in vast research fields. In recent years, analysis of characteristic X-rays from muonic atoms, in which a muon is captured, has attracted attention because both a muon beam and a muon-induced characteristic X-ray have high transmission abilities. Here we report the first non-destructive elemental analysis of a carbonaceous chondrite using one of the world-leading intense direct current muon beam source (MuSIC; MUon Science Innovative Channel). We successfully detected characteristic muonic X-rays of Mg, Si, Fe, O, S and C from Jbilet Winselwan CM chondrite, of which carbon content is about 2 wt%, and the obtained elemental abundance pattern was consistent with that of CM chondrites. Because of its high sensitivity to carbon, non-destructive elemental analysis with a muon beam can be a novel powerful tool to characterize future retuned samples from carbonaceous asteroids.

  10. Ion beam induced charge microscopy studies of power diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmeck, M; Balk, L J; Osipowicz, T; Watt, F; Phang, J C H; Khambadkone, A M; Niedernostheide, F-J; Schulze, H-J

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge microscopy (IBIC microscopy) has been established recently as an analytical tool for the characterization of various types of semiconductor devices. In this paper the potential of IBIC microscopy for the analysis of deeply buried structures of high power devices under biases of more than 2 kV is discussed. Such data are useful in the design process of high power devices because excessive fields at device edge regions or within protection elements (e.g. field ring structures) can be avoided. Since charge collection efficiency within depleted pn junctions is typically 100% for IBIC analysis, the contrast due to E-field variations within the large depletion regions of high power devices is limited. Here we will introduce a new approach for enhancing this contrast by using the temporal information from the IBIC signals gained with a transient IBIC set-up. Simulations and experimental data will be compared to evaluate the suitability of the new approach. The device used here is a high voltage diode with a field ring structure which was analysed using a 2 MeV proton beam

  11. An optimized nanoparticle separator enabled by electron beam induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowlkes, J D; Rack, P D; Doktycz, M J

    2010-01-01

    Size-based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct-write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism for depositing/etching nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam-interaction region. Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub-50 nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular-sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects) and (2) preserved the fidelity of the spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size-based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  12. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett B. Lewis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IVMe3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  13. Spectra of explosive glowing of heavy metal azides at initiation by high-current electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Lysyk, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Glowing spectra of products resulted by heavy metal azides explosive decomposition initiated by high-current electron beam were measured and identified. Intensive emission lines related to atoms of alkali metals were observed in spectra of samples under study. These atoms enter explosives during their preparation. Emission lines of elements being part of a sample holder were also presented in spectra of explosion.

  14. Small-sized monitor of beam current and profile for the proton pulse electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getmanov, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    Design and principle of operation of current monitor and beam profile of range-coordinate type are described. Monitor operation peculiarities are discussed using diagnostics of a beam of 330-420 keV electrostatic pulse proton accelerator with a beam current of up to 20 mA, at a current density of up to 23 mA x cm -2 and wth pulse duraton of about 20 μs. The monitor consists of a vacuum-dense foil of 3.0+-0.1 μm in thickness (or 0.81+-0.0x- mg x cm -2 ) two grid electrodes, each containing 12 wires, and as solid copper bottom. Foil serves for chopping off background particles with a path lesser 3.0 μm and stands thermal pulse load up to 0.5 J/cm -2 . Grid electrode wires are oriented perpendicularly to lach other and form a two-coordinate secondary-emisson roughness indicator. The bothhom is used for measuring an absolute value of beam current

  15. Direct Measurement of Beam Angle in a High Current Ion Implanter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, B. S.; Rubin, L. M.; Graf, M. A.; Hoglund, D. E.; Newman, D.; Ditzler, K.; Elshot, K.; Romig, T.

    2006-11-01

    We report the first device results from a new method of direct measurement and real-time control of the average angle of an ion beam in a high current ion implanter. The angle detector consists of an array of high aspect ratio slots that are mounted directly on the same process disk containing the wafers. Beam profiling is achieved by measuring the ion current through the slots versus angle as the disk is rotated perpendicular to the slots. From this profile we determine an angle offset relative to the nominal implant angle. This offset may be a result of beam steering, mechanical positioning uncertainty, or both. The disk is then reoriented if necessary to ensure that the desired beam angle with respect to the wafer is achieved. We implanted the NMOS and PMOS source/drain extension implants for several dozen lots of 90nm and 120nm NMOS and PMOS devices. We showed tightened distributions of both transistor drive currents and asymmetry of drive currents under reverse biasing for 90nm and 120nm devices manufactured on 300mm wafers after the installation of the angle detection hardware. We also observed a tightening of the yield distribution for the 120nm devices.

  16. Neutronics design of accelerator-driven system for power flattening and beam current reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Kenji; Iwanaga, Kohei; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Kurata, Yuji; Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tomohiko

    2008-01-01

    In the present neutronics design of the Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), we investigated several methods to reduce the power peak and beam current, and estimated the temperature reductions of the cladding tube and beam window from the conventional design. The methods are adjustment of inert matrix ratio in fuel in each burn-up cycle, multiregion design in terms of pin radius or inert matrix content, and modification of the level of the beam window position and the height of the central fuel assemblies. As a result, we optimized the ADS combined with the adjustment of the inert matrix ratio in each burn-up cycle, multiregion design in terms of inert matrix content and deepened window level. The maximum temperatures of the optimized ADS at the surface of the cladding tube and the beam window were reduced by 91 and 38degC, respectively. The maximum beam current was improved from 20.3 to 15.6 mA. (author)

  17. A squid-based beam current monitor for FAIR/CRYRING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geithner, Rene; Stöhlker, Thomas; Kurian, Febin; Reeg, Hansjörg; Schwickert, Marcus; Neubert, Ralf; Seidel, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A SQUID-based beam current monitor was developed for the upcoming FAIR-Project, providing a non-destructive online monitoring of the beam currents in the nA-range. The cryogenic current comparator (CCC) was optimized for lowest possible noise-limited current resolution together with a high system bandwidth. This CCC is foreseen to be installed in the CRYRING facility (CRYRING@ESR: A study group report www.gsi.de/fileadmin/SPARC/documents/Cryring/ReportCryring-40ESR.PDF), working as a test bench for FAIR. In this contribution we present results of the completed CCC for FAIR/CRYRING and also arrangements that have been done for the installation of the CCC at CRYRING, regarding the cryostat design. (paper)

  18. A laser beam quality definition based on induced temperature rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harold C

    2012-12-17

    Laser beam quality metrics like M(2) can be used to describe the spot sizes and propagation behavior of a wide variety of non-ideal laser beams. However, for beams that have been diffracted by limiting apertures in the near-field, or those with unusual near-field profiles, the conventional metrics can lead to an inconsistent or incomplete description of far-field performance. This paper motivates an alternative laser beam quality definition that can be used with any beam. The approach uses a consideration of the intrinsic ability of a laser beam profile to heat a material. Comparisons are made with conventional beam quality metrics. An analysis on an asymmetric Gaussian beam is used to establish a connection with the invariant beam propagation ratio.

  19. Experience with the PEP-II RF System at High Beam Currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corredoura, Paul L.

    2000-07-06

    The PEP-II Factory Low-Level RF System (LLRF) is a fully programmable VXI based design running under an EPICS control environment. Several RF feedback loops are used to control longitudinal coupled-bunch modes driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. This paper updates the performance of the LLRF system as beam currents reach design levels. Modifications which enhance the stability, diagnostics, and overall operational performance are described. Recent data from high current operation is included.

  20. Induced current in superconducting coils and its effect on dynamic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haibin; Zhou Youhe; Zheng Xiaojing

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamic stability of the superconducting coils in tokamak-type fusion reactor has been performed, when the induced current and its effect on the dynamic stability have been taken into account from the theory of magnetism captured by the superconducting coil. Based on the theory of curved beams and the Biot-Savart law, a theoretical model of the magneto-elastic interactions among the deformation of the coils, the electromagnetic force exerted on the coils and the induced current of the coils has been established. From the numerical analysis of a three-coil superconducting partial torus, it is found that the induced current due to the coil vibration is very small when a steady current is applied in the coil, therefore there is a little effect of the current on the mechanical behavior of the coil. When the structure is subjected to a transient electromagnetic force due to a rapid change of pulse current, the influence of induced current on the mechanical behavior becomes notable. That is to say, the range of magneto-elastic dynamic stability becomes smaller due to the induced current in the superconducting partial torus when pulse current is applied in the coils

  1. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X-band choke-mode cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The X-band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns.

  2. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X -band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  3. Spatially-Resolved Beam Current and Charge-State Distributions for the NEXT Ion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, James E.; Diamant, Kevin D.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Plume characterization tests with the 36-cm NEXT ion engine are being performed at The Aerospace Corporation using engineering-model and prototype-model thrusters. We have examined the beam current density and xenon charge-state distribution as functions of position on the accel grid. To measure the current density ratio j++/j+, a collimated Eprobe was rotated through the plume with the probe oriented normal to the accel electrode surface at a distance of 82 cm. The beam current density jb versus radial position was measured with a miniature planar probe at 3 cm from the accel. Combining the j++/j+ and jb data yielded the ratio of total Xe+2 current to total Xe+1 current (J++/J+) at forty operating points in the standard throttle table. The production of Xe+2 and Xe+3 was measured as a function of propellant utilization to support performance and lifetime predictions for an extended throttle table. The angular dependence of jb was measured at intermediate and far-field distances to assist with plume modeling and to evaluate the thrust loss due to beam divergence. Thrust correction factors were derived from the total doubles-to-singles current ratio and from the far-field divergence data

  4. Current control of the electron beam formed in the magnetron gun with a secondary-emission cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbnya, A.N.; Reshetnyak, N.G.; Zakutin, V.V.; Chertishchev, I.A.; Romas'ko, V.P.; Dovbnyan, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Data are reported on electron beam generation and beam current control in two types of secondary-emission cathode magnetron guns. The influence of the magnetic field value and field distribution on the formation of the beam and its parameters has been investigated in the electron energy range between 20 and 150 keV. The influence of local magnetic field variations on the cathode and the electron beam characteristics has been studied. The possibility to control the electron beam current in various ways has been demonstrated

  5. High-stable secondary-emission monitor for accelerated electron beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudnikov, I.A.; Saksaganskij, G.L.; Bazhanov, E.B.; Zabrodin, B.V.

    1977-01-01

    A secondary-emission monitor for a 10 to 30 MeV electron beam (beam current is 10 -4 to 10 -2 A) is described. The monitor comprises a measuring electrode unit, titanium discharge-type pump, getter made of porous titanium, all enclosed in a metal casing. The measuring unit comprises three electrodes made of 20 μm aluminium foil. The secondary emission coefficient (5.19%+-0.06% for the electron energy of 20 MeV) is maintained stable for a long time. The monitor detects pulses of up to some nanoseconds duration. It is reliable in operation, and is recommended for a wide practical application

  6. Application of the inverse estimation method of current distribution from magnetic fields using genetic algorithm to beam profile measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Sakasai, K.; Ara, K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the new type of non-invasive beam profile monitor for intense ion accelerator using high-temperature superconductor. We regard the inverse estimation problem of beam profile as the optimum allocation problem of the currents into the cross-section of the beam vacuum pipe and applied genetic algorithm to solve this optimization problem. And we carried out the computer simulation to verify the effectiveness of this inverse estimation method of beam profile. (author)

  7. Development of movable mask system to cope with high beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Sanami, T.; Kageyama, T.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The KEK B factory (KEKB), a high current electron-positron collider, has a movable mask (or collimator) system to reduce the background noise in the BELLE detector coming from spent particles. The early movable masks, however, had severe problems of heating, arcing, and vacuum leaks over the stored beam current of several hundred mA. The cause is intense trapped higher order modes (HOMs) excited at the mask head, where the cross section of the beam chamber changed drastically. The mask head, made of copper-tungsten alloy or pure copper, was frequently damaged by hitting of the high energy beam at the same time. Since the problems of the mask were revealed, several kinds of improved masks have been designed employing rf technologies in dealing with the HOM and installed to the ring step by step. Much progress has come from adopting a trapped-mode free structure, where the mask was a bent chamber itself. Recently the further improved mask with a reduced HOM design or HOM dampers was developed to suppress the heating of vacuum components near the mask due to the HOM traveling from the mask. To avoid damage to the mask head, on the other hand, a titanium mask head was tried. The latest masks are working as expected now at the stored beam current of 1.5 A. Presented are the problems and experiences on the movable mask system for the KEKB, which are characteristic of and common in a high intensity accelerator

  8. Reactions induced by 11Be beam at Rex-Isolde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppesen H.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The collision induced by the three Beryllium isotopes, 9,10,11Be, on a 64Zn target were investigated at Ec.m. ≈ 1.4 the Coulomb barrier. The experiments with the radioactive 10,11Be beams were performed at the Rex-Isolde facility at CERN. In the case of 9,10Be, elastic scattering angular distributions were measured whereas, in the 11Be case, the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. A strong damping of the quasielastic cross-section was observed in the 11Be case, in the angular range around the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. In this latter case a large total-reaction cross-section is found. Such a cross-section is more than a factor of two larger than the ones extracted in the reactions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the 11Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  9. Current-induced forces: a simple derivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Dundas, Daniel; Lü, Jing-Tao

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the problem of forces on atoms under current in nanoscale conductors. We derive and discuss the five principal kinds of force under steady-state conditions from a simple standpoint that-with the help of background literature-should be accessible to physics undergraduates. The discussion...... aims at combining methodology with an emphasis on the underlying physics through examples. We discuss and compare two forces present only under current-the non-conservative electron wind force and a Lorentz-like velocity-dependent force. It is shown that in metallic nanowires both display significant...

  10. Absolute Current Calibrations of 1$\\mu$A CW Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Freyberger, A; Day, A R; Degtiarenko, P; Saha, A; Slachtouski, S

    2005-01-01

    The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1$\\mu\\A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy losses due to electromagnetic and hadronic losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and GEANT simulations will be presented.

  11. High Accuracy Beam Current Monitor System for CEBAF'S Experimental Hall A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Denard; A. Saha; G. Lavessiere

    2001-01-01

    CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three experimental Halls. In Hall A, all experiments require continuous, non-invasive current measurements and a few experiments require an absolute accuracy of 0.2 % in the current range from 1 to 180 (micro)A. A Parametric Current Transformer (PCT), manufactured by Bergoz, has an accurate and stable sensitivity of 4 (micro)A/V but its offset drifts at the muA level over time preclude its direct use for continuous measurements. Two cavity monitors are calibrated against the PCT with at least 50 (micro)A of beam current. The calibration procedure suppresses the error due to PCT's offset drifts by turning the beam on and off, which is invasive to the experiment. One of the goals of the system is to minimize the calibration time without compromising the measurement's accuracy. The linearity of the cavity monitors is a critical parameter for transferring the accurate calibration done at high currents over the whole dynamic range. The method for measuring accurately the linearity is described

  12. Heavy-ion induced current through an oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Nagasawa, Takaharu; Nakajima, Yasuhito; Kawanabe, Ryu; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Hirao, Toshio; Onoda, Shinobu; Mishima, Kenta; Kawano, Katsuyasu; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the heavy-ion induced current in MOS structure is investigated. We have measured the transient gate current in a MOS capacitor and a MOSFET induced by single heavy-ions, and found that a transient current can be observed when the semiconductor surface is under depletion condition. In the case of MOSFET, a transient gate current with both positive and negative peaks is observed if the ion hits the gate area, and that the total integrated charge is almost zero within 100-200 ns after irradiation. From these results, we conclude that the radiation-induced gate current is dominated by a displacement current. We also discuss the generation mechanism of the radiation-induced current through the oxide layer by device simulation

  13. Dynamics of current induced nano-skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Rajamani, Amuda; Arumugam, Brinda

    2017-08-01

    The dynamics of magnetic skyrmions is investigated in a composite free layer spin valve nano pillar for different coupling mechanisms in the absence of Dzyaloshinski-Moriya Interaction (DMI). Nano meter sized skyrmions and anti skyrmions are trapped with different helices in the free layer. The spin polarised current under specific choice of system parameters changes the droplet solitons into skyrmions and anti skyrmions. The current driven dynamics is studied and the condition at which an isolated skyrmion exists, is reported. We have optimised the current density (J) and spin wave vector (k) for which Skyrmion Hall Effect (SHE) completely vanishes and as a result the velocity, size and shape of skyrmions are preserved. When the coupling between the composite free layers is changed, skyrmion-anti skyrmion pair and radial skyrmion-chiral skyrmion pair emerge. For the specific values of 'J' and 'k' these pairs show coupled motion along the layer and hence these pairs could also be used as a bit in the data processing and storage devices. Our investigation ascertains that a single material can host all the localised magnetic structures if the current density, spin wave vector and coupling constant are suitably chosen and tuned. This study would really be of fundamental importance owing to the possible applications in information processing and data storage in skyrmion based logic circuits and magnetic sensors.

  14. Comparison of Parmela and MAFIA Simulations of Beam Dynamics in High Current Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, Sergey S

    2004-01-01

    A high-current RF photoinjector producing low-emittance electron beam is an important technology for high-power CW FEL. LANL-AES team designed a 2.5-cell, pi-mode, 700-MHz normal-conducting RF photoinjector with magnetic emittance compensation. With the electric field gradients of 7, 7, and 5 MV/m in the three subsequent cells, the photoinjector will produce a 2.5-MeV electron beam with 3-nC charge per bunch and the transverse rms emittance 7 mm-mrad. Beam dynamics in the photoinjector has been modeled in details. In addition to the usual approach, with fields calculated by Superfish-Poisson and beam simulations performed by Parmela, we also used MAFIA group of codes, both to calculate cavity fields and to model beam dynamics with its particle-in-cell module TS. The second way naturally includes wake-field effects into consideration. The simulation results and comparison between two approaches will be presented.

  15. [Update in current care guidelines: induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The rate of induced abortions (9/1000 women aged 15-49 y in 2011) is low in Finland. Ninety-two per cent of them are performed on grounds of social reasons. Use of medical abortion (combination of mifepristone and misoprostol) has increased to nearly 90 % of abortions, also in abortions of 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. Intrauterine contraception started at the time of abortion lowers the risk of future unplanned pregnancies. Prophylactic antibiotics are recommended in cases of surgical evacuation of the uterus. Written instructions for patients and professionals are introduced in the guideline.

  16. Investigation on a new inducer of pulsed eddy current thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min He

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new inducer of pulsed eddy current thermography (PECT is presented. The use of the inducer can help avoid the problem of blocking the infrared (IR camera’s view in eddy current thermography technique. The inducer can also provide even heating of the test specimen. This paper is concerned with the temperature distribution law around the crack on a specimen when utilizing the new inducer. Firstly, relative mathematical models are provided. In the following section, eddy current distribution and temperature distribution around the crack are studied using the numerical simulation method. The best separation distance between the inducer and the specimen is also determined. Then, results of temperature distribution around the crack stimulated by the inducer are gained by experiments. Effect of current value on temperature rise is studied as well in the experiments. Based on temperature data, temperature features of the crack are discussed.

  17. Dynamics of current induced nano-skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Rajamani, Amuda, E-mail: amuacademics@gmail.com; Arumugam, Brinda

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • We have revised and organised section II. • The expression for H{sub eff} is now expressed clearly. • We have added Appendix which explains the derivation of the solution and the occurrence of the oscillatory factor. - Abstract: The dynamics of magnetic skyrmions is investigated in a composite free layer spin valve nano pillar for different coupling mechanisms in the absence of Dzyaloshinski-Moriya Interaction (DMI). Nano meter sized skyrmions and anti skyrmions are trapped with different helices in the free layer. The spin polarised current under specific choice of system parameters changes the droplet solitons into skyrmions and anti skyrmions. The current driven dynamics is studied and the condition at which an isolated skyrmion exists, is reported. We have optimised the current density (J) and spin wave vector (k) for which Skyrmion Hall Effect (SHE) completely vanishes and as a result the velocity, size and shape of skyrmions are preserved. When the coupling between the composite free layers is changed, skyrmion-anti skyrmion pair and radial skyrmion-chiral skyrmion pair emerge. For the specific values of ‘J’ and ‘k’ these pairs show coupled motion along the layer and hence these pairs could also be used as a bit in the data processing and storage devices. Our investigation ascertains that a single material can host all the localised magnetic structures if the current density, spin wave vector and coupling constant are suitably chosen and tuned. This study would really be of fundamental importance owing to the possible applications in information processing and data storage in skyrmion based logic circuits and magnetic sensors.

  18. Interplanetary shock induced ring current auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongliang; Paxton, Larry J.; Zheng, Yihua

    2008-01-01

    On 21 January 2005, a fast interplanetary (IP) shock compressed the magnetosphere and caused detached auroras (DA) on the dayside, duskside and nightside ionosphere. The DA were detected by three independent FUV instruments: IMAGE/SI-12, TIMED/GUVI and DMSP/SSUSI. The SI-12 observations show that the dayside detached aurora (DDA) was located between 60° and 68° Mlat and between 06:00 and 15:00 MLT. It lasted for only ˜2 min. Coincident in situ Polar measurements show that sudden bursts of proton EMIC waves (˜2 min) were associated with the DDA. This provides direct evidence of the link between the EMIC waves and the DDA. The DA in the duskside and nightside appeared once the DDA disappeared. GUVI and SSUSI also observed the DA in the duskside and dayside with more details. Ring current simulations show that ˜10 keV protons with sausage-shaped spatial distribution of high anisotropy in flux and temperature were the particle source for the duskside and nightside DA. Compression of the magnetosphere appears to be the driver for both of the DDA and dusk/night DA. The nightside DA was observed for the first time during a sudden commencement. To unify the different terminologies, the detached auroras due to precipitating energetic protons from the ring current are called the ring current auroras.

  19. Single-beam measurements of LHC instability threshold in terms of octupole current

    CERN Document Server

    Mounet, N; Buffat, X; Burov, A; Hemelsoet, G; Metral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Pojer, M; Salvant, B; Trad, G

    2012-01-01

    This note summarizes two machine development (MD) studies aimed at determining the octupole current needed in the LHC in order to stabilize all headtail instabilities at 4TeV/c, before and after the squeeze, with tight collimator settings, and when a single beam (beam 2) at maximum intensity (1380 bunches, 2.1 1014 protons) is present in the machine. The MDs followed the normal physics operation procedure, at the notable exception that a single beam was used, the other beam containing only one non-colliding nominal bunch. Octupole current (with negative polarity in the focusing octupoles and the opposite in the defocusing ones) was decreased by small steps until the instability threshold was reached. This was performed in two distinct MDs, one before the squeeze and the other after it, testing also several chromaticity values and the effect of the transverse damper in the latter case. Octupole thresholds are shown in each case studied, as well as the rise times of the instabilities observed.

  20. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  1. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  2. Production of tightly focused E-beam with high-current accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poukey, J.W.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Frost, C.A.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Using numerical modeling the authors study several approaches to the problem of designing an injector to produce a 3-30 kA, 2-4 mm diameter electron beam in the energy range 10-20 MeV. The cathode may be small in diameter and immersed in a strong magnetic field, producing an equilibrium beam for transport to a target (the immersed case). This approach appears to be the most promising for applications such as radiography, and the authors shall emphasize it in this paper. The alternative is the conventional non-immersed cathode, in which the beam from a larger-radius, cold-beam cathode is focused with magnetic lenses to a small spot on the target. Because the non-immersed cathode, in which the beam from a larger-radius, cold-beam cathode is focused with a magnetic lenses to a small spot on the target. Because the non-immersed case has been extensively studied, and because it has advantages for these purposes, the authors shall only discuss a few of the non-immersed-cathode injector studies, primarily for purposes of comparison. Either type of diode is to be powered by an inductive voltage adder based on the successful SABRE/Hermes III/RADLAC (SMILE) magnetically-insulated-transmission-line design concepts. A possible variation uses a re-entrant geometry with low electric stresses so that only the cathode face emits. The authors discuss issues such as dumping excess current and voltage dependence of the focus

  3. Vortex phase-induced changes of the statistical properties of a partially coherent radially polarized beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lina; Chen, Yahong; Liu, Xianlong; Liu, Lin; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-06-27

    Partially coherent radially polarized (PCRP) beam was introduced and generated in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the statistical properties of a PCRP beam embedded with a vortex phase (i.e., PCRP vortex beam). We derive the analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of a PCRP vortex beam propagating through a paraxial ABCD optical system and analyze the statistical properties of a PCRP vortex beam focused by a thin lens. It is found that the statistical properties of a PCRP vortex beam on propagation are much different from those of a PCRP beam. The vortex phase induces not only the rotation of the beam spot, but also the changes of the beam shape, the degree of polarization and the state of polarization. We also find that the vortex phase plays a role of resisting the coherence-induced degradation of the intensity distribution and the coherence-induced depolarization. Furthermore, we report experimental generation of a PCRP vortex beam for the first time. Our results will be useful for trapping and rotating particles, free-space optical communications and detection of phase object.

  4. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value

  5. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lü, Jing-Tao; Hedegård, Per; Brandbyge, Mads

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces.

  6. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Bjerregaard Christensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces.

  7. Radioactive Ion Beam Production by Fast-Neutron-Induced Fission in Actinide Targets at EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Martínez, Adonai

    The European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (EURISOL) is set to be the 'next-generation' European Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility. It will extend and amplify current research on nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics and fundamental interactions beyond the year 2010. In EURISOL, the production of high-intensity RIBs of specific neutron-rich isotopes is obtained by inducing fission in large-mass actinide targets. In our contribution, the use of uranium targets is shown to be advantageous to other materials, such as thorium. Therefore, in order to produce fissions in U-238 and reduce the plutonium inventory, a fast neutron energy spectrum is necessary. The large beam power required to achieve these RIB levels requires the use of a liquid proton-to-neutron converter. This article details the design parameters of the converter, with special attention to the coupled neutronics of the liquid converter and fission target. Calculations performed with the ...

  8. Development of a high current 60 keV neutral lithium beam injector for beam emission spectroscopy measurements on fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, G.; Dunai, D.; Lampert, M.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Németh, J.; Bató, S.; Nam, Y. U.; Hu, G. H.; Zoletnik, S.

    2018-01-01

    A 60 keV neutral lithium beam system was designed and built up for beam emission spectroscopy measurement of edge plasma on the KSTAR and EAST tokamaks. The electron density profile and its fluctuation can be measured using the accelerated lithium beam-based emission spectroscopy system. A thermionic ion source was developed with a SiC heater to emit around 4-5 mA ion current from a 14 mm diameter surface. The ion optic is following the 2 step design used on other devices with small modifications to reach about 2-3 cm beam diameter in the plasma at about 4 m from the ion source. A newly developed recirculating sodium vapour neutralizer neutralizes the accelerated ion beam at around 260-280 °C even during long (manipulation techniques are applied to allow optimization, aiming, cleaning, and beam modulation. The maximum 60 keV beam energy with 4 mA ion current was successfully reached at KSTAR and at EAST. Combined with an efficient observation system, the Li-beam diagnostic enables the measurement of the density profile and fluctuations on the plasma turbulence time scale.

  9. Numerical simulation of the processes of small-diameter high-current electron beam shaping and injection

    CERN Document Server

    Gordeev, V S; Myskov, G A

    2001-01-01

    With the aid of BEAM 25 program there was carried out the numerical simulation of the non-stationary process of shaping a small-diameter (<= 20mm) high-current hollow electron beam in a diode with magnetic insulation,as well as of the process of beam injection into the accelerating LIA track. The diode configuration for the purpose of eliminating the leakage of electron flux to the anode surface was update. Presented are the results of calculation of the injected beam characteristics (amplitude-time parameters of a current pulse, space-angle distributions of electrons etc.) depending on diode geometric parameters.

  10. Analysis of the influence of the current of a negative ion beam on its diagnostics by means of detachment electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the field of a negative ion beam on information about its characteristics, transferred by detachment electrons after a probing internal target, is considered. The perturbations of the momentum components of electrons during their extraction out of the beam by means of a 180 degree magnetic analyzer with a homogeneous field, are calculated in the model of infinite cylinder with a uniformly cross section distributed current. The obtained results show that the method of nonperturbative diagnostics of a negative ion beam by means of photodetachment electrons can be used successfully for relativistic beams with a current of hundreds of milliampers, for example, in projected neutron sources based on linear accelerators

  11. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Thomas M., E-mail: baumannt@nscl.msu.edu; Lapierre, Alain, E-mail: lapierre@nscl.msu.edu; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  12. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS)...

  13. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, E S; Grigoriev, V P

    2015-01-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed. (paper)

  14. Beam-induced heat loads on the beam screens of the inner triplets for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Skripka, Galina; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    The expected heat load induced on the beam screens has been evaluated for the triplet assemblies in the four experimental Insertion Regions (IRs) of the HL-LHC. The contribution from electron cloud effects has been estimated using PyECLOUD macroparticle simulations. The presence of a surface treatment for the reduction of the Secondary Electron Yield has been taken into account. The contribution from the impedance of the beam screen has been evaluated taking into account the impact of the temperature and of the magnetic field on the resistivity of the surface.

  15. Beam-driven return current instability and anomalous plasma heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, D.; McQuillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    1988-09-01

    The authors consider the problem of ion-acoustic wave generation, and resultant anomalous Joule heating, by a return current driven unstable by a small-area thick-target electron beam in solar flares. They demonstrate the existence of two quite distinct types of ion-acoustic unstable heating regimes: marginally stable heating and a "catastrophic" heating regime. For the marginally stable case electron and ion heating equations are solved numerically. Rapid anomalous Ohmic heating occurs then in a substantial plasma volume. This large hot plasma emits thermal bremsstrahlung hard X-rays (⪆20 keV) comparable to, or exceeding, the nonthermal bremsstrahlung. This means that with small beam areas, this indirect mechanism can result in a higher hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency than in a conventional collisional thick target. The catastrophic heating regime is discussed qualitatively.

  16. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J.; Dzelzainis, T.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Schumaker, W.; Doria, D.; Romagnani, L.; Poder, K.; Cole, J. M.; Alejo, A.; Yeung, M.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Reville, B.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D. D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Borghesi, M.; Sarri, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1 T ) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ɛB≈10-3 is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  17. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J; Dzelzainis, T; Dieckmann, M E; Schumaker, W; Doria, D; Romagnani, L; Poder, K; Cole, J M; Alejo, A; Yeung, M; Krushelnick, K; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Reville, B; Samarin, G M; Symes, D D; Thomas, A G R; Borghesi, M; Sarri, G

    2017-11-03

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1  T) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ε_{B}≈10^{-3} is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  18. Dark currents and their effect on the primary beam in an X-band linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl L. F. Bane

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We numerically study properties of primary dark currents in an X-band accelerating structure. For the H60VG3 structure considered for the Next Linear Collider (NLC we first perform a fairly complete (with some approximations calculation of dark-current trajectories. These results are used to study properties of the dark current leaving the structure. For example, at accelerating gradient of 65  MV/m, considering two very different assumptions about dark-current emission around the irises, we find that the fraction of emitted current leaving the structure to be a consistent ∼1%. Considering that ∼1  mA outgoing dark current is seen in measurement, this implies that ∼100  mA (or 10 pC per period is emitted within the structure itself. Using the formalism of the Liénard-Wiechert potentials, we then perform a systematic calculation of the transverse kick of dark currents on a primary linac bunch. The result is ∼1   V kick per mA (or per 0.1  pC per period dark current emitted from an iris. For an entire structure we estimate the total kick on a primary bunch to be ∼15   V. For the NLC linac this translates to a ratio of (final vertical beam offset to beam size of about 0.2. However, with the assumptions that needed to be made—particularly the number of emitters and their distribution within a structure—the accuracy of this result may be limited to the order of magnitude.

  19. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  20. Fast crystallization of amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 induced by thermally activated electron-beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhangyi; Qi, Jianqi; Zhou, Li; Feng, Zhao; Yu, Xiaohe; Gong, Yichao; Yang, Mao; Shi, Qiwu; Wei, Nian; Lu, Tiecheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the ionization and displacement effects of an electron-beam (e-beam) on amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 synthesized by the co-precipitation and calcination methods. The as-received amorphous specimens were irradiated under electron beams at different energies (80 keV, 120 keV, and 2 MeV) and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A metastable fluorite phase was observed in nanocrystalline Gd2Zr2O7 and is proposed to arise from the relatively lower surface and interface energy compared with the pyrochlore phase. Fast crystallization could be induced by 120 keV e-beam irradiation (beam current = 0.47 mA/cm2). The crystallization occurred on the nanoscale upon ionization irradiation at 400 °C after a dose of less than 1017 electrons/cm2. Under e-beam irradiation, the activation energy for the grain growth process was approximately 10 kJ/mol, but the activation energy was 135 kJ/mol by calcination in a furnace. The thermally activated ionization process was considered the fast crystallization mechanism.

  1. Initiating the explosive decomposition of heavy metal azides by electron-beam-induced electric discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Damamme, G.; Malys, D.; Lisitsyn, V. M.

    2009-10-01

    The explosive decomposition of heavy metal azides (HMAs) initiated by the electric (streamer) discharge induced by a nanosecond electron beam has been experimentally studied. A physical model is proposed that describes the initiation of an electron-beam-induced HMA explosion, which involves the formation of a strong electric field in a sample and its neutralization by a supersonic anode discharge. The propagating streamer front generates hot spots in a condensed reactive substance, from which the foci of explosive decomposition are formed.

  2. An eddy current-induced magnetic plucking for piezoelectric energy harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Nam Ho; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    Frequency up-conversion is a very efficient method of energy harvesting in order to overcome low, non-periodic, or altered ambient vibration. In order to perform frequency up-conversion and transference of mechanical energy without contact, an eddy current-induced magnetic drag force is used. In this paper, we present a novel configuration of eddy current-induced magnetic plucking for piezoelectric energy harvesting. Our method consists of two permanent magnets, a piezoelectric beam, and a copper disk piece. We design our harvesting method to achieve loading, sudden release, and free vibration using the actuation of the piezoelectric beam through the magnetic mutual coupling between the magnet and copper disk piece. We present the principle of magnetic drag force-generation, characterize the energy harvesting performance of our harvesting method, and demonstrate our harvesting method’s capability of frequency up-conversion and transference of mechanical energy without contact under low, non-periodic, or altered ambient vibration. To that end, we describe the calculation of magnetic drag force with various geometric dimensions and material properties, model of the piezoelectric cantilever beam, comparison between estimation response and measured experiment response, and the measured voltage and power responses. (paper)

  3. Laser beam shaping for studying thermally induced damage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of a laser beam shaping system for both heating a diamond tool and measuring the resulting temperature optically. The influence the initial laser parameters have on the resultant temperature profiles is shown...

  4. Current-Induced Effective Fields Detected by Magnetotrasport Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Masashi; Shimamura, Kazutoshi; Fukami, Shunsuke; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2013-11-01

    We show that the angle-dependent Hall measurement is an effective method to determine the current-induced effective fields by investigating MgO/Fe/Ta and MgO/Fe/Pt/Ta multilayer structures. The experimentally obtained Hall resistance under a relatively large dc electrical current is well described by considering two components of current-induced effective fields, which may be related to the spin Hall effect and the Rashba effect. The directions of the effective fields are consistent with and their magnitudes are comparable to those reported previously for similar multilayer structures.

  5. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Jiang, Jian; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Chang; Wei, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  6. A fast non-intercepting linac beam position and current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.W.; Wille, M.

    1982-01-01

    A non-intercepting beam monitor consisting of four detecting loops is used to determine the spatial postion and current of a pulsed beam from an electron linear accelerator. The monitor detects the magnetic field radiated by the substructure of the electron bunches created by the accelerating microwave. The detecting loops are interconnected two by two, by means of two coaxial hybrid junctions, the two sets positioned perpendicular to each other. By means of the two signals from the diametrically positioned detecting loops, a good spatial displacement and current monitoring sensitivity are achieved by subtracting one signal from the other and adding the two signals, respectively. For displacements below 2 mm from the center axis an average sensitivity of 0.5 mV/mm x mA is measured, whereas displacements more than 2 mm yields 1.3 mV/mm x mA. A sensitivity of 0.2 mV/mA in current monitoring is measured, and the rise time of the monitored pulse signal is better than 5 ns measured from 10 to 90% of the pulse height. Design strategy and performance of the monitor are described. (orig.)

  7. Beam Aborts in PEP-II Rings and Lingering Drift Chamber Currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkat, N.

    2004-01-01

    The BABAR detector at SLAC was designed to study CP-violation in B-meson decays from electron-positron collisions in the PEP-II electron-positron storage rings. Background radiation in the High Energy Ring (HER) and Low Energy Ring (LER) of PEP-II has the potential to damage the sensitive equipment in the BABAR detector. As a result, the beams in the HER and LER can be aborted to prevent such damage. In the span of a few microseconds, the HER and LER currents drop from, for example, 1450 micro Amps and 2300 micro Amps, respectively, to zero. At this time the voltage in the Drift Chamber is rapidly ramped down from a potential of 1930 V to a safe potential of 800 V, thus we would expect the currents in the Drift Chamber to quickly go to zero once the beams are aborted. However, we observe an average 15 second delay in the measured time it takes for all current in the Drift Chamber to fall below 1 micro Amp. This delay has been hypothesized as an instrumentation issue and not as a physical phenomenon. The specific sources of this error are still not completely known, but analysis suggests that it results from the interplay of the CAEN High Voltage supplies and the EPICS system and/or limitations within those systems

  8. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...... of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects. Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic...... voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...

  9. Current-induced atomic dynamics, instabilities, and Raman signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegard, Per

    2012-01-01

    We derive and employ a semiclassical Langevin equation obtained from path integrals to describe the ionic dynamics of a molecular junction in the presence of electrical current. The electronic environment serves as an effective nonequilibrium bath. The bath results in random forces describing Joule...... heating, current-induced forces including the nonconservative wind force, dissipative frictional forces, and an effective Lorentz-type force due to the Berry phase of the nonequilibrium electrons. Using a generic two-level molecular model, we highlight the importance of both current-induced forces...... and Joule heating for the stability of the system. We compare the impact of the different forces, and the wide-band approximation for the electronic structure on our result. We examine the current-induced instabilities (excitation of runaway "waterwheel" modes) and investigate the signature...

  10. Positron annihilation and thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiated polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Shinyama, Katsuyoshi; Baba, Makoto [Hachinohe Inst. of Tech., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Suzuki, Takenori

    1997-03-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were applied to electron beam irradiated poly(ether-ether-ketone). The lifetime, {tau}{sub 3}, of the ortho-positronium of unirradiated and 5 MGy irradiated specimen became rapidly longer above about 150degC. {tau}{sub 3} of 50 MGy and 100 MGy irradiated specimen was shorter than that of unirradiated one. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) decreased with increasing the dose before voltage application. In the case of voltage application, a TSC peak appeared and the peak value decreased with increased the dose. The correlation between the results of positron annihilation and TSC was investigated. (author)

  11. High current, high energy proton beams accelerated by a sub-nanosecond laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Krása, Josef; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Láska, Leoš; Velyhan, Andriy; Prokůpek, Jan; Ryc, L.; Parys, P.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 653, č. 1 (2011), s. 159-163 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1165; GA AV ČR IAA100100715; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 212105 - ELI-PP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : laser-acceleration * proton beam * high ion current * time -of-flight * proton energy distribution Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  12. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  13. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  14. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  15. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  16. Experimental study of coupling between eddy currents and deflections in cantilevered beams as models of tokamak limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Hua, T.Q.

    1987-01-01

    The coupling between eddy current and motion in a cantilevered beam is examined. The beam, which provides a simple model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor, was subjected to simultaneous orthogonal time-varying and constant magnetic fields. The dynamic deformation of the beam includes two different modes: a bending mode and a torsional mode. Interaction of current with each mode and with the combined modes of vibration is described. Experimental verification for the case without torsional motion was performed with the FELIX facility at ANL. The peak deflection and stresses are much less than those predicted without consideration given to the coupling. (Auth.)

  17. Experimental study of coupling between eddy currents and deflections in cantilevered beams as models of tokamak limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Hua, T.Q.

    1986-01-01

    The coupling between eddy current and motion in a cantilevered beam is examined. The beam, which provides a simple model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor, was subjected to simultaneous orthogonal time-varying and constant magnetic fields. The dynamic deformation of the beam includes two different modes: a bending mode and a torsional mode. Interaction of current with each mode and with the combined modes of vibration in described. Experimental verification of the case without torsional motion was performed with the FELIX facility at ANL. The peak deflection and stresses are much less than those predicted without consideration given to the coupling

  18. The influence of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on transmission systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertson, V.; Kappenman, J.; Damsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particles emitted by the sun from flares or similar phenomena can enter the magnetic field of the earth and induce large currents within the earth. These currents follow a circular path around the magnetic poles and are large enough to produce earth surface potentials up to 10 volts per mile. Such currents have been known to last for many minutes, effectively a dc mode which can saturate power or current transformers. Factors known to influence susceptibility to the phenomenon include grounding philosophy, transformer core construction, transmission line length and orientation, and local geology. In this paper plans for a mitigation scheme and a warning network are explained

  19. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  20. Two-section linear direct-current accelerator of 1.2 MeV electrons. Mean beam current of 50 mA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, A.S.; Ermakov, D.I.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Shvedunov, V.I.; Sakharov, V.P.; Trower, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental results, obtained by simulation, creation and start-up of the two-section linear electron accelerator, are presented. The following beam parameters: beam current of 49 mA, mean energy of 1.2 MeV, of 59 kV, normalized emittance of 11 mm mrad are determined on the basis of the data on the beam dynamics simulation and the accelerating structure optimization. Special attention is paid to the choice of the version of the SHF-supply system of the two-section accelerator. The version of the SHF-supply system, based on the sections phasing, operating in the auto-oscillation model by means of the synchronizing signal from the feedback chain of the first section into the feedback chain of the second section, is considered. The electron beam parameters on the accelerator outlet (beam current - 44 mA, beam energy - 1.15 MeV, beam efficiency - 50.6 kW) proved to be close to the simulation results [ru

  1. Neutral beam and ICP etching of HKMG MOS capacitors: Observations and a plasma-induced damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tai-Chen; Shih, Tzu-Lang; Su, Yin-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Hsi; Current, Michael Ira; Samukawa, Seiji

    2018-04-01

    In this study, TiN/HfO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors were etched by a neutral beam etching technique under two contrasting conditions. The configurations of neutral beam etching technique were specially designed to demonstrate a "damage-free" condition or to approximate "reactive-ion-etching-like" conditions to verify the effect of plasma-induced damage on electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors. The results show that by neutral beam etching (NBE), the interface state density (Dit) and the oxide trapped charge (Qot) were lower than routine plasma etching. Furthermore, the decrease in capacitor size does not lead to an increase in leakage current density, indicating less plasma induced side-wall damage. We present a plasma-induced gate stack damage model which we demonstrate by using these two different etching configurations. These results show that NBE is effective in preventing plasma-induced damage at the high-k/Si interface and on the high-k oxide sidewall and thus improve the electrical performance of the gate structure.

  2. Amplification of Cooper pair splitting current in a graphene-based Cooper pair beam splitter geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, SK Firoz; Saha, Arijit

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the recent experiments [Scientific Reports 6, 23051 (2016), 10.1038/srep23051; Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 096602 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.096602], we theoretically investigate Cooper pair splitting current in a graphene-based Cooper pair beam splitter geometry. By considering the graphene-based superconductor as an entangler device, instead of normal [two-dimensional (2D)] BCS superconductor, we show that the Cooper pair splitting current mediated by the crossed Andreev process is amplified compared to its normal superconductor counterpart. This amplification is attributed to the strong suppression of the local normal Andreev reflection process (arising from the Cooper pair splitting) from the graphene-based superconductor to lead via the same quantum dot, in comparison to the usual 2D superconductor. Due to the vanishing density of states at the Dirac point of undoped graphene, a doped graphene-based superconductor is considered here and it is observed that Cooper pair splitting current is very insensitive to the doping level in comparison to the usual 2D superconductor. The transport process of nonlocal spin-entangled electrons also depends on the type of pairing, i.e., whether the electron-hole pairing is onsite, intersublattice or the combination of both. The intersublattice pairing of graphene causes the maximum nonlocal Cooper pair splitting current, whereas the presence of both pairings reduces the Cooper pair splitting current.

  3. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083092; Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  4. Observation of helium flow induced beam orbit oscillations at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bonati, R.; Brennan, J.M.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Ganetis, G.; He, P.; Hirzel, W.; Jia, L.X.; Koello, P.; Louie, W.; McIntyre, G.; Nicoletti, A.; Rank, J.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Schmalzle, J.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Sondericker, J.; Tallerico, T.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal beam orbit jitter at frequencies around 10 Hz has been observed at RHIC for several years. The distinct frequencies of this jitter have been found at superconducting low-beta quadrupole triplet magnets around the ring, where they coincide with mechanical vibration modes of the cold masses. Recently, we have identified liquid helium flow as the driving force of these oscillations

  5. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowton, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anaya, Richard [LLNL; Caporaso, George [LLNL; Chambers, Frank [LLNL; Chen, Yu - Jiuan [LLNL; Falabella, Steve [LLNL; Guethlein, Gary [LLNL; Raymond, Brett [LLNL; Richardson, Roger [LLNL; Trainham, C [NSTEC/STL; Watson, Jim [LLNL; Weir, John [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  6. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdahl, Carl A.; Abeyta, Epifanio O.; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Jacquez, Edward B.; Mccuistian, Brian T.; Montoya, Nicholas A.; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M.; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A.; Broste, William B.; Carlson, Carl A.; Frayer, Daniel K.; Johnson, Douglas E.; Tom, C.Y.; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C.; Watson, Jim; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 (micro)s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  7. Two-stream Stability Properties of the Return-Current Layer for Intense Ion Beam Propagation Through Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    When an ion beam with sharp edge propagates through a background plasma, its current is neutralized by the plasma return current everywhere except at the beam edge over a characteristic transverse distance Δx perpendicular ∼ (delta) pe , where (delta) pe = c/ω pe is the collisionless skin depth, and ω pe is the electron plasma frequency. Because the background plasma electrons neutralizing the ion beam current inside the beam are streaming relative to the background plasma electrons outside the beam, the background plasma can support a two-stream surface-mode excitation. Such surface modes have been studied previously assuming complete charge and current neutralization, and have been shown to be strongly unstable. In this paper we study the detailed stability properties of this two-stream surface mode for an electron flow velocity profile self-consistently driven by the ion beam. In particular, it is shown that the self-magnetic field generated inside the unneutralized current layer, which has not been taken into account previously, completely eliminates the instability

  8. Interface tuning of current-induced cooling in molecular circuits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2017), s. 1082-1088 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19672S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : current-induced heating and cooling * molecular junction * Carbene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  9. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lu, Jing Tao; Hedegard, Per

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from...

  10. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase synchronization. HAIHONG LI1, WEIQING LIU1,2, QIONGLING DAI1 and JINGHUA XIAO1. 1School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876,. China. 2School of Science, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, ...

  11. Comments on dyadic Green's functions and induced currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    The article formulates the wave equation in regions with induced currents in the case of scattering by a perfect conductor. By using this formulation the ordinary solution using the dyadic Green's function for the problem is discussed. The region of validity of this solution is pointed out...

  12. Voltage-independent KCNQ4 currents induced by (+/-)BMS-204352

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Rikke Louise; Strøbaek, Dorte; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2003-01-01

    -204352 also induces a voltage-independent KCNQ4 current. The channels were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), and investigated by use of the whole-cell mode of the patch-clamp technique. (+/-)BMS-204352 was applied extracellularly (10 microM) in order to precipitate the robust...

  13. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LITHIUM BEAM EDGE PLASMA CURRENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTIC ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEAVY, J.J.; CARY, W.P; THOMAS, D.M; KELLMAN, D.H.; HOYT, D.M; DELAWARE, S.W.; PRONKO, S.G.E.; HARRIS, T.E.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 An edge plasma current density diagnostic employing a neutralized lithium ion beam system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The lithium beam control system is designed around a GE Fanuc 90-30 series PLC and Cimplicity(reg s ign) HMI (Human Machine Interface) software. The control system operates and supervises a collection of commercial and in-house designed high voltage power supplies for beam acceleration and focusing, filament and bias power supplies for ion creation, neutralization, vacuum, triggering, and safety interlocks. This paper provides an overview of the control system, while highlighting innovative aspects including its remote operation, pulsed source heating and pulsed neutralizer heating, optimizing beam regulation, and beam ramping, ending with a discussion of its performance

  14. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  15. PRR1 rehabilitation and the current and future neutron beam utilization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calix, Virginia S.

    2003-01-01

    The PRR1 research reactor is the center for nuclear science R and D in the Philippines. It is located in Metro Manila inside the campus of the University of the Philippines. It is a General Electric designed reactor and was commissioned in 1963 with a rated thermal power of 1 MW. It was operated for 20 years enabling the Institute to pursue activities in radioisotope production, neutron scattering, activation analyses and other R and D activities requiring neutron beams. In 1984 it was converted to a 3 MW TRIGA Type reactor. Conversion was completed and test run was successfully accomplished in 1988. In the same year the reactor was shut down due to a leak in the aluminum linear of the reactor pool. During the repair deterioration of the other parts of the reactor was discovered that could affect the safety of its operation. A rehabilitation program is made that include the reactor core box and all the other peripherals that could affect its safety operation and to address present regulatory concerns. Modification of the core box and its position in the pool opens opportunities and possibilities to suit specific neutron beam application for the users. Plans for this will be presented as well as the strategy of the Institute to satisfy the current need for reactor based facilities to enhanced implementation of the Country's S and T Program. (author)

  16. Preliminary results on time-resolved ion beam induced luminescence applied to the provenance study of lapis lazuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czelusniak, C.; Palla, L.; Massi, M.; Carraresi, L.; Giuntini, L.; Re, A.; Lo Giudice, A.; Pratesi, G.; Mazzinghi, A.; Ruberto, C.; Castelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    This work will present preliminary results concerning the use of time-resolved ion beam induced luminescence applied to provenance studies of lapis lazuli. Measurements were performed at the pulsed beam facility at LABEC laboratory in Florence. Lapis lazuli is a semi-precious gemstone, used as ornament since the early civilizations that can be found in few places on Earth. The importance of this work lies in understanding the origin of various samples of lapis lazuli, from which it may be possible to gain insight into trade routes from ancient times. The samples studied in this work originated from Chile, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Myanmar, and Siberia. The stones were irradiated with 3 MeV protons and the resulting luminescence was detected by a photomultiplier tube, whose output was acquired using a sampling digitizer VME module (CAEN/V1720). Wavelength discrimination was performed at 430 nm utilizing a range of beam currents. The results showed that, by changing the beam current intensity, one can study different features of lapis lazuli, and this may aid in distinguishing lapis lazuli from different provenances.

  17. Beam diagnostics for Laser-induced proton generation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Heun; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae; Chan, Young Ho; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yoo, Byeong Duk

    2005-01-01

    With an advent of femto-second lasers, a laseraccelerated ion generation has been world-widely studied for medical and nuclear applications. It is known that protons with the energy from several tens MeV to a few hundreds MeV require for a cancer therapy and nuclear reaction. Even though, up to present, the maximum energy of laser-accelerated proton is about 60 MeV, it is expected that the energy of protons generated can be obtained at least up to 150 MeV. According to theoretical and experimental works, it turns out the energy distribution and the flux of ions strongly depends on the intensity of a fs laser at a target. However, physics on laser-plasma interaction is still not clear. The precise measurements of parameters of a fs laser and ions are important to figure out the physics and develop the theoretical interpretation. Typically, beam diagnostic system includes measurements and/or monitoring of the temporal and spatial profiles of lasers at the target as well as the energy spectrum and density profile of protons, which are critical for the analysis of mechanism and the characterization of protons generated. We fabricated and installed the target chamber for laser-accelerated proton generation and are now integrating beam diagnostic system. For laser diagnostics, beam monitoring and alignment system has been installed. For a charged particle, CR-39 detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and Si charged particle detectors are installed for density profile and energy spectrum. In this paper, we discuss the laser beam monitoring and alignment system. We also estimates expected spectrum of protons from Thomson parabola spectrometer, depending on the parameters of protons

  18. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S., E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.edu; Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  19. Radiation-Induced Graft Polymerization: Gamma Radiation and Electron Beam Technology for Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Cabalar, Patrick Jay; Lopez, Girlie Eunice; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of functional hybrid materials by attaching polymer chains with advantageous tailored properties to the surface of a base polymer with desirable bulk character is an attractive application of graft copolymerization. Radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) has been a popular approach for surface modification of polymers because of its merits over conventional chemical processes. RIGP, which proceeds primarily via free radical polymerization process, has the advantages such as simplicity, low cost, control over process and adjustment of the materials composition and structure. RIGP can be performed using either electron beam or gamma radiation and it can be applied to both synthetic and natural polymers. These merits make RIGP a popular research topic worldwide. Moreover, the materials synthesized and produced via RIGP has found applications, and were proposed to produce continuous impact, in the fields of medicine, agriculture, pollution remediation, rare earth and valuable metals recovery, fuel cell membrane synthesis and catalysis to name a few. From 2012 our group has performed electron beam and gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of various monomers onto polymers of natural and synthetic origins (e.g. monomers - glycidyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylonitrile, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate; base polymers – polyethylene/polypropylene nonwoven fabric, polypropylene nonwoven fabric pineapple fibers, cellulose nonwoven fabric microcrystalline cellulose). We tested these grafted materials for heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu) and organic molecule removal from aqueous solutions and E. coli activity (using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer RAFT mediated grafting). The results clearly showed the success of materials modified via FIGP in these applications. Currently, we are studying the applications of grafted materials on treatment of waste waters from tanning industry, value addition to abaca nonwoven fabrics cell sheet

  20. Electrical Characterisation of electron beam exposure induced Defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danga, Helga T., E-mail: helga.danga@up.ac.za; Auret, Francois D.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2016-01-01

    The defects introduced in epitaxially grown p-type silicon (Si) during electron beam exposure were electrically characterised using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high resolution Laplace-DLTS. In this process, Si samples were first exposed to the conditions of electron beam deposition (EBD) without metal deposition. This is called electron beam exposure (EBE) herein. After 50 minutes of EBE, nickel (Ni) Schottky contacts were fabricated using the resistive deposition method. The defect level observed using the Ni contacts had an activation energy of H(0.55). This defect has an activation energy similar to that of the I-defect. The defect level is similar to that of the HB4, a boron related defect. DLTS depth profiling revealed that H(0.55) could be detected up to a depth of 0.8 μm below the junction. We found that exposing the samples to EBD conditions without metal deposition introduced a defect which was not introduced by the EBD method. We also observed that the damage caused by EBE extended deeper into the material compared to that caused by EBD.

  1. Strain and Thermally Induced Magnetic Dynamics and Spin Current in Magnetic Insulators Subject to Transient Optical Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Guang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the magnetic dynamics and particularly the spin current in an open-circuit ferromagnetic insulator irradiated by two intense, phase-locked laser pulses. The interference of the laser beams generates a transient optical grating and a transient spatiotemporal temperature distribution. Both effects lead to elastic and heat waves at the surface and into the bulk of the sample. The strain induced spin current as well as the thermally induced magnonic spin current are evaluated numerically on the basis of micromagnetic simulations using solutions of the heat equation. We observe that the thermo-elastically induced magnonic spin current propagates on a distance larger than the characteristic size of thermal profile, an effect useful for applications in remote detection of spin caloritronics phenomena. Our findings point out that exploiting strain adds a new twist to heat-assisted magnetic switching and spin-current generation for spintronic applications.

  2. Beam-Induced Multipactoring and Electron-Cloud Effects in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Scandale, Walter; Zimmermann, F

    2009-01-01

    In the beam pipe of high-energy proton or positron accelerators an “electron cloud” can be generated by a variety of processes, e.g. by residual-gas ionization, by photoemission from synchrotron radiation, and, most importantly, by secondary emission via a beam-induced multipactoring process. The electron cloud commonly leads to a degradation of the beam vacuum by several orders of magnitude, to fast beam instabilities, to beam-size increases, and to fast or slow beam losses. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the cloud electrons could also give rise to an additional heat load inside cold superconducting magnets. In addition to the direct heat deposition from incoherently moving electrons, a potential “magnetron effect” has been conjectured, where electrons would radiate coherently when moving in a strong magnetic field under the simultaneous influence of a beam-induced electric “wake” field that may become resonant with the cyclotron frequency. Electron-cloud effects are already being observed w...

  3. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P. [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F. [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada); Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  4. Beam energy spread in FERMI(at)elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI(at)elettra electron gun

  5. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  6. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  7. RAMI Analysis of Neutral Beam Heating and Current Drive System for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Doo Hee; Lee, Sang Il

    2009-01-01

    A RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, Inspectability) analysis has been performed for the neutral beam (NB) heating and current drive (H and CD) system of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) device. The objective of this analysis is to implement RAMI engineering requirements for the design and testing to prepare a reliability-centred plan for commissioning, operation, and maintenance of the system in the framework of a technical risk control to support the overall ITER Project. These RAMI requirements will correspond to the RAMI targets for the ITER project and the compensating provisions to reach them as deduced from the necessary actions to decrease the risk level of the function failure modes. The RAMI analyses have to match with the procurement plan of the system

  8. Extrinsic Influence of Environment-Induced Degradation on Load Carrying Capacity of Steel Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Sunil; Patnaik, A.; Payer, J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of a study aimed at evaluating the strength of wide-flanged beams subjected to corrosion-induced damage, modeled using a standard finite element program (ABAQUS) is presented and discussed. Typical beams in consideration were subjected to different cases of corrosion-induced damage, such as non-uniform and varying degree of material loss that simulates pitting corrosion. Many variables, such as (a) shape of pitting damage, (b) location of pits along the length of the beam, (c) number of pits, and (d) depth of pits, were considered to facilitate a better understanding of the load carrying capacity of steel I-beams having damage quite similar to pitting damage to the web. The results are compared with an "as-new" beam for purpose of evaluation of the reduction in strength due to environment-induced deterioration. A "corrosion strength reduction factor (CSRF)" is introduced to help identify the reduction in load carrying capacity as a consequence of both height and depth of the damage due to corrosion. The results are presented in charts for purpose of practical beam design.

  9. Production and focusing of high-currents beams of relativistic electrons up to high densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, A.V.; Korolev, V.D.; Sidorov, Y.L.; Smirnov, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    The results of beam focusing experiments carried out on the ''MS'' and ''Triton'' accelerators are presented. The magnetic insulation of vacuum lines is described. Some experiments on beam focusing in the diode gap with a plasma filling are discussed. (MOW)

  10. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  11. Suitability of high-current standing-wave linac technology for ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, D.C.; Faehl, R.J.; Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Near-term development of the existing PHERMEX standing-wave linac would provide a 40 to 60 MeV electron beam with a current of 3 kA capable of answering a number of fundamental issues concerning endoatmospheric, ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation. Inherent high-repetition rate and multiple-pulse capability would allow alternative propagation scenarios to be investigated. Much of the theoretical expertise required to support the technology development and time-resolved beam propagation experiments presently resides within the Theoretical Applications Division

  12. Simulative research on the expansion of cathode plasma in high-current electron beam diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qifu; Liu Lie

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of cathode plasma has long been recognized as a limiting factor in the impedance lifetime of high-current electron beam diode. Realistic modeling of such plasma is of great necessity in order to discuss the dynamics of cathode plasma. Using the method of particle-in-cell, the expansion of cathode plasma is simulated in this paper by a scaled-down diode model. It is found that the formation of cathode plasma increases the current density in the diode. This consequently leads to the decrease of the potential at plasma front. Once the current density has been increased to a certain value, the potential at plasma front would then be equal to or lower than the plasma potential. Then the ions would move towards the anode, and the expansion of cathode plasma is thereby formed. Different factors affecting the plasma expansion velocity are discussed in this paper. It is shown that the decrease of proton genatation rate has the benefit of reducing the plasma expansion velocity.

  13. FNR demonstration experiments Part I: Beam port leakage currents and spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehe, D.K.; King, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the NR-LEU experimental program has been to measure the changes in numerous reactor characteristics when the conventional HEU core is replaced by a complete LEU fueled core or by a single LEU element in the normal HEU core. We have observed comparisons in a) thermal flux intensity, spatial distribution and cadmium ratios, both in the core and in the light and heavy water reflectors, b) fast flux intensity and spectral shape at a special element within the core, c) the thermal leakage flux intensity at the exit positions of several beam ports and its spectral shape at one beam port, d) shim and control rod worths, e) temperature coefficient of reactivity, and f) xenon poison worth. The NR is a 2 MW light water pool reactor, reflected on three faces by light water and on one face by D 2 O, composed of MTR plate fuel elements. Figure shows a plan view of the core grid, D 2 O reflector tank, and beam ports. The conventional HEU fuel element contains eighteen MTR Al plates 30 in x 24 in x 0.06 in. The center 0.02 in of each plate is 93% U-235 enriched UAl x . A normal equilibrium HEU core loading is outlined. Each new HEU element contains ∼ 140 grams of U-235. The LEU low enrichment fuel retains the same plate and element geometry but the fuel is contained in a central 0.03 in thick UA l x matrix with 19.5% U-235 enrichment. Each new LEU element contains ov 167.3 grams U-235. In-core neutron fluxes were routinely mapped by a rhodium SPND and by many wire and foil activations. The same data, but in more restricted positions, were obtained through the light water reflector (south) and D 2 O reflector tank (north). Beam port leakage currents were measured during all power cycles, by transmission fission chambers at the exits of ports GI, and J, by a B3 detector at A-port, and by a prompt detector at the F-port exit. Thermal neutron spectra for both HEU and LEU cores were measured at I port using a single crystal silicon diffractometer. These measurements

  14. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1 a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2 a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200  MeV/u up to 1  GeV/u.

  15. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; MONTAG, C.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far

  16. Applying inversion techniques to derive source currents and geoelectric fields for geomagnetically induced current calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. de Villiers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the inversion of geomagnetic variation field measurement to obtain source currents in the ionosphere. During a geomagnetic disturbance, the ionospheric currents create magnetic field variations that induce geoelectric fields, which drive geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in power systems. These GIC may disturb the operation of power systems and cause damage to grounded power transformers. The geoelectric fields at any location of interest can be determined from the source currents in the ionosphere through a solution of the forward problem. Line currents running east–west along given surface position are postulated to exist at a certain height above the Earth's surface. This physical arrangement results in the fields on the ground having the magnetic north and down components, and the electric east component. Ionospheric currents are modelled by inverting Fourier integrals (over the wavenumber of elementary geomagnetic fields using the Levenberg–Marquardt technique. The output parameters of the inversion model are the current strength, height and surface position of the ionospheric current system. A ground conductivity structure with five layers from Quebec, Canada, based on the Layered-Earth model is used to obtain the complex skin depth at a given angular frequency. This paper presents preliminary and inversion results based on these structures and simulated geomagnetic fields. The results show some interesting features in the frequency domain. Model parameters obtained through inversion are within 2% of simulated values. This technique has applications for modelling the currents of electrojets at the equator and auroral regions, as well as currents in the magnetosphere.

  17. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  18. Effects induced by LHC high energy beam in copper structures

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Dallocchio, A

    2011-01-01

    This study is performed in order to estimate the damage on copper components due to the impact of a 7 TeV proton beam in the Large Hadron Collider. The case study represents an accidental case consequent to an abnormal release of the beam, in which eight bunches impact directly the copper. The energy delivered on the components is calculated by the FLUKA Team at CERN using their Monte-Carlo code for calculation of particle transport and interactions with matter. The energy maps are used by the authors as input for the structural simulations carried out via the FEM code LS-DYNA. The evolution of the phenomenon is quite similar to what might happen during an explosion. The impacted part of the component reaches extremely high values of pressure and temperature and undergoes changes of state. The sudden increase in pressure originates outgoing shockwaves that, travelling through the component, lead to a substantial density reduction in the impacted part. The energy delivered on the component is sufficient to sev...

  19. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He + multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams

  20. Modelling of helical current filaments induced by LHW on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Michael; Denner, Peter; Liang, Yunfeng [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Zeng, Long [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Wang, Liang; Liu, Fukun; Qian, Jinping; Shen, Biao; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Gauthier, Eric [Association EURATOM-CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: the EAST Team

    2013-07-01

    Helical radiation belts have been observed in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of the plasma during the application of lower hybrid wave (LHW) heating at the superconducting tokamak EAST. Modelled SOL field lines, starting in-front of the LHW antennas, show agreement in position and pitch angle to the experimental observed radiation belts. A splitting of the strike-line can be observed on the outer divertor plates during the application of LHW heating. Agreement in the comparison of the Mirnov coil signals and a modelled electric current flow along these SOL field lines was found. A lower hybrid current drive can induce such an electric current flow near the plasma edge. This electric current flow causes a change of the plasma topology which could result in the splitting of the strike-line as known from the application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields. Comparisons of modelled footprint structures and experimental observed heat load patterns in the divertor region are discussed.

  1. Nonconservative current-induced forces: A physical interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchavdar N. Todorov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We give a physical interpretation of the recently demonstrated nonconservative nature of interatomic forces in current-carrying nanostructures. We start from the analytical expression for the curl of these forces, and evaluate it for a point defect in a current-carrying system. We obtain a general definition of the capacity of electrical current flow to exert a nonconservative force, and thus do net work around closed paths, by a formal noninvasive test procedure. Second, we show that the gain in atomic kinetic energy over time, generated by nonconservative current-induced forces, is equivalent to the uncompensated stimulated emission of directional phonons. This connection with electron–phonon interactions quantifies explicitly the intuitive notion that nonconservative forces work by angular momentum transfer.

  2. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  3. Current-Induced Forces and Hot Spots in Biased Nanojunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant...... asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect....

  4. Structure and properties of combined protective coatings with use high-current electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzimov, Sh.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Improvement of superficial materials and products is the important task. The high-efficiency vacuum - arc sources created recently open more ample opportunities for change of properties of a surface of metal materials. Now there is a number of known technologies on drawing coverings for updating a surface of working parts of metals. Today the protecting coatings, which were deposited on tools applied in electrochemical and chemical devices, acquired a great interest. It is known that some kinds of treatment, such as, for example, ion implantation, ion-assisted deposition of thin films, electron beam irradiation, CVD, PVD, etc. cannot result directly in desired effect. Therefore to resolve some application problems, one has to use combined methods of treatment, which allow one to resolve complicated serious problems of material science and industrial fields, for example, in space, automobile, aviation, ship building, etc. So, the goal of this work was to study the structure, element composition and properties of hybrid coatings on TiNi/Cr/Al 2 O 3 and TiN/Al 2 O 3 base, which were deposited on AISI 321 stainless steel before and after electron beam irradiation. A special attention was paid to studies of diffusion and mass-transfer processes. We applied XRD, RBS, AES, SEM with micro-analysis as well as corrosion in sulfur acid, adhesion and hardness tests. It had been demonstrated that these coatings were able to perform different functions as protecting coatings. Tests of TiN/Al 2 O 3 and TiN/Cr/Al 2 O 3 coatings, which were deposited on AISI 321 steel, after high-current electron beam irradiation demonstrated significant increase in corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4 solution under 400 0 C temperature. Hardness and adhesion of these coatings to substrate increased, and significant decrease in friction wear of coating surfaces was found. In such a way, in this report it was demonstrated that hybrid coatings on TiN/Cr/Al 2 O 3 and TiN/Al 2 O 3 base after

  5. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  6. Neutral current induced neutrino oscillations in a supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A; Kusenko, Alexander; Segre, Gino

    1997-01-01

    Neutral currents induced matter oscillations of electroweak-active (anti-)neutrinos to sterile neutrinos can explain the observed motion of pulsars. In contrast to a recently proposed explanation of the pulsar birth velocities based on the electron to tau (muon) neutrino oscillations [hep-ph/9606428], the heaviest neutrino (either active or sterile) would have to have mass of order several keV.

  7. 3D, Flash, Induced Current Readout for Silicon Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Sherwood I. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-06-07

    A new method for silicon microstrip and pixel detector readout using (1) 65 nm-technology current amplifers which can, for the first time with silicon microstrop and pixel detectors, have response times far shorter than the charge collection time (2) 3D trench electrodes large enough to subtend a reasonable solid angle at most track locations and so have adequate sensitivity over a substantial volume of pixel, (3) induced signals in addition to, or in place of, collected charge

  8. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  9. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  10. Comparison of methods for modelling geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, D. H.; Pirjola, R. J.

    2014-09-01

    Assessing the geomagnetic hazard to power systems requires reliable modelling of the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) produced in the power network. This paper compares the Nodal Admittance Matrix method with the Lehtinen-Pirjola method and shows them to be mathematically equivalent. GIC calculation using the Nodal Admittance Matrix method involves three steps: (1) using the voltage sources in the lines representing the induced geoelectric field to calculate equivalent current sources and summing these to obtain the nodal current sources, (2) performing the inversion of the admittance matrix and multiplying by the nodal current sources to obtain the nodal voltages, (3) using the nodal voltages to determine the currents in the lines and in the ground connections. In the Lehtinen-Pirjola method, steps 2 and 3 of the Nodal Admittance Matrix calculation are combined into one matrix expression. This involves inversion of a more complicated matrix but yields the currents to ground directly from the nodal current sources. To calculate GIC in multiple voltage levels of a power system, it is necessary to model the connections between voltage levels, not just the transmission lines and ground connections considered in traditional GIC modelling. Where GIC flow to ground through both the high-voltage and low-voltage windings of a transformer, they share a common path through the substation grounding resistance. This has been modelled previously by including non-zero, off-diagonal elements in the earthing impedance matrix of the Lehtinen-Pirjola method. However, this situation is more easily handled in both the Nodal Admittance Matrix method and the Lehtinen-Pirjola method by introducing a node at the neutral point.

  11. Comparison of methods for modelling geomagnetically induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Boteler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the geomagnetic hazard to power systems requires reliable modelling of the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC produced in the power network. This paper compares the Nodal Admittance Matrix method with the Lehtinen–Pirjola method and shows them to be mathematically equivalent. GIC calculation using the Nodal Admittance Matrix method involves three steps: (1 using the voltage sources in the lines representing the induced geoelectric field to calculate equivalent current sources and summing these to obtain the nodal current sources, (2 performing the inversion of the admittance matrix and multiplying by the nodal current sources to obtain the nodal voltages, (3 using the nodal voltages to determine the currents in the lines and in the ground connections. In the Lehtinen–Pirjola method, steps 2 and 3 of the Nodal Admittance Matrix calculation are combined into one matrix expression. This involves inversion of a more complicated matrix but yields the currents to ground directly from the nodal current sources. To calculate GIC in multiple voltage levels of a power system, it is necessary to model the connections between voltage levels, not just the transmission lines and ground connections considered in traditional GIC modelling. Where GIC flow to ground through both the high-voltage and low-voltage windings of a transformer, they share a common path through the substation grounding resistance. This has been modelled previously by including non-zero, off-diagonal elements in the earthing impedance matrix of the Lehtinen–Pirjola method. However, this situation is more easily handled in both the Nodal Admittance Matrix method and the Lehtinen–Pirjola method by introducing a node at the neutral point.

  12. Compositional changes in industrial hemp biomass (Cannabis sativa L.) induced by electron beam irradiation Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Yong Joo; Shin, Soo-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical decomposition of industrial hemp biomass were evaluated at doses of 150, 300, and 450 kGy. The quantity of decomposed components was indirectly estimated by measuring changes in alkaline extraction. The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation doses resulted in larger amounts of alkaline extract. Carbohydrate compositional analysis using 1 H-NMR spectroscopy was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the polysaccharides of the industrial hemp. The xylose peak intensity in the NMR spectra decreased with increasing electron irradiation dose, indicating that xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose. -- Highlights: → The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation. → Carbohydrate analysis was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the industrial hemp. → Xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose.

  13. Modeling of Low Frequency MHD Induced Beam Ion Transport In NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Medley, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    Beam ion transport in the presence of low frequency MHD activity in National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) plasma is modeled numerically and analyzed theoretically in order to understand basic underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed fast ion redistribution and losses. Numerical modeling of the beam ions flux into the NPA in NSTX shows that after the onset of low frequency MHD activity high energy part of beam ion distribution, E b > 40keV, is redistributed radially due to stochastic diffusion. Such diffusion is caused by high order harmonics of the transit frequency resonance overlap in the phase space. Large drift orbit radial width induces such high order resonances. Characteristic confinement time is deduced from the measured NPA energy spectrum and is typically ∼ 4msec. Considered MHD activity may induce losses on the order of 10% at the internal magnetic field perturbation (delta)B/B = Ο (10 -3 ), which is comparable to the prompt orbit losses

  14. Magnetically induced electric fields and currents in the circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Thomas S

    2005-01-01

    Blood flow in an applied magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the aorta and other major arteries of the central circulatory system that can be observed as superimposed electrical signals in the electrocardiogram (ECG). The largest magnetically induced voltage occurs during pulsatile blood flow into the aorta, and results in an increased signal at the location of the T-wave in the ECG. Studies involving the measurement of blood pressure, blood flow rate, heart sounds, and cardiac valve displacements have been conducted with monkeys and dogs exposed to static fields up to 1.5 tesla (T) under conditions producing maximum induced voltages in the aorta. Results of these studies gave no indication of alterations in cardiac functions or hemodynamic parameters. Cardiac activity monitored by ECG biotelemetry during continuous exposure of rats to a 1.5-T field for 10 days gave no evidence for any significant changes relative to the 10 days prior to and following exposure. Theoretical modeling of magnetic field interactions with blood flow has included a complete solution of the equation describing the flow of an electrically conductive fluid in the presence of a magnetic field (the Navier-Stokes equation) using the finite element technique. Magnetically induced voltages and current densities as a function of the applied magnetic field strength have been calculated for the aorta and surrounding tissues structures, including the sinoatrial node. Induced current densities in the region of the sinoatrial node are predicted to be >100 mA/m2 at field levels >5 T in an adult human under conditions of maximum electrodynamic coupling with aortic blood flow. Magnetohydrodynamic interactions are predicted to reduce the volume flow rate of blood in the human aorta by a maximum of 1.3%, 4.9%, and 10.4% at field levels of 5, 10, and 15 T, respectively.

  15. Optimization of High-Current Ion Beam Acceleration and Charge Compensation in Two Cusps of Induction Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Karas, Vyacheslav I

    1996-01-01

    Results of the numerical simulation of the hollow high-current ion beam (HHCIB) dynamics in two magnet-isolated accelerat- ing gaps separated by the drift gap are presented. The previous study has shown that the good charge and current compensations of the ion beam by the specially injected electron beam occur in the accelerating gaps of the i nduction linac. However in the drift gap the high positive electric potential due to the positive space charge of HHCIB was obtained because the essential dif- ference between the electron and ion drift velocities exists un- der this compensation method. This disadvantage impairing the brightness of the ion beam can be considerably reduced by the additional injection of the thermal electrons into the drift region. In present report the some cases of the cold electron injection into drift gap are considered. The more optimal regime for the effec- tive charge and current compensations of HHCIB without loss in the stability of ion beam was found

  16. Radioprotective efficacy of bisarylidene cyclopentanone on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darshan Raj, C.G.; Sarojini, B.K.; Musthafa Khaleel, V.; Ramesh, S.R.; Ramakrishna, M.K.; Narayana, B.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Present study was carried out for evaluating the radioprotective effect of bischalcone (2E, 5E) - 2,5-bis (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzylidene) cyclopentanone (curcumin analog (CA)), on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster adults. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants included superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The oxidative stress was induced at 1.5 Gy. (author)

  17. Halo Evolution of Hypereutectic Al-17.5Si Alloy Treated with High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Halo evolution of an Al-17.5Si alloy surface after treatment with increasing pulse numbers of a high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB was investigated. A halo is a ring microstructure resembling a bull’s eye. SEM results indicate that the nanocrystallization of halo induced by HCPEB treatment leads to gradual diffusion of the Si phase. Multiple pulses numbers cause the Si phase to be significantly refined and uniformly distributed. In addition, nanosilicon particles with a grain size of 30~100 nm were formed after HCPEB treatment, as shown by TEM observation. XRD results indicate that Si diffraction peaks broadened after HCPEB treatment. The microhardness tests demonstrate that the microhardness at the midpoint from the halo edge to center decreased sharply from 9770.7 MPa at 5 pulses to 2664.14 MPa at 25 pulses. The relative wear resistance of a 15-pulse sample is effectively improved by a factor of 6.5, exhibiting optimal wear resistance.

  18. Vibration induced sliding: theory and experiment for a beam with a spring-loaded mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Erik; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    1998-01-01

    , and contributes to a further understanding of this nonlinear phenomenon. A mathematical model is set up to describe vibration induced sliding for a base-excited cantilever beam with a spring-loaded pointmass. Approximations simplify the model into two nonlinear ordinary differential equations, describing motions...

  19. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  20. Crosslinking of oriented polyethylene by electron beam radiation. Influence of morphology induced by drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Crevecoeur, G.; Lemstra, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of drawing on the crosslinking efficiency for electron beam radiation is reported for solution-crystallized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. A maximum in crosslinking efficiency is found at a draw ratio of approximately five, indicating an optimum morphology for inducing crosslinks during the hot-drawing process. (author)

  1. Beam-induced radiation in the compact muon solenoid tracker at the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The intense radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN at a design energy of. √ s = 14 TeV ... situated only a few centimeters from the interaction point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. .... fluences beyond 1 × 1015 cm−2 for minimum ionizing protons [6]. So we expect the pixel detectors to ...

  2. Ion-beam-induced amorphization and order-disorder transition in the murataite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Jie; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Yudintsev, Sergey V.; Stefanovsky, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    Murataite (A 3 B 6 C 2 O 22-x/2 ,F43m), a derivative of an anion-deficient fluorite structure, has been synthesized as different polytypes as a result of cation ordering. Ion-beam-induced amorphization has been investigated by 1-MeV Kr 2+ ion irradiation with in situ transmission electron microscopy. The critical amorphization dose was determined as a function of temperature and the degree of structural disordering. A lower critical amorphization temperature (∼860 K) was obtained for the disordered murataite as compared with that of the murataite superstructure (930 to 1060 K). An ion-beam-induced ordered murataite to a disordered fluorite transition occurred in the murataite superstructure, similar to that observed in the closely related pyrochlore structure-type, A 2 B 2 O 7 . The ion-beam-induced defect fluorite structure is more energetically stable in the murataite structure with a higher degree of structural disordering, as compared with the murataite superstructure. This suggests that the degree of intrinsic structural disorder has a significant effect on the energetics of structural disordering process; this affects the tendency toward the order-disorder structural transition for fluorite-related compounds and their response to ion-beam-induced amorphization

  3. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing: the effect of substrate thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F; Lazic, Ivan; Beyer, André

    2011-01-01

    It is often suggested that the growth in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is caused not only by primary electrons, but also (and even predominantly) by secondary electrons (SEs). If that is true, the growth rate for FEBIP can be changed by modifying the SE yield. Results from our ...

  4. A comparison of current-voltage relationships of collectors in the Earth's ionosphere with and without electron beam emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, N.B.; Raitt, W.J.; Gilchrist, B.E.; Banks, P.M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P.R.; Sasaki, S.; Star Laboratory, Stanford University; Institute for Space and Astronautical Science, Tokyo)

    1989-01-01

    The CHARGE-2 sounding rocket flight was designed primarily to measure the vehicle potential of an electron-emitting payload in the mid-latitude ionosphere. The experiment was separated into two sections, the larger section carried a 1 keV electron gun and was referred to as the mother vehicle. The smaller section, referred to as the daughter, was connected to the mother by an insulated, conducting tether, and was deployed to a distance of up to 426 m across the geomagnetic field. In addition to performing electron beam experiments, the mother vehicle contained a high voltage power supply capable of applying up to 450 V and 28 mA to the daughter through the tether. Steady state potentials of up to 560 V were measured for the mother vehicle during beam emissions of up to 36 mA. The daughter collected currents up to 6.5 mA and attained potentials of up to 1000 V relative to the background ionosphere. The CHARGE-2 experiment was unique in that for the first time a comparison can be made of the current collection between an electron beam-emitting vehicle and a non-emitting vehicle at high potentials (400 V to 1000 V). The daughter current collection agreed well with the Parker-Murphy model, while the mother current collection always exceeded the Parker-Murphy limit and even exceeded the Langmuir-Blodgett predicted current below 240 km. The additional current collection of the mother is attributed to beam-plasma interactions. This additional source of collected current may be very important for successful electron beam emission at altitudes below 240 km. Copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  5. Current-induced torques and interfacial spin-orbit coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Haney, Paul M.

    2013-12-19

    In bilayer systems consisting of an ultrathin ferromagnetic layer adjacent to a metal with strong spin-orbit coupling, an applied in-plane current induces torques on the magnetization. The torques that arise from spin-orbit coupling are of particular interest. Here we use first-principles methods to calculate the current-induced torque in a Pt-Co bilayer to help determine the underlying mechanism. We focus exclusively on the analog to the Rashba torque, and do not consider the spin Hall effect. The details of the torque depend strongly on the layer thicknesses and the interface structure, providing an explanation for the wide variation in results found by different groups. The torque depends on the magnetization direction in a way similar to that found for a simple Rashba model. Artificially turning off the exchange spin splitting and separately the spin-orbit coupling potential in the Pt shows that the primary source of the “fieldlike” torque is a proximate spin-orbit effect on the Co layer induced by the strong spin-orbit coupling in the Pt.

  6. Optimization of a ribbon diode with magnetic insulation for increasing the current density in a high-current relativistic electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrelin, V. T.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Sinitskii, S. L.; Stepanov, V. D.

    2009-05-01

    The geometry of the ribbon diode of the U-2 accelerator is optimized to increase both the current density and the total current of the relativistic electron beam for its subsequent injection into the plasma of a multimirror GOL-3 trap. Beam simulation in the diode was performed using the POISSON-2 applied software modified on the basis of the results obtained using the theory of a planar diode in an inclined magnetic field. As a result of the optimization, the diode geometry and the magnetic field configuration were found that should provide a factor of 1.5-2 increase in the current density in experiments with a small angular divergence of electron velocities.

  7. Surface alloying of aluminum with molybdenum by high-current pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Han; Zhang, Conglin; Lv, Peng; Cai, Jie; Jin, Yunxue; Guan, Qingfeng

    2018-02-01

    The surface alloying of pre-coated molybdenum (Mo) film on aluminum (Al) substrate by high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) was investigated. The microstructure and phase analysis were conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that Mo particles were dissolved into Al matrix to form alloying layer, which was composed of Mo, Al and acicular or equiaxed Al5Mo phases after surface alloying. Meanwhile, various structure defects such as dislocation loops, high-density dislocations and dislocation walls were observed in the alloying surface. The corrosion resistance was tested by using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). Electrochemical results indicate that all the alloying samples had better corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution compared to initial sample. The excellent corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to the combined effect of the structure defects and the addition of Mo element to form a more stable passive film.

  8. Destabilization of counter-propagating TAEs by off-axis, co-current Neutral Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta', M.; Fredrickson, E.; Gorelenkova, M.

    2017-10-01

    Neutral Beam injection (NBI) is a common tool to heat the plasma and drive current non-inductively in fusion devices. Energetic particles (EP) resulting from NBI can drive instabilities that are detrimental for the performance and the predictability of plasma discharges. A broad NBI deposition profile, e.g. by off-axis injection aiming near the plasma mid-radius, is often assumed to limit those undesired effects by reducing the radial gradient of the EP density, thus reducing the ``universal'' drive for instabilities. However, this work presents new evidence that off-axis NBI can also lead to undesired effects such as the destabilization of Alfvénic instabilities, as observed in NSTX-U plasmas. Experimental observations indicate that counter propagating toroidal AEs are destabilized as the radial EP density profile becomes hollow as a result of off-axis NBI. Time-dependent analysis with the TRANSP code, augmented by a reduced fast ion transport model (known as kick model), indicates that instabilities are driven by a combination of radial and energy gradients in the EP distribution. Understanding the mechanisms for wave-particle interaction, revealed by the phase space resolved analysis, is the basis to identify strategies to mitigate or suppress the observed instabilities. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Current-induced switching in transport through anisotropic magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Niels; Arrachea, Liliana; Lozano, Gustavo S.; Nunner, Tamara S.; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-03-01

    Anisotropic single-molecule magnets may be thought of as molecular switches, with possible applications to molecular spintronics. In this paper, we consider current-induced switching in single-molecule junctions containing an anisotropic magnetic molecule. We assume that the carriers interact with the magnetic molecule through the exchange interaction and focus on the regime of high currents in which the molecular spin dynamics is slow compared to the time which the electrons spend on the molecule. In this limit, the molecular spin obeys a nonequilibrium Langevin equation which takes the form of a generalized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and which we derive microscopically by means of a nonequilibrium Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We exploit this Langevin equation to identify the relevant switching mechanisms and to derive the current-induced switching rates. As a by-product, we also derive S-matrix expressions for the various torques entering into the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation which generalize previous expressions in the literature to nonequilibrium situations.

  10. Research of the Ion Current Density Influence on the Glass-Ceramics Surface Defects Forming under Ion-Beam Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Pozdnyakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of modern optics is primarily determined by manufacturing accuracy of the working surfaces of optical parts. Therefore, at the last stage of manufacturing optical parts the ion-beam treatment is applied. This method uses spraying the high-energy ions of heavy gases on the surface of a solid body. After an intense ion treatment there are microscopic defects, resembling chips, on the surface of polycrystalline glass. The aim of this work is to study distribution of the surface density of defects by sizes, depending on the density of ion current.Accelerator with an anode layer and a focused ion beam was used as an ion source. The accelerator worked on argon and created ion beam with Gaussian distribution of current density along the radius. The excess positive charge of the ion beam was compensated owing to ionization of residual gas. To eliminate the influence of slow ions with peripheral regions of the ion beam, the etching was performed through a circular aperture with a diameter of 40 mm.Surface treatment of the sample was carried out at the discharge voltage of 3800 V and current of 50 mA for 30 min. The maximum ion current density on the sample surface was 20.2 A/m2 and a power density was of 5.4·104 W/m2 .Distribution of defects by size was measured in three areas of the treated surface corresponding to different densities of ion current, namely: 20.2 A/m2 , 11.3A/m2 , and 3.4 A/m2 . Their number per area unit defines a density of defects.The results show that with increasing ion current density the density of defects on the surface of polycrystalline glass decreases. Thus a view of distribution function of defect density according to size is changed: density of small defects is reduced, and density of large ones increases. Also with increasing ion current density is observed an increase in the size of defects: a 6 times increase of the average size of defects results in 1.6 times increasing ion current density.These data will

  11. Proposed use of the radio-frequency quadrupole structure to funnel high-current ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, R.H.; Minerbo, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to funneling beams that are initially accelerated in two radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators. Instead of discrete optical elements, we propose to funnel within an RFQ structure, so that during the funneling process the beam is always confined by periodic transverse focusing. Beams with high space charge experience irreversible emittance growth when they emerge from a periodic focusing system. To alleviate this problem, in the proposed funneling system it should be possible to maintain the same focusing periodicity as that of the accelerators preceding the funnel. Also, instead of conventional deflection systems, we propose to use the properties of a modified RFQ structure to deflect two parallel beams toward each other and to merge them into a single final beam. 1 ref., 3 figs

  12. Proposed use of the radio-frequency quadrupole structure to funnel high-current ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, R.H.; Minerbo, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to funneling beams that are initially accelerated in two radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators. Instead of discrete optical elements, we propose to funnel within an RFQ structure, so that during the funneling process the beam is always confined by periodic transverse focusing. Beams with high space charge experience irreversible emittance growth when they emerge from a periodic focusing system. To alleviate this problem, in the proposed funneling system it should be possible to maintain the same focusing periodicity as that of the accelerators preceding the funnel. Also, instead of conventional deflection systems, we propose to use the properties of a modified RFQ structure to deflect two parallel beams toward each other and to merge them into a single final beam

  13. Present status on the ion collective acceleration and high-current beam transport in the Lebedev's Physical Institute USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomenskij, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of investigations into the ion collective acceleration and transport of high-current electron beams (HCEB) in vacuum channels with dielectric walls (VCDW) are presented. The physical principle of transport is in the partial neutralization of spatial charge of electrons with ions escaped from the prewall plasma and the compression of the beam with its own magnetic field. A problem of obtaining the intensive beams of negative ions in diode with magnetic isolation is considered. The mechanism of ion acceleration in VCDW is considered. It is shown that there are two regions with different mechanisms of acceleration. In the first region (''plasma'') ion acceleration in the quasipotential HCEB field up to energy of the order of the electron energy takes place. In the second region (''beam'') the acceleration takes place in the wave fields that can be excited due to the mechanism of the two-beam type instability. The mechanism of ion acceleration in direct electron beams is considered. This mechanism is based on the concept of relaxation oscillations of the virtual cathode and corresponding the reconstruction of the spatial charge distribution

  14. Chaos control in an electron beam with the supercritical current in the hydrodynamic model of the Pierce diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koronovskij, A.A.; Rempen, I.S.; Khramov, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of controlling the chaos in the electron beam with the supercritical current in the hydrodynamic model of the Pierce diode through the continuous feedback; the methodology of controlling the chaotic dynamics through stabilization of the unstable equilibrium state in the distributed active medium is proposed [ru

  15. Damage and annealing recovery of boron-implanted ultra-shallow junction: The correlation between beam current and surface configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Wu, Zong-Zhe; Lin, Yen-Fu; Kao, Li-Chi; Wu, Cheng-Ta; JangJian, Shiu-Ko; Chen, Yuan-Nian; Lo, Kuang Yao

    2018-03-01

    The condition of the beam current in the implantation process is a key issue in the damage rate and structural evolution in the sequent annealing process, especially for ultra-shallow layers. In this work, we develop a compensative optical method combined with UV Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to inspect the influence of the beam current in the implantation process. The optima condition of the beam current in the implantation process is determined by higher effective Si-B bond portion in UV Raman spectra and less the peak of B-B bond in XPS spectra which is caused by B cluster defects. Results of XANES indicate that the B oxide layer is formed on the surface of the ultra-shallow junction. The defects in the ultra-shallow junction after annealing are analyzed by novel optical analyses, which cannot be inspected by a traditional thermal wave and resistance measurement. This work exhibits the structural variation of the ultra-shallow junction via a variant beam current and provides a valuable metrology in examining the chemical states and the effective activation in the implantation technology.

  16. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; Pasquale, S. De; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Jungst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schonberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Gottlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huttmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Yagues Molina, A. G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Brummer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e(-)p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb(-1) collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a

  17. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  18. A 200-A, 500-Hz, triangle current-wave modulator and magnet used for particle beam rastering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a simple 2D beam-rastering system to uniformly spread a 100-mA 6.7-MeV cw proton beam over a 50-cm by 50-cm beam stop. The basic circuit uses a 20-mF capacitor bank, a IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) full-wave inverter, and a 1-mH ferrite dipole magnet to produce a ± 500-Gauss peak triangular-waveform deflection field at 500 Hz. A dc input voltage of 200 volts at 2.6 amps (520 watts) produces a 160-ampere peak-to-peak triangular current waveform in the ferrite magnet at 500 Hz. For dual-axis rastering, two ferrite dipoles are used, one at 500 Hz, and the other at 575 Hz, to produce a uniform 2D beam distribution at the beam stop. The paper will discuss the IGBT modulator and ferrite deflector in detail, including current and voltage waveforms, and the ferrite magnet B-dot (dB/dt) signal

  19. Wideband current transformers for the surveillance of the beam extraction kicker system of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Defrance, C; Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. A separate high voltage pulse generator powers each magnet. Because of the high beam energy and the consequences which could result from significant beam loss due to a malfunctioning of the dump system the magnets and generators are continuously surveyed in order to generate a beam abort as soon as an internal fault is detected. Amongst these surveillance systems, wideband current transformers have been designed to detect any erratic start in one of the generators. Output power should be enough to directly re-trigger all the power trigger units of the remaining 14 generators. The current transformers were developed in collaboration with industry. To minimize losses, high-resistivity cobalt alloy was chosen for the cores. The annealing techniques originally developed for LEP b...

  20. Generation and acceleration of high-current annular electron beam in linear induction accelerator and generation of the power microwave radiation from Cherenkov TWT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abubakirov, E.V.; Arkhipov, O.V.; Bobyleva, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    The section of linear induction accelerator (LIA) with a strong guiding magnetic field (up to 1.5 T), with output beam power up to 2 GW and beam pulse duration 60 ns is created and investigated by experiment. The beam energy gain is equal to 10 keV/sm with explosive emission is used; the large length of the beam propagation (1.5 m) without spolling of the beam with high beam energy gain has been established. The microwave radiation power about 30-100 MW has achieved from relativistic Cherenkov travelling wave tube with high exponential gain on the basis of LIA and high-current diode

  1. Electric currents induced by twisted light in Quantum Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G F; Berakdar, J

    2009-10-26

    We theoretically investigate the generation of electric currents in quantum rings resulting from the optical excitation with twisted light. Our model describes the kinetics of electrons in a two-band model of a semiconductor-based mesoscopic quantum ring coupled to light having orbital angular momentum (twisted light). We find the analytical solution, which exhibits a "circular" photon-drag effect and an induced magnetization, suggesting that this system is the circular analog of that of a bulk semiconductor excited by plane waves. For realistic values of the electric field and material parameters, the computed electric current can be as large as microA; from an applied perspective, this opens new possibilities to the optical control of the magnetization in semiconductors.

  2. Multi-bunch energy spread induced by beam loading in standing wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction of a relativistic beam with the modes of the TM 010 pass-band of a multicell cavity does not cause any problem: although all the modes are excited by the RF (radiofrequency) generator, resulting in different cell excitations during the cavity filling and the beam pulse, the net accelerating field exhibits negligible fluctuations from bunch to bunch. However, when the beam is not fully relativistic, this is no more true. The phase slippage occurring in the first cells, between the non relativistic beam and the lower pass-band modes, produces an effective enhancement of the shunt impedances, which is usually negligible for a relativistic beam in a well tuned cavity. Moreover, the voltage jumps (amplitude and phase) occurring at each bunch passage, as well as the beam detuning caused by the off-crest bunches, vary from cell to cell. These effects enhance dramatically the fluctuation of the accelerating voltage, with a dominant beating provided by the pass-band mode nearest to the pi-mode. The induced beam energy spread has been estimated by the help of two distinct codes, developed at Frascati (Italy) and (Saclay), with results in good agreement. While an interaction integral is computed at each bunch passage, the cavity refilling is calculated by solving coupled differential equations of the modes of the pass-band, driven by a generator linked to one end-cell. It is shown also that the intermode coupling arises from the external Q of the drive end-cell, and not from the wall losses. For illustration, the authors applied the method to the beam-loading problem in the SC capture cavity of the low charge injector of the TESLA test facility installed at DESY

  3. Investigations of Beam Dynamics Issues at Current and Future Hadron Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lau, Stephen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heinemann, Klaus [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bizzozero, David [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-12

    Final Report Abstract for DE-FG02-99ER4110, May 15, 2011- October 15, 2014 There is a synergy between the fields of Beam Dynamics (BD) in modern particle accelerators and Applied Mathematics (AMa). We have formulated significant problems in BD and have developed and applied tools within the contexts of dynamical systems, topological methods, numerical analysis and scientific computing, probability and stochastic processes, and mathematical statistics. We summarize the three main areas of our AMa work since 2011. First, we continued our study of Vlasov-Maxwell systems. Previously, we developed a state of the art algorithm and code (VM3@A) to calculate coherent synchrotron radiation in single pass systems. In this cycle we carefully analyzed the major expense, namely the integral-over-history (IOH), and developed two approaches to speed up integration. The first strategy uses a representation of the Bessel function J0 in terms of exponentials. The second relies on “local sequences” developed recently for radiation boundary conditions, which are used to reduce computational domains. Although motivated by practicality, both strategies involve interesting and rather deep analysis and approximation theory. As an alternative to VM3@A, we are integrating Maxwell’s equations by a time-stepping method, bypass- ing the IOH, using a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. DG is a generalization of Finite Element and Finite Volume methods. It is spectrally convergent, unlike the commonly used Finite Difference methods, and can handle complicated vacuum chamber geometries. We have applied this in several contexts and have obtained very nice results including an explanation of an experiment at the Canadian Light Source, where the geometry is quite complex. Second, we continued our study of spin dynamics in storage rings. There is much current and proposed activity where spin polarized beams are being used in testing the Standard Model and its modifications. Our work has focused

  4. High current CW beam profile monitors using transisiton radiation at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, P.; Denard, J.C.; Adderley, P.; Capek, K.; Feldl, E.

    1996-01-01

    One way of measuring the profile of CEBAF's low emittance and high power beam is to use the Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) emitted from a thin foil surface when the electron beam passes through it. We present the design of a monitor using the forward OTR emitted from a 0.25 μm carbon foil. We believe that the monitor will resolve three main issues: (i) whether the max temperature of the foil stays below the melting point, (ii) whether the beam loss remains below 0. 5%, in order not to trigger the machine protection system, and (iii) whether the monitor resolution (unlike that of synchrotron radiation monitors) is better than the product λγ. It seems that the most serious limitation for CEBAF is the beam loss due to beam scattering. We present results from Keil's theory and simulations from the computer code GEANT as well as measurements with Al foils with a 45 MeV electron beam. We also present a measurement of a 3.2 GeV beam profile that is much smaller than λγ, supporting Rule ampersand Fiorito's calculations of the OTR resolution limit due to diffraction

  5. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  6. Control of optically induced currents in semiconductor crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, Kapil Kumar

    2010-06-01

    The generation and control of optically induced currents has the potential to become an important building block for optical computers. Here, shift and rectification currents are investigated that emerge from a divergence of the optical susceptibility. It is known that these currents react to the shape of the impinging laser pulse, and especially to the shape of the pulse envelope. The main goal is the systematic manipulation of the pulse envelope with an optical pulse shaper that is integrated into a standard THz emission setup. The initial approach, the chirping of the laser pulse only has a weak influence on the envelope and the currents. Instead, a second approach is suggested that uses the combined envelope of a phase-stable pulse-pair as a parameter. In a laser pulse, the position of the maxima of the electrical field and the pulse envelope are shifted relative to each other. This shift is known as the Carrier-Envelope Phase (CEP). It is a new degree of freedom that is usually only accessible in specially stabilized systems. It is shown, that in a phase-stable pulse-pair, at least the relative CEP is usable as a new degree of freedom. It has a great influence on the shape of the pulse envelope and thus on the current density. It is shown that this approach enables the coherent control of the current density. The experiments are corroborated by a theoretical model of the system. The potential of this approach is demonstrated in an application. A framework is presented that uses an iterative genetic algorithm to create arbitrarily shaped THz traces. The algorithm controls the optical pulse shaper, and varies the phase of the impinging laser pulses until the desired target trace is found. (orig.)

  7. Photo-induced dipole relaxation current in natural Amethyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Trombini Russo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC measurements were carried out for SiO2 in the amethyst form, aiming to investigate the relationship of observed current with relaxation phenomena related to quartz impurities. In addition to TSDC conventional dark procedure, photo-induced TSDC was also carried out, where the exciting light came from an Ar+ laser, tuned either at 488 nm or at 541 nm. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption measurements were used as complement for the interpretation of TSDC data. Optical absorption data, mainly in the range 400-700 nm, allow identifying the characteristic bands of amethyst as well as to relate them with TSDC and photo-induced TSDC data, leading to a relationship between absorption bands and light irradiation with selected wavelengths. These results allow determining how the formation of a TSDC band in the range 220-260 K, is affected by the light absorption, modifying the formation and the dipole orientation distribution in the samples. Results also help the verification of defects formed by Fe3+ or Fe4+ ions in the amethyst structure, as well as suggest that these defects, besides the participation in the amethyst structure as color centers, also play a role in the formation of TSDC bands, contributing for the observed effect of monochromatic light irradiation on these bands.

  8. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihler F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich Ihler, Martin CanisDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyAbstract: Ragweed (Ambrosia spp. is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by

  9. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  10. Current Compensation of Hydrogen Ion Beam Extracted from PIG with Metal-Hydride Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisko, V.N.; Sereda, I.N.; Klochko, E.V.; Tseluyko, A.F.; Afanas'eva, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of extracted hydrogen ion beam compensation from reflective discharge with metal-hydride cathode that sufficiently widens the possible field of applying plasma sources of such type is found. The evolution of energy distribution function of ions extracted along the axial direction from reflective discharge with metal-hydride cathode depending on external parameters of the discharge is investigated. The electron distribution functions which compensate hydrogen ion beam are determined

  11. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology an...

  12. Selected immobilization of individual nanoparticles by spot-exposure electron-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbridge, Daniel J; Crampin, Simon; Gordeev, Sergey N [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Viau, Guillaume [Departement de Genie Physique, INSA de Toulouse, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-01-29

    The use of spot-exposure electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) to immobilize targeted nanoparticles on a substrate is demonstrated, and investigated using experiment and simulation. Nanoparticles are secured in place through the build-up of carbonaceous material that forms in the region between a particle and substrate when an energetic electron beam is focused onto the particle and projected through to the substrate. Material build-up directly affects the strength of adhesion to the surface, and can be controlled through electron dosage and beam energy. By selectively immobilizing specific particles within surface agglomerations and removing the excess, we illustrate the potential for spot-exposure EBID as a new technique for nanofabrication.

  13. Development of microwave ion source and low energy beam transport system for high current cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, V.S., E-mail: pandit@vecc.gov.in; Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Srivastava, S.; Misra, A.; Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P.Y.; Yadav, R.C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.; Nandi, C.; Pal, G.; Thakur, S.K.

    2013-12-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source and a low energy beam transport system have been developed to study the high intensity proton beam injection into a 10 MeV, 5 mA compact cyclotron. We have extracted proton beam more than 10 mA at 80 kV as measured by the DCCT after the extraction and a well collimated beam of 7 mA (through 1 cm × 1 cm slit) at the faraday cup 1.5 m away from the source. The transport of protons from the ion source in the presence of H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} species has been studied using PIC simulations through our transport line which consists of two solenoids. We have also installed a small dipole magnet with similar field as that of the cyclotron along with vacuum chamber, spiral inflector and few diagnostic elements at the end of the beam line. In the preliminary testing of inflection, we achieved 1 mA beam on the faraday cup at the exit of inflector with ∼60% transmission efficiency.

  14. Compensation of the open-quotes Pacmanclose quotes tune spread by tailoring the beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    ' Factory'-like e + -e - colliders presently under design or construction achieve high luminosity by resorting to large numbers of closely-spaced bunches. The short bunch spacing implies that there are unavoidable parasitic collisions (PCs) in the neighborhood of the interaction point (IP). Since the bunch population of the beam is not uniform due to an intentional ion-clearing gap, the bunches at the head or tail of the train (open-quotes pacman bunchesclose quotes) experience different beam-beam tune shifts than those away from the edges (open-quotes typical bunchesclose quotes). The author presents here a method to minimize the vertical tune spread at the expense of increasing the horizontal tune spread (it is assumed that there is only one IP). Since the beam-beam dynamics for flat beams typically tolerates a significantly higher horizontal tune spread than a vertical tune spread, this method implies a net advantage. The author presents this discussion in the context of the PEP-II collider

  15. Proton-induced knockout reactions with polarized and unpolarized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasa, T.; Ogata, K.; Noro, T.

    2017-09-01

    Proton-induced knockout reactions provide a direct means of studying the single particle or cluster structures of target nuclei. In addition, these knockout reactions are expected to play a unique role in investigations of the effects of the nuclear medium on nucleon-nucleon interactions as well as the properties of nucleons and mesons. However, due to the nature of hadron probes, these reactions can suffer significant disturbances from the nuclear surroundings and the quantitative theoretical treatment of such processes can also be challenging. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical progress in this field, particularly focusing on the use of these reactions as a spectroscopic tool and as a way to examine the medium modification of nucleon-nucleon interactions. With regard to the former aspect, the review presents a semi-quantitative evaluation of these reactions based on existing experimental data. In terms of the latter point, we introduce a significant body of evidence that suggests, although does not conclusively prove, the existence of medium effects. In addition, this paper also provides information and comments on other related subjects.

  16. Beam induced heat loads on the beam-screens of the twin-bore magnets in the IRs of the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The expected heat load induced on the beam screens has been evaluated for all the twin-bore magnets in the Insertion Regions (IRs) of the HL-LHC. The contribution from the impedance of the beam screen has been evaluated taking into account the presence of a longitudinal weld in the beam screen and the impact of the temperature and of the magnetic field on the resistivity of the surface. The contribution coming from electron cloud effects has been evaluated for different values of the Secondary Electron Yield of the surface based PyECLOUD build-up simulations.

  17. Comparison of three different concepts of high dynamic range and dependability optimised current measurement digitisers for beam loss systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, W; Effinger, E; Venturini, G G; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    Three Different Concepts of High Dynamic Range and Dependability Optimised Current Measurement Digitisers for Beam Loss Systems will be compared on this paper. The first concept is based on Current to Frequency Conversion, enhanced with an ADC for extending the dynamic range and decreasing the response time. A summary of 3 years’ worth of operational experience with such a system for LHC beam loss monitoring will be given. The second principle is based on an Adaptive Current to Frequency Converter implemented in an ASIC. The basic parameters of the circuit are discussed and compared with measurements. Several measures are taken to harden both circuits against single event effects and to make them tolerant for operation in radioactive environments. The third circuit is based on a Fully Differential Integrator for enhanced dynamic range, where laboratory and test installation measurements will be presented. All circuits are designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and have reliability and fail safe...

  18. Analysis of radiation pressure force exerted on a biological cell induced by high-order Bessel beams using Debye series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Renxian; Ren, Kuan Fang; Han, Xiang'e; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Shuxi

    2013-01-01

    Debye series expansion (DSE) is employed to the analysis of radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted on biological cells induced by high-order Bessel beams (BB). The beam shape coefficients (BSCs) for high-order Bessel beams are calculated using analytical expressions obtained by the integral localized approximation (ILA). Different types of cells, including a real Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell and a lymphocyte which are respectively modeled by a coated and five-layered sphere, are considered. The RPF induced by high-order Bessel beams is compared with that by Gaussian beams and zeroth-order Bessel beams, and the effect of different scattering processes on RPF is studied. Numerical calculations show that high-order Bessel beams with zero central intensity can also transversely trap particle in the beam center, and some scattering processes can provide longitudinal pulling force. -- Highlights: ► BSCs for high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) is derived using ILA. ► DSE is employed to study the RPF induced by HOBB exerted on multilayered cells. ► RPF is decided by radius relative to the interval of peaks in intensity profile. ► HOBB can also transversely trap high-index particle in the vicinity of beam axis. ► RPF for some scattering processes can longitudinally pull particles back

  19. Use of cone beam computed tomography in implant dentistry: current concepts, indications and limitations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Michael M; Horner, Keith; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an essential component of treatment planning in the field of implant dentistry. This narrative review will present current concepts for the use of cone beam computed tomography imaging, before and after implant placement, in daily clinical practice and research. Guidelines for the selection of three-dimensional imaging will be discussed, and limitations will be highlighted. Current concepts of radiation dose optimization, including novel imaging modalities using low-dose protocols, will be presented. For preoperative cross-sectional imaging, data are still not available which demonstrate that cone beam computed tomography results in fewer intraoperative complications such as nerve damage or bleeding incidents, or that implants inserted using preoperative cone beam computed tomography data sets for planning purposes will exhibit higher survival or success rates. The use of cone beam computed tomography following the insertion of dental implants should be restricted to specific postoperative complications, such as damage of neurovascular structures or postoperative infections in relation to the maxillary sinus. Regarding peri-implantitis, the diagnosis and severity of the disease should be evaluated primarily based on clinical parameters and on radiological findings based on periapical radiographs (two dimensional). The use of cone beam computed tomography scans in clinical research might not yield any evident beneficial effect for the patient included. As many of the cone beam computed tomography scans performed for research have no direct therapeutic consequence, dose optimization measures should be implemented by using appropriate exposure parameters and by reducing the field of view to the actual region of interest. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Joule heating and current-induced domain wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, J.; Lemaître, A.; Niazi, T.; Faini, G.; Jeudy, V.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate numerically and experimentally the Joule heating produced by current pulses and its contribution to current-induced domain wall (DW) motion in a (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductor. Different thermal coupling between tracks and substrates are explored. A direct contact leads to a logarithmic transient temperature rise and a stationary state determined by the substrate thickness. The introduction of a low thermal conducting (Ga,In)As interlayer produces an additional temperature rise whose time variation and magnitude are analyzed. Experimentally, the measured temperature rises present a good agreement with predictions over more than four orders of magnitude in time for values of the heat conductivity and of the heat capacity close to those reported in the literature. The Joule heating is shown to produce non-linearities in the domain wall velocity versus current density characteristics. A correction of Joule heating is proposed and permits the identification of the flow regimes from a comparison of domain-wall dynamics in tracks presenting different pinning characteristics.

  1. Methodology for simulation of geomagnetically induced currents in power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boteler David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems it is useful to be able to simulate the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC that are produced during major geomagnetic disturbances. This paper examines the methodology used in power system analysis and shows how it can be applied to modelling GIC. Electric fields in the area of the power network are used to determine the voltage sources or equivalent current sources in the transmission lines. The power network can be described by a mesh impedance matrix which is combined with the voltage sources to calculate the GIC in each loop. Alternatively the power network can be described by a nodal admittance matrix which is combined with the sum of current sources into each node to calculate the nodal voltages which are then used to calculate the GIC in the transmission lines and GIC flowing to ground at each substation. Practical calculations can be made by superposition of results calculated separately for northward and eastward electric fields. This can be done using magnetic data from a single observatory to calculate an electric field that is a uniform approximation of the field over the area of the power system. It is also shown how the superposition of results can be extended to use data from two observatories: approximating the electric field by a linear variation between the two observatory locations. These calculations provide an efficient method for simulating the GIC that would be produced by historically significant geomagnetic storm events.

  2. Observations of geomagnetically induced currents in the Australian power network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Gorniak, H.; van der Walt, T.; Waters, C. L.; Sciffer, M. D.; Miller, M.; Dalzell, M.; Daly, T.; Pouferis, G.; Hesse, G.; Wilkinson, P.

    2013-01-01

    such as pipelines and power networks at low-middle latitude regions have historically been considered relatively immune to geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Over the past decade there have been an increasing number of investigations into the impact of GICs in long grounded conductors at these latitudes. The Australian region power network spans thousands of kilometers from low to middle latitudes. The approaching maximum of solar cycle 24 and recent findings of studies into power networks located at similar latitudes have stimulated the Australian power industry to better understand this phenomenon in their region. As a result, a pilot study to compare space weather activity with in situ GIC monitors at strategic locations within the power network was initiated. This paper provides some results from the first of these operational GIC monitors during a modest geomagnetic storm, showing the first observational evidence of space weather well correlated with GICs measured in the Australian power network. Transformer neutral currents show a high degree of similarity with the geoelectric field derived from the closest available geomagnetic observatory. Current maxima of 4-5 amperes were observed in association with geoelectric field values of ~0.06-0.07 volts per kilometer. This paper also discusses the GIC measurements obtained during this storm in terms of the space weather drivers and the considerably larger geoelectric field values anticipated during larger geomagnetic storms.

  3. Comparison of beam-position-transfer functions using circular beam-position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    A cylindrical beam-position monitor (BPM) used in many accelerator facilities has four electrodes on which beam-image currents induce bunched-beam signals. These probe-electrode signals are geometrically configured to provide beam-position information about two orthogonal axes. An electronic processor performs a mathematical transfer function (TF) on these BPM-electrode signals to produce output signals whose time-varying amplitude is proportional to the beam's vertical and horizontal position. This paper will compare various beam-position TFs using both pencil beams and will further discuss how diffuse beams interact with some of these TFs

  4. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based on single beam splitting and geometric configuration for effective signal enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-05

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS.

  5. Decomposition of organic pollutants in industrial Effluent induced by advanced oxidation process with Electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, C.L.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Rela, P.R.; Oikawa, H.; Silveira, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) by electron beam irradiation induce the decomposition of pollutants in industrial effluent. Experiments were conducted using a Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1.5 MeV energy and 37 Kew power. Experiments were conducted using samples from a Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) that receives about 20% of industrial wastewater, with the objective of use the electrons beam technology to destroy the refractory organic pollutants. Samples from WTP main Industrial Receiver Unit influent (IRU), Coarse Bar Screens effluent (CBS), Medium Bar Screens effluent (MBS), Primary Sedimentation effluent (PS) and Final Effluent (FE), were collected and irradiated in the electron beam accelerator in a batch system. The delivered doses were 5.0kGy, 10.0kGy and 20.0kGy. The electron beam irradiation showed be efficient on destroying the organic compounds delivered in these effluents mainly chloroform, dichloroethane, methyl isobutyl ketone, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol. The necessary dose to remove 90% of the most organic compounds from industry effluent was 20 kGy. The removal of organic compounds from this complex mixture were described by the destruction G value (Gd) that were obtained for those compounds in different initial concentration and compared with literature

  6. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  7. Novel Programmable Shape Memory Polystyrene Film: A Thermally Induced Beam-power Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Han, Yu; Wang, Wenxin; Liu, Yanju; Jin, Peng; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-03-01

    Micro/nanophotonic structures that are capable of optical wave-front shaping are implemented in optical waveguides and passive optical devices to alter the phase of the light propagating through them. The beam division directions and beam power distribution depend on the design of the micro/nanostructures. The ultimate potential of advanced micro/nanophotonic structures is limited by their structurally rigid, functional singleness and not tunable against external impact. Here, we propose a thermally induced optical beam-power splitter concept based on a shape memory polystyrene film with programmable micropatterns. The smooth film exhibits excellent transparency with a transmittance of 95% in the visible spectrum and optical stability during a continuous heating process up to 90 °C. By patterning double sided shape memory polystyrene film into erasable and switchable micro-groove gratings, the transmission light switches from one designed light divided directions and beam-power distribution to another because of the optical diffraction effect of the shape changing micro gratings during the whole thermal activated recovery process. The experimental and theoretical results demonstrate a proof-of-principle of the beam-power splitter. Our results can be adapted to further extend the applications of micro/nanophotonic devices and implement new features in the nanophotonics.

  8. Neon ion beam induced pattern formation on amorphous carbon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Bobes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ripple pattern formation on amorphous carbon surfaces at room temperature during low energy Ne ion irradiation as a function of the ion incidence angle. Monte Carlo simulations of the curvature coefficients applied to the Bradley-Harper and Cater-Vishnyakov models, including the recent extensions by Harrison-Bradley and Hofsäss predict that pattern formation on amorphous carbon thin films should be possible for low energy Ne ions from 250 eV up to 1500 eV. Moreover, simulations are able to explain the absence of pattern formation in certain cases. Our experimental results are compared with prediction using current linear theoretical models and applying the crater function formalism, as well as Monte Carlo simulations to calculate curvature coefficients using the SDTrimSP program. Calculations indicate that no patterns should be generated up to 45° incidence angle if the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer introduced by Hofsäss is taken into account, while pattern formation most pronounced from 50° for ion energy between 250 eV and 1500 eV, which are in good agreement with our experimental data.

  9. Electron-Cloud Simulation and Theory for High-Current Heavy-Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Lee, E; Azevedo, T; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-01-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary- electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability: (1) We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2) We simulate of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration). One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3) We report first results from a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics

  10. Electron-cloud simulation and theory for high-current heavy-ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy-ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron-cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds (also applicable to other accelerators. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability. (1 We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2 We simulate the effect of specified electron-cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing-mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope “breathing” mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3 We report first results from a long-time-step algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics.

  11. Long term Geomagnetically Induced Current observations from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divett, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Mac Manus, D. H.; Dalzell, M.; Thomson, A. W. P.; Clarke, E.; Petersen, T.; Clilverd, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Transpower New Zealand Limited have measured DC currents at transformers in the New Zealand electrical network at multiple South Island locations . Near continuous archived DC current data exist since 2001, starting with 11 different substations, and expanding from 2012 to include 17 substations. In some cases multiple measurements are made at different transformers inside the same substation. Primarily the measurements were to monitor the impact of the High Voltage DC system linking the North and South Islands when it is operating in "Earth return" mode. The 2012 expansion in measurement locations was specifically undertaken to better monitor the Geomagnetically Induced Current (GIC) Space Weather risk. It is recognised that GIC caused the loss of a South Island transformer in November 2001, during a storm that caused multiple alarms on GIC monitors across that island. The long time period spanned by the monitoring and the relatively dense spatial coverage make this an internationally important dataset for GIC studies.In this poster we will therefore present preliminary analysis of current and magnetic field data measured during large geomagnetic storms. During storms we find some locations report GIC of many tens of amps, with strong variation across the South Island. Of particular importance to operators, the GIC magnitude varies inside substations, depending on the local electrical setup. Due to the number of GIC measurements during large geomagnetic storms (e.g., for >40 nT/min local magnetic field rate of change) in our dataset we are able to make rough estimates of the extreme GIC values likely in a worst case scenario. As the extreme level is many hundred's of amps, GIC is clearly a hazard to the New Zealand electrical transmission system, despite the countries geomagnetic mid-latitude location.

  12. Currents, drag, and sediment transport induced by a tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.; Buscombe, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of water surface elevation, currents, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from a 10-m deep site on the inner shelf in northern Monterey Bay during the arrival of the 2010 Chile tsunami. Velocity profiles were measured from 3.5 m above the bed (mab) to the surface at 2 min intervals, and from 0.1 to 0.7 mab at 1 Hz. SSC was determined from the acoustic backscatter of the near-bed profiler. The initial tsunami waves were directed cross shore and had a period of approximately 16 min. Maximum wave height was 1.1 m, and maximum current speed was 0.36 m/s. During the strongest onrush, near-bed velocities were clearly influenced by friction and a logarithmic boundary layer developed, extending more than 0.3 mab. We estimated friction velocity and bed shear stress from the logarithmic profiles. The logarithmic structure indicates that the flow can be characterized as quasi-steady at these times. At other phases of the tsunami waves, the magnitude of the acceleration term was significant in the near-bed momentum equation, indicating unsteady flow. The maximum tsunami-induced bed shear stress (0.4 N/m2) exceeded the critical shear stress for the medium-grained sand on the seafloor. Cross-shore sediment flux was enhanced by the tsunami. Oscillations of water surface elevation and currents continued for several days. The oscillations were dominated by resonant frequencies, the most energetic of which was the fundamental longitudinal frequency of Monterey Bay. The maximum current speed (hourly-timescale) in 18 months of observations occurred four hours after the tsunami arrived.

  13. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Wu Xin; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Liu Qingfang; He Jinyu; Jing Xigang; Ding Nan; Dai Zhongying; Zhou Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  14. Simulating Geomagnetically Induced Currents in the Irish Power Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. G.; Blake, S. P.; Gallagher, P.; McCauley, J.; Hogg, C.; Beggan, C.; Thomson, A. W. P.; Kelly, G.; Walsh, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms are known to cause geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) which can damage or destroy transformers on power grids. Previous studies have examined the vulnerability of power networks in countries such as the UK, New Zealand, Canada and South Africa. Here we describe the application of a British Geological Survey (BGS) thin-sheet conductivity model to compute the geo-electric field from the variation of the magnetic field, in order to better quantify the risk of space weather to Ireland's power network. This was achieved using DIAS magnetotelluric data from across Ireland. As part of a near-real-time warning package for Eirgrid (who oversee Ireland's transmission network), severe storm events such as the Halloween 2003 storm and the corresponding GIC flows at transformers are simulated.

  15. Current-Induced Transistor Sensorics with Electrogenic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fromherz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of transistor recording of electroactive cells are considered, when the response is determined by a current-induced voltage in the electrolyte due to cellular activity. The relationship to traditional transistor recording, with an interface-induced response due to interactions with the open gate oxide, is addressed. For the geometry of a cell-substrate junction, the theory of a planar core-coat conductor is described with a one-compartment approximation. The fast electrical relaxation of the junction and the slow change of ion concentrations are pointed out. On that basis, various recording situations are considered and documented by experiments. For voltage-gated ion channels under voltage clamp, the effects of a changing extracellular ion concentration and the enhancement/depletion of ion conductances in the adherent membrane are addressed. Inhomogeneous ion conductances are crucial for transistor recording of neuronal action potentials. For a propagating action potential, the effects of an axon-substrate junction and the surrounding volume conductor are distinguished. Finally, a receptor-transistor-sensor is described, where the inhomogeneity of a ligand–activated ion conductance is achieved by diffusion of the agonist and inactivation of the conductance. Problems with regard to a development of reliable biosensors are mentioned.

  16. Advanced ion beam analysis of materials using ion-induced fast electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Ishihara, Toyoyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-energy shadowing effect using ion-induced electron spectroscopy is reported with emphasis on a possibility of determination of local electronic structure in solids, which has been a difficult problem to approach with other experimental techniques. We demonstrate real-space determination of covalent-bond electron distribution in Si crystal. The analysis technique may provide a new field of ion beam analysis of solids. (author)

  17. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Abigail T., E-mail: abigail.berman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-02

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  18. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  19. Measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon by a muon neutrino beam with average energy 0.8 GeV. The separation of coherent from inclusive neutral pion production has been improved by detecting recoil protons from resonant neutral pion production. We measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent neutral pion production to total charged current cross sections to be (1.16 +/- 0.24) x 10-2. The ratio of charged current coherent pion to neutral current coherent pion production is calculated to be 0.14+0.30 -0.28, using our published charged current coherent pion measurement.

  20. A Projection Quality-Driven Tube Current Modulation Method in Cone-Beam CT for IGRT: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jianrong

    2017-12-01

    To develop a projection quality-driven tube current modulation method in cone-beam computed tomography for image-guided radiotherapy based on the prior attenuation information obtained by the planning computed tomography and then evaluate its effect on a reduction in the imaging dose. The QCKV-1 phantom with different thicknesses (0-400 mm) of solid water upon it was used to simulate different attenuation (μ). Projections were acquired with a series of tube current-exposure time product (mAs) settings, and a 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio was analyzed for each projection to create a lookup table of mAs versus 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio, μ. Before a patient underwent computed tomography, the maximum attenuation [Formula: see text] within the 95% range of each projection angle (θ) was estimated according to the planning computed tomography images. Then, a desired 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio value was selected, and the mAs setting at θ was calculated with the lookup table of mAs versus 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio,[Formula: see text]. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography images were reconstructed using the projections acquired with the selected mAs. The imaging dose was evaluated with a polymethyl methacrylate dosimetry phantom in terms of volume computed tomography dose index. Image quality was analyzed using a Catphan 503 phantom with an oval body annulus and a pelvis phantom. For the Catphan 503 phantom, the cone-beam computed tomography image obtained by the projection quality-driven tube current modulation method had a similar quality to that of conventional cone-beam computed tomography . However, the proposed method could reduce the imaging dose by 16% to 33% to achieve an equivalent contrast to noise ratio value. For the pelvis phantom, the structural similarity index was 0.992 with a dose reduction of 39.7% for the projection quality-driven tube current modulation method. The proposed method could reduce the

  1. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsky, S. L.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  2. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsky, S. L.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  3. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinitsky, S. L., E-mail: s.l.sinitsky@inp.nsk.su; Arzhannikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Acad. Lavrentyev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova St., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Acad. Lavrentyev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Prospekt K. Marksa, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-25

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  4. Low-beam-loss design of a compact, high-current deuteron radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhang

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A 201.5 MHz, 50 mA, 2.0 MeV deuteron radio frequency quadrupole accelerator is proposed as the neutron generator for the neutron experiment facility project at Peking University, China. Based on better understanding of beam losses, some new optimization procedures concerning both longitudinal and transverse dynamics are adopted. Accordingly, the beam transmission efficiency is improved from 91.2% to 98.3% and the electrode length is shortened from 2.91 to 2.71 m. The fundamental physical analyses are performed to look inside the new design recipe and explain why it works.

  5. Geomagnetically induced currents in a power grid of northeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torta, J. Miquel; Serrano, LluíS.; Regué, J. Ramon; SáNchez, Albert M.; RoldáN, Elionor

    2012-06-01

    Using the geomagnetic records of Ebro geomagnetic observatory and taking the plane wave assumption for the external current source and a homogeneous Earth conductivity, a prediction of the effects of the geomagnetic activity on the Catalonian (northeastern Spain) power transmission system has been developed. Although the area is located at midlatitudes, determination of the geoelectric field on the occasion of the largest geomagnetic storms during the last solar cycles indicates amplitudes that are higher than those recorded in southern Africa, where some transformer failures on large transmission systems have been reported. A DC network model of the grid has been constructed, and the geomagnetically induced current (GIC) flows in the power network have been calculated for such extreme events using the electric field at Ebro as a regional proxy. In addition, GICs have been measured at one transformer neutral earthing of the power grid, so that there the accuracy of the model has been assessed. Although the agreement is quite satisfactory, results indicate that better knowledge of the ground conductivity structure is needed. This represents the first attempt to study and measure GICs in southern European power grids, a region considered to have low GIC-risk up to the present.

  6. Beam Induced Ferrite Heating of the LHC Injection Kickers and Proposals for Improved Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Calatroni, S; Day, H; Ducimetière, L; Garlaschè, M; Gomes Namora, V; Mertens, V; Sobiech, Z; Taborelli, M; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

    2013-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker systems produce an integrated field strength of 1.3 T·m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. A beam screen is placed in the aperture of each magnet, which consists of a ceramic tube with conductors in the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the beam image current and screen the ferrite yoke against wakefields. Recent LHC operation, with high intensity beam stable for many hours, resulted in significant heating of both the ferrite yoke and beam impedance reduction ferrites. For one kicker magnet the ferrite yoke approached its Curie temperature. As a result of a long thermal time-constant the ferrite yoke can require several hours to cool sufficiently to allow re-injection of beam, thus limiting the running efficiency of the LHC. Thermal measurement data has been analysed, a thermal model developed and emissivity measurements carried out. Various measures to improve the ferrite cooling have...

  7. Multi-channel Andreev reflection in Co-W nanocontacts fabricated using focused electron/ion beam induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N; Vugts, P; Daniels, C; Keuning, W; Kohlhepp, J T; Kurnosikov, O; Koopmans, B

    2014-12-12

    We report multi-channel electron transport in nano-contacts fabricated using focused electron beam induced deposited (FEBID) cobalt and focused ion beam induced deposited (FIBID) tungsten. Anomalous Andreev reflection (AR) effect is observed to which the conventional Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) fit cannot be applied. In specific, we have observed multiple number of shoulders near the AR peak, whose origin is unknown in literature. We explain this effect based on a simple model that takes into account the material properties of the FIBID grown W superconductor, as well as the specific interface properties that are an outcome of using FEBID/FIBID as a fabrication technique. We show that numerical calculations using the BTK approximation based on the consideration of multiple channels generate similar shoulders as we observed in the AR experiments. Electrical measurements and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy carried out on FIBID W deposits puts additional evidence towards multi-channel current transport occuring at the interface of the nanocontacts.

  8. Assessment of Nearshore Hazard due to Tsunami-Induced Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynett, P. J.; Ayca, A.; Borrero, J. C.; Eskijian, M.; Miller, K.; Wilson, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    The California Tsunami Program in cooperation with NOAA and FEMA has begun implementing a plan to increase tsunami hazard preparedness and mitigation in maritime communities (both ships and harbor infrastructure) through the development of in-harbor hazard maps, offshore safety zones for boater evacuation, and associated guidance for harbors and marinas before, during and following tsunamis. The hope is that the maritime guidance and associated education program will help save lives and reduce exposure of damage to boats and harbor infrastructure. Findings will be used to develop maps, guidance documents, and consistent policy recommendations for emergency managers and port authorities and provide information critical to real-time decisions required when responding to tsunami alert notifications. The initial goals of the study are to (1) evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of existing numerical models for assessing maritime tsunami hazards, (2) find a relationship between current speeds and expected damage levels, (3) evaluate California ports and harbors in terms of tsunami induced hazards by identifying regions that are prone to higher current speeds and damage and to identify regions of relatively lower impact that may be used for evacuation of maritime assets, and (4) determine 'safe depths' for evacuation of vessels from ports and harbors during a tsunami event. We will present details of a new initiative to evaluate the future likelihood of failure for different structural components of a harbor, leading to the identification of high priority areas for mitigation. This presentation will focus on the results from California ports and harbors across the State, and will include feedback we have received from discussions with local harbor masters and port authorities. To help promote accurate and consistent products, the authors are also working through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program to organize a tsunami current model benchmark workshop.

  9. Trapping induced nonlinear behavior of backward stimulated Raman scattering in multi-speckled laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Langdon, A. B.; Michel, P.

    2012-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion experiments, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) occurs when electron density fluctuations are amplified resonantly by the incident laser beams and scattered light. These beams comprise several thousands of individual laser speckles. We have found in single-speckle studies that electron trapping lowers the threshold intensity for SRS onset to a value below that from linear theory and enhances scattering. The trapping-induced plasma-wave frequency shift leads to wave-front bowing and filamentation processes that saturate SRS and limit scattering within a speckle. With large-scale simulations, we have now examined how laser speckles interact with one another through three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of two interacting speckles and 2D PIC simulations of ensembles of laser speckles (hundreds of speckles). Our work shows that kinetic trapping physics also governs the onset and saturation of SRS in ensembles of speckles. Speckles interact in a manner that is nonlinear and nonlocal: An intense speckle can destabilize its neighbors through transport of hot electrons and SRS waves, resulting in enhanced emission of particles and waves that, in turn, act upon the original speckle. In this manner, speckles below threshold when in isolation can be above the threshold in multi-speckled beams under conditions for laser-driven fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and ensembles of speckles are thus found to collectively lower the SRS onset threshold. Simulations of the hohlraum interior where laser beams overlap show that multi-speckled laser beams at low average intensity (a few times 10 14 W/cm 2 ) have correspondingly lower thresholds for enhanced SRS and that the sub-ps bursts of SRS saturate through trapping induced nonlinearities. Because of electron trapping effects, SRS reflectivity grows slowly with average laser intensity. While SRS reflectivity saturates under NIF conditions, SRS hot electron

  10. Optimization of acceleration and charge neutralization of a high-current ion beam in two accelerating gaps of an induction linear acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, N.G.; Karas', V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Paper presents the results of numerical investigation into dynamics of high-current ion beam in two drift gap separated magnetoseparated accelerating gaps of linear induction accelerator. For eliminating imperfection one studies several variants of cold electron injection in a drift gap the enable to obtain satisfactory degree of charge and current neutralization of high-degree of charge and current neutralization of high-current ion beam

  11. Modified knife-edge method for current density distribution measurements in e-beam writers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bok, Jan; Kolařík, Vladimír; Horáček, Miroslav; Matějka, Milan; Matějka, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2013), 031603:1-6 ISSN 1071-1023 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA TA ČR TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : electron-beam * intensity distribution * aperture * detector * profile * size Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2013

  12. A high current sinusoidal pulse generator for the diluter magnets of the LHC beam dump system

    CERN Document Server

    Vossenberg, Eugène B; Ducimetière, L; Schröder, G H

    2000-01-01

    CERN is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a superconducting accelerator that will collide protons at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. The two colliding beams will each store an energy of up to 540 MJ, which must be safely deposited within one beam revolution of 89 mu s on two external absorbers located about 700 m from the extraction points at the end of dedicated extraction tunnels. To avoid evaporation of the graphite absorber material by the very high energy density of the incident beams, the deposition area of the beams on the absorber front face will be increased. This is done by a pair of sinusoidally powered orthogonal magnet systems producing approximately an e-shape figure of about 35 mm diameter, with a minimum velocity of 10 mm/ mu s during the dumping process. The pulse generators of the horizontally and vertically deflecting diluter magnets are composed of capacitor banks, discharged by stacks of solid state closing switches. They are connected to the magnets by 28 m long low induct...

  13. Application of Monochromatic Ocean Wave Forecasts to Prediction of Wave-Induced Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Stoke's wave-induced currents are compared, for variety of wind conditions resulting in partially developed seas and for two water depths, with currents induced by average and significant monochromatic waves related to Bretschneider spectrum.

  14. Hot ion buildup by low current neutron beam injection in LITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, R.G.; Ard, W.B.; Fader, W.J.; Polk, D.H.; Mensing, A.E.; Stufflebeam, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    The laser produced target plasma confined in the LITE minimum-B mirror magnetic field is shown along with a drawing of the confinement field line configuration. The plasma is generated by two beam, 1.06 micron, Nd-glass laser irradiation of LiH particles approximately 100 microns in diameter producing a plasma of approximately 10 16 hydrogen and lithium ions which expands in and is captured by the ''baseball'' confinement field. The plasma luminosity displays a plasma configuration which corresponds to the magnetic field geometry and indicates a plasma volume of approximately 400 cm 3 . Probe and microwave measurements confirm the plasma distribution indicated by the luminosity photographs. Charge collector probes located at a series of positions over a 120 0 arc in the mirror fan permit simultaneous observations of the plasma decay along field lines which pass through the mid-plane at different radial distances from the magnetic field axis. Plasma flux is observed with these probes to field lines 6 cm from the axis. Microwave measurements have been made with a strongly focused, 75 GHz (lambda = 4 mm) beam passing through the mid-plane, orthogonal to the mirror axis. Cut-off of the microwave beam transmission early in the confined plasma time history indicates that the radial dimension of the high density plasma region exceeds 2 cm. Measurement of the line density via interferometric measurements of the phase shift of the transmitted beam when the density has fallen below cut-off indicates an ''effective'' diameter of approximately 5 cm and an axial extent of approximately 20 cm. Thus, the plasma presents approximately 100 cm 2 target area to an incident neutral beam and occupies approximately 400 cm 3 volume

  15. Interaction of high-current relativistic electron beams with plasma. Physical nature of the phenomenon and its application in microwave electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukhadze, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed high-current electron beams with characteristic parameters: electron energy 10 5 -10 7 eV, electron current 10 3 -10 6 A, pulse duration 10 -8 -10 -6 s, beam energy 10 2 -10 6 J and power 10 8 -10 13 W, are widely used in different branches of science and technology such as controlled thermonuclear fusion, relativistic microwave electronics, powerful semiconductors, chemical and gaseous lasers, new principles of heavy-ion acceleration, and long-distance energy transmission. The paper discusses a new branch of science - pulsed high-current electronics, which has its own experimental technique and methods of theoretical analysis. Parts I and II determine what is meant by ''high current'' in an electron beam and calculate the maximum obtainable current values; these calculations are made for the simplest geometrical configurations realizable in practice. Current methods for theoretical analysis of high-current electron beam physics are described, together with classification of current experimental devices for generating such beams according to high-current parameters. The stability of electron beams is discussed and the concept of critical currents is introduced. Part III gives a detailed account of plasma-beam instability which occurs on the interaction of a high-current electron beam with high-density space-limited plasma. The linear and non-linear stages of beam instability are considered. The given theory is used for calculations for amplifiers and microwave generators of electromagnetic radiation. Finally, the experimental achievements in high-current relativistic microwave electronics are reviewed. (author)

  16. High peak current operation of x-ray free-electron laser multiple beam lines by suppressing coherent synchrotron radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toru; Kondo, Chikara; Inagaki, Takahiro; Togawa, Kazuaki; Fukami, Kenji; Nakazawa, Shingo; Hasegawa, Taichi; Morimoto, Osamu; Yoshioka, Masamichi; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Otake, Yuji; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2018-04-01

    The parallel operation of multiple beam lines is an important means to expand the opportunity of user experiments at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facilities. At SPring-8 Angstrom free-electron laser (SACLA), the multi-beam-line operation had been tested using two beam lines, but transverse coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects at a dogleg beam transport severely limited the laser performance. To suppress the CSR effects, a new beam optics based on two double bend achromat (DBA) structures was introduced for the dogleg. After the replacement of the beam optics, high peak current bunches of more than 10 kA are now stably transported through the dogleg and the laser pulse output is increased by a factor of 2-3. In the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA, the electron beam parameters, such as the beam energy and peak current, can be adjusted independently for each beam line. Thus the laser output can be optimized and wide spectral tunability is ensured for all beam lines.

  17. Elements of section of the high-current linear induction accelerator of charge-compensating ion beams with the raised power characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, A.G.; Kornilov, E.A.; Lozhkin, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    The method of account of basic elements of section of the high-current linear induction accelerator of charge-compensating ion beams, optimized with the purpose of reception of the greatest efficiency, rate of acceleration and average capacity of a beam is submitted. The opportunity of creation section on average capacity of a beam 100 kW at efficiency of induction system at a level 0,7, current of a beam in a pulse 20 kA, rate of acceleration 2 MeV/m, duration of an accelerating pulse 125 ns, frequency of shots 13,3 Hz, meaning of an accelerating voltage 3 MV, is shown.

  18. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  19. In-beam PET measurement of $^{7}Li^{3+}$ irradiation induced $\\beta^+}$-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Priegnitz, M; Parodi, K; Sommerer, F; Fiedler, F; Enghardt, W

    2008-01-01

    At present positron emission tomography (PET) is the only feasible method of an in situ and non-invasive monitoring of patient irradiation with ions. At the experimental carbon ion treatment facility of the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt an in-beam PET scanner has been integrated into the treatment site and lead to a considerable quality improvement of the therapy. Since ions other than carbon are expected to come into operation in future patient treatment facilities, it is highly desirable to extend in-beam PET also to other therapeutic relevant ions, e.g. 7Li. Therefore, by means of the in-beam PET scanner at GSI the β+-activity induced by 7Li3+ ions has been investigated for the first time. Targets of PMMA, water, graphite and polyethylene were irradiated with monoenergetic, pencil-like beams of 7Li3+ with energies between 129.1 A MeV and 205.3 A MeV and intensities ranging from 3.0 × 107 to 1.9 × 108 ions s−1. This paper presents the measured β+-activity profiles as well as d...

  20. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongliang; Tang, Jihua; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping; Tian, Shuangqi

    2009-08-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism.

  1. Development of data acquisition and over-current protection systems for a suppressor-grid current with a neutral-beam ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, LIU; Chundong, HU; Sheng, LIU; Shihua, SONG; Jinxin, WANG; Yan, WANG; Yuanzhe, ZHAO; Lizhen, LIANG

    2017-12-01

    Neutral beam injection is one of the effective auxiliary heating methods in magnetic-confinement-fusion experiments. In order to acquire the suppressor-grid current signal and avoid the grid being damaged by overheating, a data acquisition and over-current protection system based on the PXI (PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation) platform has been developed. The system consists of a current sensor, data acquisition module and over-current protection module. In the data acquisition module, the acquired data of one shot will be transferred in isolation and saved in a data-storage server in a txt file. It can also be recalled using NBWave for future analysis. The over-current protection module contains two modes: remote and local. This gives it the function of setting a threshold voltage remotely and locally, and the forbidden time of over-current protection also can be set by a host PC in remote mode. Experimental results demonstrate that the data acquisition and over-current protection system has the advantages of setting forbidden time and isolation transmission.

  2. Arcjet Diagnostics Using Current Modulation Velocimetry and Pulsed Electron Beam Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Beam Fluorescence more involved. The plume of a low - power helium arcjet consists primarily of ground-state helium atoms at a density of Background...diagnostics ’to low - power arcjet to detect and isolate. After calibration of the experiment with plumes. a. static gas of known density, it is...Reviewj34.4A , A888, 1964. 21. M. Mitchner and C. H. Kruger, Partially Ionized Gases, 78, Wiley 1. W. W. Smith et al., " Low Power Hydrazine Arcjet

  3. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  4. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behavior and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Rubanov, Sergey [Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  5. Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-07-17

    This paper presents a summary of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector and discusses methods to tag and remove background contaminated events in data. Trigger-rate based monitoring of beam-related backgrounds is presented. The correlations of backgrounds with machine conditions, such as residual pressure in the beam-pipe, are discussed. Results from dedicated beam-background simulations are shown, and their qualitative agreement with data is evaluated. Data taken during the passage of unpaired, i.e. non-colliding, proton bunches is used to obtain background-enriched data samples. These are used to identify characteristic features of beam-induced backgrounds, which then are exploited to develop dedicated background tagging tools. These tools, based on observables in the Pixel detector, the muon spectrometer and the calorimeters, are described in detail and their efficiencies are evaluated. Finally an example of an application of these techniques to a monojet analysis is given, which demonstra...

  6. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  7. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  8. In situ transmission electron microscopy analysis of electron beam induced crystallization of amorphous marks in phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.; Pieterson, L. van; Verheijen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallization of amorphous data marks in crystalline Ga 15 Sb 85 and Ge,In doped SbTe phase-change material was studied in situ in a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Electron irradiation induced crystallization was obtained at room temperature using a 120 kV beam. In general, electron beam (e - beam) induced crystallization started from the amorphous-crystalline interface and was growth dominated for both materials. A dependence of growth velocity on electron beam intensity and crystal direction was observed. A comparison with laser-crystallized amorphous marks was made. For laser-induced crystallization also crystal growth from the amorphous-crystalline interface was seen. However, differences in morphology between the e - -beam and laser-recrystallized data marks of the GaSb phase-change material were observed. The electron beam erased data marks contained crystals with (extremely) large periodicities found in three dimensions. For the Ge,In doped SbTe phase-change material identical morphologies were observed for the e - -beam and laser-recrystallized data marks. Both methods that induce crystallization displayed a rhombohedral Sb structure, the same structure as the laser-crystallized surroundings

  9. Effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene non-woven fabric induced by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Young; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric induced by electron beam. The electron beam irradiations on PP non-woven fabric were carried out over a range of irradiation doses from 25 to 100 kGy to make free radicals on fabric surface. The radical measurement was established by electron spin resonance (ESR) for confirming the changes of the alkyl radical and peroxy radical according to effect of storage time, storage temperature and atmosphere. It was observed that the free radicals were increased with irradiation dose and decreased with storage time due to the continuous oxidation. However, the radical extinction was significantly delayed due to reduced mobility of radicals at extremely low temperature. The degree of graft based on the analysis of ESR was investigated. The conditions of graft reaction were set at a temperature: 60 degrees Celcius, reaction time: 6 hours and styrene monomer concentration: 20 wt%

  10. Modification of some properties of polyamide-6 by electron beam induced grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timus, D.M.; Cincu, C.; Bradley, D.A.; Craciun, G.; Mateescu, E.

    2000-01-01

    Electron irradiation, applied on its own or in combination with other physical and chemical treatments, can result in radiation damage to materials. One category of such pursuits is electron beam radiation processing technologies, the intent being to produce favourable modification of materials. Study has been made herein of the use of accelerator-generated electron beams for the induced grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acids and acrylamide onto polyamide-6, the latter being popularly used in the textiles industry. Samples of polyamide-6, in the form of rectangular sheets of dimension, 10 cm x 10 cm or granules, have been irradiated using a 3 GHz travelling wave electron accelerator of energy 6.5 MeV. Results show that the degree of grafting is dependent upon radiation dose and extent of monomers dilution. Modifications have been observed in the melting temperature of the crystalline phase, glass transition temperature, mechanical parameters and the reticulation of polyamide

  11. Analysis of art objects by means of ion beam induced luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, A; Dran, J C; Salomon, J; Pivin, J C; Vomiero, A; Tonezzer, M; Maggioni, G; Carturan, S; Mea, G Della

    2006-01-01

    The impact of energetic ions on solid samples gives rise to the emission of visible light owing to the electronic excitation of intrinsic defects or extrinsic impurities. The intensity and position of the emission features provide information on the nature of the luminescence centers and on their chemical environments. This makes ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) a useful complement to other ion beam analyses, like PIXE, in the cultural heritage field in characterizing the composition and the provenience of art objects. In the present paper, IBIL measurements have been performed on inorganic pigments for underlying the complementary role played by IBIL in the analysis of artistic works. Some blue and red pigment has been presented as case study

  12. Effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene non-woven fabric induced by electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Young; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun [Radiation Research Dvision for Industry and Environment, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we fabricated effect of storage conditions on graft of polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric induced by electron beam. The electron beam irradiations on PP non-woven fabric were carried out over a range of irradiation doses from 25 to 100 kGy to make free radicals on fabric surface. The radical measurement was established by electron spin resonance (ESR) for confirming the changes of the alkyl radical and peroxy radical according to effect of storage time, storage temperature and atmosphere. It was observed that the free radicals were increased with irradiation dose and decreased with storage time due to the continuous oxidation. However, the radical extinction was significantly delayed due to reduced mobility of radicals at extremely low temperature. The degree of graft based on the analysis of ESR was investigated. The conditions of graft reaction were set at a temperature: 60 degrees Celcius, reaction time: 6 hours and styrene monomer concentration: 20 wt%.

  13. DNA damage and chromosome aberration induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kahoru; Funada, Aya; Aoki, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human cells (human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells and GM05389 human normal fibroblasts) irradiated with heavy ion beams on the basis of linear energy transfer (LET) values. The LET dependences of cell death were observed for the both cells by the method of colony assay. The LET dependences of the chromosomal aberrations, breaks and gaps, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were also observed for the both cells using the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. From these results it is suggested that exchange formation is essential for the cell death caused by heavy ion beam irradiation. It is suspected that the densely ionizing track structure of hight LET heavy ions inhibits the effective repair in the chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks and finally induce much exchange in the cells, which should be essential cause of cell death. (author)

  14. Electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of amorphous solid phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Wu, Liangcai; Wen, Lin; Ma, Liya; Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Song, Zhitang

    2018-04-01

    The electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of phase change materials in a nano sized area was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Amorphous phase change materials changed to a polycrystalline state after being irradiated with a 200 kV electron beam for a long time. The results indicate that the crystallization temperature strongly depends on the difference in the heteronuclear bond enthalpy of the phase change materials. The selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that Ge2Sb2Te5 is a nucleation-dominated material, when Si2Sb2Te3 and Ti0.5Sb2Te3 are growth-dominated materials.

  15. Particle identification in a LKr ionization chamber by multiple induced current measurements using the shape analysis of the signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P.L.; Stagni, L.; Diaferia, R.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.; Manfredi, P.F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.

    1995-01-01

    Charged particle (π/K) separation in the momentum range 0.5-0.7 GeV/c using a new method of shape analysis of the signal from a liquid krypton ionization chamber has been studied experimentally. The detector has been exposed to the T11 test beam at CERN PS. The shape of the preamplifier output signal has been recorded by a waveform digitizer and differentiated to obtain multiple measurements of induced current inside a 2 cm gap. Results on particle separation are presented. (orig.)

  16. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium; Ionenstrahlinduzierte Strukturmodifikationen in amorphem Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-05-03

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy {epsilon}{sub n} deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 {mu}m thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of {epsilon}{sub e}{sup HRF}=(10.5{+-}1.0) kev nm{sup -1} was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation {epsilon}{sub e}{sup S{sub a}}=(12{+-}2) keV nm{sup -1} for the first

  17. Octopole correction of geometric aberrations for high-current heavy-ion fusion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Haber, I.; Crandall, K.R.; Brandon, S.T.

    1989-03-17

    The success of heavy-ion fusion depends critically on the ability to focus heavy-ion beams to millimeter-size spots. Third-order geometric aberrations caused by fringe fields of the final focusing quadrupoles can significantly distort the focal spot size calculated by first-order theory. We present a method to calculate the locations and strengths of the octopoles that are needed to correct these aberrations. Calculation indicates that the strengths of the octopoles are substantially less than that of the final focusing quadrupoles. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  19. Modeling geomagnetic induced currents in Australian power networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Kelly, A.; Van Der Walt, T.; Honecker, A.; Ong, C.; Mikkelsen, D.; Spierings, A.; Ivanovich, G.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geomagnetic induced currents (GICs) have been considered an issue for high-latitude power networks for some decades. More recently, GICs have been observed and studied in power networks located in lower latitude regions. This paper presents the results of a model aimed at predicting and understanding the impact of geomagnetic storms on power networks in Australia, with particular focus on the Queensland and Tasmanian networks. The model incorporates a "geoelectric field" determined using a plane wave magnetic field incident on a uniform conducting Earth, and the network model developed by Lehtinen and Pirjola (1985). Model results for two intense geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 24 are compared with transformer neutral monitors at three locations within the Queensland network and one location within the Tasmanian network. The model is then used to assess the impacts of the superintense geomagnetic storm of 29-31 October 2003 on the flow of GICs within these networks. The model results show good correlation with the observations with coefficients ranging from 0.73 to 0.96 across the observing sites. For Queensland, modeled GIC magnitudes during the superstorm of 29-31 October 2003 exceed 40 A with the larger GICs occurring in the south-east section of the network. Modeled GICs in Tasmania for the same storm do not exceed 30 A. The larger distance spans and general east-west alignment of the southern section of the Queensland network, in conjunction with some relatively low branch resistance values, result in larger modeled GICs despite Queensland being a lower latitude network than Tasmania.

  20. Cylindrical shock waves and dynamic phenomena induced in solids by intense proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertarelli, Alessandro; Carra, Federico; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Guinchard, Michael; Mariani, Nicola; Peroni, Lorenzo; Redaelli, Stefano; Scapin, Martina

    2013-06-01

    The accidental impact of hadron beams on matter can induce intense shockwaves along with complex dynamic phenomena (phase transitions, extended density changes, explosions and fragment projections). These events have been successfully modeled resorting to wave propagation codes; to produce accurate results, however, these programs require reliable material constitutive models that are often scarce and inaccurate. A complex and innovative experiment was carried out at CERN to benchmark existing material constitutive models and possibly derive new ones. The test setup, aimed at the characterization of six different materials impacted by 440 GeV intense proton pulses, allowed to generate cylindrical shockwaves on material specimens and to observe the effects induced by their propagation. This method, a combination between numerical simulations and an experimental technique, permitting to tune the intensity, location and timing of the beam-deposited energy, may allow to study the effects induced by internal, quasi-instantaneous loadings in domains well beyond particle physics (accidents in nuclear facilities, internal explosions, high pressure blasts etc.), particularly when relatively little explored cylindrical shockwaves are generated. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission under the FP7 Research Infrastructures project EuCARD, grant agreement no. 227579.

  1. Pulsed laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching of titanium with XeF2: enhanced reaction rate and precursor transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J H; Fowlkes, J D; Timilsina, R; Stanford, M G; Lewis, B B; Rack, P D

    2015-02-25

    In order to enhance the etch rate of electron-beam-induced etching, we introduce a laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching (LA-FEBIE) process which is a versatile, direct write nanofabrication method that allows nanoscale patterning and editing. The results demonstrate that the titanium electron stimulated etch rate via the XeF2 precursor can be enhanced up to a factor of 6 times with an intermittent pulsed laser assist. The evolution of the etching process is correlated to in situ stage current measurements and scanning electron micrographs as a function of time. The increased etch rate is attributed to photothermally enhanced Ti-F reaction and TiF4 desorption and in some regimes enhanced XeF2 surface diffusion to the reaction zone.

  2. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nation, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work carried out on DOE contract number DE-AC02-80ER10569 during the period December 15, 1979 to May 31, 1992. The original purpose of this research was to investigate the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three major objectives: development of a suitable ion injector, growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components into a suitable proof-of-principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. Work focused on the first two of these objectives. Control of the space charge waves' phase velocity was not obtained to the degree required for a working accelerator, so the project was duly terminated in favor of a program which focused on generating ultra high power microwave signals suitable for use in the next linear collider. Work done to develop suitable efficient, inexpensive, phase-stable microwave sources, with peak powers of up to 1 GW in the X band in pulses shorter than 1 ns, is described. Included are lists of the journal and conference papers resulting from this work, as well as a list of graduate students who completed their Ph.D. studies on the projects described in this report

  3. Application of magnetically insulated transmission lines for high current, high voltage electron beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Frost, C.A.; Poukey, J.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines (MITL) adders have been used successfully in a number of Sandia accelerators such as HELIA, HERMES III, and SABRE. Most recently the authors used a MITL adder in the RADLAC/SMILE electron beam accelerator to produce high quality, small radius (r b < 2 cm), 11 to 15 MeV, 50 to 100-kA beams with a small transverse velocity v perpendicular/c = β perpendicular ≤ 0.1. In RADLAC/SMILE, a coaxial MITL passed through the eight, 2 MV vacuum envelopes. The MITL summed the voltages of all eight feeds to a single foilless diode. The experimental results are in good agreement with code simulations. The authors' success with the MITL technology led them to investigate the application to higher energy accelerator designs. They have a conceptual design for a cavity-fed MITL that sums the voltages from 100 identical, inductively-isolated cavities. Each cavity is a toroidal structure that is driven simultaneously by four 8-ohm pulse-forming lines, providing a 1-MV voltage pulse to each of the 100 cavities. The point design accelerator is 100 MV, 500 kA, with a 30-50-ns FWHM output pulse

  4. Application of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines for high current, high voltage electron beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Frost, C.A.; Poukey, J.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines (MITL) adders have been used successfully in a number of Sandia accelerators such as HELIA, HERMES III, and SABRE. Most recently we used at MITL adder in the RADLAC/SMILE electron beam accelerator to produce high quality, small radius (r ρ < 2 cm), 11 to 15 MeV, 50 to 100-kA beams with a small transverse velocity v perpendicular/c = β perpendicular ≤ 0.1. In RADLAC/SMILE, a coaxial MITL passed through the eight, 2 MV vacuum envelopes. The MITL summed the voltages of all eight feeds to a single foilless diode. The experimental results are in good agreement with code simulations. Our success with the MITL technology led us to investigate the application to higher energy accelerator designs. We have a conceptual design for a cavity-fed MITL that sums the voltages from 100 identical, inductively-isolated cavities. Each cavity is a toroidal structure that is driven simultaneously by four 8-ohm pulse-forming lines, providing a 1-MV voltage pulse to each of the 100 cavities. The point design accelerator is 100 MV, 500 kA, with a 30--50 ns FWHM output pulse. 10 refs

  5. Improved single particle potential for transport model simulations of nuclear reactions induced by rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account more accurately the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the in-medium many-body force term of the Gogny effective interaction, new expressions for the single-nucleon potential and the symmetry energy are derived. Effects of both the spin (isospin) and the density dependence of nuclear effective interactions on the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy are examined. It is shown that they both play a crucial role in determining the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities. The improved single-nucleon potential will be useful for more accurate simulation of nuclear reactions induced by rare-isotope beams within transport models.

  6. Radiation induced synthesis of gold/iron-oxide composite nanoparticles using high-energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kojima, Takao; Taniguci, Ryoichi; Okuda, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2008-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of gold and iron oxide were synthesized in aqueous solution systems by using a high-energy electron beam. The electron irradiation induces radiation-chemical reaction to form metallic gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles. Surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles are almost fully coated with fine gold nanoparticles. The size of these gold nanoparticles depended on the concentrations of gold ions, polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in the solutions before the irradiation.

  7. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  8. Ion desorption induced by charged particle beams: mechanisms and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, E.F. da; Schweikert, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis, through desorption, induced by fast particles, is presented and discussed. The stopping of projectils is essentially made by collisions with the target electrons. The desorbed particles are generally emmited with kinetic energy from 0.1 to 20 eV. Mass, charge, velocity and emission angle give information about the surface components, its structure as well as beam-solid interaction processes. Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of desorbed ions, determine the mass of organic macromolecules and biomolecules. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  9. Destructive effects induced by the electron beam in scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Banu, M. A.; Tomescu, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscopy has been validated by its impressive imaging and reliable measuring as an essential characterization tool for a variety of applications and research fields. This paper is a comprehensive study dedicated to the undesirable influence of the accelerated electron beam associated with the dielectric materials, sensitive structures or inappropriate sample manipulation. Depending on the scanning conditions, the electron beam may deteriorate the investigated sample due to the extended focusing or excessive high voltage and probe current applied on vulnerable configurations. Our aim is to elaborate an instructive material for improved SEM visualization capabilities by overcoming the specific limitations of the technique. Particular examination and measuring methods are depicted along with essential preparation and manipulation procedures in order to protect the integrity of the sample. Various examples are mentioned and practical solutions are described in respect to the general use of the electron microscope.

  10. Broad-beam high-current dc ion source based on a two-stage glow discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizir, A V; Oks, E M; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    We have designed, made, and demonstrated a broad-beam, dc, ion source based on a two-stage, hollow-cathode, and glow discharges plasma. The first-stage discharge (auxiliary discharge) produces electrons that are injected into the cathode cavity of a second-stage discharge (main discharge). The electron injection causes a decrease in the required operating pressure of the main discharge down to 0.05 mTorr and a decrease in required operating voltage down to about 50 V. The decrease in operating voltage of the main discharge leads to a decrease in the fraction of impurity ions in the ion beam extracted from the main gas discharge plasma to less than 0.2%. Another feature of the source is a single-grid accelerating system in which the ion accelerating voltage is applied between the plasma itself and the grid electrode. The source has produced steady-state Ar, O, and N ion beams of about 14 cm diameter and current of more than 2 A at an accelerating voltage of up to 2 kV.

  11. Seismically induced landslides: current research by the US Geological Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, E.L.; Wilson, R.C.; Keefer, D.K.; Wieczorek, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    We have produced a regional seismic slope-stability map and a probabilistic prediction of landslide distribution from a postulated earthquake. For liquefaction-induced landslides, in situ measurements of seismically induced pore-water pressures have been used to establish an elastic model of pore pressure generation. -from Authors

  12. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  13. Gamma and electron beam radiation induced physico-chemical modifications of poly(propylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoubi, N.; Peron, R.; Legendre, B.; Grossiord, J. L.; Ferrier, D.

    1999-05-01

    The homopolymer PP, a plastic material used as packaging and for medical products, must be subjected to a form of sterilization. Nowadays, one kind of this technology uses ionising radiation, which can be γ-rays or electron beams. In order to study the structural modifications of polymer syringes which could occur following these treatments at different doses (25-150 kGy), several analytical techniques have been used. DSC provided information on changes in the cristallinity of the polymer. The thermal evaluation was supplemented by testing the rheological properties of polypropylene. In addition, Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with a quaternary elution gradient was carried out for the evaluation of the degradation of the additives. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared (TGA/FTIR) was used to measure the desorption of food simulating liquid (CH 2Cl 2). First, the results obtained proved that the γ-rays as well as the electron beam induced degradation of the polymer and its additives. Next, we compared the effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation to determine which of these two processes better maintained the integrity of the irradiated product.

  14. Metallurgical characterization of pulsed current gas tungsten arc, friction stir and laser beam welded AZ31B magnesium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the influences of welding processes such as friction stir welding (FSW), laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) on mechanical and metallurgical properties of AZ31B magnesium alloy. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction technique were used to evaluate the metallurgical characteristics of welded joints. LBW joints exhibited superior tensile properties compared to FSW and PCGTAW joints due to the formation of finer grains in weld region, higher fusion zone hardness, the absence of heat affected zone, presence of uniformly distributed finer precipitates in weld region.

  15. Principal Component Analysis in the Nonlinear Dynamics of Beams: Purification of the Signal from Noise Induced by the Nonlinearity of Beam Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Krysko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the impact of the von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity introduced to a mathematical model of beam vibrations on the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the signal for the proposed mathematical models of beam vibrations. An attempt is made to separate vibrations of continuous mechanical systems subjected to a harmonic load from noise induced by the nonlinearity of the system by employing the principal component analysis (PCA. Straight beams lying on Winkler foundations are analysed. Differential equations are obtained based on the Bernoulli-Euler, Timoshenko, and Sheremetev-Pelekh-Levinson-Reddy hypotheses. Solutions to linear and nonlinear differential equations are found using the principal component analysis (PCA.

  16. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dynamics of two uncoupled distinct Chua circuits driven by a common direct current voltage is explored experimentally. It was found that, with increasing current intensity, the dominant frequencies of these two Chua circuits will first vary at different speeds, approach an identical value for a certain current intensity and ...

  17. Spectrum of lithium induced thyroid abnormalities: a current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige Davis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lithium is an integral drug used in the management of acute mania, unipolar and bipolar depression and prophylaxis of bipolar disorders. Thyroid abnormalities associated with treatment with lithium have been widely reported in medical literature to date. These include goitre, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis. This current review explores the varied thyroid abnormalities frequently encountered among patients on lithium therapy and their management, since lithium is still a fundamental and widely drug used in psychiatry and Internal Medicine. Methods PubMed database and Google scholar were used to search for relevant English language articles relating to lithium therapy and thyroid abnormalities up to December 2012. The search terms used were lithium treatment, thyroid abnormalities, thyroid dysfunction, goitre, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, thyrotoxicosis, autoimmune thyroiditis, lithium toxicity, treatment of affective disorders and depression and side effects of antipsychotic drugs. Reference lists of the identified articles were further used to identify other studies. Results Lithium affects normal thyroid functioning through multiple mechanisms. At the cellular level, it decreases thyroid hormone synthesis and release. It also decreases peripheral deiodination of tetraiodothyronine (T4 or thyroxine by decreasing the activity of type I 5’ de-iodinase enzyme. Hypothyroidism and goitre (clinically and/ultrasonographically detected are the most prevalent thyroid abnormalities among patients on long term lithium therapy. Lithium induced hyperthyroidism is very infrequent. Lithium increases the propensity to thyroid autoimmunity in susceptible individuals due to its effect of augmenting the activity of B lymphocytes and reducing the ratio of circulating suppressor to cytotoxic T cells. Conclusions Thyroid function tests (serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroid hormones-T4 and

  18. Beam generations of three kinds of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.; Mulser, P.; Drska, L.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses are given for beam generations of three kinds of charged particles: electrons, light ions, and heavy ions. The electron beam oscillates in a dense plasma irradiated by a strong laser light. When the frequency of laser light is high and its intensity ia large, the acceleration of oscillating electrons becomes large and the electrons radiate electromagnetic waves. As the reaction, the electrons feel a damping force, whose effect on oscillating electron motion is investigated first. Second, the electron beam induces the strong electromagnetic field by its self-induced electric current density when the electron number density is high. The induced electric field reduces the oscillation motion and deforms the beam. In the case of a light ion beam, the electrostatic field, induced by the beam charge, as well as the electromagnetic field, induced by the beam current, affects the beam motion. The total energy of the magnetic field surrounding the beam is rather small in comparison with its kinetic energy. In the case of heavy ion beams the beam charge at the leading edge is much smaller in comparison with the case of light ion beams when the heavy ion beam propagates in the background plasma. Thus, the induced electrostatic and electromagnetic fields do not much affect the beam propagation. (author)

  19. Reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by $^{8}$B beam close to the barrier

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of the proposed experiment is to investigate the reaction dynamics of proton-halo induced collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier where coupling to continuum effects are expected to be important. We propose to measure the $^{8}$B + $^{64}$Zn elastic scattering angular distribution together with the measurement, for the first time, of p - $^{7}$Be coincidences coming from transfer and/or break-up of $^{8}$B. The latter will allow a better understanding of the relative contribution of elastic $\\textit{vs}$ non-elastic break-up in reactions induced by extremely weakly-bound nuclei. We believe that with the availability of the post accelerated $^{8}$B beam at REX-ISOLDE we will be able to collect for the first time high quality data for the study of such an important topic.

  20. Laser marking on soda-lime glass by laser-induced backside wet etching with two-beam interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazumi, Tomoka; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    For crack-free marking of glass materials, a beam-scanning laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) process by a beam spot with a fine periodic structure was examined. The fine periodic structure was produced within a beam spot by means of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer incorporated to the optical setup for the beam-scanning LIBWE. A fine structure with a period of 9 µ m was observed within the microstructures with a diameter of ca. 40 µ m fabricated by a laser shot under double-beam irradiation, and they could be homogeneously fabricated within an area of 800  ×  800 µ m. The area filled with the microstructures, including fine periodic structures, could be observed in high contrast under a diffuse, on-axis illumination that was used in commercial QR code readers. (paper)

  1. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Weirich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID. It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt–C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me3. For W(CO6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques.

  2. Microscopic kinetic analysis of space-charge induced optical microbunching in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Marinelli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal space-charge forces from density fluctuations generated by shot noise can be a major source of microbunching instability in relativistic high brightness electron beams. The gain in microbunching due to this effect is broadband, extending at least up to optical frequencies, where the induced structure on the beam distribution gives rise to effects such as coherent optical transition radiation. In the high-frequency regime, theoretical and computational analyses of microbunching formation require a full three-dimensional treatment. In this paper we address the problem of space-charge induced optical microbunching formation in the high-frequency limit when transverse thermal motion due to finite emittance is included for the first time. We derive an analytical description of this process based on the beam’s plasma dielectric function. We discuss the effect of transverse temperature on the angular distribution of microbunching gain and its connection to the physics of Landau damping in longitudinal plasma oscillations. Application of the theory to a relevant experimental scenario is discussed. The analytical results obtained are then compared to the predictions arising from high resolution three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Study of the thermal effect on silicon surface induced by ion beam from plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Z., E-mail: pscientific5@aec.org.sy [Scientific Service Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Ahmad, M. [IBA Laboratory, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2017-04-01

    Structural modifications in form of ripples and cracks are induced by nitrogen ions from plasma focus on silicon surface. The investigation of such structures reveals correlation between ripples and cracks formation in peripheral region of the melt spot. The reason of such correlation and structure formation is explained as result of thermal effect. Melting and resolidification of the center of irradiated area occur within one micro second of time. This is supported by a numerical simulation used to investigate the thermal effect induced by the plasma focus ion beams on the silicon surface. This simulation provides information about the temperature profile as well as the dynamic of the thermal propagation in depth and lateral directions. In accordance with the experimental observations, that ripples are formed in latter stage after the arrival of last ion, the simulation shows that the thermal relaxation takes place in few microseconds after the end of the ion beam arrival. Additionally, the dependency of thermal propagation and relaxation on the distance of the silicon surface from the anode is presented.

  4. Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilking, Michael Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Neutrinos are among the least understood particles in the standard model of particle physics. At neutrino energies in the 1 GeV range, neutrino properties are typically determined by observing the outgoing charged lepton produced in a charged current quasi-elastic interactions. The largest charged current background to these measurements comes from charged current pion production interactions, for which there is very little available data.

  5. The influence of current neutralization and multiple Coulomb scattering on the spatial dynamics of resistive sausage instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in ohmic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Manuilov, A. S.; Petrov, V. S.; Klyushnikov, G. N.; Chernov, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of the current neutralization process, the phase mixing of the trajectories of electrons and multiple Coulomb scattering of electrons beam on the atoms of the background medium on the spatial increment of the growth of sausage instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in ohmic plasma channel has been considered. It has been shown that the amplification of the current neutralization leads to a significant increase in this instability, and phase mixing and the process of multiple scattering of electrons beam on the atoms of the background medium are the stabilizing factor.

  6. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Robert H. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCπ0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (~ 1, 000, 000 interactions) low-energy (Evϵ 2 0.5 - 2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCπ0 events is presented. The π0 and μ- are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCπ0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <σ>Φ = (9.2 ± 0.3stat. ± 1.5syst.) × 10-39 cm2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  7. Electric current induced light emission from C-60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, TTM; Haddon, RC; Lyons, KB; Kafafi, ZH

    1997-01-01

    We report the luminescence of C-60 crystals and films due to the passage of an electrical current. The current-voltage behaviour is highly non-linear with light-emission beyond a threshold voltage. The emission spectrum is featureless and resembles black body radiation with an effective temperature

  8. Electric Current Induced Light Emission from C60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, T.T.M.; Haddon, R.C.; Lyons, K.B.

    1997-01-01

    We report the luminescence of C60 crystals and films due to the passage of an electrical current. The current-voltage behavior is highly non-linear with light-emission beyond a threshold voltage. The emission spectrum is featureless and resembles black-body radiation with an effective temperature on

  9. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho-Lopez, Santiago; Evans, Rodger; Escobar-Alarcon, Luis; Camacho-Lopez, Miguel A.; Camacho-Lopez, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO 2 in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance

  10. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Lopez, Santiago [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico)], E-mail: camachol@cicese.mx; Evans, Rodger [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, Luis [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Miguel A. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n, esq. Jesus Carranza, Toluca, Estado de Mexico 50120 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO{sub 2} in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance.

  11. Current inversion induced by colored non-Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Hu, Chin-Kung

    2009-01-01

    We study a stochastic process driven by colored non-Gaussian noises. For the flashing ratchet model we find that there is a current inversion in the variation of the current with the half-cycle period which accounts for the potential on–off operation. The current inversion almost disappears if one switches from non-Gaussian (NG) to Gaussian (G) noise. We also find that at low value of the asymmetry parameter of the potential the mobility controlled current is more negative for NG noise as compared to G noise. But at large magnitude of the parameter the diffusion controlled positive current is higher for the former than for the latter. On increasing the noise correlation time (τ), keeping the noise strength fixed, the mean velocity of a particle first increases and then decreases after passing through a maximum if the noise is non-Gaussian. For Gaussian noise, the current monotonically decreases. The current increases with the noise parameter p, 0< p<5/3, which is 1 for Gaussian noise

  12. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  13. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite-length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to influence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ω ce ∼> ω pe β b , where ω ce = eB/m e c is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β b = V b /c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement

  14. Cell killing and chromosomal aberration induced by heavy-ion beams in cultured human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, K.; Funada, A.; Mohri, M.; Lee, R.; Aoki, M.; Furusawa, Y.; Gotoh, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human tumor cells irradaited with heavy-ion beams. The analyses were carried out on the basis of the linear energy transfer (LET) values of heavy ion beams as radiation source. Exponentially growing human tumor cells, Human Salivary Gland Tumor cells (HSG cells), were irradiated with various high energy heavy ions, such as 13 keV/micrometer carbon (C) ions as low LET charged particle radiation source, 120 keV/ micrometer carbon (C) ions and 440 keV/micrometer iron (Fe) ions as high LET charged particle radiation sources.The cell death was analysed by the colony formation method, and the chromosomal aberration and its repairing kinetics was analysed by prematurely chromosome condensation method (PCC method) using calyculin A. Chromatid-type breaks, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were scored for the samples from the cells keeping with various incubation time after irradiation. The LET dependence of the cell death was similar to that of the chromosome exchange formation after 12 hours incubation. A maximum peak was around 120 keV/micrometer. However it was not similar to the LET dependence of isochromatid breaks or chromatid breaks after 12 hours incubation. These results suggest that the exchanges formed in chromosome after irradiation should be one of essential causes to lead the cell death. The different quality of induced chromosome damage between high-LET and low-LET radiation was also shown. About 89 % and 88 % chromatid breaks induced by X rays and 13 keV/micrometer C ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation, though only 71% and 58 % of chromatid breaks induced by 120 keV/micrometer C ions and 440 keV/micrometer Fe ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation

  15. Source brightness and useful beam current of carbon nanotubes and other very small emitters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.; Bezuijen, M.; Barth, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The potential application of carbon nanotubes as electron sources in electron microscopes is analyzed. The resolution and probe current that can be obtained from a carbon nanotube emitter in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope are calculated and compared to the state of the art using Schottky

  16. Control electron beam oscillation regimes in Pierce diode with overcritical current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempen, I.S.; Khramov, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the delayed feedback on the complex oscillation regimes in the electron flux with the overcritical current in the Pierce diode is studied. The possibility of controlling the oscillation regimes through changing the feedback parameters is shown. The finite-dimensional model, describing the behavior of the electron flux in the Pierce diode hydrodynamic model, is constructed. Its behavior under the effect of the delayed feedback is studied [ru

  17. A Fast Non Intercepting Linac Electron Beam Position and Current Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Wille, Mads

    1982-01-01

    are achieved by subtracting one signal from the other and adding the two signals, respectively. For displacements below 2 mm from the center axis an average sensitivity of 0.5 mV/mm·mA is measured, whereas displacements more than 2 mm yields 1.3 mV / mm·mA. A sensitivity of 0.2 mV / mA in current monitoring...

  18. Current Induced Seismicity in the Paskov Mine Field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Karel; Rušajová, Jana; Holečko, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 181-187 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Ostrava-Karviná coal mines * seismic network * induced seismicity * location plot Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2013 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2013_02/acta_170_07_%20Holub_181-187.pdf

  19. Harmonics generation of a terahertz wakefield free-electron laser from a dielectric loaded waveguide excited by a direct current electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We propose to generate high-power terahertz (THz) radiation from a cylindrical dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) excited by a direct-current electron beam with the harmonics generation method. The DLW supports a discrete set of modes that can be excited by an electron beam passing through the structure. The interaction of these modes with the co-propagating electron beam results in micro-bunching and the coherent enhancement of the wakefield radiation, which is dominated by the fundamental mode. By properly choosing the parameters of DLW and beam energy, the high order modes can be the harmonics of the fundamental one; thus, high frequency radiation corresponding to the high order modes will benefit from the dominating bunching process at the fundamental eigenfrequency and can also be coherently excited. With the proposed method, high power THz radiation can be obtained with an easily achievable electron beam and a large DLW structure.

  20. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280

  1. Electron Beam-Induced Deposition for Atom Probe Tomography Specimen Capping Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Mulders, Johannes J L

    2017-04-01

    Six precursors were evaluated for use as in situ electron beam-induced deposition capping layers in the preparation of atom probe tomography specimens with a focus on near-surface features where some of the deposition is retained at the specimen apex. Specimens were prepared by deposition of each precursor onto silicon posts and shaped into sub-70-nm radii needles using a focused ion beam. The utility of the depositions was assessed using several criteria including composition and uniformity, evaporation behavior and evaporation fields, and depth of Ga+ ion penetration. Atom probe analyses through depositions of methyl cyclopentadienyl platinum trimethyl, palladium hexafluoroacetylacetonate, and dimethyl-gold-acetylacetonate [Me2Au(acac)] were all found to result in tip fracture at voltages exceeding 3 kV. Examination of the deposition using Me2Au(acac) plus flowing O2 was inconclusive due to evaporation of surface silicon from below the deposition under all analysis conditions. Dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co2(CO)8] and diiron nonacarbonyl [Fe2(CO)9] depositions were found to be effective as in situ capping materials for the silicon specimens. Their very different evaporation fields [36 V/nm for Co2(CO)8 and 21 V/nm for Fe2(CO)9] provide options for achieving reasonably close matching of the evaporation field between the capping material and many materials of interest.

  2. Resonant antineutrino induced electron capture with low energy bound-beta beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldeman, R.G.C.; Meloni, M.; Saitta, B. [Universita degli Studi di Cagliari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Cagliari (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    Antineutrino induced electron capture is a resonant process that can have a large cross-section for beams of monochromatic antineutrinos. We calculate the cross-section of this process and investigate an experimental setup where monochromatic antineutrinos are produced from the bound-beta decay of fully ionized radioactive atoms in a storage ring. If the energy between the source and the target is well matched, the cross-sections can be significantly larger than the cross-sections of commonly used non-resonant processes. The rate that can be achieved at a small distance between the source and two targets of 10{sup 3} kg is up to one interaction per 8.3.10{sup 18} decaying atoms. For a source-target distance corresponding to the first atmospheric neutrino oscillation maximum, the largest rate is one interaction per 3.2.10{sup 21} decaying atoms, provided that extremely stringent monochromaticity conditions (10{sup -7} or better) are achieved in future ion beams. (orig.)

  3. Monte Carlo study of molecular weight distribution changes induced by degradation of ion beam irradiated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappa, V.C., E-mail: chappa@tandar.cnea.gov.a [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Pastorino, C.; Grosso, M.F. dwel; Arbeitman, C.R. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Mueller, M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Georg-August-Universitaet, Goettingen (Germany); Garci' a Bermudez, G. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologi' a, UNSAM (Argentina)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we study a polymeric material that degrades upon irradiation due to the energy inhomogeneously deposited by heavy ion beams. Ion beam irradiation of polymers generates rather different effects than those induced by 'classical' low ionizing particles such as electrons or gamma rays. This is due to the high electronic stopping power and the inhomogeneous distribution of deposited energy. This energy is transferred to the material within a small volume along the ion path forming the so called 'nuclear track' or 'latent track'. The track size primarily depends on the ion velocity, and it is determined by the secondary electrons (delta rays) generated along the ion trajectory. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we first obtained equilibrated polymer configurations using a coarse-grained model, and then investigated the spatially inhomogeneous chain scission process due to the passage of the ions. The number average molecular weight, weight average molecular weight and the polydispersity were calculated as a function of track radius, scission probability within the ion track and irradiation fluence. Finally we compared our results with a numerical implementation of a model for random homogeneous degradation.

  4. Focused-ion-beam induced interfacial intermixing of magnetic bilayers for nanoscale control of magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, D M; Atkinson, D; Hase, T P A

    2014-01-01

    Modification of the magnetic properties in a thin-film ferromagnetic/non-magnetic bilayer system by low-dose focused ion-beam (FIB) induced intermixing is demonstrated. The highly localized capability of FIB may be used to locally control magnetic behaviour at the nanoscale. The magnetic, electronic and structural properties of NiFe/Au bilayers were investigated as a function of the interfacial structure that was actively modified using focused Ga + ion irradiation. Experimental work used MOKE, SQUID, XMCD as well as magnetoresistance measurements to determine the magnetic behavior and grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity to elucidate the interfacial structure. Interfacial intermixing, induced by low-dose irradiation, is shown to lead to complex changes in the magnetic behavior that are associated with monotonic structural evolution of the interface. This behavior may be explained by changes in the local atomic environment within the interface region resulting in a combination of processes including the loss of moment on Ni and Fe, an induced moment on Au and modifications to the spin-orbit coupling between Au and NiFe. (paper)

  5. Electron beam-induced Fries rearrangement of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Jun; Yuasa, Kanako; Yamashita, Takashi; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    Electron beam (EB)-induced reactions of organic crystals containing a carbonyl or a sulfonyl group have been investigated. The EB irradiation of benzenesulfonanilide (BSA) in the crystalline state induced the Fries rearrangement to yield o- and p-aminodiphenylsulfones as the major and minor products, respectively. Several BSA derivatives also had the same reactivity, while benzanilide as the corresponding carbonyl compound did not rearrange under the same conditions. These results showed that the S-N bond could be cleaved selectively by EB irradiation but the C-N bond couldn't, which could take place only by the use of EB. The EB irradiation of phenyl p-toluenesulfonate (PTS) crystals gave not only Fries-type products but also the oxidation product. By comparing with the reactivity of liquid phenyl benzenesulfonate, the EB-induced Fries rearrangement was suggested to proceed under crystalline lattice restrictions. The G-values of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates were in the range of ca. 1-2 molecules per 100 eV of absorbed energy. This is the first Fries rearrangement via direct excitation by EB irradiation. (author)

  6. The role of electron-stimulated desorption in focused electron beam induced deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of our study about the deposition rate of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) as a function of the substrate temperature with the substrate being an electron-transparent amorphous carbon membrane. When W(CO)6 is used as a precursor it is observed that the growth...... experiments compared to literature values is consistent with earlier findings by other authors. The discrepancy is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption, which is known to occur during electron irradiation. The data suggest that, of the W(CO)6 molecules that are affected by the electron irradiation......, the majority desorbs from the surface rather than dissociates to contribute to the deposit. It is important to take this into account during FEBIP experiments, for instance when determining fundamental process parameters such as the activation energy for desorption....

  7. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  8. Effects on cuytoskeleton system in pollen tube of pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunce; Liang Qiuxia; Li Guopin

    2008-01-01

    The damage of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen and the pollen tube of Pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation were researched. The results showed that the disorganization of the micro-tubules in the pollen tube was produced by N + implantation. The abnormal states of the pollen tube in morphology were very correlative with the abnormality of the cytoskeleton system. N + implantation was responsible for morphological abnormalities in the pollen tubes. There was a distinct correlation between the damage effects and the ion implantation dose. The add of dose caused more obvious damage effects. Furthermore, the state of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen tube was influenced by the ion implantation. The impact grade depended also on the ion implantation dose. (authors)

  9. Temperature dependence of the amorphization process induced by ion beam mixing in a metallic bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, L.; Benkoulal, T.; Jagielski, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amorphization induced by ion beam mixing has been investigated via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channelling experiments on a Zr/Ni bilayer as a function of the bombardment temperature. Irradiation was performed with various noble gas ions (Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) in a temperature range between 100K and 500K. The results show that both the mixing and the amorphization processes are influenced by the temperature at which ion bombardment is performed. The mixing rate is much higher at 500K than at low temperature; conversely, the amorphization rate decreases as the temperature increases. The composition of the amorphous phase formed during mixing was also demonstrated to depend on the irradiation temperature. ((orig.))

  10. Modal Analysis and Measurement of Water Cooling Induced Vibrations on a CLIC Main Beam Quadrupole Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Janssens, S; Leuxe, R; Modena, M; Moron Ballester, R; Struik, M; Deleglise, C; Jeremie, A

    2011-01-01

    To reach the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design luminosity, the mechanical jitter of the CLIC main beam quadrupoles should be smaller than 1.5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) displacement above 1 Hz. A stiff stabilization and nano-positioning system is being developed but the design and effectiveness of such a system will greatly depend on the stiffness of the quadrupole magnet which should be as high as possible. Modal vibration measurements were therefore performed on a first assembled prototype magnet to evaluate the different mechanical modes and their frequencies. The results were then compared with a Finite Element (FE) model. The vibrations induced by water-cooling without stabilization were measured with different flow rates. This paper describes and analyzes the measurement results.

  11. Electron beam induced etching of carbon nanotubes enhanced by secondary electrons in oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hideto; Tomita, Yuto; Soma, Kentaro; Takeda, Seiji

    2017-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are subjected to electron-beam-induced etching (EBIE) in oxygen. The EBIE process is observed in situ by environmental transmission electron microscopy. The partial pressure of oxygen (10 and 100 Pa), energy of the primary electrons (80 and 200 keV), and environment of the CNTs (suspended or supported on a silicon nitride membrane) are investigated as factors affecting the etching rate. The EBIE rate of CNTs was markedly promoted by the effects of secondary electrons that were emitted from a silicon nitride membrane under irradiation by primary electrons. Membrane supported CNTs can be cut by EBIE with a spatial accuracy better than 3 nm, and a nanogap of 2 nm can be successfully achieved between the ends of two suspended CNTs.

  12. Observation of whispering gallery modes through electron beam-induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, F J; Chang, L; van Wolferen, H A G M; Lenferink, A T M; Otto, C

    2017-04-01

    Surprisingly intense spectra of whispering gallery modes were observed in polymer microbeads after illumination with electrons in a scanning electron microscope and subsequent laser illumination and spectral analysis. It will be proposed that whispering gallery mode resonances became visible after local deposition of hydrocarbon material through electron beam-induced deposition. The illumination of deposited material with a near infrared laser generates a broad light spectrum, acting as a local "white light" source that couples, for favorable wavelengths, with the WGM sustained by the sphere. This facilitates a spectroscopic analysis of the WGM and provides the Q-factor and free spectral range for all investigated particles. The analysis by an integrated SEM and Raman micro-spectrometer offers a direct approach to the analysis of WGM resonators as they are, for instance, used in sensing.

  13. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly......Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer...... and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti-γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region...

  14. Shallow-trap-induced positive absorptive two-beam coupling 'gain' and light-induced transparency in nominally undoped barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, M. H.; Tayebati, P.; Chang, J. Y.; Jenssen, H. P.; Warde, C.

    1992-01-01

    The asymmetry of beam coupling with respect to the orientation of the polar axis in a nominally undoped barium titanate crystal is used to determine the electro-optic and absorptive 'gain' in the usual beam-coupling geometry. For small grating wave vectors, the electrooptic coupling vanishes but the absorptive coupling remains finite and positive. Positive absorptive coupling at small grating wave vectors is correlated with the light-induced transparency of the crystal described herein. The intensity and grating wave vector dependence of the electrooptic and absorptive coupling, and the light-induced transparency are consistent with a model incorporating deep and shallow levels.

  15. Longitudinal motion in high current ion beams: a self-consistent phase space distribution with an envelope equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.

    1979-03-01

    Many applications of particle acceleration, such as heavy ion fusion, require longitudinal bunching of a high intensity particle beam to extremely high particle currents with correspondingly high space charge forces. This requires a precise analysis of longitudinal motion including stability analysis. Previous papers have treated the longitudinal space charge force as strictly linear, and have not been self-consistent; that is, they have not displayed a phase space distribution consistent with this linear force so that the transport of the phase space distribution could be followed, and departures from linearity could be analyzed. This is unlike the situation for transverse phase space where the Kapchinskij--Vladimirskij (K--V) distribution can be used as the basis of an analysis of transverse motion. In this paper a self-consistent particle distribution in longitudinal phase space is derived which is a solution of the Vlasov equation and an envelope equation for this solution is derived

  16. Ion-beam induced transformations in nanoscale multilayers: Evolution of clusters with preferred length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, S.; Satpati, B.; Goswami, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, K.; Satyam, P. V.; Dev, B. N.

    2006-04-01

    Ion-irradiation-induced modifications of a periodic Pt/C multilayer system containing a small amount of Fe have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) studies. The multilayer stack with 16 Pt/C layer pairs (period of 4.23 nm) was fabricated on a glass substrate. A 2 MeV Au2+ ion beam was rastered on the sample to obtain uniformly irradiated strips with fluences from 1×1014 to 1×1015 ions/cm2. Ion irradiation has been found to cause preferential migration of Fe towards Pt layers [Bera et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 212, 530 (2003)]. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) shows considerable atomic redistribution for irradiation at the highest ion fluence (1×1015 ions/cm2). This structure is composed of small clusters. Phase separation and cluster formation processes are discussed. Periodic multilayers have periodicity only in the direction normal to the multilayer surface. However, Fourier transform (FT) of the XTEM images of the sample irradiated at the highest fluence shows extra off-normal Fourier components of superlattice periodicities arising due to ion irradiation. These extra spots in the FT are due to preferential length scales in intercluster separation in three dimensions. With a proper understanding of this phenomenon it may be possible to fabricate useful three-dimensional self-assembled structures of nanoclusters. Our high resolution transmission electron microscopy and GIXRD results reveal the formation of an FePt alloy. As FePt is a magnetic alloy, our observation raises the possibility of fabrication of ion-beam induced magnetic nanocluster lattices.

  17. Ion-beam induced transformations in nanoscale multilayers: Evolution of clusters with preferred length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, S.; Satpati, B.; Goswami, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, K.; Satyam, P. V.; Dev, B. N.

    2006-01-01

    Ion-irradiation-induced modifications of a periodic Pt/C multilayer system containing a small amount of Fe have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) studies. The multilayer stack with 16 Pt/C layer pairs (period of 4.23 nm) was fabricated on a glass substrate. A 2 MeV Au 2+ ion beam was rastered on the sample to obtain uniformly irradiated strips with fluences from 1x10 14 to 1x10 15 ions/cm 2 . Ion irradiation has been found to cause preferential migration of Fe towards Pt layers [Bera et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 212, 530 (2003)]. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) shows considerable atomic redistribution for irradiation at the highest ion fluence (1x10 15 ions/cm 2 ). This structure is composed of small clusters. Phase separation and cluster formation processes are discussed. Periodic multilayers have periodicity only in the direction normal to the multilayer surface. However, Fourier transform (FT) of the XTEM images of the sample irradiated at the highest fluence shows extra off-normal Fourier components of superlattice periodicities arising due to ion irradiation. These extra spots in the FT are due to preferential length scales in intercluster separation in three dimensions. With a proper understanding of this phenomenon it may be possible to fabricate useful three-dimensional self-assembled structures of nanoclusters. Our high resolution transmission electron microscopy and GIXRD results reveal the formation of an FePt alloy. As FePt is a magnetic alloy, our observation raises the possibility of fabrication of ion-beam induced magnetic nanocluster lattices

  18. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Failor, B H; Riordan, j c; Lojewski, D Y

    2007-01-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  19. Topology-induced critical current enhancement in Josephson networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrini, P.; Russo, R.; Corato, V.; Ruggiero, B.; Granata, C.; Rombetto, S.; Russo, M.; Cirillo, M.; Trombettoni, A.; Sodano, P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the properties of Josephson junction networks with inhomogeneous architecture. The networks are shaped as 'square comb' planar lattices on which Josephson junctions link superconducting islands arranged in the plane to generate the pertinent topology. Compared to the behavior of reference linear arrays, the temperature dependencies of the Josephson currents of the branches of the network exhibit relevant differences. The observed phenomena evidence new and surprising behavior of superconducting Josephson arrays

  20. Long-Term Geomagnetically Induced Current Observations From New Zealand: Peak Current Estimates for Extreme Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Mac Manus, Daniel H.; Dalzell, Michael; Thomson, Alan W. P.; Clarke, Ellen; Petersen, Tanja; Clilverd, Mark A.; Divett, Tim

    2017-11-01

    Geomagnetically induced current (GIC) observations made in New Zealand over 14 years show induction effects associated with a rapidly varying horizontal magnetic field (dBH/dt) during geomagnetic storms. This study analyzes the GIC observations in order to estimate the impact of extreme storms as a hazard to the power system in New Zealand. Analysis is undertaken of GIC in transformer number six in Islington, Christchurch (ISL M6), which had the highest observed currents during the 6 November 2001 storm. Using previously published values of 3,000 nT/min as a representation of an extreme storm with 100 year return period, induced currents of 455 A were estimated for Islington (with the 95% confidence interval range being 155-605 A). For 200 year return periods using 5,000 nT/min, current estimates reach 755 A (confidence interval range 155-910 A). GIC measurements from the much shorter data set collected at transformer number 4 in Halfway Bush, Dunedin, (HWB T4), found induced currents to be consistently a factor of 3 higher than at Islington, suggesting equivalent extreme storm effects of 460-1,815 A (100 year return) and 460-2,720 A (200 year return). An estimate was undertaken of likely failure levels for single-phase transformers, such as HWB T4 when it failed during the 6 November 2001 geomagnetic storm, identifying that induced currents of 100 A can put such transformer types at risk of damage. Detailed modeling of the New Zealand power system is therefore required to put this regional analysis into a global context.