WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam induced charge

  1. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  2. Semiconductor characterization by scanning ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Olivero, P; Manfredotti, C; Jaksic, M; Giudice, A Lo; Fizzotti, F; Colombo, E

    2016-01-01

    The acronym IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) was coined in early 1990's to indicate a scanning microscopy technique which uses MeV ion beams as probes to image the basic electronic properties of semiconductor materials and devices. Since then, IBIC has become a widespread analytical technique to characterize materials for electronics or for radiation detection, as testified by more than 200 papers published so far in peer-reviewed journals. Its success stems from the valuable information IBIC can provide on charge transport phenomena occurring in finished devices, not easily obtainable by other analytical techniques. However, IBIC analysis requires a robust theoretical background to correctly interpret experimental data. In order to illustrate the importance of using a rigorous mathematical formalism, we present in this paper a benchmark IBIC experiment aimed to test the validity of the interpretative model based on the Gunn's theorem and to provide an example of the analytical capability of IBIC to characteriz...

  3. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  4. Space-charged-induced emittance growth in the transport of high-brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emittance induced by space charge in a drifting beam of finite length has been investigated, and a scaling law has been obtained from simple considerations of the different rates of expansion of different portions of the beam. The scaling law predicts the initial rate of emittance growth, before the beam shape has distorted significantly, and thus represents an upper bound on the rate of emittance increase. This scaling law has been substantiated by particle-in-cell simulation and the dependence on geometric factors evaluated for specific choices of the beam profile. For long, axially nonuniform beams, the geometric factors have been evaluated explicitly for Gaussian profiles, and other shapes

  5. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  6. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth

  7. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, H. [Air Force Research Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walsh, D.S.; Sexton, F.W.; Doyle, B.L.; Aurand, J.F.; Dodd, P.E.; Flores, R.S.; Wing, N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth.

  8. Space charge dominated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introductory section on the relationship between emittance and beam Coulomb energy we discuss the properties of space charge dominated beams in progressive steps: from uniformly charged bunched beams to non-uniformly charged beams to correlation effects between particles (simulation beams or 'crystalline' beams). A practical application can be found in the beam dynamics of a high-current injector. The concept of correlation energy is of practical interest in computer simulation of high-brilliance beams, where one deals with an artificially enhanced two-particle Coulomb energy, if many real particles are combined into one simulation super-particle. This can be a source of non-physical emittance growth. (orig./HSI)

  9. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Yuri K; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  10. Suppression of space charge induced beam halo in nonlinear focusing channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Yuri K.; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-04-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  11. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  12. Methods of optimising ion beam induced charge collection of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witham, L.C.G.; Jamieson, D.N.; Bardos, R.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics, Microanalytical Research Centre

    1998-06-01

    Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) is a valuable method for the mapping of charge carrier transport and recombination in silicon solar cells. However performing IBIC analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cells is problematic in a manner unlike previous uses of IBIC on silicon-based electronic devices. Typical solar cells have a surface area of several square centimeters and a p-n junction thickness of only few microns. This means the cell has a large junction capacitance in the many nanoFarads range which leads to a large amount of noise on the preamplifier inputs which typically swamps the transient IBIC signal. The normal method of improving the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio by biasing the junction is impractical for these cells as the low-quality silicon used leads to a large leakage current across the device. We present several experimental techniques which improve the S/N ratio which when used together should make IBIC analysis of many low crystalline quality devices a viable and reliable procedure. (authors). Extended abstract. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  14. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behavior and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Rubanov, Sergey [Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  15. Ion beam induced charge collection (IBICC) from integrated circuit test structures using a 10 MeV carbon microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.N.; Bouanani, M.E.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Doyle, B.L.; Walsh, D.S. [Ion Beam Materials Research Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1056, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] Aton, T.J. [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments Inc., PO Box 650311, MS 3704, Dallas, Texas 75265 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    As feature sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink, the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICs. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories, employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1{mu}m diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICs. With the aid of IC layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Emittance growth and instability induced by space charge effect during final beam bunching in HIF accelerator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beam dynamics and emittance growth are investigated by using particle-in-cell simulations during a final beam bunching for a driver system of inertial fusion driven by intense heavy ion beams. Space-charge-dominated beams are transported by a transverse confinement lattice with longitudinal compression, and the emittance increases along the longitudinal beam bunching. Dipole oscillations are excited due to the initial displacement of the beam center. The displacement causes the additional emittance growth during the final beam bunching.

  17. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) from Integrated Circuit Test Structures Using a 10 MeV Carbon Microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aton, T.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; El Bouanani, M.; Guo, B.N.; McDaniel, F.D.; Renfrow, S.N.; Walsh, D.S.

    1998-11-18

    As future sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICS. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1pm diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICS. With the aid of layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. In the present work a 10 MeV Carbon high-resolution microbeam was used to demonstrate the differential charge collection efficiency in ICS with the aid of the IC design Information. When ions strike outside the FET, the charge was only measured on the outer ring, and decreased with strike distance from this diode. When ions directly strike the inner and ring diodes, the collected charge was localized to these diodes. The charge for ions striking the gate region was shared between the inner and ring diodes. I The IBICC measurements directly confirmed the interpretations made in the earlier work.

  18. Space charge dominated beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider beam transport systems where space charge forces are comparable in strength with the external focusing force. Space charge then plays an important role for beam transmission and emittance growth. We use the envelope model for matching and the generalized field energy equations to study emittance growth. Analytic results are compared with numerical simulation. (orig.)

  19. Study on the bias-dependent effects of proton-induced damage in CdZnTe radiation detectors using ion beam induced charge microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Na; Guo, Rongrong; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    The influence of damage induced by 2MeV protons on CdZnTe radiation detectors is investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) in irradiated region is found to be degraded above a fluence of 3.3×10(11)p/cm(2) and the energy spectrum is severely deteriorated with increasing fluence. Moreover, CCE maps obtained under the applied biases from 50V to 400V suggests that local radiation damage results in significant degradation of CCE uniformity, especially under low bias, i. e., 50V and 100V. The CCE nonuniformity induced by local radiation damage, however, can be greatly improved by increasing the detector applied bias. This bias-dependent effect of 2MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe detectors is attributed to the interaction of electron cloud and radiation-induced displacement defects. PMID:27399802

  20. Interpretation of electron beam induced charging of oxide layers in a transistor studied using electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ubaldi, F; Pozzi, G; Kasama, Takeshi;

    2010-01-01

    into account the mean inner potential of the specimen and the perturbed vacuum reference wave. The simulations suggest that the oxide layers contain a uniform volume density of positive charge and that the elliptical contours result from the combined effect of the electrostatic potential in the specimen...

  1. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Radiation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride is an emerging material for room temperature radiation detectors. In order to optimize the performance of these detectors, it is important to determine how the electronic properties of CZT are related to the presence of impurities and defects that are introduced during the crystal growth and detector fabrication. At the Sandia microbeam facility IBICC and Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) were used to image electronic properties of various CZT detectors. Two-dimensional areal maps of charge collection efficiency were deduced from the measurements. In order to determine radiation damage to the detectors, we measured the deterioration of the IBICC signal as the function of dose. A model to explain quantitatively the pattern observed in the charge collection efficiency maps of the damaged detectors has been developed and will be discussed in the paper

  2. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, S.; Suss, M. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bercovici, M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, ...

  3. Beam induced heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Baudrenghien, P; Bracco, C; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Esteban Mueller, J; Gentini, L; Goddar, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Nougaret, J L; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Sapinski, M; Shaposhinkova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the rapid increase of the luminosity performance of LHC came at the expense of increased temperature and pressure readings on several near-beam LHC equipments. In some cases, this beam induced heating was suspected to cause beam dumps and even degradation of the equipment. This contribution aims at gathering the observations of beam induced heating due to beam coupling impedance, their current level of understanding and possible actions that could be implemented during the winter stop 2011-2012.

  4. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, S; Biesheuvel, P M; Bercovici, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, which leads to rapid and significant deionization of ionic species from a volume which is on the scale of the particle. We show by theory and experiment that the transient response around a cylindrical particle results in spatially non-uniform charging and non-steady growth of depletion regions which emerge around the particle's poles. Potentially, ICCDI can be useful in applications where fast concentration changes of ionic species are required over large volumes.

  5. Space-charge dynamics of polymethylmethacrylate under electron beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, H; Ong, C K

    1997-01-01

    Space-charge dynamics of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) under electron beam irradiation has been investigated employing a scanning electron microscope. Assuming a Gaussian space-charge distribution, the distribution range (sigma) has been determined using a time-resolved current method in conjunction with a mirror image method. sigma is found to increase with irradiation time and eventually attain a stationary value. These observations have been discussed by taking into account radiation-induced conductivity and charge mobility. (author)

  6. Multiply charged ion beams from solid substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mVINIS Ion Source has enabled us to obtain multiply charged ion beams from gases as well as from solid materials. The solid substance ion beams were produced by using two techniques: a) the evaporation of metals by using the inlet system based on mini-oven and b) the metal-ions-from volatile-compounds method (MIVOC) by using the modified gas inlet system. In the production of high current stable ion beams of solids with relatively high melting points (over 1000 deg) were made great efforts. The B3+ ion beam current of over 300 μA is one of the most intensive beams extracted until now. The obtained multiply charged ion beam spectra of solid substances (B, Fe and Zn) are presented as well as some of the corresponding experimental results achieved during the modification of polymers, carbon materials and fullerenes. (author)

  7. Charge collection in an external proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from the measurement of the stability of charge collected from the target and exit foil, or as alternatives, the γ-ray or backscattered proton counts from the exit foil and the Ar X-ray counts from the air path in an external proton beam are presented. These results show that comparative analysis of material mounted in air is reliable, using either the collected charge or the γ-ray counts as the normalizing factor, if there are no earthed objects in close geometry. The backscattered proton counts can also be used, but not the Ar X-ray counts, unless the current is stabilized. The electrical or thermal conductivity of the target and the target to exit foil separation do not affect the proportionality of the collected charge and the γ-ray counts to the charge incident on the target

  8. Method for charged particle beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of charged particle beam acceleration based on its resonance interaction with electromagnetic field of travelling wave is suggested. The electron beam is injected into waveguide in which longitudinal magnetic field and electromagnetic wave are excited. With the purpose of reducing HF-power losses in the waveguide walls, the azimuthal particle motion is synchronized with azimuthal change of longitudinal component of electric field of the accelerating electromagnetic wave. The suggested method permits to increase the efficiency and shunting resistance of the accelerating waveguide by reducing its boundary surface

  9. Particle beams carrying orbital angular momentum, charge, mass and spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijssen, Teuntje; Hayrapetyan, Armen; Goette, Joerg; Dennis, Mark

    Electron beams carrying vortices and angular momentum have been of much experimental and theoretical interest in recent years. In addition, optical vortex beams are a well-established field in optics and photonics. In both cases, the orbital angular momentum associated with the beam's axial vortex has effects on the overall spin of the beam, due to spin-orbit interactions. A simple model of these systems are Bessel beam solutions (of either the Dirac equation or Maxwell equations) with a nonzero azimuthal quantum number, which are found by separation in cylindrical coordinates. Here, we generalize this approach, considering the classical field theory of Bessel beams for particles which are either massive or massless, uncharged or charged and of a variety of different spins (0, 1/2, 1, ⋯). We regard the spin and helicity states and different forms of spin-orbit terms that arise. Moreover, we analyse the induced electromagnetic field when the particles carry charge. Most importantly, this unified field theory approach leads to the prediction of effects for vortex beams of neutrons, mesons and neutrinos.

  10. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  11. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meusel, O., E-mail: o.meusel@iap.uni-frankfurt.de; Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C. [IAP, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt D-60438 (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  12. Induced-charge Electrokinetic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Bazant, M Z; Bazant, Martin Z.; Squires, Todd M.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of AC electro-osmosis near micro-electrodes, we predict a broad class of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena involving induced interfacial charge. By considering various polarizable objects (metals or dielectrics) in DC and AC applied fields, we develop a simple physical picture of `induced-charge electro-osmosis' (ICEO), the fluid slip at a surface due to an electric field acting on the diffuse charge it induces. We also discuss `induced-charge electrophoresis' (ICEP), the analogous motion of a freely-suspended polarizable particle. Both differ significantly from their classical linear counterparts. We present a mathematical theory of ICEO flows in the weakly nonlinear limit of thin double layers. As an example, we calculate the time-dependent ICEO slip around a metallic sphere with a thin dielectric coating in a suddenly-applied DC field. We briefly discuss possible applications of ICEO to microfluidics and of ICEP to colloidal manipulation.

  13. Device for measuring charge density distribution in charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device to measure charge density distribution in charged particle beams has been described. The device contains a set of hollow interinsulated current-receiving electrodes, recording system, and cooling system. The invention is aimed at the increase of admissible capacity of the beams measured at the expense of cooling efficiency increase. The aim is achieved by the fact, that in the device a dynamic evaporating-condensational cooling of electrodes is realized by means of cooling agent supply in perpendicular to their planes through the tubes introduced inside special cups. Spreading in radial direction over electrode surface the cooling agent gradually and intensively washes the side surface of the cup, after that, it enters the cooling cavity in the form of vapour-liquid mixture. In the cavity the cooling agent, supplied using dispensina and receiving collectors in which vapoUr is condensed, circulates. In the device suggested the surface of electrode cooling is decreased significantly at the expense of side surface of the cups which receives the electrode heat

  14. Theory and design of charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Reiser, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Although particle accelerators are the book's main thrust, it offers a broad synoptic description of beams which applies to a wide range of other devices such as low-energy focusing and transport systems and high-power microwave sources. Develops material from first principles, basic equations and theorems in a systematic way. Assumptions and approximations are clearly indicated. Discusses underlying physics and validity of theoretical relationships, design formulas and scaling laws. Features a significant amount of recent work including image effects and the Boltzmann line charge density prof

  15. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed

  16. The impact of charging on low-energy electron beam lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Lau Kien; Drouin, Dominique; Lavallée, Eric; Beauvais, Jacques

    2004-12-01

    A major issue in low voltage lithography is surface charging, which results in beam deflection presented as uneven exposure between adjacent structures. In this study, charge-induced pattern distortions in low-voltage energy beam lithography (LVEBL) were investigated using a silicide direct-write electron beam lithography process. Two methodologies have been proposed to avert charging effects in LVEBL, namely, pattern randomizing and lithography using the crossover voltage. Experimental results demonstrated that these methods are effective in significantly reducing the problems associated with charging. They indicate that charging on a sample is a function of time interval and proximity between line structures. In addition, the optimum time and distance between exposures for no charge-induced pattern distortion were determined. By using the crossover voltage of the material for lithography, charging effect can be significantly minimized. PMID:19780323

  17. Parasitic components from charge transfer in neutral beams for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.A.

    1978-02-01

    Charge exchange within accelerating grids in neutral beam systems produces parasitic beam components which degrade the performance of the systems. These components also change the plasma confinement properties at the target. This note discusses parasitic beams produced in three types of grid systems: (1) TFTR/MFTF sources, (2) accel-decel grids for low energy beams, and (3) the JSC negative ion system.

  18. Charged-particle beam: a safety mandate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a recent development in the field of charged particle beam research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With this experimental apparatus, researchers will characterize intense pulses of electron beams propagated through air. Inherent with the ATA concept was the potential for exposure to hazards, such as high radiation levels and hostile breathing atmospheres. The need for a comprehensive safety program was mandated; a formal system safety program was implemented during the project's conceptual phase. A project staff position was created for a safety analyst who would act as a liaison between the project staff and the safety department. Additionally, the safety analyst would be responsible for compiling various hazards analyses reports, which formed the basis of th project's Safety Analysis Report. Recommendations for safety features from the hazards analysis reports were incorporated as necessary at appropriate phases in project development rather than adding features afterwards. The safety program established for the ATA project faciliated in controlling losses and in achieving a low-level of acceptable risk

  19. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  20. Formation of High Charge State Heavy Ion Beams with intense Space Charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High charge-state heavy-ion beams are of interest and used for a number of accelerator applications. Some accelerators produce the beams downstream of the ion source by stripping bound electrons from the ions as they pass through a foil or gas. Heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF) would benefit from low-emittance, high current ion beams with charge state >1. For these accelerators, the desired dimensionless perveance upon extraction from the emitter is ∼10-3, and the electrical current of the beam pulse is ∼1 A. For accelerator applications where high charge state and very high current are desired, space charge effects present unique challenges. For example, in a stripper, the separation of charge states creates significant nonlinear space-charge forces that impact the beam brightness. We will report on the particle-in-cell simulation of the formation of such beams for HIF, using a thin stripper at low energy.

  1. Charged particle acceleration by electron beam in corrugated plasma waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-beam charged particle acceleration scheme in a plasma waveguide with corrugated conducting walls is considered. The guiding heavy-current relativistic electron beam is in synchronism with the first plasma wave space harmonics and the accelerated beam is synchronism with a quicker plasma wave. In this case under weak corrugation of the wall the accelerating resonance field effecting the accelerated particles notably increases the field braking the guiding beam. The process of plasma wave excitation with regard to the guiding beam space charge and the relativistic particle acceleration dynamics are investigated by numeric methods. Optimal acceleration modes are found. 19 refs.; 12 figs

  2. Magnetic fields for transporting charged beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of charged particle beams requires magnetic fields that must be shaped correctly and very accurately. During the last 20 years or so, many studies have been made, both analytically and through the use of computer programs, of various magnetic shapes that have proved to be useful. Many of the results for magnetic field shapes can be applied equally well to electric field shapes. A report is given which gathers together the results that have more general significance and would be useful in designing a configuration to produce a desired magnetic field shape. The field shapes studied include the fields in dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, octupoles, septum magnets, combined-function magnets, and electrostatic septums. Where possible, empirical formulas are proposed, based on computer and analytical studies and on magnetic field measurements. These empirical formulas are often easier to use than analytical formulas and often include effects that are difficult to compute analytically. In addition, results given in the form of tables and graphs serve as illustrative examples. The field shapes studied include uniform fields produced by window-frame magnets, C-magnets, H-magnets, and cosine magnets; linear fields produced by various types of quadrupoles; quadratic and cubic fields produced by sextupoles and octupoles; combinations of uniform and linear fields; and septum fields with sharp boundaries

  3. Observation Of Electron-beam-induced Phase Evolution Mimicking The Effect Of Charge-discharge Cycle In Li-rich Layered Cathode Materials Used For Li-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping; Yan, Pengfei; Romero, Eric; Spoerke, Erik D.; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-02-24

    Capacity loss, and voltage fade upon electrochemical charge-discharge cycling observed in lithium-rich layered cathode oxides (Li[LixMnyTM1-x-y]O2 , TM = Ni, Co or Fe) have recently been identified to be correlated to the gradual phase transformation, featuring the formation of a surface reconstructed layer (SRL) that evolves from a thin (<2 nm), defect spinel layer upon the first charge, to a relatively thick (~5 nm), spinel or rock-salt layer upon continuous charge-discharge cycling. Here we report observations of a SRL and structural evolution of the SRL on the Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LMR) particles, which are identical to those reported due to the charge-discharge cycle but are a result of electron-beam irradiation during scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. Sensitivity of the lithium-rich layered oxides to high-energy electrons leads to the formation of thin, defect spinel layer on surfaces of the particles when exposed to a 200 kV electron beam for as little as 30 seconds under normal high-resolution STEM imaging conditions. Further electron irradiation produces a thicker layer of the spinel phase, ultimately producing a rock-salt layer at a higher electron exposure. Atomic-scale chemical mapping by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in STEM indicates the electron-beam-induced SRL formation on LMR is accomplished by migration of the transition metal ions to the Li sites without breaking down the lattice. This study provides an insight for understanding the mechanism of forming the SRL and also possibly a mean to study structural evolution in the Li-rich layered oxides without involving the electrochemistry.

  4. The effect of additives on charge decay in electron-beam charged polypropylene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillenbrand, J; Motz, T; Sessler, G M; Zhang, X [Institute for Communications Technology, Darmstadt University of Technology, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Behrendt, N; Altstaedt, V [Polymer Engineering, University of Bayreuth, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Von Salis-Soglio, C; Erhard, D P; Schmidt, H-W, E-mail: j.hillenbrand@nt.tu-darmstadt.d [Macromolecular Chemistry I, University of Bayreuth, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2009-03-21

    The charge decay in isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films of 50 {mu}m thickness, containing three kinds of additives, namely a trisamide, a bisamide and a fluorinated compound, with concentrations in the range 0.004-1 wt% was studied. Compression molding was used to produce the films. The samples were either surface-charged by a corona method or volume-charged by mono-energetic electron beams of different energies, having penetration depths up to 6 {mu}m. In all cases, surface potentials of about 200 V were chosen. After charging the films, the decay of the surface potential was studied either by an isothermal discharge method at 90 deg. C or by thermally stimulated discharge measurements. The results show a dependence of the decay rate on the kind of additive used, on additive concentration and on the energy of the injected charges. In particular, for samples with fluorinated additives, the stability of the surface potential decreases markedly with increasing electron energy, while such a dependence is very weak for samples containing the bisamide additive and does not exist at all for samples with the trisamide additive. These observations are tentatively explained by the radiation-induced generation of relatively mobile negative ions originating from the bisamide and fluorinated additives.

  5. The effect of additives on charge decay in electron-beam charged polypropylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, J; Motz, T; Sessler, G M; Zhang, X; Behrendt, N; von Salis-Soglio, C; Erhard, D P; Altstädt, V; Schmidt, H-W

    2009-03-01

    The charge decay in isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films of 50 µm thickness, containing three kinds of additives, namely a trisamide, a bisamide and a fluorinated compound, with concentrations in the range 0.004-1 wt% was studied. Compression molding was used to produce the films. The samples were either surface-charged by a corona method or volume-charged by mono-energetic electron beams of different energies, having penetration depths up to 6 µm. In all cases, surface potentials of about 200 V were chosen. After charging the films, the decay of the surface potential was studied either by an isothermal discharge method at 90 °C or by thermally stimulated discharge measurements. The results show a dependence of the decay rate on the kind of additive used, on additive concentration and on the energy of the injected charges. In particular, for samples with fluorinated additives, the stability of the surface potential decreases markedly with increasing electron energy, while such a dependence is very weak for samples containing the bisamide additive and does not exist at all for samples with the trisamide additive. These observations are tentatively explained by the radiation-induced generation of relatively mobile negative ions originating from the bisamide and fluorinated additives.

  6. Development of the charge exchange type beam scraper system at the J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kinsho, M.

    2016-03-01

    Improvement in injection beam quality at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3-GeV rapid cycle synchrotron is to mitigate beam loss at the injection section. We developed a charge-exchange type scraper system with a thin carbon foil to collimate the beam halo in the injection beam line of the synchrotron. The key issue to realize the scraper is a reduction of the beam loss induced by the multiple-scattering effect of charge-exchange foil placed at the scraper head. In order to determine the adequate foil thickness, a charge-exchange efficiency of a carbon foil and particle-tracking simulation study of the collimated beam have been performed assuming a realistic halo at the scraper section. Using the results of this study, we chose the thickness of a 520 μg /cm2 as the scraper foils to mitigate radiation dose around the L3BT scraper section. A charge-exchange scraper system that prevents the emission of radioactive fragments of the carbon foil was build. The system was put into operation to prove its effectiveness in eliminating the beam halo. From the result of a preliminary beam experiments, we confirmed that the installed scrapers eliminate a transverse beam tail or halo. After two days of operation with beam collimation, the radiation dose level around the scraper section was a tolerable one for the hands-on maintenance.

  7. Transverse Schottky spectra and beam transfer functions of coasting ion beams with space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the transverse dynamics of coasting ion beams with moderate space charge is presented in this work. From the dispersion relation with linear space charge, an analytic model describing the impact of space charge on transverse beam transfer functions (BTFs) and the stability limits of a beam is derived. The dielectric function obtained in this way is employed to describe the transverse Schottky spectra with linear space charge as well. The difference between the action of space charge and impedances is highlighted. The setup and the results of an experiment performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI to detect space-charge effects at different beam intensities are explicated. The measured transverse Schottky spectra and BTFs are compared with the linear space-charge model. The stability diagrams constructed from the BTFs are presented. The space-charge parameters evaluated from the Schottky and BTF measurements are compared with estimations based on measured beam parameters. The impact of collective effects on the Schottky and BTF diagnostics is also investigated through numerical simulations. For this purpose the self-field of beams with linear and non-linear transverse density-distributions is computed on a twodimensional grid. The noise of the random particle distribution causes fluctuations of the dipole moment of the beam which produce the Schottky spectrum. BTFs are simulated by exciting the beam with transverse kicks. The simulation results are used to verify the space-charge model. (orig.)

  8. Transverse Schottky spectra and beam transfer functions of coasting ion beams with space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paret, Stefan

    2010-02-22

    A study of the transverse dynamics of coasting ion beams with moderate space charge is presented in this work. From the dispersion relation with linear space charge, an analytic model describing the impact of space charge on transverse beam transfer functions (BTFs) and the stability limits of a beam is derived. The dielectric function obtained in this way is employed to describe the transverse Schottky spectra with linear space charge as well. The difference between the action of space charge and impedances is highlighted. The setup and the results of an experiment performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI to detect space-charge effects at different beam intensities are explicated. The measured transverse Schottky spectra and BTFs are compared with the linear space-charge model. The stability diagrams constructed from the BTFs are presented. The space-charge parameters evaluated from the Schottky and BTF measurements are compared with estimations based on measured beam parameters. The impact of collective effects on the Schottky and BTF diagnostics is also investigated through numerical simulations. For this purpose the self-field of beams with linear and non-linear transverse density-distributions is computed on a twodimensional grid. The noise of the random particle distribution causes fluctuations of the dipole moment of the beam which produce the Schottky spectrum. BTFs are simulated by exciting the beam with transverse kicks. The simulation results are used to verify the space-charge model. (orig.)

  9. Charge and Current Compensation of Intense Charged Beams in Future Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Riege, H

    1998-01-01

    Proposals for future high-energy accelerators are characterized by demands for increasingly intense and energetic beams. The classical operation of high-current accelerators is severely constrained by collective electrodynamic phenomena, such as problems related to space-charge, to high-current flow, to beamstrahlung and pair production. These detrimental electrodynamic effects dominate the dynamic s and the collision interactions of high-intensity beams. With the introduction of soft space-charge and current compensation techniques utilizing low- to medium-energy lepton beams with charge polari ty opposite to that of the beams to be neutralized, all electromagnetic high-intensity limitations may be removed. The application of beam compensation is proposed for various sections of different ty pes of classical accelerator systems, such as for ion sources and the low-energy beam transport sections of ion linacs, for the crossing points of circular and linear colliders and for the final focii of ion beam fusion ...

  10. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  11. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  12. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  13. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  14. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E. [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  15. Charge breeding simulations for radioactive ion beam production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge breeding technique is used for radioactive ion beam (RIB) production in order of optimizing the re-acceleration of the radioactive element ions produced by a primary beam in a thick target. Charge breeding is achieved by means of a device capable of increasing the ion charge state from 1+ to a desired value n+. In order to get high intensity RIB, experiments with charge breeding of very high efficiency could be required. To reach this goal, the charge breeding simulation could help to optimize the high charge state production efficiency by finding more proper parameters for the radioactive 1+ ions. In this paper a device based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS) is considered. In order to study that problem, a code already developed for studying the ion selective containment in an EBIS with RF quadrupoles, BRICTEST, has been modified to simulate the ion charge state breeding rate for different 1+ ion injection conditions. Particularly, the charge breeding simulations for an EBIS with a hollow electron beam have been studied.

  16. Optimization of a charge-state analyzer for ECRIS beams

    CERN Document Server

    Saminathan, S; Kremers, H R; Mironov, V; Mulder, J; Brandenburg, S

    2012-01-01

    A detailed experimental and simulation study of the extraction of a 24 keV He-ion beam from an ECR ion source and the subsequent beam transport through an analyzing magnet is presented. We find that such a slow ion beam is very sensitive to space-charge forces, but also that the neutralization of the beam's space charge by secondary electrons is virtually complete for beam currents up to at least 0.5 mA. The beam emittance directly behind the extraction system is 65 pi mm mrad and is determined by the fact that the ion beam is extracted in the strong magnetic fringe field of the ion source. The relatively large emittance of the beam and its non-paraxiality lead, in combination with a relatively small magnet gap, to significant beam losses and a five-fold increase of the effective beam emittance during its transport through the analyzing magnet. The calculated beam profile and phase-space distributions in the image plane of the analyzing magnet agree well with measurements. The kinematic and magnet aberrations...

  17. Dynamics of fast charged particle beam rotation in bended crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamics of fast charged particle beam rotation in a bended monocrystal is considered. Face and volume mechanisms of capture in channels are taken into account simultaneously in the model presented. Functions of distribution in transverse energies (φ) of channeled and dechanneled particles are obtained. Charge-energy ''scale invariance'' in ion channeling with charge Z in a bended crystal determined by scale parameter W=pv/Z (p and v are pulse and velocity local to transverse planes) follows from the model presented

  18. Modeling the work piece charging during e-beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Benjamin; Cotte, Eric; Simeon, Bernd; Wandel, Timo

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays, high end photomasks are usually patterned with electron beam writers since they provide a superior resolution. However, placement accuracy is severely limited by the so-called charging effect: Each shot with the electron beam deposits charges inside the mask blank which deflect the electrons in the subsequent shots and therefore cause placement errors. In this paper, a model is proposed which allows to establish a prediction of the deflection of the beam and thus provide a method for improving pattern placement for photomasks.

  19. Aberrations due to solenoid focusing of a multiply charged high-current ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, G; Lisi, N; Schnuriger, J C; Scrivens, R; Tambini, J

    2000-01-01

    At the output of a laser ion source, a high current of highly charged ions with a large range of charge states is available. The focusing of such a beam by magnetic elements causes a nonlinear space-charge field to develop which can induce large aberrations and emittance growth in the beam. Simulation of the beam from the CERN laser ion source will be presented for an ideal magnetic and electrostatic system using a radially symmetric model. In addition, the three dimensional software KOBRA3 is used for the simulation of the solenoid line. The results of these simulations will be compared with experiments performed on the CERN laser ion source with solenoids (resulting in a hollow beam) and a series of gridded electrostatic lenses. (5 refs).

  20. Space Charge Dominated Beams in the Iucf Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    1995-01-01

    Many present and future accelerator projects require significantly increased brightness of the accelerated and stored beams to make modern nuclear and high energy experiments feasible. In the case of IUCF Cooler it has been stated that there is strong motivation for increased beam intensity to provide the designed luminosity for the future Light Ion Spin Synchrotron. To achieve the desired brightness of the beam one must consider a complex problem involving both effective injection and circumventing various intensity limits. This dissertation is essentially a collection of theoretical models and experimental observations which, taken together, make an attempt to analyze numerous intensity and space charge related effects in the IUCF Cooler. We found that the proton beams in the IUCF Cooler are nearly completely space charge dominated longitudinally. This leads to a number of beam properties, such as coherent synchrotron frequency shift and an absence of decoherence in the synchrotron phase oscillations, which have not been observed before. We observed experimentally that the intensity limit in the IUCF Cooler is a peak current limit due to space charge effects. Beam losses occur due to incoherent transverse effects, such as large space charge tune shift and the formation of tails. In addition to that, a very precise bunched beam current monitor was invented and tested. This device could be used in the future precise nuclear experiments.

  1. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kai

    Modern accelerator applications, such as heavy ion fusion drivers, pulsed neutron sources, electron injectors for high-energy linear colliders, and X-ray Free Electron Lasers, demand beams with high intensity, low emittance and small energy spread. At low (non-relativistic) energies, the "electrostatic", collective interactions from space-charge forces existing in such intense beams play the dominant role; we characterize these beams as space-charge dominated beams. This dissertation presents numerous new findings on the longitudinal dynamics of a space-charge dominated beam, particularly on the propagation of density perturbations. In order to fully understand the complex physics of longitudinal space-charge waves, we combine the results of theory, computer simulation, and experiment. In the Long Solenoid Experimental system (LSE), with numerous diagnostic tools and techniques, we have, for the first time, experimentally measured the detailed energy profiles of longitudinal space-charge waves at different locations, both near the beam source and at the end of the transport system. Along with the current profiles, we have a complete set of experimental data for the propagation of space-charge waves. We compare these measured results to a 1-D theory and find better agreement for beams with perturbations in the linear regime, where the perturbation strength is less than 10%, than those with nonlinear perturbations. Using fast imaging techniques that we newly developed, we have, for the first time, obtained the progressive time-resolved images of longitudinal slices of a space-charge dominated beam. These images not only provide us time-resolved transverse density distribution of the beam, but also enable us to take time-resolved transverse phase space measurement using computerized tomography. By combining this information with the longitudinal energy measurement, we have, for the first time, experimentally constructed the full 6-D phase space. Part of the results

  2. Discriminant Analysis and Secondary-Beam Charge Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Lukasik, J; Aumann, T; Bacri, C O; Barczyk, T; Bassini, R; Bianchin, S; Boiano, C; Botvina, A S; Boudard, A; Brzychczyk, J; Chbihi, A; Cibor, J; Czech, B; Ducret, J -E; Emling, H; Frankland, J; Hellström, M; Henzlova, D; Imme, G; Iori, I; Johansson, H; Kezzar, K; Lafriakh, A; Le Fèvre, A; Gentil, E Le; Leifels, Y; Lühning, J; Lynch, W G; Lynen, U; Majka, Z; Mocko, M; Müller, W F J; Mykulyak, A; De Napoli, M; Orth, H; Otte, A N; Palit, R; Pawlowski, P; Pullia, A; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Sann, H; Schwarz, C; Sfienti, C; Simon, H; Sümmerer, K; Trautmann, W; Tsang, M B; Verde, G; Volant, C; Wallace, M; Weick, H; Wiechula, J; Wieloch, A; Zwieglinski, B

    2007-01-01

    The discriminant-analysis method has been applied to optimize the exotic-beam charge recognition in a projectile fragmentation experiment. The experiment was carried out at the GSI using the fragment separator (FRS) to produce and select the relativistic secondary beams, and the ALADIN setup to measure their fragmentation products following collisions with Sn target nuclei. The beams of neutron poor isotopes around 124La and 107Sn were selected to study the isospin dependence of the limiting temperature of heavy nuclei by comparing with results for stable 124Sn projectiles. A detector to measure the projectile charge upstream of the reaction target was not used, and alternative methods had to be developed. The presented method, based on the multivariate discriminant analysis, allowed to increase the efficacy of charge recognition up to about 90%, which was about 20% more than achieved with the simple scalar methods.

  3. Electro-Optical Detection of Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R C; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas; Usack, V

    1999-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the propagation of laser light in a birefringent crystal at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. Polarized infrared light was coupled to a LiNbO3 crystal through a polarization maintaining fiber of 4 micron diameter. An electron beam in 10ps bunches of 1mm diameter was scanned across the crystal. The modulation of the laser light during passage of the electron beam was observed using a photodiode with 45GHz bandwidth. The fastest rise time measured, 120ps, was made in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. Both polarization dependent and polarization independent effects were observed. This technology holds promise of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution of charged particle beams.

  4. Radiation-induced charge dynamics in dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labonte, K.

    1982-12-01

    A general physical model is presented for the analysis of charge dynamics in dielectrics exposed to ionizing radiation. Discrete trap levels, recombination between trapped and free carriers, trapping and detrapping events, and the mobility of positive and negative charge carriers are included in the theory. This model is applied to electron beam irradiated Teflon FEP foils and results for various boundary conditions are compared with experimental data from a split Faraday cup arrangement.

  5. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  6. Production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an all-superconducting-magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged ion beams to meet the requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, an aluminum chamber has been installed inside a 1.5 mm thick Ta liner used for the reduction of x-ray irradiation at the high voltage insulator. With double-frequency (18+14.5 GHz) heating and at maximum total microwave power of 2.0 kW, SECRAL has successfully produced quite a few very highly charged Xe ion beams, such as 10 e μA of Xe37+, 1 e μA of Xe43+, and 0.16 e μA of Ne-like Xe44+. To further explore the capability of the SECRAL in the production of highly charged heavy metal ion beams, a first test run on bismuth has been carried out recently. The main goal is to produce an intense Bi31+ beam for HIRFL accelerator and to have a feel how well the SECRAL can do in the production of very highly charged Bi beams. During the test, though at microwave power less than 3 kW, more than 150 e μA of Bi31+, 22 e μA of Bi41+, and 1.5 e μA of Bi50+ have been produced. All of these results have again demonstrated the great capability of the SECRAL source. This article will present the detailed results and brief discussions to the production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL.

  7. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  8. Beam-Charge Asymmetry associated with DVCS at HERMES

    CERN Document Server

    Ellinghaus, F

    2002-01-01

    We report the first observation of an azimuthal asymmetry in the hard electroproduction of real photons with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam. The asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler process and the deeply-virtual Compton scattering process, which gives access to the latter at the amplitude level. This process appears to be the theoretically cleanest way to access generalized parton distributions. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, scattering the HERA 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target.

  9. Nonlinear Stability Theorem for High-Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global conservation constraints based on the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to derive a three-dimensional kinetic stability theorem for an intense non-neutral ion beam (or charge bunch) propagating with average axial velocity vb=const . It is shown that a sufficient condition for linear and nonlinear stability for perturbations with arbitrary polarization is that the equilibrium distribution be a monotonically decreasing function of the single-particle energy H' in the beam frame, i.e., ∂feq(H') /∂H'≤0 . copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Space-Charge Dominated Beam Transport via Multiresolution

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorova, A N; Fedorova, Antonina N.; Zeitlin, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    We consider space-charge dominated beam transport systems, where space-charge forces are the same order as external focusing forces and dynamics of the corresponding emittance growth. We consider the coherent modes of oscillations and coherent instabilities both in the different nonlinear envelope models and in initial collective dynamics picture described by Vlasov system. Our calculations are based on variation approach and multiresolution in the base of high-localized generalized coherent states/wavelets. We control contributions to dynamical processes from underlying multiscales via nonlinear high-localized eigenmodes expansions in the base of compactly supported wavelet and wavelet packets bases.

  11. Orbital angular momentum induced beam shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Hermosa N.; Merano M.; Aiello A.; Woerdman J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We present experiments on Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) induced beam shifts in optical reflection. Specifically, we observe the spatial Goos-H\\"anchen shift in which the beam is displaced parallel to the plane of incidence and the angular Imbert-Fedorov shift which is a transverse angular deviation from the geometric optics prediction. Experimental results agree well with our theoretical predictions. Both beam shifts increase with the OAM of the beam; we have measured these for OAM indices u...

  12. Electron beam induced and microemulsion templated synthesis of CdSe quantum dots: tunable broadband emission and charge carrier recombination dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Apurav; Singh, Ajay K.; Rath, Madhab C.; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2015-04-01

    CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by a rapid and one step templated approach inside the water pool of AOT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) based water-in-oil microemulsions (MEs) via electron beam (EB) irradiation technique with high dose rate, which favours high nucleation rate. The interplay of different experimental parameters such as precursor concentration, absorbed dose and {{W}0} values (aqueous phase to surfactant molar ratio) of MEs were found to have interesting consequences on the morphology, photoluminescence (PL), surface composition and carrier recombination dynamics of as-grown QDs. For instance, highly stable ultrasmall (∼1.7 nm) bluish-white light emitting QDs were obtained with quantum efficiency (η) of ∼9%. Furthermore, QDs were found to exhibit tunable broadband light emission extending from 450 to 750 nm (maximum FWHM ∼180 nm). This could be realized from the CIE (Commission Internationale d’Eclairage) chromaticity co-ordinates, which varied across the blue region to the orange region thereby, conferring their potential application in white light emitting diodes. Additionally, the average PL lifetime ≤ft( ≤ft \\right) values could be varied from 18 ns to as high as 74 ns, which reflect the role of surface states in terms of their density and distribution. Another interesting revelation was the self-assembling of the initially formed QDs into nanorods with high aspect ratios ranging from 7 to 20, in correspondence with the {{W}0} values. Besides, the fundamental roles of the chemical nature of water pool and the interfacial fluidity of AOT MEs in influencing the photophysical properties of QDs were investigated by carrying out a similar study in CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; cationic surfactant) based MEs. Surprisingly, very profound and contrasting results were observed wherein ≤ft and η of the QDs in case of CTAB MEs were found to be at least three times lower as compared to that in AOT MEs.

  13. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  14. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam ChargeNeutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson,Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-10-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K{sup +} ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments.

  15. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ∼ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage (∼ 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K+ ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments

  16. Electron beam propagation in a space-charge regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the propagation of electron beams generated by a niobium photocathode illuminated by different wavelength excimer lasers. The cathode used was a polycrystalline disc. Its work function was 4.3 eV while the laser photon energy was 4.02 eV for the XeCl laser and 5.6 eV for the KrCl laser. The anode-cathode distance was variable as well as the saturation output current. At low accelerating voltage the beam was space charge dominated but its peak value was not limited by the Child-Langmuir calculated value. A fast shunt resistance allowed to record the electron beam generated with a fast rise time. The maximum output current was reached with the KrCl laser which provided an electron bunch containing 980 mA and 9 nC

  17. A Space-Charge-Neutralizing Plasma for Beam Drift Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.E.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-08-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a {approx} 10 cm long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter {approx} 5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8T field. Measured plasma density of {ge} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} meets the challenge of n{sub p}/Zn{sub b} > 1, where n{sub p} and n{sub b} are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the plasma ions.

  18. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David Richard

    2007-05-23

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  19. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O7+ and 1.15 emA of O6+, more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar13+, Ca13+, Fe13+, Co14+ and Kr18+, and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr26+, Xe28+, Au35+, Bi34+ and U34+ have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe36+, Au46+, Bi47+ and U48+. An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I ≥ 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams

  20. Charge Stripper Effects on Beam Optics in 180-degree Bending Section of RISP Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Ji-Ho; Song, Jeong Seog

    2016-01-01

    The RAON, a superconducting linear accelerator for RISP (Rare Isotope Science Project), will use a charge stripper in order to increase the charge states of the heavy ions for effective acceleration in the higher energy part of the linac. The charge stripper affects the beam qualities by scattering when the heavy ions go through the charge stripper. Moreover we have to select and accelerate proper charge states between 77+ and 81+ for uranium beam case in order to satisfy the beam power requirement at an IF (Inflight Fragmentation) target. This work focuses on the beam optics affected by the charge stripper in the 180-dgree bending section.

  1. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2008-06-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally-applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage ({approx} 8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO{sub 3} source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios {approx} 120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high energy density physics applications.

  2. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2014-01-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  3. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  4. Anomaly-induced charges in baryons

    OpenAIRE

    Eto, Minoru; Hashimoto, Koji; Iida, Hideaki; Ishii, Takaaki; Maezawa, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We show that quantum chiral anomaly of QCD in magnetic backgrounds induces a novel structure of electric charge inside baryons. To illustrate the anomaly effect, we employ the Skyrme model for baryons, with the anomaly-induced gauged Wess-Zumino term (\\pi_0 + (multi-pion)) E_i B_i. Due to this term, the Skyrmions giving a local pion condensation ((\\pi_0 + (multi-pion)) \

  5. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Huth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID is a direct-writing technique with nanometer resolution, which has received strongly increasing attention within the last decade. In FEBID a precursor previously adsorbed on a substrate surface is dissociated in the focus of an electron beam. After 20 years of continuous development FEBID has reached a stage at which this technique is now particularly attractive for several areas in both, basic and applied research. The present topical review addresses selected examples that highlight this development in the areas of charge-transport regimes in nanogranular metals close to an insulator-to-metal transition, the use of these materials for strain- and magnetic-field sensing, and the prospect of extending FEBID to multicomponent systems, such as binary alloys and intermetallic compounds with cooperative ground states.Results: After a brief introduction to the technique, recent work concerning FEBID of Pt–Si alloys and (hard-magnetic Co–Pt intermetallic compounds on the nanometer scale is reviewed. The growth process in the presence of two precursors, whose flux is independently controlled, is analyzed within a continuum model of FEBID that employs rate equations. Predictions are made for the tunability of the composition of the Co–Pt system by simply changing the dwell time of the electron beam during the writing process. The charge-transport regimes of nanogranular metals are reviewed next with a focus on recent theoretical advancements in the field. As a case study the transport properties of Pt–C nanogranular FEBID structures are discussed. It is shown that by means of a post-growth electron-irradiation treatment the electronic intergrain-coupling strength can be continuously tuned over a wide range. This provides unique access to the transport properties of this material close to the insulator-to-metal transition. In the last part of the review, recent developments in mechanical

  6. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelmann, A

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density ({approx} 10{sup 9} protons/cm{sup 3}) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  7. Charge State Evolution of Uranium in Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-Feng; YAO Ke; Roger Hutton; ZOU Ya-Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present a calculation scheme with significant modifications and improvements for determining the ionization balance and the ion temperature evolution in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The scheme is applied to uranium and nitrogen ions using a specific set of EBIT operating parameters. The calculation results are compared to the experimental data. Rates for the individual atomic processes in EBIT, especially single and multiple charge exchange processes, are discussed. The time evolution of the ion temperatures for uranium and its coolant nitrogen are also given.

  8. Investigations of the Dynamics of Space Charged Dominated Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, Richard C.

    2002-08-01

    We propose to perform investigations of the dynamics of space charge dominated beams. These investigations will support present activities such as the electron ring project at the University of Maryland as well as provide an improved basis for future accelerator designs. Computer simulations will provide the primary research element with improved code development being an integral part of the activities during the first period. We believe that one of the code development projects provides a unique strategy for the inclusion of longitudinal dynamics, and that this concept should provide a computationally rapid research tool.

  9. Charged-particle beam diagnostics for the advanced photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e -, e +) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest X-ray sources in the 10-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV injector synchrotron (IS), 7-GeV storage ring (SR), and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  10. Charge-induced electromagnetic resonances in nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav [ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Klacka, Jozef; Kundracik, Frantisek [Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Videen, Gorden [US Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-CI-ES, Adelphi, MD (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Electromagnetic theories have reproduced the scattering properties of differently shaped particles and successfully been used to characterize numerous systems. However, certain anomalous features remain unexplained that include enhanced extinction when particles are much smaller than the wavelength. Here we explain these features exploiting recent research in electromagnetic scattering theories that suggests incorporating the effect of particle charge results in new physical outcomes that deviate appreciably from what is predicted by electromagnetic interaction from uncharged systems. For electrically charged particles, the resonant excitation of surface modes is governed by excess charges deposited on the particle surface. Charge effects become large when particles are small compared to the incident wavelength, and we show that the electrostatic approximation is not valid for modelling the electromagnetic interaction from such particles. Charge-induced resonances appear in such systems that can reproduce previously unexplained phenomena, for instance, amplified microwave attenuation observed in sandstorms. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Plasma effect in the longitudinal space charge induced microbunching instability

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Dazhang; Gu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The microbunching instability usually exists in the LINAC of a free electron laser facility. If it is not well-controlled, the beam quality will be seriously damaged and the machine will not operate properly. In many cases, the longitudinal space charge (LSC) is a dominant factor that generates the instability; therefore its contribution must be studied in detail. The current analytical solution of the LSC impedance derived from the fundamental electromagnetic theory without space charge oscillation included has been widely used to estimate the gain of the LSC-induced microbunching instability. However, in the case of highly bright electron beams at lower energy, the space charge oscillation or the plasma effect can also play a role. In this article, the physical model of the LSC is constructed by analyzing the Vlasov and Poisson equations in the multiple-dimensional phase space, and its influence on the gain of the instability is also investigated analytically. The solution shows that due to the plasma effec...

  12. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics for charges particle beams with a curved axis in the matrix - recursive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dymnikov, A.D. [University of St Petersburg, (Russian Federation). Institute of Computational Mathematics and Control Process

    1993-12-31

    In this paper a new matrix and recursive approach has been outlined for treating nonlinear optics of charged particle beams. This approach is a new analytical and computational tool for designers of optimal beam control systems. 9 refs.

  14. A New Technique for Diagnosing Multi-charged Ion Beams Produced by ECR Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangZimin; ZhaoHongwei; CaoYun; MaLei; MaBaohua; LiJinyu; WangHui; FengYucheng; DuJunfeng

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the transmission properties of multi-charged ion beams between the ECR ion source and the analyzing magnet, a new diagnostic system composed of three Wien-filters with three single-wires has been built and installed on the IMP ECR source test bcnch. The single-wire is used to measure the beam profile and the beam density distribution, and the Wien-filter is used to measure the charge state distribution of ion beam.

  15. A stochastic-hydrodynamic model of halo formation in charged particle beams

    OpenAIRE

    Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2003-01-01

    The formation of the beam halo in charged particle accelerators is studied in the framework of a stochastic-hydrodynamic model for the collective motion of the particle beam. In such a stochastic-hydrodynamic theory the density and the phase of the charged beam obey a set of coupled nonlinear hydrodynamic equations with explicit time-reversal invariance. This leads to a linearized theory that describes the collective dynamics of the beam in terms of a classical Schr\\"odinger equation. Taking ...

  16. Coherent space charge instability of a two-dimensional beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of analytic calculations on the coherent space charge instabilities of a beam with initial Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij distribution and unequal emittances, rsp. average energy in the two transverse phase planes x-p/sub x/ and y-p/sub y/. We note that in computer simulation calculations evidence has been given for rapid emittance transfer to occur if the initial emittances epsilon/sub x/, epsilon/sub y/ are noticeably different. We have not attempted to make a quantitative comparison of our results with those from computer simulation. The main purpose of this study is to give some insight into the instability mechanism, the dimensionless parameters that characterize the situation and the growth rates one may expect to find

  17. Induced-Charge Electro-Osmosis

    CERN Document Server

    Squires, T M; Squires, Todd M.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2003-01-01

    The general phenomenon of `induced-charge electro-osmosis' (ICEO) is described -- the nonlinear electro-osmotic slip caused by an applied field acting on induced ionic charge in the vicinity of a polarizable surface. A simple physical picture of the basic phenomenon is presented, and the ICEO flow around conducting cylinders and spheres in steady (DC), oscillitory (AC), and suddenly-applied electric fields is calculated, providing perhaps the simplest and clearest example of a non-equilibrium electrokinetic phenomenon. It is shown that ICEO slip velocities generally vary like $u_s \\propto E_0^2 a$ in uniform fields, where $E_0$ is the applied field strength and $a$ is a geometrical length scale, and are set up on a time scale $\\tau_c = \\lambda_D a/D$, where $\\lambda_D$ is the screening length and $D$ the diffusion constant of the electrolytic ions. A variety of microfludic flows results for conducting objects of either fixed total charge or fixed potential. The effect of a dielectric coating upon ICEO flows i...

  18. Nonlinear potential model of space-charge-limited electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litz, M.S. [Army Research Lab., Adelphi, MD (United States); Golden, J. [Berkeley Research Associates, Springfield, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) time-varying nonlinear theory based on the Duffing equation is applied to space-charge limited beams and specifically vircators. This theory classifies test particle trajectories in a modulated nonlinear potential. Two predictions of the theory that can be directly compared to experiment are the final state of electron trajectories and the oscillation frequency of the electrons m the potential well. Experimental measurements of electron flux recorded along the vircator chamber wall correlates well with the numerically integrated final state of electron trajectory in the 1D theory. The oscillation frequency measured in the experiment is shown to be a better match to the oscillation frequency calculated from the nonlinear potential as compared to a parabolic potential (that results from a linear restoring force). In the experiment, random initial conditions arise from beam thermalization and nonuniform electron emission at the surface of the cathode. However, these characteristics alone do not explain the experimentally observed fluctuations in rf power and frequency. The predictions of the time-varying nonlinear potential theory clearly exhibits trends that were observed in the experimental results, in the form of classes of particle trajectories, fluctuations in particle asymptotic states, and particle motion sensitive to the shape of the virtual cathode.

  19. Study of the transient effects of the space charge compensation on the dynamics of an intense beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A main interest in the design of ion accelerators is the control of the dynamics of intense beams at low energy. This dynamics is dominated by nonlinear effects of the Space Charge (SC) field. This SC field induces a halo formation which can induce losses along the transport. Once ionized by the beam, the residual gas, diffused by the source and produced by the desorption of the vacuum chamber of the accelerator, contributes to the production of electrons and ions. According to their sign of charge compared to the beam, these particles will be repelled or confined. The accumulation of particles in the beam contributes to the compensation of the SC field. However, this neutralization induces other non linearity which are dependent on time. This thesis presents an experimental and theoretical work of the SC compensation for ion beams (H+ and H-). The dynamics of these beams is modelled by a new PIC code, CARTAGO, ensuring the coupling between the created plasma and the studied beams. A single-particle study introduces the dynamics of the plasma in presence of the SC field and of an external magnetic field. The modeling of the compensation with the 1D version of CARTAGO code gave the establishment times and the compensation degrees for several cases of beams and various gas pressures. The compensation of a protons beam was studied more particularly in the low-energy line of the Injector of Protons of High Intensity (IPHI) at Saclay. Simulations show an over-compensation of the space charge inside the focusing solenoid and outside the compensation is only partial. Experimental confrontations of the 2D(r,z) modeling results in a part of this line are also detailed. (author)

  20. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  1. Dynamics of relativistic electron beam space charge compensation in a neutral gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilko, V.I.; Ognivenko, V.V.

    1983-06-01

    The dynamics of the space charge compensation of a relativistic electron beam with magnetized electrons as a result of ionization collisions of beam electrons and secondary ions with gas atoms has been studied theoretically. The analysis of calculation data shows that the neutral gas ionization by a relativistic electron beam leads to appearance of secondary ions which oscillate in a potential well of the electron beam space charge. It is shown that the density of ions formed is maximal in the beam center and drops to the beam periphery. As a result, the force compensation is possible only in the vicinity of a fixed coordinate which value grows with time.

  2. Charged current neutrino induced coherent pion production

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Hirenzaki, S; Vacas, M J V

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the neutrino induced charged current coherent pion production at the energies of interest for recent experiments like K2K and MiniBooNE. Medium effects in the production mechanism and the distortion of the pion wave function, obtained solving the Klein Gordon equation with a microscopic optical potential, are included in the calculation. We find a strong reduction of the cross section due to these effects and also substantial modifications of the energy distributions of the final lepton and pion.

  3. Charge-induced patchy attractions between proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weimin; Persson, Björn A; Morin, Maxim; Behrens, Manja A; Lund, Mikael; Zackrisson Oskolkova, Malin

    2015-01-15

    Static light scattering (SLS) combined with structure-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide new insights into mechanisms behind anisotropic, attractive protein interactions. A nonmonotonic behavior of the osmotic second virial coefficient as a function of ionic strength is here shown to originate from a few charged amino acids forming an electrostatic attractive patch, highly directional and complementary. Together with Coulombic repulsion, this attractive patch results in two counteracting electrostatic contributions to the interaction free energy which, by operating over different length scales, is manifested in a subtle, salt-induced minimum in the second virial coefficient as observed in both experiment and simulations. PMID:25494398

  4. Beam induced RF cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency (RF) cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ωr of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω0. The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(jhω0t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting RF cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kind of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  5. Key elements of space charge compensation on a low energy high intensity beam injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shixiang; Lu, Pengnan; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Jia; Xu, Yuan; Guo, Zhiyu; Chen, Jia'er; Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Liangting

    2013-03-01

    Space charge effect (SCE) along the beam line will decrease beam quality. Space charge compensation (SCC) with extra gas injection is a high-efficiency method to reduce SCE. In this paper, we will report the experimental results on the beam profile, potential distribution, beam emittance, and beam transmission efficiency of a 35 keV∕90 mA H(+) beam and a 40 keV∕10 mA He(+) beam compensated by Ar∕Kr. The influence of gas type, gas flow, and injection location will be discussed. Emphasis is laid on the consideration of SCC when designing and commissioning a high intensity ion beam injector. Based on measured data, a new definition of space charge compensation degree is proposed. PMID:23556812

  6. Key elements of space charge compensation on a low energy high intensity beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Shixiang; Lu Pengnan; Ren Haitao; Zhao Jie; Chen Jia; Xu Yuan; Guo Zhiyu; Chen Jia' er [Institution of Nuclear Science and Technology (INST), State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology (KLNPT), Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao Hongwei; Sun Liangting [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Space charge effect (SCE) along the beam line will decrease beam quality. Space charge compensation (SCC) with extra gas injection is a high-efficiency method to reduce SCE. In this paper, we will report the experimental results on the beam profile, potential distribution, beam emittance, and beam transmission efficiency of a 35 keV/90 mA H{sup +} beam and a 40 keV/10 mA He{sup +} beam compensated by Ar/Kr. The influence of gas type, gas flow, and injection location will be discussed. Emphasis is laid on the consideration of SCC when designing and commissioning a high intensity ion beam injector. Based on measured data, a new definition of space charge compensation degree is proposed.

  7. Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the physics of beams with intense space charge. This course is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in accelerator systems that require sufficient high intensity where mutual particle interactions in the beam can no longer be neglected. This course is intended to give the student a broad overview of the dynamics of beams with strong space charge. The emphasis is on theoretical and analytical methods of describing the acceleration and transport of beams. Some aspects of numerical and experimental methods will also be covered. Students will become familiar with standard methods employed to understand the transverse and longitudinal evolution of beams with strong space charge. The material covered will provide a foundation to design practical architectures. In this course, we will introduce you to the physics of intense charged particle beams, focusing on the role of space charge. The topics include: particle equations of motion, the paraxial ray equation, and the Vlasov equation; 4-D and 2-D equilibrium distribution functions (such as the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij, thermal equilibrium, and Neuffer distributions), reduced moment and envelope equation formulations of beam evolution; transport limits and focusing methods; the concept of emittance and the calculation of its growth from mismatches in beam envelope and from space-charge non-uniformities using system conservation constraints; the role of space-charge in producing beam halos; longitudinal space-charge effects including small amplitude and rarefaction waves; stable and unstable oscillation modes of beams (including envelope and kinetic modes); the role of space charge in the injector; and algorithms to calculate space-charge effects in particle codes. Examples of intense beams will be given primarily from the ion and proton accelerator communities with applications from, for example, heavy-ion fusion, spallation

  8. Beam Induced Pressure Rise at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Y; Bai, Mei; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Gullotta, Justin; He, Ping; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Peggs, Steve; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smart, Loralie; Snydstrup, Louis; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Zeno, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Beam induced pressure rise in RHIC warm sections is currently one of the machine intensity and luminosity limits. This pressure rise is mainly due to electron cloud effects. The RHIC warm section electron cloud is associated with longer bunch spacings compared with other machines, and is distributed non-uniformly around the ring. In addition to the countermeasures for normal electron cloud, such as the NEG coated pipe, solenoids, beam scrubbing, bunch gaps, and larger bunch spacing, other studies and beam tests toward the understanding and counteracting RHIC warm electron cloud are of interest. These include the ion desorption studies and the test of anti-grazing ridges. For high bunch intensities and the shortest bunch spacings, pressure rises at certain locations in the cryogenic region have been observed during the past two runs. Beam studies are planned for the current 2005 run and the results will be reported.

  9. Induced focusing and conversion of a Gaussian beam into an elliptic Gaussian beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Mishra; Swapan Konar

    2005-09-01

    We have presented an investigation of the induced focusing in Kerr media of two laser beams, the pump beam and the probe beam, which could be either Gaussian or elliptic Gaussian or a combination of the two. We have used variational formalism to derive relevant beam-width equations. Among several important findings, the finding that a very week probe beam can be guided and focused when power of both beams are well below their individual threshold for self-focusing, is a noteworthy one. It has been found that induced focusing is not possible for laser beams of any wavelength and beam radius. In case both beams are elliptic Gaussian, we have shown that when power of both beams is above a certain threshold value then the effective radius of both beams collapses and collapse distance depends on power. Moreover, it has been found that induced focusing can be employed to convert a circular Gaussian beam into an elliptic Gaussian beam.

  10. Study of two-charged body hadronic scattering, induced on protons by a beam of π-, K-, antip, between 3 and 12 GeV/c, wih a scattering angle near 900 c.m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large angle two-body hadronic scattering was studied between 3 and 12 GeV/c by the WA 13 experiment at C.E.R.N. (Omega Spectrometer), with a negative RF separated beam, on a hydrogen target. The cross sections of these reactions, at fixed c.m. angle, decrease very rapidly with the energy; then high beam intensities were required together with high selectivity, obtained thanks to a multilevel triggering system, including a coplanarity chamber associated to a fast logic. This thesis describes the reactions with two charged final particles (π-p, K-p, antipp elastic scattering and antipp annihilation into two mesons). The kinematical reconstruction eliminates the background almost completely. More over a special vertex fitting method improves the reconstruction of the tracks, using their convergence at the same point to increase the geometrical information. Neglecting fixed t structures, the differential cross sections are compatible with the dimensional counting laws (however elastic antipp seems to decrease less rapidly than expected). Different models are compared with the results: no one agrees with the whole set of available data. This work emphasizes the handling of error matrices and the use of optimal estimation. It proposes a recursive track fitting method, optimized with respect to the multiple scattering

  11. Theory and Simulation of the Physics of Space Charge Dominated Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes modeling of intense electron and ion beams in the space charge dominated regime. Space charge collective modes play an important role in the transport of intense beams over long distances. These modes were first observed in particle-in-cell simulations. The work presented here is closely tied to the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) experiment and has application to accelerators for heavy ion beam fusion

  12. Charged particle therapy with mini-segmented beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Avraham eDilmanian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental attributes of proton therapy and carbon ion therapy is the ability of these charged particles to spare tissue distal to the targeted tumor. This significantly reduces normal tissue toxicity and has the potential to translate to a wider therapeutic index. Although, in general, particle therapy also reduces dose to the proximal tissues, particularly in the vicinity of the target, dose to the skin and to other very superficial tissues tends to be higher than that of megavoltage x-rays. The methods presented here, namely Interleaved carbon minibeams and Radiosurgery with arrays of proton and light ion minibeams, both utilize beams segmented into arrays of parallel minibeams of about 0.3 mm incident beam size. These minibeam arrays spare tissues, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray experiments. An additional feature of particle minibeams is their gradual broadening due to multiple Coulomb scattering as they penetrate tissues. In the case of interleaved carbon minibeams, which do not broaden much, two arrays of planar carbon minibeams that remain parallel at target depth, are aimed at the target from 90º angles and made to interleave at the target to produce a solid radiation field within the target. As a result the surrounding tissues are exposed only to individual carbon minibeam arrays and are therefore spared. The method was used in four-directional geometry at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to ablate a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain at a single exposure with 40 Gy physical absorbed dose. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and histology six month later showed very focal target necrosis with nearly no damage to the surrounding brain. As for minibeams of protons and light ions, for which the minibeam broadening is substantial, measurements at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and Monte Carlo simulations showed that the broadening minibeams will merge with their neighbors at a certain tissue depth

  13. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  14. Conversion circularly polarized beam shifting optical vortices with a fractional topological charges in a uniaxial crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrebnaya, A. O.; Halilov, S. I.; Rubass, A. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we have studied the distribution of a circularly polarized beam carrying the optical vortex with fractional topological charge equal to ½ in a uniaxial crystal. We have found that by increasing the angle of inclination of the beam relative to the optical axis of the crystal to α = 1.75 °, mixed dislocation movement observed wave front interference pattern to beam periphery. Experimental research has shown that when the angle α = 2 ° in the central region of the beam, we are seeing the emergence of "fork", optical vortex with a topological charge of the order of 1. The results show depolarization of the beam and the transition to the spin angular momentum of the orbital angular momentum. The intensity of the RCP and LCP component in the beam carrying the optical vortex with fractional topological charge oscillate. The total intensity of the beam as the sum of two orthogonally polarized components does not change.

  15. Optimization of a charge-state analyzer for electron cyclotron resonance ion source beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saminathan, S.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Kremers, H. R.; Mironov, V.; Mulder, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed experimental and simulation study of the extraction of a 24 keV He+ beam from an ECR ion source and the subsequent beam transport through an analyzing magnet is presented. We find that such a slow ion beam is very sensitive to space-charge forces, but also that the neutralization of the b

  16. Mapping ion beam induced current changes in a commercial MOSFET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, A.D.C.; Thompson, S.; Yang, C. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, D.N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We demonstrate a novel nuclear microprobe imaging and analysis modality for micrometre-scale field effect transistor devices probed with focused beams of MeV ions. By recording the drain current as a function of time during ion irradiation it is possible to identify current transients induced by the passage of single ions through the sensitive structures of the device. This modality takes advantage of the fact that the ionization produced by the passage of a single ion acts in an equivalent way to a transient change in the gate bias which therefore modulates the drain current as a function of time. This differs from the traditional ion beam induced charge technique where the ionization drifts in an internal electric field and induces a single charge pulse in an electrode applied to the device. Instead a richer variety of phenomena are observed, with different time constants which depend on the proximity of the ion strike to the channel of the device. The signals may be used to examine device function, radiation sensitivity or to count ion impacts within the channel.

  17. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found. (orig.)

  18. Analytical treatment of the nonlinear electron cloud effect and the combined effects with beam-beam and space charge nonlinear forces in storage rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we treat first some nonlinear beam dynamics problems in storage rings, such as beam dynamic apertures due to magnetic multipoles, wiggles, beam-beam effects, nonlinear space charge effect, and then nonlinear electron cloud effect combined with beam-beam and space charge effects, analytically. This analytical treatment is applied to BEPC Ⅱ. The corresponding analytical expressions developed in this paper are useful both in understanding the physics behind these problems and also in making practical quick hand estimations.

  19. Beam-induced tensor pressure tokamak equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D-shaped tensor pressure tokamak equilibria induced by neutral-beam injection are computed. The beam pressure components are evaluated from the moments of a distribution function that is a solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in which the pitch-angle scattering operator is ignored. The level-psub(perpendicular) contours undergo a significant shift away from the outer edge of the device with respect to the flux surfaces for perpendicular beam injection into broad-pressure-profile equilibria. The psub(parallel) contours undergo a somewhat smaller inward shift with respect to the flux surfaces for both parallel and perpendicular injection into broad-pressure-profile equilibria. For peaked-pressure-profile equilibria, the level pressure contours nearly co-incide with the flux surfaces. (author)

  20. Self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam in plasma wake field excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, T.; Fedele, R.; Nicola, S. De; Tanjia, F.; Jovanović, D.; Mannan, A.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam is provided within the context of the theory of plasma wake field excitation. The self-consistent description of the beam dynamics is provided by coupling the Vlasov equation with a Poisson-type equation relating the plasma wake potential to the beam density. An analysis of the beam envelope self-modulation is then carried out and the criteria for the occurrence of the instability are discussed thereby.

  1. Status of the SPES-charge breeder (SPES-CB) and its beam line at INFN-LNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatá, Àlessio; Comunian, M.; Bellan, L.; Maggiore, M.; Patti, G.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Russo, A. D.; Calabretta, L.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2016-06-01

    The Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) facility is under construction at INFN-LNL: aim of this project is the production, ionization and post-acceleration of radioactive ions to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. Radioactive species will be produced by fissions induced by a proton beam impinging on an UCx target: the proton beam will be delivered by a room temperature cyclotron (built by the Best Company) with a maximum energy of 40 MeV and 0.25 mA of maximum current. The radioactive species produced in the Target-Ion-Source system, extracted as a 1+ beam, cooled in a RFQ-cooler and purified from the isobars contaminants through a High Resolution Mass Spectrometer (HRMS). In order to allow post acceleration with the superconducting linac ALPI at INFN-LNL (up to 10 MeV/A for A/q = 7), an ECR-based charge breeding technique (ECR-CB) was chosen: in particular the SPES-CB was developed by the LPSC Grenoble on the basis of the Phoenix booster. The SPES-CB will be equipped with a complete test bench, totally integrated with the SPES beam line: in particular, in order to avoid beam contaminations induced by the impurities present inside the SPES-CB, and to have high transmission for a beam of very low intensity, special attention was paid not only to the transport efficiency but also to the resolution of the spectrometer downstream the charge breeder, with the design of a Medium Resolution Mass Spectrometer (MRMS). In the following paper the technical aspects connected with SPES-CB, its beam line and the transport of highly charged radioactive ions will be described.

  2. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  3. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S., E-mail: pandit@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  4. Charge stripping of U238 ion beam by helium gas stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imao, H.; Okuno, H.; Kuboki, H.; Yokouchi, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Kamigaito, O.; Hasebe, H.; Watanabe, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kase, M.; Yano, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a nondestructive, efficient electric-charge-stripping method is a key requirement for next-generation high-intensity heavy-ion accelerators such as the RIKEN Radioactive-Isotope Beam Factory. A charge stripper employing a low-Z gas is an important candidate applicable to high-intensity uranium beams for replacing carbon-foil strippers. In this study, a high-beam-transmission charge-stripping system employing helium gas for U238 beams injected at 10.8MeV/u was developed and demonstrated for the first time. The charge-state evolution measured using helium in a thickness range of 0.24-1.83mg/cm2 is compared with theoretical predictions. Energy attenuation and energy spread due to the helium stripper are also investigated.

  5. Radiation-induced charge transport in polymer electrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labonte, K. (Technische Univ., Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Inst. for Electroacoustics)

    1984-01-01

    Recently, a new physical model has been developed describing the charge dynamics in dielectrics during irradiation. Experimental investigations of the charge transport in polymer electrets were carried out in a modified electron-beam microscope on various materials (FEP, PETP, PVDF). A qualitative comparison of the theoretical results with experimental data shows that, in FEP, electrons are practically immobile, whereas positive charge carriers cause a trap-modulated unipolar hole current. For PETP, analogous results are found except that here the mobility of the electrons dominates. In PVDF, however, both charge carriers must be mobile.

  6. The ReA electron-beam ion trap charge breeder for reacceleration of rare isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Fogleman, J.; Krause, S.; Nash, S.; Rencsok, R.; Tobos, L.; Perdikakis, G.; Portillo, M.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Wittmer, W.; Wu, X.; Bollen, G.; Leitner, D.; Syphers, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 South Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Collaboration: ReA Team

    2013-04-19

    ReA is a post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. ReA is designed to reaccelerate rare isotopes to energies of a few MeV/u following production by projectile fragmentation and thermalization in a gas cell. The facility consists of four main components: an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder, an achromatic charge-over-mass (Q/A) separator, a radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder was specifically designed to efficiently capture continuous beams of singly charged ions injected at low energy (<60 keV), charge breed in less than 50 ms, and extract highly charged ions to the Q/A separator for charge-state selection and reacceleration through the accelerator structures. The use of highly charged ions to reach high beam energies is a key aspect that makes ReA a compact and cost-efficient post-accelerator. The EBIT is characterized by a high-current electron gun, a long multi-electrode trap structure and a dual magnet to provide both the high electron-beam current density necessary for fast charge breeding of short-lived isotopes as well as the high capture probability of injected beams. This paper presents an overview and the status of the ReA EBIT, which has extracted for reacceleration tests stable {sup 20}Ne{sup 8+} ion beams produced from injected gas and more recently {sup 39}K{sup 16+} beams by injecting stable {sup 39,41}K{sup +} ions from an external ion source.

  7. Minimization of the emittance growth of multi-charge particle beams in the charge stripping section of RAON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge stripping section of the Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON), which is one of the critical components to achieve a high power of 400 kW with a short lianc, is a source of transverse emittance growth. The dominant effects are the angular straggling in the charge stripper required to increase the charge state of the beam and chromatic aberrations in the dispersive section required to separate the selected ion beam from the various ion beams produced in the stripper. Since the main source of transverse emittance growth in the stripper is the angular straggling, it can be compensated for by changing the angle of the phase ellipse. Therefore the emittance growth is minimized by optimizing the Twiss parameters at the stripper. The emittance growth in the charge selection section is also minimized by the correction of high-order aberrations using six sextupole magnets. In this paper, we present a method to minimize the transverse emittance growth in the stripper by changing the Twiss parameters and in the charge selection section by using sextupole magnets

  8. EBIS/T charge breeding for intense rare isotope beams at MSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S; Bollen, G; Kester, O; Kittimanapun, K; Lapierre, A [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory NSCL, Michigan State University MSU, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg, 69117 (Germany); Dilling, J; Ames, F [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ahle, L E; Beiersdorfer, P; Marrs, R E [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL, Livermore, CA (United States); Beene, J R; Mendez, A J; Stracener, D W [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lindroos, M; Wenander, F, E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.ed [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Experiments with reaccelerated beams are an essential component of the science program of existing and future rare isotope beam facilities. NSCL is currently constructing ReA3, a reaccelerator for rare isotopes that have been produced by projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission and that have been thermalized in a gas stopper. The resulting low-energy beam will be brought to an Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) in order to obtain highly charged ions at an energy of 12 keV/u. This charge breeder is followed by a compact linear accelerator with a maximum beam energy of 3 MeV/u for {sup 238}U and higher energies for lighter isotopes. Next-generation rare isotope beam facilities like the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams FRIB, but also existing Isotope Separator On-line (ISOL) facilities are expected to provide rare-isotope beam rates in the order of 10{sup 11} particles per second for reacceleration. At present the most promising scheme to efficiently start the reacceleration of these intense beams is the use of a next-generation high-current charge-breeder based on an EBIS/T. MSU has formed a collaboration to develop an EBIT for this purpose. A new high-current EBIS/T breeder will be developed and constructed at MSU, where also first tests on achievable beam rate capability will be performed. The EBIT is planned to be installed at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator facility ISAC at TRIUMF laboratory for on-line tests with rare isotope beams and to provide intense energetic reaccelerated radioactive beams. The status of the ReA3-EBIS/T in the NSCL reaccelerator project is given with a brief summary of results, followed by a discussion of plans for the future high-intensity EBIS/T charge breeder.

  9. Space Charge Neutralization of DEMO Relevant Negative Ion Beams at Low Gas Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of neutral beams to future power plant devices (DEMO) is dependent on achieving significantly improved electrical efficiency and the most promising route to achieving this is by implementing a photoneutralizer in place of the traditional gas neutralizer. A corollary of this innovation would be a significant reduction in the background gas density through which the beam is transported between the accelerator and the neutralizer. This background gas is responsible for the space charge neutralization of the beam, enabling distances of several metres to be traversed without significant beam expansion. This work investigates the sensitivity of a D- beam to reduced levels of space charge compensation for energies from 100 keV to 1.5 MeV, representative of a scaled prototype experiment, commissioning and full energy operation. A beam transport code, following the evolution of the phase space ellipse, is employed to investigate the effect of space charge on the beam optics. This shows that the higher energy beams are insensitive to large degrees of under compensation, unlike the lower energies. The probable degree of compensation at low gas density is then investigated through a simple, two component beam-plasma model that allows the potential to be negative. The degree of under-compensation is dependent on the positive plasma ion energy, one source of which is dissociation of the gas by the beam. The subsequent space charge state of the beam is shown to depend upon the relative times for equilibration of the dissociation energy and ionization by the beam ions.

  10. The ReA electron-beam ion trap charge breeder for reacceleration of rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Fogleman, J.; Krause, S.; Nash, S.; Rencsok, R.; Tobos, L.; Perdikakis, G.; Portillo, M.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Wittmer, W.; Wu, X.; Bollen, G.; Leitner, D.; Syphers, M.; ReA Team

    2013-04-01

    ReA is a post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. ReA is designed to reaccelerate rare isotopes to energies of a few MeV/u following production by projectile fragmentation and thermalization in a gas cell. The facility consists of four main components: an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder, an achromatic charge-over-mass (Q/A) separator, a radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder was specifically designed to efficiently capture continuous beams of singly charged ions injected at low energy (breed in less than 50 ms, and extract highly charged ions to the Q/A separator for charge-state selection and reacceleration through the accelerator structures. The use of highly charged ions to reach high beam energies is a key aspect that makes ReA a compact and cost-efficient post-accelerator. The EBIT is characterized by a high-current electron gun, a long multi-electrode trap structure and a dual magnet to provide both the high electron-beam current density necessary for fast charge breeding of short-lived isotopes as well as the high capture probability of injected beams. This paper presents an overview and the status of the ReA EBIT, which has extracted for reacceleration tests stable 20Ne8+ ion beams produced from injected gas and more recently 39K16+ beams by injecting stable 39,41K+ ions from an external ion source.

  11. Advanced charged particle beam ignited nuclear pulse propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-06-01

    It is shown that the mass of the driver for nuclear microexplosion—Orion type—pulse propulsion can be substantially reduced with a special fusion-fast fission configuration, which permits to replace an inefficient laser beam driver with a much more efficient and less massive relativistic electron beam (or light ion beam) driver. The driver mass can be further reduced, and the propulsion efficiency increased, by surrounding the nuclear microexplosion assembly with a shell of conventional hydrogen-rich explosive, helping to ignite the nuclear reaction and dissipating the otherwise lost kinetic neutron energy in the shell which becomes part of the propellant.

  12. Space charge compensation on the low energy beam transport of Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)733270; Scrivens, Richard; Jesus Castillo, Santos

    Part of the upgrade program in the injector chains of the CERN accelerator complex is the replacement of the the proton accelerator Linac2 for the brand new Linac4 which will accelerate H$^-$ and its main goal is to increase the beam intensity in the next sections of the LHC accelerator chain. The Linac4 is now under commissioning and will use several ion sources to produce high intensity unbunched H$^-$ beams with different properties, and the low energy beam transport (LEBT) is the system in charge of match all these different beams to the Radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). The space charge forces that spread the beam ions apart of each other and cause emittance growth limits the maximum intensity that can be transported in the LEBT, but the space charge of intense unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the generated ions by the impact ionization of the residual gas, which creates a source of secondary particles inside the beam pipe. For negative ion beams, the effect of the beam electric field is to ex...

  13. Charge exchange momentum transfer due to ion beam injection in partially ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time responses of a helium plasma to helium gas puffing without and with helium beam injection in a linear plasma device are experimentally investigated. Increase in the neutral density due to gas puffing is suppressed by ion beam injection. The experimental results show that a momentum transport from the ion beam to the puffed neutral particles occurs due to the charge exchange interaction, suggesting that charge exchange momentum transport is one of the processes responsible for the spatial redistribution of neutral atoms in partially ionized plasmas. (author)

  14. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  15. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  16. Determination of the topological charge of a twisted beam with a Fresnel bi-prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine; Brousseau, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The self-interference pattern of a Laguerre Gaussian beam using a Fresnel bi-prism is shown to be very different from what could be expected from a usual laser beam. It resembles the interference pattern that could be obtained using a double slit experiment. The interferences are shifted and the topological charge and its sign can be readily determined considering the shift order of the pattern only. However, since there is no diffraction nor absorption losses unlike in a double slit interference, such a set up could be used even for low power twisted beams or beams with high topological charge. Even fractional topological charges could be determined with an absolute precision of 0.05.

  17. Demonstration of Cathode Emittance Dominated High Bunch Charge Beams in a DC gun-based Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (greater than or equal to 100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell Energy Recovery Linac Photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittance measured at 9-9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and Free Electron Lasers (FELs).

  18. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9–9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers

  19. Determination of the topological charge of a twisted beam with a Fresnel bi-prism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-interference pattern of a Laguerre Gaussian beam using a Fresnel bi-prism is shown to be very different from what could be expected from a usual laser beam. It resembles the interference pattern that could be obtained using a double slit experiment. The interferences are shifted and the topological charge and its sign can be readily determined considering the shift order of the pattern only. However, since there is no diffraction nor absorption losses unlike in a double slit interference, such a set up could be used even for low power twisted beams or beams with high topological charge. Even fractional topological charges could be determined with an absolute precision of 0.05. (paper)

  20. P.I.A.F.E. project: production of highly charged particles for radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transformation of a mono-charged ion beam into a multicharged ion beam is an important problem in the projects of radioactive beams acceleration. This transformation must be performed with the best possible efficiency and in the shortest possible time to avoid the loss of particles by radioactive degenerescence. A ionization method using an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source is proposed. It consists in the fast capture by the ECR plasma of the radioactive elements injected inside this source in the form of a mono-charged ion beam. This method gives good results (2 to 6% efficiency to move from the 1+ to the 9+ charge state) for the ionization of alkaline elements, rare and metallic gases, with fast times of response allowing the ionization of radioactive products with a lifetime inferior to 1 s. (J.S.)

  1. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nusinovich, G. S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  2. Modeling of direct beam extraction for a high-charge-state fusion driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. A.; Grant Logan, B.

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. We discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1 MV beam of Xe 16+ ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. Our design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from our initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. We conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 A.

  3. Space Charge Studies with High Intensity Single Bunch Beams in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, Hannes; Schmidt, Frank; Titze, Malte

    2016-01-01

    In order to reach the target beam parameters of the LHC injectors upgrade (LIU) project the beam degradation due to losses and emittance growth on the long injection plateau of the SPS needs to be minimized. A detailed study of the dependence of losses, transverse emittance blow-up and transverse beam tail creation as function of the working point is presented here for a high brightness single bunch beam with a vertical space charge tune spread of about 0.2 on the 26 GeV injection plateau. The beam behaviour close to important betatron resonances is characterised and a region in the tune diagram with minimal beam degradation is identified. Implications about the performance for LIU beams are discussed.

  4. Numerical Studies of Electromagnetic Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Startsev, Edward; Lee, Wei-li

    2005-01-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large energy anisotropy, free energy is available to drive transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instabilities. Such slow-wave transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be described by the so-called Darwin model, which neglects the fast-wave portion of the displacement current. The Weibel instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the Weibel instability using the Beam Eigenmode And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  5. Pragmatic development of a laser ion source for intense highly-charged ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, applications of high-charge-state (including fully stripped) heavy-ion beams have been attracting interest in both physics and industry. To enhance their usefulness, more intense beams are required. Cancer therapy using carbon ions is a particularly promising heavy-ion beam application. Due to advances in laser technology, the laser ion source (LIS) has become one of the most popular sources for generating highly charged and intense heavy-ion beams. The project to develop a high-intensity LIS was started on June 2009. In our project, whose ultimate goal is to apply a heavy-ion accelerator for cancer therapy, we have almost completed designing the LIS, and manufacturing will commence soon. We intend to measure the source performance by performing plasma and beam tests up until the end of March 2011. We will report the outline and a progress of the project. (author)

  6. Fluctuation-Induced Interaction between Randomly Charged Dielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Naji, Ali; Dean, David S.; Sarabadani, Jalal; Horgan, Ron R.; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    Monopolar charge disorder effects are studied in the context of fluctuation-induced interactions between neutral dielectric slabs. It is shown that quenched bulk charge disorder gives rise to an additive contribution to the net interaction force which decays as the inverse distance between the slabs and may thus completely mask the standard Casimir--van der Waals force at large separations. By contrast, annealed (bulk or surface) charge disorder leads to a net interaction force whose large-di...

  7. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Unidad PET/CT-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)], E-mail: avilarod@uwalumni.com; Wilson, J.S.; McQuarrie, S.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8 MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired.

  8. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Wilson, J S; McQuarrie, S A

    2009-11-01

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired. PMID:19054679

  9. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A. [SHI Accelerator Service Ltd., 1-17-6 Osaki, Shinagawa, Tokyo 141-0032 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  10. Condition for production of circulating proton beam with intensity greater than space charge limit.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadim Dudnikov

    2002-11-19

    Transverse e-p instability in proton rings could be damped by increasing the beam density and the rate of secondary particles production above the threshold level, with the corresponding decrease of unstable wavelength {lambda} below the transverse beam size h (increase of beam density n{sub b} and ion density n{sub i} above the threshold level: n{sub b} + n{sub i} > {beta}{sup 2}/(r{sub e} h{sup 2}), where r{sub e} = e{sup 2}/mc{sup 2}). Such island of stability can be reached by a fast charge-exchange injection without painting and enhanced generation of secondary plasma, which was demonstrated in a small scale Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. With successful damping of e-p instability, the intensity of circulating proton beam, with a space charge neutralization was increased up to 6 times above a space charge limit. Corresponding tune shift without space charge neutralization should be up to {Delta}v=0.85 x 6 (in the ring with v = 0.85). In this paper, they review experimental observations of transverse instability of proton beams in various rings. they also discuss methods which can be used to damp the instability. Such experimental data could be useful for verification of computer simulation tools developed for the studies of the space charge and instabilities in realistic conditions.

  11. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yushkov, G. Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru; Nikolaev, A. G.; Frolova, V. P. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control System and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  12. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  13. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described

  14. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E; Maceina, T J; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H(-) ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H(-) beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2 (+) ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H(+)). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions. PMID:26932089

  15. Simulations of beam emittance growth from the collectiverelaxation of space-charge nonuniformities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Steven M.; Grote, David P.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-05-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. For unbunched beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in linear focusing channels, Debye screening of self-field interactions tends to make the transverse density profile flat. An injected particle distribution with a large systematic charge nonuniformity will generally be far from an equilibrium of the focusing channel and the initial condition will launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and experience nonlinear interactions which result in an effective relaxation to a more thermal-equilibrium-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This relaxation transfers self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). Here they employ two-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the effects of initial transverse space-charge nonuniformities on the equality of beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in a continuous focusing channel. Results are compared to theoretical bounds of emittance growth developed in previous studies. Consistent with earlier theory, it is found that a high degree of initial distribution nonuniformity can be tolerated with only modest emittance growth and that beam control can be maintained. The simulations also provide information on the rate of relaxation and characteristic levels of fluctuations in the relaxed states. This research suggests that a surprising degree of initial space-charge nonuniformity can be tolerated in practical intense beam experiments.

  16. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  17. The positive charging effect of dielectric films irradiated by a focused electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space charge and surface potential profiles are investigated with numerical simulation for dielectric films of SiO2 positively charged by a focused electron beam. By combining the Monte Carlo method and the finite difference method, the simulation is preformed with a newly developed comprehensive two-dimensional model including electron scattering, charge transport and trapping. Results show that the space charge is distributed positively, like a semi-ellipsoid, within a high-density region of electrons and holes, but negatively outside the region due to electron diffusion along the radial and beam incident directions. Simultaneously, peak positions of the positive and negative space charge densities shift outwards or downwards with electron beam irradiation. The surface potential, along the radial direction, has a nearly flat-top around the center, abruptly decreases to negative values outside the high-density region and finally increases to zero gradually. Influences of electron beam and film parameters on the surface potential profile in the equilibrium state are also shown and analyzed. Furthermore, the variation of secondary electron signal of a large-scale integration sample positively charged in scanning electron microscopic observation is simulated and validated by experiment.

  18. EBIS/T charge breeding for intense rare isotope beams at MSU

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Marrs, R E; Kittimanapun, K; Lapierre, A; Mendez, A J; Ames, F; Beene, J R; Lindroos, M; Ahle, L E; Stracener, D W; Kester, O; Wenander, F; Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Dilling, J; Bollen, G

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with reaccelerated beams are an essential component of the science program of existing and future rare isotope beam facilities. NSCL is currently constructing ReA3, a reaccelerator for rare isotopes that have been produced by projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission and that have been thermalized in a gas stopper. The resulting low-energy beam will be brought to an Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) in order to obtain highly charged ions at an energy of 12 keV/u. This charge breeder is followed by a compact linear accelerator with a maximum beam energy of 3MeV/u for U-238 and higher energies for lighter isotopes. Next-generation rare isotope beam facilities like the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams FRIB, but also existing Isotope Separator On-line (ISOL) facilities are expected to provide rare-isotope beam rates in the order of 10(11) particles per second for reacceleration. At present the most promising scheme to efficiently start the reacceleration of these intense beams is the use of a...

  19. Elastic Beating Pump Using Induced-Charge Electro-osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-10-01

    Pumping a viscous liquid in a confined space is essential in microfluidic systems because the pressure-driven flow rate through small channels decreases with the third or fourth power of the channel size. Hence, inspired by a cilium's pumping ability in a confined space, we propose an elastic beating pump using a hydrodynamic force due to induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) and numerically examine the pumping performance. By the multiphysics coupled simulation technique based on the boundary element method along with the thin double-layer approximation, we find that by selecting the optimum rigidity of the elastic beam, the ICEO elastic beating pump functions effectively at high frequencies with low applied voltages and shows a large average flow velocity with a remarkably large peak velocity that may be useful to flow a liquid with unexpectedly high viscosity. Furthermore, we propose a simple model that explains the characteristics of the time response behavior of the ICEO elastic beating pump tosome extent. By this analysis, we can considerably contribute to developments in studies on the artificial cilia having versatile functions.

  20. Selection of charge methods for lithium ion batteries by considering diffusion induced stress and charge time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo; Song, Yicheng; Zhang, Junqian

    2016-07-01

    This article demonstrates the design of charging strategies for lithium ion batteries with considering the balance between diffusion induced stress and total charge time for two- and three-stage charge methods. For the two-stage galvanostatic-potentiostatic charge method the low mechanical stress can be achieved without increasing total charge time by switching the galvanostatic to the potentiostatic at the time moment when the lithium concentration at the surface of particles reaches the limit cbarsurf = 0 . A three-stage method, which consists of an initial galvanostatic stage of high current, a galvanostatic stage of low current and a potentiostatic ending stage, is suggested. Employing the initial galvanostatic stage of high current is helpful not only in accelerating the charge process, but also in controlling the mechanical stress once the electrical current and time duration of the initial galvanostatic stage are properly designed.

  1. Update on Beam Induced RF Heating in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J; Nosych, A; Nougaret, J; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M; Fassnacht, P; Jakobsen, S; Deile, M

    2013-01-01

    Since June 2011 the rapid increase of the luminosity performance of the LHC has come at the expense of both increased temperature and pressure of specific, near-beam, LHC equipment. In some cases, this beam induced heating has caused delays while equipment cool-down, beam dumps and even degradation of some devices. This contribution gathers the observations of beam induced heating, attributed to longitudinal beam coupling impedance, their current level of understanding and possible actions planned to be implemented during the 1st LHC Long Shutdown (LS1) in 2013-2014.

  2. Light emission from particle beam induced plasma - An overview

    CERN Document Server

    Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    Experiments to study the light emission from plasma produced by particle beams are presented. Fundamental aspects in comparison with discharge plasma formation are discussed. It is shown that the formation of excimer molecules is an important process. This paper summarizes various studies of particle beam induced light emission and presents first results of a direct comparison of light emission induced by electron- and ion beam excitation. Both high energy heavy ion beam and low energy electron beam experiments are described and an overview over applications in the form of light sources, lasers, and ionization devices is given.

  3. Light-Induced Charge Separation and Transfer in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-Hua; LI Qing-Guo; ZHAO You-Yuan; ZHANG Zhong-Bin; OU-YANG Xiao-Ping; GONG Qin-Gan; CHEN Ling-Bing; LI Fu-Ming; LIU Jian; DING Jian-Dong

    2000-01-01

    The photo-voltage signals in bacteriorhodopsin(bR) excited by 1064nm pulse laser are different from those by 532 or 355 nm. It shows that the positive and negative photoelectric signals are produced by the motion of the positive and negative charges, respectively, and more energy is needed for producing the positive charges than the negative. The mechanism of light-induced charge generation and charge transfer in bR was studied and analyzed by measuring the photoelectric signals with different impedance of measuring circuit and different pulse-width of 532 nm laser as pump light.

  4. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source. PMID:26932107

  5. Non-stationary Effects In Space-charge Dominated Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonov, A V; Tarakanov, V P

    2004-01-01

    Problems of non-linear dynamics of space charge dominated electron beams in plane and in coaxial electron guns are discussed from the point of view of non-stationary behaviour of beams. The results of computer simulations of beam formation are presented for several simple plane diode geometries and for the gun with large compression of annular beam. Emphasised is non-stationary behaviour combined with edge and hysteresis effects. Non-stationary effects in crossed electron and magnetic field are considered from the point of view a development of schemes of intense electron beam formation for compact accelerators and RF-devices. The results of computer simulation of beam formation inside coaxial guns are described under condition of secondary self-sustaining emission. Possibilities of electron storage and capture due to transient processes are discussed. Work supported by RFBR under grant 03-02-17301.

  6. Space-charge limiting currents for magnetically focused intense relativistic electron beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian-Qing; Mo Yuan-Long

    2007-01-01

    The self-consistent differential equations, which describe a laminar-flow equilibrium state in a magnetically focused intense relativistic electron beam propagating inside a conducting waveguide, are presented. The canonical angular momentum, Pθ, defined under the conditions at the source, uniquely determines the possible solutions of these equations.By numerically solving these equations, the space-charge limited current and the externally applied magnetic field are obtained in a solid beam and a hollow beam in two cases of Pθ = 0 (magnetically shielded source) and Pθ = const.(immersed source) separately. It is shown that the hollow beam is more beneficial to the propagation of the intense relativistic beam through a drift tube than the solid beam.

  7. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H− magnetron source provides about 100 mA H− beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H− beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H− beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H− beam from optically pumped polarized ion source

  8. Preservation of beam loss induced quenches, beam lifetime and beam loss measurements with the HERAp beam-loss-monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenburg, Kay

    1994-06-01

    The beam-loss-monitors (BLMs) in the HERA-proton-ring (HERAp) must fulfill the following requirements: They have to measure losses sensitive and fast enough to prevent the superconducting magnets from beam loss induced quenching; the dynamic range of the monitors must exceed several decades in order to measure losses during beam lifetimes of hundreds of hours as well as the much stronger losses that may quench superconducting magnets; they have to be insensitive to the synchrotron radiation of the adjacent electron-ring (HERAe); and their radiation hardness must allow a monitor-lifetime of a few years of HERA operation. These requirements are well satisfied by the HERAp-BLM-System.

  9. Polarization-induced surface charges in hydroxyapatite ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, N.; Nakaguki, S.; Wada, N.; Nozaki, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nagai, A.; Katayama, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2014-07-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is a well-known biomaterial that is the main inorganic component of bones and teeth. Control over the surface charge on HAp would be a key advance in the development of the material for tissue engineering. We demonstrate here that surface charge can be induced by an electrical poling process using the Kelvin method. Positive and negative charges were induced on the HAp surface in response to the applied electric field in the poling process. The surface charging is attributed to dipole polarization that is homogeneously distributed in HAp. Additionally, the surface charging is considered to originate from the organization of OH- ions into a polar phase in the structure.

  10. Beam splitter for guided polar molecules with a Y-shaped charged wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2007-06-15

    We propose a beam splitter for cold polar molecules in weak-field-seeking states that uses a Y-shaped charged wire half embedded in a substrate and sandwiched by a charged metallic parallel-plate capacitor. We demonstrate our molecular-beam splitter and study its dynamic beam-splitting process for the guided cold molecules by using Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that cold polar molecules from a supersonic beam source with a mean velocity of a few hundred meters per second can be split with a fixed 0.5/0.5 splitting ratio, and an adjustable splitting ratio of about 0.03-0.97 can be realized by introducing a small alteration to the scheme.

  11. Self-modulation of a relativistic charged-particle beam as thermal matter wave envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-modulation, resulting from its interaction with the surrounding medium, of a relativistic charged-particle beam traveling through an overdense plasma, is investigated theoretically. The description of the transverse nonlinear and collective beam dynamics of an electron (or positron) beam in a plasma-based accelerator is provided in terms of a thermal matter wave envelope propagation. This is done using the quantum-like description provided by the thermal wave model. It is shown that the charged-particle beam dynamics is governed by a Zakharov-type system of equations, comprising a nonlinear Schrödinger equation that is governing the spatiotemporal evolution of the thermal matter wave envelope and a Poisson-like equation for the wake potential that is generated by the bunch itself

  12. Development of low energy ion beam system for space charge compensation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy ion beam system for space charge compensation (SCC) experiments was developed and evaluated. This system was designed for observation of SCC of a positive ion beam with an electron beam. The system consisted of the ion source chamber and the SCC experiment chamber. The ion source chamber was equipped with the compact microwave ion source for low voltage extraction. Ion current at initial position of the analysis chamber was 84 μA at extraction voltage of 500 V, and satisfied a condition to observe the SCC effect clearly. In order to evaluate the SCC, we measured the arrival ion current by supplying thermionic electrons, which were extracted from a tungsten filament driven by ac voltage. As the electron supply, the arrival ion current increased from 40 to 68 μA at the potential of filament of +3 eV which produced the thermionic electron with extremely low energy extracted by space charge of the ion beam

  13. Some fundamental aspects of fluctuations and coherence in charged-particle beams in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual survey and exposition is presented of some fundamental aspects of fluctuations and coherence, as well as the interplay between the two, in coasting charged-particle beams - both continuous and bunched - in storage rings. A detailed study is given of the spectral properties of the incoherent phase-space Schottky fluctuations, their propagation as waves in the beam, and the analytic complex coherent beam electromagnetic response or transfer function. The modification or distortion of these by collective interactions is examined in terms of simple regeneration mechanisms. Collective or coherent forces in the beam-storage-ring system are described by defining suitable impedance functions or propagators, and a brief discussion of the coherent collective modes and their stability is provided, including a general and rigorous description of the Nyquist stability criterion. The nature of the critical fluctuations near an instability threshold is explored. The concept of Landau damping and its connection with phase-mixing within the beam is outlined. The important connection between the incoherent fluctuations and the beam response, namely the Fluctuation-Dissipation relation, is revealed. A brief discussion is given of the information degrees of freedom, and effective temperature of the fluctuation signals. Appendices provide a short resume of some general aspects of various interactions in a charged-particle beam-environment system in a storage ring and a general introduction to kinetic theory as applied to particle beams. (orig.)

  14. Half-plane diffraction of Gaussian beams carrying two vortices of equal charges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He De; Gao Zeng-Hui; Lü Bai-Da

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives explicit expressions for the propagation of Ganssian beams carrying two vortices of equal charges m =±1 diffracted at a half-plane screen,which enables the study of the dynamic evolution of vortices in the diffraction field.It shows that there may be no vortices,a pair or several pairs of vortices of opposite charges m =+l,-1 in the diffraction field.Pair creation,annihilation and motion of vortices may appear upon propagation.The off-axis distance additionally affects the evolutionary behaviour.In the process the total topological charge is equal to zero,which is unequal to that of the vortex beam at the source plane.A comparison with the free-space propagation of two vortices of equal charges and a further extension are made.

  15. PandoraPFA Tests using Overlaid Charged Pion Test Beam Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, O.; CALICE Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The test beam data obtained with CALICE calorimeter prototypes were used to test the PandoraPFA program. The program capability to recover a neutral hadron energy in the vicinity of a charged hadron was studied. The impact of overlapping of two hadron showers on energy resolution was investigated. The dependence of the confusion error on the distance between a 10 GeV neutral hadron and a charged pion was derived for pion energies of 10 and 30 GeV which are representative of a 100 GeV jet. The comparison of these test beam data results with Monte Carlo simulation using GEANT4 physics lists was performed.

  16. Electron-beam-induced conduction in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical conduction in polyethylene induced by the irradiation of the short-pulsed-electron-beam (100 nsec time width) consists of the fast and the slow components. The former is attributed to the carrier transport in the crystalline part and the latter to that in the amorphous part. Logarithmic plot (Scher-Montroll plot) of the slow part of the induced current vs. time gives a knee at time T sub(r), which is thought to be the transit time of the carrier front between electrodes. Simple calculation by the formula μ = L/T sub(r) E gives the apparent slow carrier mobility μ of 5.6 x 10-7 cm2/V.sec and 3.2 x 10-7 cm2/V.sec for the electron and the hole respectively at 343 K under the field E of 1.2 MV/cm for the sample thickness L of 12 μm. These apparent slow carrier mobilities are dependent on both the thickness and the field strength. These behavior are discussed in terms of Scher-Montroll theory on the transport in amorphous substances. The activation energy of the mobility is in good agreement with the apparent trap depth obtained from the TSC measurement. (author)

  17. A stochastic model for the semiclassical collective dynamics of charged beams in particle accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    A recent proposal (see quant-ph/9803068) to simulate semiclassical corrections to classical dynamics by suitable classical stochastic fluctuations is applied to the specific instance of charged beam dynamics in particle accelerators. The resulting picture is that the collective beam dynamics, at the leading semiclassical order in Planck constant can be described by a particular diffusion process, the Nelson process, which is time-reversal invariant. Its diffusion coefficient $\\sqrt{N}\\lambda_...

  18. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Jac A Nickoloff

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilitie...

  19. Tomographic measurement of the phase space distribution of a space-charge-dominated beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    Many applications of accelerators, such as free electron lasers, pulsed neutron sources, and heavy ion fusion, require a good quality beam with high intensity. In practice, the achievable intensity is often limited by the dynamics at the low-energy, space-charge dominated end of the machine. Because low-energy beams can have complex distribution functions, a good understanding of their detailed evolution is needed. To address this issue, we have developed a simple and accurate tomographic method to map the beam phase using quadrupole magnets, which includes the effects from space charge. We extend this technique to use also solenoidal magnets which are commonly used at low energies, especially in photoinjectors, thus making the diagnostic applicable to most machines. We simulate our technique using a particle in cell code (PIC), to ascertain accuracy of the reconstruction. Using this diagnostic we report a number of experiments to study and optimize injection, transport and acceleration of intense space charge dominated beams. We examine phase mixing, by studying the phase-space evolution of an intense beam with a transversely nonuniform initial density distribution. Experimental measurements, theoretical predictions and PIC simulations are in good agreement each other. Finally, we generate a parabolic beam pulse to model those beams from photoinjectors, and combine tomography with fast imaging techniques to investigate the time-sliced parameters of beam current, size, energy spread and transverse emittance. We found significant differences between the slice emittance profiles and slice orientation as the beam propagates downstream. The combined effect of longitudinal nonuniform profiles and fast imaging of the transverse phase space provided us with information about correlations between longitudinal and transverse dynamics that we report within this dissertation.

  20. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  1. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  2. Radiative and collisional processes of highly charged heavy ions studied with electron beam ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying radiative and collisional processes of highly charged heavy ions using two electron beam ion traps (EBITs) at the University of Electro-Communications (UEC/Tokyo); one is the Tokyo-EBIT constructed in 1995 for the operation with a high energy (up to 200 keV) electron beam, and another is “CoBIT” constructed recently for the operation with a low energy (< 1 keV) electron beam. Recent activities using the two EBITs are presented. (author)

  3. Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2012-03-15

    Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique. (orig.)

  4. Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Imazu, Y; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2012-01-01

    Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique.

  5. Linear induction accelerator for charge-neutralized ion beams in inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batishchev, O.V.; Golota, V.I.; Karas, V.I.; Kiyashko, V.A.; Kornilov, E.A.; Sigov, Yu.S.; Silaev, I.I.; Fainberg, Ya.B. [Khar`kov Physico-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    1993-05-01

    Results are presented from experimental, analytical, and numerical studies of the physical processes that occur in a high-current ion induction accelerator (the ion linac IINDUS). The experiments were performed in a module of the IINDUS accelerator consisting of an injector of gaseous or metallic ions and two induction sections with magnetically insulated cusps in the accelerator gaps filled with plasma. The following ion beam parameters were found: 2-3 kA, 0.5 MeV, 0.5 {mu}s. The two most dangerous instabilities effecting beam quality were studied. These are the high-frequency beam-plasma instability and the filamentation instability. A nonlinear analytical theory of charge neutralization of a high-current ion beam in magnetically insulated accelerating gaps is presented. In order to develop diagnostics for high-current beams of accelerated particles the amplitude and shape of the acoustic pulse excited in a metal target by the particles have been studied theoretically and experimentally as functions of the beam parameters. The possibility of practical application of this acceleration in ICF has been studied using a 2.5-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic code to simulate the processes of acceleration, charge neutralization, and stability of the ion beam in the accelerating channel. The results provide evidence in favor of the prospects for this direction of research. 70 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Production of highly charged argon ions from a room temperature electron beam ion trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tie-Shan; PENG Hai-Bo; Ovsyannikov V P; Kentsch U; Ullmann F; CHENG Rui; Zschornack G

    2008-01-01

    In this work.highly charged ions have been extracted from the advanced Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS-A) developed in a scientific cooperation between the Dresden University of Technology and the DREEBIT GmbH Dresden.The charge state distributions of ions extracted from the EBIS-A are measured in and extracted in the leaky mode.3×105 Ar18+ ions per pulse are extracted in the pulse mode.The ion charge state distribution is a function of the ionization time.

  7. Analysis of the topological charge of vortex beams using a hole wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine; Viaris de Lesegno, Bruno; Pruvost, Laurence; Brousseau, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The measurement of the topological charge of a vortex beam is demonstrated using the diffraction pattern produced by hole wheel. The resulting mandala-like interference pattern depends on the number of holes relatively to the topological charge. The interference at the centre of the pattern —bright or dark—enables us to determine the topological charge in a procedure when hole wheels with different number of holes are applied. This method is direct and wavelength independent. It does not require any image analysis and could find applications in classical telecommunications or quantum optics using twisted light.

  8. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L., E-mail: sunlt@impcas.ac.cn; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Qian, C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Fang, X. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-02-15

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling laws of microwave frequency effect. However, compared to the microwave power heating efficiency at 18 GHz, 24 GHz microwave heating does not show the ω{sup 2} scale at the same power level, which indicates that microwave power coupling at gyrotron frequency needs better understanding. In this paper, after a review of the operation status of SECRAL with regard to the beam availability and stability, the recent study of the extracted ion beam transverse coupling issues will be discussed, and the test results of the both TE{sub 01} and HE{sub 11} modes will be presented. A general comparison of the performance working with the two injection modes will be given, and a preliminary analysis will be introduced. The latest results of the production of very intense highly charged ion beams, such as 1.42 emA Ar{sup 12+}, 0.92 emA Xe{sup 27+}, and so on, will be presented.

  9. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Yang, Y.; Qian, C.; Fang, X.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling laws of microwave frequency effect. However, compared to the microwave power heating efficiency at 18 GHz, 24 GHz microwave heating does not show the ω2 scale at the same power level, which indicates that microwave power coupling at gyrotron frequency needs better understanding. In this paper, after a review of the operation status of SECRAL with regard to the beam availability and stability, the recent study of the extracted ion beam transverse coupling issues will be discussed, and the test results of the both TE01 and HE11 modes will be presented. A general comparison of the performance working with the two injection modes will be given, and a preliminary analysis will be introduced. The latest results of the production of very intense highly charged ion beams, such as 1.42 emA Ar12+, 0.92 emA Xe27+, and so on, will be presented.

  10. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling laws of microwave frequency effect. However, compared to the microwave power heating efficiency at 18 GHz, 24 GHz microwave heating does not show the ω2 scale at the same power level, which indicates that microwave power coupling at gyrotron frequency needs better understanding. In this paper, after a review of the operation status of SECRAL with regard to the beam availability and stability, the recent study of the extracted ion beam transverse coupling issues will be discussed, and the test results of the both TE01 and HE11 modes will be presented. A general comparison of the performance working with the two injection modes will be given, and a preliminary analysis will be introduced. The latest results of the production of very intense highly charged ion beams, such as 1.42 emA Ar12+, 0.92 emA Xe27+, and so on, will be presented

  11. Electron beam induced modification of grafted polyamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that irradiation, when applied on its own or in combination with other physical and chemical treatments, can manifest in radiation damage to materials. Radiation processing technology focuses upon producing favourable modification of materials through use of relatively high dose and dose rates. Current interest is in modifying the thermal and electrical properties of textured polymers in an effort to improve safety and wear comfort of clothing. No less important is the production of textiles which are safe to use, both in homes and offices. Present investigations provide additional data in support of findings which show that polyamides, a particular class of textured polymer, are amenable to radiation processing. Accelerated electron beam irradiation of sheets of polyamide fibre results in induced grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acids. The degree of grafting is critically dependent upon irradiation dose and the extent of monomers dilution. Of particular importance is the high correlation which is found between degree of grafting and a decrease in the softening rate of the modified polyamide. A systematic modification of electrical conductivity is also observed. (author)

  12. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  13. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun; Ling, D. C.; Li, L. J.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  14. Analysis of the dynamic behavior of an intense charged particle beam using the semigroup approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, M. A.

    1985-05-01

    Dynamic models of a charged particle beam subject to external electromagnetic fields are cast into the abstract Cauchy problem form. Various applications of intense charged particle beams, i.e., beams whose self electromagnetic fields are significant, might require, or be enhanced by, the use of dynamic control constructed from suitably processed measurements of the state of the beam. This research provides a mathematical foundation for future engineering development of estimation and control designs for such beams. Beginning with the Vlasov equation, successively simpler models of intense beams are presented, along with their corresponding assumptions. Expression of a model in abstract Cauchy problem form is useful in determining whether the model is well posed. Solutions of well-posed problems can be expressed in terms of a one-parameter semigroup of linear operators. (The state transition matrix for a system of linear, ordinary, first-order, constant coefficient differential equations is a special case of such a semigroup.) The semigroup point of view allows the application of the rapidly maturing modern control theory of infinite-dimensional systems. An appropriate underlying Banach space is identified for a simple, but non-trivial, single degree of freedom model (the electrostatic approximation model), and the associated one-parameter semigroup of linear operators is characterized.

  15. Analysis of the dynamic behavior of an intense charged particle beam using the semigroup approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic models of a charged particle beam subject to external electromagnetic fields are cast into the abstract Cauchy problem form. Various applications of intense charged particle beams, i.e., beams whose self electromagnetic fields are significant, might require, or be enhanced by, the use of dynamic control constructed from suitably processed measurements of the state of the beam. This research provides a mathematical foundation for future engineering development of estimation and control designs for such beams. Beginning with the Vlasov equation, successively simpler models of intense beams are presented, along with their corresponding assumptions. Expression of a model in abstract Cauchy problem form is useful in determining whether the model is well posed. Solutions of well-posed problems can be expressed in terms of a one-parameter semigroup of linear operators. The semigroup point of view allows the application of the rapidly maturing modern control theory of infinite dimensional system. An appropriate underlying Banach space is identified for a simple, but nontrivial, single degree of freedom model (the electrostatic approximation model), and the associated one-parameter semigroup of linear operators is characterized

  16. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y., E-mail: yangyao@impcas.ac.cn; Lu, W.; Fang, X. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  17. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Hu, Q; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper. PMID:24593453

  18. Nonlinear delta f Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hong Qi

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, ...

  19. Approximate longitudinal space charge impedances of a round beam between parallel plates and inside a rectangular chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingjie, E-mail: liyingji@msu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wang, Lanfa [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the approximate analytical solutions to the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances of a round beam with uniform transverse distribution and sinusoidal line density modulations under two boundary conditions: (a) between parallel plates (b) inside a rectangular chamber, respectively. When the ratio of beam diameter to chamber height is small, the image charge fields of the round beam can be approximated by those of a line charge, the approximate analytical LSC impedances can be obtained by image method. The derived theoretical LSC impedances are valid at any perturbation wavelength and are consistent well with the numerical simulation results in a large range of ratios of beam diameters to chamber heights.

  20. Stochastic collective dynamics of charged-particle beams in the stability regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, N C; De Martino, S; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a description of the collective transverse dynamics of charged (proton) beams in the stability regime by suitable classical stochastic fluctuations. In this scheme, the collective beam dynamics is described by time-reversal invariant diffusion processes deduced by stochastic variational principles (Nelson processes). By general arguments, we show that the diffusion coefficient, expressed in units of length, is given by lambda(c)sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles in the beam and lambda(c) the Compton wavelength of a single constituent. This diffusion coefficient represents an effective unit of beam emittance. The hydrodynamic equations of the stochastic dynamics can be easily recast in the form of a Schrödinger equation, with the unit of emittance replacing the Planck action constant. This fact provides a natural connection to the so-called "quantum-like approaches" to beam dynamics. The transition probabilities associated to Nelson processes can be exploited to model evolutions suitable to control the transverse beam dynamics. In particular we show how to control, in the quadrupole approximation to the beam-field interaction, both the focusing and the transverse oscillations of the beam, either together or independently. PMID:11304370

  1. Systematic study of individual charge-changing cross sections of intermediate-energy secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Precision total and partial charge-changing cross section measurements of medium-mass nuclides were performed. • Systematic reaction data of intermediate-energy heavy-ion beams were obtained. • A significant odd-even effect is found in the partial charge-changing cross sections. -- Abstract: Charge-changing interactions of stable and unstable medium-mass nuclides have been systematically investigated at intermediate energies. Secondary beams ranging from Ar to Ge isotopes produced by projectile fragmentation of 56Fe and 70Ge were irradiated onto a carbon target, and their total and partial charge-changing cross sections were precisely measured. A clear odd–even effect found in the partial charge-changing cross sections monotonically varies as a function of the Z/N ratio among the isotopes, and grows toward the neutron-deficient side. The total charge-changing cross sections are sensitive to the Z number of nuclides, and tend to gradually increase toward the neutron-deficient side in some isotopes

  2. Soft beams: When capillarity induces axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukirch, S.; Antkowiak, A.; Marigo, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition to the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet, we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfies the classical Young-Dupré relation.

  3. Analysis of the longitudinal space charge impedance of a round uniform beam inside parallel plates and rectangular chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lanfa

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances of a round uniform beam inside a rectangular and parallel plate chamber using image charge method. The analysis is valid for arbitrary wavelengths and the calculation converges fast. The research shows that only a few of image beams are needed to get a relative error less than 0.1%. The beam offset effect is also included.

  4. Beam Charge Measurement for the g2p/GEp experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Pengjia

    2016-01-01

    The g2p/GEp experiments used a solid NH3 polarized target, where the polarization of the target is sensitive to temperature and radiation. The beam current was limited to 5-100 nA during the experiment to avoid too much depolarization of target (The typical Hall A running condition for beam current is 1 uA to 100 uA). The measured charge was further used to get the accurate physics cross sections. New BCM (Beam Current Monitor) receivers and a DAQ system were used to measure the beam current at such a low current range. A tungsten calorimeter was used to calibrate the BCMs. This technical note summarizes the calibration procedure and the performance of the BCMs.

  5. Beam emittance growth in a proton storage ring employing charge exchange injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it has been shown that very large currents can be accumulated in medium energy proton storage rings by multiturn injection of an H- beam through a charge stripping medium. Since the particles are injected continuously into the same phase space, it is possible to increase the circulating beam brightness with respect to that of the incoming beam by a large factor. The stored protons pass repeatedly through the stripper, however, so that this phase space is gradually enlarged by scattering. The dependence of the circulating beam phase space (emittance) growth rate on the nature of the scattering process and on where it occurs in the storage ring matrix is considered. Since the motivation for this work arose in connection with the design of the proposed high-current storage ring at LAMPF, the results are focused on the specific parameters of that device. (U.S.)

  6. Charge-stripping system for 238U ion beam with recirculating He gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in a charge-stripping system employing high-flow rate He gas circulation (∼200 L/min) for 238U35+ beams injected at 10.8 MeV/u are reported. He gas is confined in a target section and is separated from a vacuum duct using five-stage differentially-pumped sections. To minimize the gas leakage rate via beam apertures, a high-performance differential pumping was required. To avoid huge gas consumption, a clean gas recycling with high-flow rate was simultaneously required. To realize these, we developed multi-stage mechanical booster pump array. The recycling rate of He gas was achieved as more than 99 %. The system performance has been checked with the present maximum beam current up to 13 eμA (∼1 kW beam power). (author)

  7. A stochastic model for the semiclassical collective dynamics of charged beams in particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    De Martino, S; Illuminati, F; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    A recent proposal (see quant-ph/9803068) to simulate semiclassical corrections to classical dynamics by suitable classical stochastic fluctuations is applied to the specific instance of charged beam dynamics in particle accelerators. The resulting picture is that the collective beam dynamics, at the leading semiclassical order in Planck constant can be described by a particular diffusion process, the Nelson process, which is time-reversal invariant. Its diffusion coefficient $\\sqrt{N}\\lambda_{c}$ represents a semiclassical unit of emittance (here $N$ is the number of particles in the beam, and $\\lambda_{c}$ is the Compton wavelength). The stochastic dynamics of the Nelson type can be easily recast in the form of a Schroedinger equation, with the semiclassical unit of emittance replacing Planck constant. Therefore we provide a physical foundation to the several quantum-like models of beam dynamics proposed in recent years. We also briefly touch upon applications of the Nelson and Schroedinger formalisms to inc...

  8. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm structure

  9. Image-induced overcharging in the weakly charged surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Electrostatic interactions at dielectric boundaries can bring about novel properties which are vital not only to understand the complex behavior at biological interfaces but also to design desirable interfacial processes for a broad variety of practical applications. Here, we aim to provide comprehensive information by Monte Carlo simulations about the annihilation and formation of the image-induced overcharging effect, a new class of charge accumulation phenomena resulting from an excess of adsorbed ions on the like-charged surfaces. It is observed that whether the image-charge interactions are repulsive or attractive, the buildup of overcharging depends critically on both the concentration and the charge-asymmetry of electrolytes. On the other hand, overcharging is gradually cancelled with an increase in the size of ions and the concentration of monovalent salt as well as in the magnitude of surface charge density. Also, our simulations show that the image-induced overcharging effect cannot promote charge reversal. These findings are especially relevant to colloidal stability and dispersibility, and will hopefully serve as a foundation for the development of adequate theories.

  10. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Maas, D.; Sadeghian, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope(AFM) probes by He+beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the fina

  11. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Veldhoven, E. van; Maas, D.J.; Sadeghian Marnani, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope (AFM) probes by He+ beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+ beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the f

  12. Electron beam induced oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam currents of a few nanoamperes, currently used in nanometer scale scanning Auger/electron microscopy, induces severe oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces at room temperature. Auger peak-to-peak oxygen curves for Al–Mg surfaces support the hypothesis that the electron beam creates additiona

  13. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  14. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements done with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90$\\degree$ with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight has been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time of flight in...

  15. Nonlinear δf Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, et al., in Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, 2001 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 688.] at the Los Alamos National Laboratory agree well with experimental observations. Large-scale parallel simulations have also been carried out for the ion-electron two-stream instability in the very-high-intensity heavy ion beams envisioned for heavy ion fusion applications. In both cases, the simulation results indicate that the dominant two-stream instability has a dipole-mode (hose-like) structure and can be stabilized by a modest axial momentum spread of the beam particles

  16. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  17. Gate currents and space charge in silicon dioxide under exposure to an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akulov, A.F.; Gurtov, V.A.; Nazarov, A.I.; Ogurtsov, O.F.

    1987-03-01

    The authors obtain information on the physical processes occurring in subgate dielectrics during radiation and field effects. The electron beam used on the MIS was strictly localized. The results show that the magnitude and kinetics of bulk charge accumulation do not depend on the type of ionizing radiation (electron or x-ray), or its energy and power in the range in question, but rather are determined only by the absorbed dose. The gate current during electron irradiation with small magnitude of accumulated charge is caused by nonequilibrium carriers generated by the irradiation in the SiO/sub 2/. Relaxation of the current as the charge accumulates is caused by decrease in the average field in the silicon dioxide bulk. At large magnitudes of the bulk charge, there appears an injection component of the electron current of thermalized carriers from the silicon through the Si-SiO/sub 2/ boundary by the Fowler-Nordheim mechanism

  18. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  19. Space charge effects and induced signals in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian; Schnizer, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Using special integral representations of the solution for the static electric field of a point charge in a three layer geometry with different permittivities, we calculate the effect of the space charge on the avalanche in the gas gap of an RPC. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation was developed which allows calculation of the actual charge spectrum. Results of this simulation are presented, using the example of a trigger-RPC with 2 mm gas gap, similar to the ones used by ATLAS (ATLAS TDR 10, CERN-LHCC-97-22), and a timing RPC with 300 mum gas gap (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 449 (2000) 295). Finally, we also present analytic solutions for the weighting field of an RPC readout strip, which allow to calculate the directly induced crosstalk and induced signals.

  20. Commissioning results of the ReA EBIT charge breeder at the NSCL: First reacceleration of stable-isotope beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapierre, A., E-mail: lapierre@nscl.msu.edu; Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Barquest, B.; Berryman, E.; Cooper, K.; Fogleman, J.; Krause, S.; Kwarsick, J.; Nash, S.; Perdikakis, G.; Portillo, M.; Rencsok, R.; Skutt, D.; Steiner, M.; Tobos, L.; Wittmer, W.; Bollen, G.; and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Latest results with the electron-beam ion trap of the ReA post-accelerator at the NSCL. • First reacceleration of stable-isotope beams. • First injection of stable-isotope beams from the NSCL’s beam stopping vault. -- Abstract: ReA is a reaccelerator of rare-isotope beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). The rare isotopes are produced by fast projectile fragmentation. After production, they are separated in-flight and thermalized in a He gas “catcher” cell before being sent to ReA for reacceleration to a few MeV/u. One of its main components is an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) employed to convert injected singly charged ions to highly charged ions prior to injection into linear-accelerator structures. The ReA EBIT features a high-current electron gun, a long trap structure, and a two-field superconducting magnet to provide both the high electron-beam current density needed for fast charge breeding and high capture probability of injected beams. This paper presents recent commissioning results. In particular, {sup 39}K{sup +} ions have been injected, charge bred to {sup 39}K{sup 16+} and extracted for reacceleration up to 60 MeV. First charge-breeding results of beams injected from a commissioning Rb ion source in the NSCL’s beam “stopping” vault are also presented.

  1. Fast Poisson Solvers for Self-Consistent Beam-Beam and Space-Charge Field Computation in Multiparticle Tracking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    We present two different approaches to solve the 2-dimensional electrostatic problem with open boundary conditions to be used in fast tracking codes for beam-beam and space charge simulations in high energy accelerators. We compare a fast multipoles method with a hybrid Poisson solver based on the fast Fourier transform and finite differences in polar coordinates. We show that the latter outperforms the first in terms of execution time and precision, allowing for a reduction of the noise in the tracking simulation. Furthermore the new algorithm is shown to scale linearly on parallel architectures with shared memory. We conclude by effectively replacing the HFMM by the new Poisson solver in the COMBI code.

  2. Charged and Neutral Current Neutrino Induced Nucleon Emission Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Vacas, M J V

    2006-01-01

    By means of a Monte Carlo cascade method, to account for the rescattering of the outgoing nucleon, we study the charged and neutral current inclusive one nucleon knockout reactions off nuclei induced by neutrinos. The nucleon emission process studied here is a clear signal for neutral--current neutrino driven reactions, and can be used in the analysis of future neutrino experiments.

  3. The Beam-Charge Azimuthal Asymmetry and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Pickert, N; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Sommer, W; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Volmer, J; Wang, S; Wendland, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of an azimuthal cross--section asymmetry with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam is reported from a study of hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam scattered off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe--Heitler process and the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. The interference term is sensitive to DVCS amplitudes, which provide the most direct access to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  4. Computer modeling of beam space charge effects in cyclotron injector into JINR phasotron

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinichenko, V V

    2002-01-01

    Charge particle beam dynamics including space charge by direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method was simulated. For this purpose in MATLAB a new code KASKADS was developed. Numerical simulations of the particle motion confirm that it is possible to achieve separated orbits in a 5 MeV, 30 mA separated sector cyclotron (accelerating voltage varies depending on radius from 150 kV in the centre to 240 kV in the extraction region). The aperture of the accelerator must be greater than 3 cm.

  5. Production of a high energy beam of multiply charged Cn+60 ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time fullerene ions have been accelerated to high energy (14-50 MeV). Negative ions of C-60 were produced in the ion source with a Cs gun and injected into the tandem accelerator. The change of charge from negative to positive was achieved in a N2 gas cell at the high voltage terminal before the second acceleration. To identify the accelerated molecular ions, the injected beam was pulsed, and time of flight measurements were performed. Unambiguous mass and charge assignments were obtained

  6. Charge equilibrium of a laser-generated carbon-ion beam in warm dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ion carbon beams generated by high intensity short pulse lasers we perform measurements of single shot mean charge equilibration in cold or isochorically heated solid density aluminum matter. We demonstrate that plasma effects in such matter heated up to 1 eV do not significantly impact the equilibration of carbon ions with energies 0.045-0.5 MeV/nucleon. Furthermore, these measurements allow for a first evaluation of semiempirical formulas or ab initio models that are being used to predict the mean of the equilibrium charge state distribution for light ions passing through warm dense matter. (authors)

  7. Setup of an ion-beam facility for the nanostructuration of 2D materials with highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the interaction of highly charged ions with surfaces. When an ion approaches a surface, its potential energy is deposited into the surface via a cascade of electronic processes. A strong electronic excitation of the surface results, which is localized in a nanometer sized region. As a consequence of further mechanisms, this excitation may lead to nanostructures being of topographic, structural or chemical modifications of the material. During this work, a setup of a complete ion beamline was constructed. The beamline offers production, focussing and charge separation of ion beams as well as irradiations of surfaces with highly charged ions. Additionally, new methods for beam profile and particle density analysis via Raman microscopy on graphene are presented. Experimental results of highly charged ions impinging on 2D materials provide the second part of this work. Ion induced nanostructures on lamellar materials, i.e. MoS2 as well as single layers of graphene, could be identified and analyzed. Each of them were triggered by the potential energy of the ions. Processes of the ion surface interaction could be deduced qualitatively from the data. Local regions of enhanced friction on graphene could be detected by Friction Force Microscopy after irradiations. Thresholds for defect creation were established regarding the potential energy, which depend strongly on the kinetic energy of the ions. In terms of the over the barrier model, this dependency could be related to the time of flight the ion spends above the surface. Defects on irradiated graphene as well as on free standing graphene were analyzed via Raman microscopy. Possible dependencies of the defect diameters and nature on the layer number as well as on the presence of a substrate were proved. It was shown, that graphene becomes locally hydrogenated by the impact of highly charged ions. Such a chemical modification leads to an enhanced friction as well as to an appearance of defect modes in

  8. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  9. PATH: a lumped-element beam-transport simulation program with space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PATH is a group of computer programs for simulating charged-particle beam-transport systems. It was developed for evaluating the effects of some aberrations without a time-consuming integration of trajectories through the system. The beam-transport portion of PATH is derived from the well-known program, DECAY TURTLE. PATH contains all features available in DECAY TURTLE (including the input format) plus additional features such as a more flexible random-ray generator, longitudinal phase space, some additional beamline elements, and space-charge routines. One of the programs also provides a simulation of an Alvarez linear accelerator. The programs, originally written for a CDC 7600 computer system, also are available on a VAX-VMS system. All of the programs are interactive with input prompting for ease of use

  10. Ion beam induced stress formation and relaxation in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T., E-mail: Tobias.Steinbach@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Reupert, A.; Schmidt, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Ion irradiation of crystalline solids leads not only to defect formation and amorphization but also to mechanical stress. In the past, many investigations in various materials were performed focusing on the ion beam induced damage formation but only several experiments were done to investigate the ion beam induced stress evolution. Especially in microelectronic devices, mechanical stress leads to several unwanted effects like cracking and peeling of surface layers as well as changing physical properties and anomalous diffusion of dopants. To study the stress formation and relaxation process in semiconductors, crystalline and amorphous germanium samples were irradiated with 3 MeV iodine ions at different ion fluence rates. The irradiation induced stress evolution was measured in situ with a laser reflection technique as a function of ion fluence, whereas the damage formation was investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The investigations show that mechanical stress builds up at low ion fluences as a direct consequence of ion beam induced point defect formation. However, further ion irradiation causes a stress relaxation which is attributed to the accumulation of point defects and therefore the creation of amorphous regions. A constant stress state is reached at high ion fluences if a homogeneous amorphous surface layer was formed and no further ion beam induced phase transition took place. Based on the results, we can conclude that the ion beam induced stress evolution seems to be mainly dominated by the creation and accumulation of irradiation induced structural modification.

  11. Ultra-fast detection of relativistic charged particle beam bunches using optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikas, Dimitrios S.

    The use of light as a carrier of information has been the subject of discussion for many scientific papers. This approach has some unique features which distinguish it from conventional electronics. These are realized in applications like telecommunications where the use of optical fibers and Electro-Optic sampling is the industry standard. Electro-Optic sampling employs the "Pockels" or "Electro-Optic" effect. Pockels discovered that an electric field applied to some crystals changes the birefringence properties of the crystal, and hence the polarization of light that propagates through it. By placing the crystal between crossed polarizers, the transmitted light intensity changes as a function of the applied field. We made the first Electro-Optical (EO) detection of a relativistic charged particle beam, applying its Lorentz contracted electric field on an EO LiNbO 3 crystal. The resulted intensity modulation was initially reconstructed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The signal rise time was bandwidth limited (˜90ps) from the electronics used and a series of tests to establish our signal EO nature was performed. In particular, the amplitude of the EO modulation was found to increase linearly with the charge of the particle beam and decrease with the optical beam path distance from the charged particle beam. Also the signal polarity changed sign when the direction of the applied electric field was reversed. Next an optimized (for maximum modulation), zero bias, EO modulator was constructed for use with the limited dynamic range of the Streak Camera for the first non destructive, completely optical, detection of a charged particle beam. The observed signal may be an image of unexpected piezoelectrically generated sound waves that propagate at the X-axis of the LiNbO3 crystal. In such a case, sound waves generated in the surface as well as inside the crystal, change the index of refraction of the crystal through the photoelastic effect and as a

  12. Gaussian Wave formalism model for propagation of charged-particle beam through a first-order optical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Bao-Xin

    2006-01-01

    An elliptical Gaussian wave formalism model of a charged-particle beam is proposed by analogy with an elliptical Gaussian light beam.In the paraxial approximation.the charged-particle beam can be described as a whole by a complex radius of curvature in the real space domains.Therefore,the propagation and transform of charged-particle beam passing through a first-order optical system is represented by the ABCD-like law.As an example of the application of this model,the relation between the beam waist and the minimum beam spot at a fixed target is discussed.The result.well matches that from conventional phase space model,and proves that the Gaussian wave formalism model is highly effective and reasonable.

  13. Characterisation of Medipix3 Silicon Detectors in a Charged-Particle Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho Akiba, Kazu; Aoude, Jadallah; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Buytaert, Jan; Collins, Paula; Dosil Suarez, Alvaro; Dumps, Raphael; Gallas Torreira, Abraham Antonio; Hombach, Christoph; Hynds, Daniel; John, Malcolm; Leflat, Alexander; Li, Yiming; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Plackett, Richard; Reid, M; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Schindler, Heinrich; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Vazquez Sierra, Carlos; Velthuis, Johannes; Wysokinski, Michal Adam

    2016-01-01

    While designed primarily for X-ray imaging applications, the Medipix3 ASIC can also be used for charged-particle tracking. In this work, results from a beam test at the CERN SPS with irradiated and non-irradiated sensors are presented and shown to be in agreement with simulation, demonstrating the suitability of the Medipix3 ASIC as a tool for characterising pixel sensors.

  14. Dispersion Matching of a Space Charge dominated Beam at Injection into the CERN PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Hanke, Klaus; Scrivens, Richard

    2005-01-01

    In order to match the dispersion at injection into the CERN PS Booster, the optics of the injection line was simulated using two different codes (MAD and TRACE). The simulations were benchmarked versus experimental results. The model of the line was then used to re-match the dispersion. Experimental results are presented for different optics of the line. Measurements with varying beam current show the independence of the measured quantity of space-charge effects.

  15. Charged current disappearance measurements in the NuMI off-axis beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. H. Bernstein

    2003-09-25

    This article studies the potential of combining charged-current disappearance measurements of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} from MINOS and an off-axis beam. The author finds that the error on {Delta}m{sup 2} from a 100 kt-yr off-axis measurement is a few percent of itself. Further, the author found little improvement to an off-axis measurement by combining it with MINOS.

  16. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  17. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraide, Katsuki; /Kyoto U.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub x} oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance ({nu}{sub {mu}}N {yields} {mu}{sup -} N{pi}{sup +}) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus ({nu}{sub {mu}}A {yields} {mu}{sup -} A{pi}{sup +}), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, {nu}{sub {mu}} {sup 12}C {yields} {mu}{sup -12}C{pi}{sup +}, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 10{sup 20} protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio of charged

  18. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraide, Katsuki [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for vμ → vx oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance (vμN → μ-+) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus (vμA → μ-+), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, vμ 12C → μ-12+, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 1020 protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 1020 protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio

  19. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raparia, D., E-mail: raparia@bnl.gov; Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11786 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The H{sup −} magnetron source provides about 100 mA H{sup −} beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H{sup −} beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H{sup −} beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H{sup −} beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  20. Beam dynamics in a rebunching CH cavity with high space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Malte; Heilmann, Manuel; Meusel, Oliver; Noll, Daniel; Podlech, Holger; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Seibel, Anja [Institute for Applied Physics, Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will provide ultra short neutron pulses at high intensities and repetition rates. The facility is under construction with expected first beam in 2013. It will allow research on nucleosynthesis of elements in stars by the s-process as well as on neutron capture cross sections for activation experiments providing knowledge gain on transmutation of radioactive waste and fusion reactor materials. The 5-gap CH rebuncher is installed behind a coupled RFQ/IH-DTL combination and completes the LINAC section. It will be used for varying the output energy between 1.8 and 2.2 MeV as well as for focusing the proton beam bunch longitudinally to compensate the huge space charge forces at high currents up to 200 mA. Therefore beam dynamics and beam transport performance research on this CH cavity is under progress. It includes benchmarking of different beam dynamic codes like LORASR, TraceWin and a new particle-in-cell tracking code for non-relativistic beams currently under development at IAP as well as validation of the results by measurements. Furthermore, this CH rebuncher serves as prototype for CH cavity operation at MYRRHA (Mol, Belgium), an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for transmutation of high level nuclear waste.

  1. Recent developments in high charge state heavy ion beams at the LBL 88-inch cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in design and operation of the internal PIG sources at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron have led to the development of high charge state (0.4 less than or equal to Q/A less than or equal to 0.5) heavy ion beams between lithium and neon with energies 20 less than or equal to E/A/ less than or equal to 32 MeV per nucleon, including fully stripped ions up to 16O8+. Total external intensities of these beams range from 1012 particles/s for 6Li3+ to 0.1 particles/s for 16O8+. Techniques have been developed for routine tune-out of the low intensity beams. These include use of model beams and reliance on the large systematic data base of cyclotron parameters which has been developed over many years of operation. Techniques for delivery of these weak beams to the experimental target areas are presented. Source design and operation, including special problems associated with Li, Be and B beams, are discussed

  2. Laser photoionization of H0 beams for charge-changing injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-step charge-changing injection used in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) requires stripping of H- to H0 by high magnetic fields and subsequent stripping of H0 to H+ by a carbon foil. The authors consider single- and multiphoton laser ionization as alternatives to using a fragile foil. The multiphoton case is of possible interest for selection of practical lasers, which tend to have increased power output at higher wavelengths. The formulas derived express the necessary laser powers for ionization of monoenergetic H0 beams; they also hold for beams of particles other than atomic hydrogen. The numerical examples given are for the 800-MeV PSR beam with momentum spread taken into account. Additionally, they discuss selective stripping as an implication of the inherent energy selectivity of the photoionization process

  3. Laser photoionization of H0 beams for charge-changing injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-step charge-changing injection used in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) requires stripping of H- to H0 by high magnetic fields and subsequent stripping of H0 to H+ by a carbon foil. We consider single- and multiphoton laser ionization as alternatives to using a fragile foil. The multiphoton case is of possible interest for selection of practical lasers, which tend to have increased power output at higher wavelengths. The formulas derived express the necessary laser powers for ionization of monoenergetic H0 beams; they also hold for beams of particles other than atomic hydrogen. The numerical examples given are for the 800-MeV PSR beam with momentum spread taken into account. Additionally, we discuss selective stripping as an implication of the inherent energy selectivity of the photoionization process

  4. Investigation of multi-charged heavy ion production in an electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of multi-charged heavy ions produced in an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) were carried out with a test model ion source 20 cm in length. This test model utilized an electron gun placed external to the bore of the focusing solenoid in order to achieve electrostatically focussed electron beams and isolation of the vacuum surrounding the electron gun from the vacuum in the ionization region within the solenoid bore. An ultrahigh vacuum system utilizing liquid nitrogen (770K) cryopumping was used to achieve the low pressures needed in the ionization region for the operation of this ion source. Several technical problems limited the operation of this test model and prevented a thorough investigation of the ionization processes in the ion source, but the experimental results have shown qualitative agreement with the theoretical calculations for the operation of this type of ion source. Even with the problems of an insufficient vacuum and electron beam focussing field, measurable currents of C+5 and A+8 ions were produced. The present experimental results suggest that the approach taken in this work of using an external electron gun and cryopumping in the EBIS to achieve the large electron beam current density and low vacuum necessary for successful operation is a viable one. Such an ion source can be used to create highly-charged heavy ions for injection into a cyclotron or other type of particle accelerator

  5. Investigation of multi-charged heavy ion production in an electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, R.W.

    1977-12-01

    Measurements of multi-charged heavy ions produced in an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) were carried out with a test model ion source 20 cm in length. This test model utilized an electron gun placed external to the bore of the focusing solenoid in order to achieve electrostatically focussed electron beams and isolation of the vacuum surrounding the electron gun from the vacuum in the ionization region within the solenoid bore. An ultrahigh vacuum system utilizing liquid nitrogen (77/sup 0/K) cryopumping was used to achieve the low pressures needed in the ionization region for the operation of this ion source. Several technical problems limited the operation of this test model and prevented a thorough investigation of the ionization processes in the ion source, but the experimental results have shown qualitative agreement with the theoretical calculations for the operation of this type of ion source. Even with the problems of an insufficient vacuum and electron beam focussing field, measurable currents of C/sup +5/ and A/sup +8/ ions were produced. The present experimental results suggest that the approach taken in this work of using an external electron gun and cryopumping in the EBIS to achieve the large electron beam current density and low vacuum necessary for successful operation is a viable one. Such an ion source can be used to create highly-charged heavy ions for injection into a cyclotron or other type of particle accelerator.

  6. Study of Nuclear Moments and Mean Square Charge Radii by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The collinear fast-beam laser technique is used to measure atomic hyperfine structures and isotope shifts of unstable nuclides produced at ISOLDE. This gives access to basic nuclear ground-state and isomeric-state properties such as spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, and the variation of the nuclear mean square charge radius within a sequence of isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ Among the various techniques used for this purpose, the present approach is of greatest versatility, due to the direct use of the beams from the isotope separator. Their phase-space properties are exploited to achieve high sensitivity and resolution. The optical spectra of neutral atoms are made accessible by converting the ion beams into fast atomic beams. This is accomplished in the charge-exchange cell which is kept at variable potential ($\\pm$10~kV) for Doppler-tuning of the effective laser wavelength. The basic optical resolution of 10$^{-8}$ requires a 10$^{-5}$ stability of the 60~kV main acceleration voltage and low energy ...

  7. Superconducting curved transport solenoid with dipole coils for charge selection of the muon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasser, P., E-mail: patrick.strasser@kek.jp [Muon Science Laboratory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ikedo, Y.; Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Makimura, S.; Fujimori, H.; Koda, A.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T. [Muon Science Laboratory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Adachi, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Pant, A.D. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Ogitsu, T. [Cryogenic Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makida, Y.; Yoshida, M. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sasaki, K. [Cryogenic Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Okamura, T. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Superconducting curved transport solenoid. • Muon charge selection by superimposed dipole field. • World strongest pulsed muon source. -- Abstract: At the J-PARC Muon Science Facility (MUSE) the Super-Omega muon beamline is now under construction in the experimental hall No. 2 of the Materials and Life Science Facility building. Muons up to 45 MeV/c will be extracted with a large acceptance solid angle to produce the world highest intensity pulsed muon beam. This beamline comprises three parts, a normal-conducting capture solenoid, a superconducting curved transport solenoid and an axial focusing solenoid. Since only solenoids are used, both surface μ{sup +} and cloud μ{sup −} are extracted simultaneously. To accommodate future experiments that would only require either μ{sup +} or μ{sup −} beam, two dipole coils located on the straight section of the curved solenoid provide the muon charge selection by directing one of the beam onto the solenoid inner-wall. The design parameters, the construction status and the initial beam commissioning are reported.

  8. The Production of Negative Lithium Beams by Charge Exchange in Cesium Vapours

    CERN Document Server

    Re, Maurizio; Chines, Francesco; Cuttone, Giacomo; Menna, Mariano; Messina, Esteban; Stracener, Dan

    2005-01-01

    These measurements were carried out at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL-HRIBF) by researchers from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Catania, Italy and local staff. The Charge Exchange Cell (CEC) consisted of a vacuum chamber containing cesium vapours at a variable temperature, T, in which positive ions accelerated from an ion source were transformed into negative ones by collisions with the Cs atoms. The main goal of this test was to measure the production efficiency for 7Li- ions at different operating conditions, such as 7Li+ beam energy (5 to 55 keV) and Cs temperature (190 to 300 °C). Moreover, the efficiency measurements performed with a 6Li+ projectile beam gave clear indications about the isotopic shift effect. These results are useful to estimate the charge exchange efficiency for 8, 9Li, which will be the first radioactive beams to be produced at the EXCYT facility (EXotics with CYclotro...

  9. Relativistic-electron-beam-induced fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a focussed relativistic electron beam (REB) with a solid target has been investigated. The beam performance of the REB generator ''REIDEN III'' is 500 kV, 80 kA at a focal spot of 1.5 mm diameter, which gives 2X1012Wcm-2. High-temperature dense plasmas are produced at the focal point on the solid target. It expands radially along the target surface. The measured electron temperature (1-2 keV) and the ion energy (approximately 2 keV) endorse the existence of enhanced REB absorption in a dense plasma. The neutrons observed (approximately 109/shot, 2.45 MeV) in the case of a CD2 target are of thermonuclear origin and compatible with the plasma temperature. On the assumption that the electron beam of radius r is stopped at a length Λ and deposits its energy, the energy balance equation is approximately given by πr2Λn1kT=IVtau. On inserting beam current I, voltage V, pulse time tau and density n1, the energy deposition distance Λ can be estimated. For a fusion temperature of 1 keV, the distance Λ must be two orders of magnitude shorter than the simple classical stopping length, which seems to be due to non-linear coupling. A pellet implosion experiment of a multi-structure target has been performed. (author)

  10. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B; Bednarek, M; Bellodi, G; Bracco, C; Bruce, R; Cerutti, F; Chetvertkova, V; Dehning, B; Granieri, P P; Hofle, W; Holzer, E B; Lechner, A; Del Busto, E Nebot; Priebe, A; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shetty, N; Skordis, E; Solfaroli, M; Steckert, J; Valuch, D; Verweij, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2015-01-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam- induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy depositio...

  11. Simulation of the interaction of positively charged beams and electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incoherent (head-tail) effect on the bunch due to the interaction with electron clouds (e-clouds) leads to a blow up of the transverse beam size in storage rings operating with positively charged beams. Even more the e-cloud effects are considered to be the main limiting factor for high current, high-brightness or high-luminosity operation of future machines. Therefore the simulation of e-cloud phenomena is a highly active field of research. The main focus in this work was set to a development of a tool for simulation of the interaction of relativistic bunches with non-relativistic parasitic charged particles. The result is the Particle-In-Cell Program MOEVE PIC Tracking which can track a 3D bunch under the influence of its own and external electromagnetic fields but first and foremost it simulates the interaction of relativistic positively charged bunches and initially static electrons. In MOEVE PIC Tracking the conducting beam pipe can be modeled with an arbitrary elliptical cross-section to achieve more accurate space charge field computations for both the bunch and the e-cloud. The simulation of the interaction between positron bunches and electron clouds in this work gave a detailed insight of the behavior of both particle species during and after the interaction. Further and ultimate goal of this work was a fast estimation of the beam stability under the influence of e-clouds in the storage ring. The standard approach to simulate the stability of a single bunch is to track the bunch particles through the linear optics of the machine by multiplying the 6D vector of each particle with the transformation matrices describing the lattice. Thereby the action of the e-cloud on the bunch is approximated by a pre-computed wake kick which is applied on one or more points in the lattice. Following the idea of K.Ohmi the wake kick was pre-computed as a two variable function of the bunch part exiting the e-cloud and the subsequent parts of a bunch which receive a

  12. Charge Order Induced in an Orbital Density-Wave State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Takimoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent angle resolved photoemission measurements [D. V. Evtushinsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 147201 (2010)] and evidence of the density-wave state for the charge and orbital ordering [J. García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107202 (2012)] in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4, the issue of charge and orbital ordering in a two-orbital tight-binding model for layered manganite near half doping is revisited. We find that the charge order with the ordering wavevector 2{Q} = (π ,π ) is induced by the orbital order of d-/d+-type having B1g representation with a different ordering wavevector Q, where the orbital order as the primary order results from the strong Fermi-surface nesting. It is shown that the induced charge order parameter develops according to TCO - T by decreasing the temperature below the orbital ordering temperature TCO, in addition to the usual mean-field behavior of the orbital order parameter. Moreover, the same orbital order is found to stabilize the CE-type spin arrangement observed experimentally below TCE < TCO.

  13. Conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gaididei, Yu B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    A simple phenomenological model for describing the conformational dynamics of biological macromolecules via the nonlinearity-induced instabilities is proposed. It is shown that the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom of closed molecular aggregates may act as drivers giving impetus to conformational dynamics of biopolymers. It is demonstrated that initially circular aggregates may undergo transformation to polygonal shapes and possible application to aggregates of bacter...

  14. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm structures after 2013, as described by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), or can be used for rapid prototyping in research applications. The key point is to combine the throughp...

  15. The beam commissioning of a CW high charge state heavy ion RFQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, K. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lu, Y.R., E-mail: yrlu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yin, X.J.; Yang, Y.Q. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gao, S.L.; Wang, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); He, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, G. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, X.H.; Yuan, Y.J.; Zhao, H.W.; Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, C.E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-09-11

    The SSC-LINAC project is launched at Institute of Modern Physics in China to develop one new linear accelerator (LINAC) injector for separated sector cyclotron (SSC). It includes a high charge state ion source, a CW RFQ and a DTL section, and is designed to accelerate ions up to 580 keV/u. Now the ion source and the RFQ cavity have been installed in the main hall and the beam commissioning has been carried out. Two kinds of ions have been tested, {sup 16}O{sup 5+} and {sup 40}Ar{sup 8+}. The experiment result of {sup 16}O{sup 5+} is: the measured beam current is 180 μA at entrance of RFQ and 150 μA at exit of RFQ. The output energy of {sup 16}O{sup 5+} is 141.89 keV/u. The measured beam current is 210 μA at entrance of RFQ and 198 μA at exit of RFQ for {sup 40}Ar{sup 8+}. The output energy of {sup 40}Ar{sup 8+} is 142.78 keV/u. The experiment results agree with the design parameters of RFQ very well. This paper presents: the design consideration of beam dynamics, RF and cooling structure design; measurement of the cold model; high power test of RFQ and beam commissioning result.

  16. The beam commissioning of a CW high charge state heavy ion RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSC-LINAC project is launched at Institute of Modern Physics in China to develop one new linear accelerator (LINAC) injector for separated sector cyclotron (SSC). It includes a high charge state ion source, a CW RFQ and a DTL section, and is designed to accelerate ions up to 580 keV/u. Now the ion source and the RFQ cavity have been installed in the main hall and the beam commissioning has been carried out. Two kinds of ions have been tested, 16O5+ and 40Ar8+. The experiment result of 16O5+ is: the measured beam current is 180 μA at entrance of RFQ and 150 μA at exit of RFQ. The output energy of 16O5+ is 141.89 keV/u. The measured beam current is 210 μA at entrance of RFQ and 198 μA at exit of RFQ for 40Ar8+. The output energy of 40Ar8+ is 142.78 keV/u. The experiment results agree with the design parameters of RFQ very well. This paper presents: the design consideration of beam dynamics, RF and cooling structure design; measurement of the cold model; high power test of RFQ and beam commissioning result

  17. Production of highly charged ion beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields, and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECRISs. So far at continuous wave (CW) mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O7+ and 1.15 emA of O6+, more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar13+, Ca13+, Fe13+, Co14+, and Kr18+, and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr26+, Xe28+, Au35+, Bi34+, and U34+ were produced from ECRISs. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe36+, Au46+, Bi47+, and U48+. An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I≥60enA) were also achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECRISs to produce the highly charged ion beams. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Induced radioactivity of the IHEP proton synchrotron beam extraction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement results of induced radioactivity of the beam extraction equipment during 1972-1978 are presented. All the values are given to the moment of the accelerator stop. The experimental data permits to predict further possible variations of the induced radioactivity levels of the equipment. Given are the measures required for reduction of the accelerator equipment irradiation, which are the following: 1) compensation of residual distortion of a closed beam orbit in the course of the induction system operation; 2) limitation of the intensity of drop on the internal targets up to the 11 protons per target level over a cycle; 3) putting into operation the program control system for the duration of a current pulse of a linear accelerator to minimize the beam residues at the 70 GeV energy during physical experiments; 4) construction of the system of beam interception and cutting-off to ensure effective energy suppression of uncontrolled beam residues and localization of their radiation effect; 5) extraction of a high-energy beam out of the accelerator during the experiments (e.g., into the neutrino channel for apparatus adjusting) instead of its dropping on the interceptor-target; 6) beam orbit controlling in the case of multiturn injection into the accelerator

  19. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, R; Levand, A; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci (252)Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10(6) ions∕s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for (23)Na(8+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 13.7% for (85)Rb(19+) with typical breeding times of 10 ms∕charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of (143)Ba(27+) accelerated to 6.1 MeV∕u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities. PMID:22380254

  20. Beam-Induced Damage Mechanisms and their Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid interaction of highly energetic particle beams with matter induces dynamic responses in the impacted component. If the beam pulse is sufficiently intense, extreme conditions can be reached, such as very high pressures, changes of material density, phase transitions, intense stress waves, material fragmentation and explosions. Even at lower intensities and longer time-scales, significant effects may be induced, such as vibrations, large oscillations, and permanent deformation of the impacted components. These lectures provide an introduction to the mechanisms that govern the thermomechanical phenomena induced by the interaction between particle beams and solids and to the analytical and numerical methods that are available for assessing the response of impacted components. An overview of the design principles of such devices is also provided, along with descriptions of material selection guidelines and the experimental tests that are required to validate materials and components exposed to interactio...

  1. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  2. Are laser-induced beams spin polarized?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buescher, Markus; Lehrach, Andreas; Raab, Natascha [Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics (JCHP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Engin, Ilhan; Hessan, Mohammad Aziz [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics (JCHP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Juelich Supercomputing Center (JSC), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institut fuer Laser-Plasma Physik (ILPP), Heinrich Heine Universitaet, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The physics of laser-plasma interactions has undergone dramatic developments in recent years, both experimentally and in the theoretical understanding of high-brightness light and particle sources. However, it is a yet untouched issue whether the laser-generated particle beams are or can be spin-polarized and, thus, whether laser-based polarized sources are conceivable. A first measurement of the degree of polarization of laser-accelerated protons have recently been carried out at the Duesseldorf Arcturus Laser Facility where proton beams of typically 3 MeV were produced in foil targets. The results have been analysed with the help of particle-in-cell simulations to follow the generation of static magnetic field gradients ({proportional_to}100s of Megagauss per micron) in thin foil targets. As a next step, measurements with unpolarized H{sub 2} (for proton acceleration) and {sup 3}He gas (for {sup 3}He ions) are planned and, finally, pre-polarized {sup 3}He will be used.

  3. The fine structure of the vortex-beams in the biaxial and biaxially-induced birefringent media caused by the conical diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeyeva, Tatyana; Anischenko, Pavel; Volyar, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We consider the paraxial propagation of nondiffracting singular beams inside natural biaxial and biaxially-induced birefringent media in vicinity of one of the optical axes in terms of eigenmode vortex-beams, whose angular momentum does not change upon propagation. We have predicted a series of new optical effects in the natural biaxial crystals such as the stable propagation of vector singular beams bearing the coupled optical vortices with fractional topological charges, the conversion of the zero-order Bessel beam with a uniformly distributed linear polarization into the radially-, azimuthally- and spirally-polarized beams and the conversion of the space-variant linear polarization in the combined beam with coupled vortices. We have revealed that the field structure of the vortex-beams in the biaxially-induced crystals resembles that in the natural biaxial crystals and form the vector structure inherent in the conical diffraction. However, the mode beams in this case do not change the propagation direction...

  4. Electric-field Induced Microdynamics of Charged Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyongok eKang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field induced phase/state transitions are observed in AC electric fields with small amplitudes and low frequencies in suspensions of charged fibrous viruses (fd, which are model systems for highly charged rod-like colloids. Texture- and particle-dynamics in these field-induced states, and on crossing transition lines, are explored by image time-correlation and dynamic light scattering, respectively. At relatively low frequencies, starting from a system within the isotropic-nematic coexistence region, a transition from a nematic to a chiral nematic is observed, as well as a dynamical state where nematic domains melt and reform. These transitions are preliminary due to field-induced dissociation/association of condensed ions. At higher frequencies a uniform state is formed that is stabilized by hydrodynamic interactions through field-induced electro-osmotic flow where the rods align along the field direction. There is a point in the field-amplitude versus frequency plane where various transition lines meet. This point can be identified as a non-equilibrium critical point, in the sense that a length scale and a time scale diverge on approach of that point. The microscopic dynamics exhibits discontinuities on crossing transition lines that were identified independently by means of image and signal correlation spectroscopy.

  5. MOSFET Electric-Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle probe compact and consumes little power. Proposed modification enables metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to act as detector of static electric charges or energetic charged particles. Thickened gate insulation acts as control structure. During measurements metal gate allowed to "float" to potential of charge accumulated in insulation. Stack of modified MOSFET'S constitutes detector of energetic charged particles. Each gate "floats" to potential induced by charged-particle beam penetrating its layer.

  6. BEAMR: An interactive graphic computer program for design of charged particle beam transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.; Giamati, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for a PDP-15 is presented which calculates, to first order, the characteristics of charged-particle beam as it is transported through a sequence of focusing and bending magnets. The maximum dimensions of the beam envelope normal to the transport system axis are continuously plotted on an oscilloscope as a function of distance along the axis. Provision is made to iterate the calculation by changing the types of magnets, their positions, and their field strengths. The program is especially useful for transport system design studies because of the ease and rapidity of altering parameters from panel switches. A typical calculation for a system with eight elements is completed in less than 10 seconds. An IBM 7094 version containing more-detailed printed output but no oscilloscope display is also presented.

  7. Diffraction Radiation Diagnostics for Moderate to High Energy Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorito, R B

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction radiation (DR) is produced when a charged particle passes throughan aperture or near a discontinuity in the media in which it is traveling. DRis closely related to transition radiation (TR), which is produced when acharged particle traverses the boundary between media with different dielectricconstants. In contrast to TR, which is now extensively used for beam diagnosticpurposes, the potential of DR as a non-interceptive, multi-parameter beamdiagnostic remains largely undeveloped. For diagnostic measurements it isuseful to observe backward reflected DR from an circular aperture or slitinclined with respect to the beam velocity. However, up to now, well foundedequations for the spectral-angular intensities of backward DR from suchapertures have not been available. We present a new derivation of the spectralangular intensity of backward DR produced from an inclined slit for twoorientations of the slit axis, i.e. perpendicular and parallel to the plane ofincidence. Our mathematical approach is genera...

  8. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ping; Salemink, Huub W M; Alkemade, Paul F A [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Veldhoven, Emile van; Maas, Diederik J [TNO Science and Industry, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Sanford, Colin A [Carl Zeiss SMT, Inc., One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D, E-mail: p.f.a.alkemade@tudelft.nl [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States)

    2010-11-12

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(C{sub P}CH{sub 3}) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions.

  9. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH3)3Pt(CPCH3) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions.

  10. Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    jima, Y Naka; Brice, S J; Bugel, L; Catala-Perez, J; Cheng, G; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Dore, U; Finley, D A; Franke, A J; Giganti, C; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Guzowski, P; Hanson, A; Hayato, Y; Hiraide, K; Jover-Manas, G; Karagiorgi, G; Katori, T; Kobayashi, Y K; Kobilarcik, T; Kubo, H; Kurimoto, Y; Louis, W C; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Mahn, K B M; Mariani, C; Masuike, S; Matsuoka, K; McGary, V T; Metcalf, W; Mills, G B; Mitsuka, G; Miyachi, Y; Mizugashira, S; Moore, C D; Nakaya, T; Napora, R; Nienaber, P; Orme, D; Otani, M; Russell, A D; Sanchez, F; Shaevitz, M H; Shibata, T -A; Sorel, M; Stefanski, R J; Takei, H; Tanaka, H -K; Tanaka, M; Tayloe, R; Taylor, I J; Tesarek, R J; Uchida, Y; Van de Water, R; Walding, J J; Wascko, M O; White, H B; Yokoyama, M; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2010-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8~GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract CC inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross section ratio measurements to absolute cross section values.

  11. Distribution of separated energy and injected charge at normal falling of fast electron beam on target

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyar, V A; Eremin, V V

    2002-01-01

    In terms of a kinetic equation diffusion model for a beam of electrons falling on a target along the normal one derived analytical formulae for distributions of separated energy and injected charge. In this case, no empirical adjustable parameters are introduced to the theory. The calculated distributions of separated energy for an electron plate directed source within infinite medium for C, Al, Sn and Pb are in good consistency with the Spencer data derived on the basis of the accurate solution of the Bethe equation being the source one in assumption of a diffusion model, as well

  12. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M K; Calabrese, R.; Cardinale, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cavallero, G.; Cojocariu, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dorosz, P.A.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; McCann, M.; Morris, A.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Pessina, G.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fiorini, M.; Frei, C.; Gambetta, S.; Gibson, V.; Gotti, C.; Harnew, N.; He, J.; Kucewicz, W.; Maciuc, F.; Keizer, F.; Petrolini, A.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pistone, A.; Placinta, V.M.; Sigurdsson, S.; Simi, G.; Smith, J.; Spradlin, P.; Tomassetti, L.; Wotton, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  13. Energy spread and time structure of ion beams extracted from the ReA-EBIT rare isotope charge breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Thomas M.; Lapierre, Alain; Schwarz, Stefan; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Bollen, Georg [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    The ReA re-accelerator of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University utilizes an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) for charge breeding thermalized rare isotope beams. Recent commissioning measurements have been performed to characterize the performance of this EBIT. The energy spread of extracted highly charged ion beams was measured to be about 0.3% of the total beam energy. From this, the temperature of the ion ensemble in the trap is calculated to be kT{sub q}/q = 31eV for O{sup 7+}, while it is kT{sub q}/q = 25eV for K{sup 15+}. In addition initial results are presented for two extraction schemes developed to spread highly charged ion pulses in time.

  14. Induced base transistor fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-Y.; Liu, W. C.; Jame, M. S.; Wang, Y. H.; Luryi, S.

    1986-09-01

    A novel three-terminal hot-electron device, the induced base transistor (IBT), has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. Two-dimensional electron gas induced by the applied collector field in an undoped GaAs quantum well is used as the base of the IBT. The common-base current gain alpha has been achieved as high as 0.96 under a collector bias of 2.5 V and an emitter current of 3 mA.

  15. Measurement of charged particle yields from therapeutic beams in view of the design of an innovative hadrontherapy dose monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; Collini, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; La Tessa, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Miraglia, F.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P. G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Vanstalle, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-02-01

    Particle Therapy (PT) is an emerging technique, which makes use of charged particles to efficiently cure different kinds of solid tumors. The high precision in the hadrons dose deposition requires an accurate monitoring to prevent the risk of under-dosage of the cancer region or of over-dosage of healthy tissues. Monitoring techniques are currently being developed and are based on the detection of particles produced by the beam interaction into the target, in particular: charged particles, result of target and/or projectile fragmentation, prompt photons coming from nucleus de-excitation and back-to-back γ s, produced in the positron annihilation from β + emitters created in the beam interaction with the target. It has been showed that the hadron beam dose release peak can be spatially correlated with the emission pattern of these secondary particles. Here we report about secondary particles production (charged fragments and prompt γ s) performed at different beam and energies that have a particular relevance for PT applications: 12C beam of 80 MeV/u at LNS, 12C beam 220 MeV/u at GSI, and 12C, 4He, 16O beams with energy in the 50-300 MeV/u range at HIT. Finally, a project for a multimodal dose-monitor device exploiting the prompt photons and charged particles emission will be presented.

  16. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation in an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear contribution from ion-induced nucleation and consider this to be the first unambiguous observation of the ion...

  17. Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acar, H.

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. Thes

  18. Sub-10 nm focused electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp, W.F.

    2008-01-01

    Work started with a critical review of literature from the past 70-odd years. The review shows that the physical processes occurring in EBID are generally well understood. By combining models for electron scattering in a solid and electron beam induced heating and knowledge of growth regimes, the ma

  19. Molecular Dipole Osmosis Based on Induced Charge Electro-Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of producing a large nonlinear electrokinetic vortex flow around a nonconductive polar molecule in an electrolyte. That is, a large nonlinear electrokinetic slip velocity is derived by considering a local giant permittivity due to a molecular electric dipole moment with induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Different from the conventional ICEO theory, our theory predicts that a nonconductive biomaterial, such as a base of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, has a significantly high ICEO flow velocity because of its large local permittivity. We consider that our findings will contribute markedly to promising biomedical applications.

  20. The functional relation between partial discharges and induced charge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Aage; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1995-01-01

    Analytical expressions are deduced for the quantitative evaluation of the charge induced on an electrode by a partial discharge (PD) within a dielectric body. Two approaches have been employed to effect this evaluation. These are characterized by the λ function and the φ function, and the essential...... relationships to be fulfilled by λ and φ are derived. The principal difference between these functions is how the dielectric polarization is accounted for, either implicitly (λ) or explicitly (φ). This difference is brought clearly into focus. Thereafter the application of these functions to PD studies...

  1. Charged particle induced energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article deals with the X-ray emission induced by heavy, charged particles and the use of this process as an analytical method (PIXE). The physical processes involved, X-ray emission and the various reactions contributing to the background, are described in some detail. The sensitivity is calculated theoretically and the results compared with practical experience. A discussion is given on how the sensitivity can be optimized. The experimental arrangements are described and the various technical problems discussed. The analytical procedure, especially the sample preparation, is described in considerable detail. A number of typical practical applications are discussed. (author)

  2. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Ions Impact on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kireeff-Covo, Michel; Barnard, John J; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, C M; Cohen, Ronald; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kwan, Joe W; Lund, Steven M; Molvik, Arthur; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L; Westenskow, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The cost of accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) can be reduced by using the smallest possible clearance between the beam and the wall from the beamline. This increases beam loss to the walls, generating ion-induced electrons that could be trapped by beam space charge potential into an "electron cloud," which can cause degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanism of production of ion-induced electrons we have measured impact of K+ ions with energies up to 400 KeV on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the ion source test stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The electron yield will be discussed and compared with experimental measurements from 1 MeV K+ ions in the High-Current Experiment at LBNL.*

  3. Precision matched solution of the coupled beam envelope equations for a periodic quadrupole lattice with space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P.

    2002-02-01

    The coupled Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) envelope equations for a charged particle beam transported by a periodic system of quadrupoles with self-consistent space charge force have previously been solved by various approximate methods, with accuracy ranging from 1% to 10%. A new method of solution is introduced here, which is based on a double expansion of the beam envelope functions in powers of the focal strength and either the beam's emittance or its dimensionless perveance. This method results in accuracy better than 0.1% for typical lattice and beam parameters when carried through one consistent level of approximation higher than employed in previous work. Several useful quantities, such as the values of the undepressed tune and the beam's perveance in the limit of vanishing emittance, are represented by very rapidly converging power series in the focal strength, with accuracy of .01% or better.

  4. Investigation of ion beam space charge compensation with a 4-grid analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, C., E-mail: c.ullmann@gsi.de; Adonin, A.; Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Kester, O. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferrière, O.; Senée, F.; Tuske, O. [CEA, Saclay (France)

    2016-02-15

    Experiments to investigate the space charge compensation of pulsed high-current heavy ion beams are performed at the GSI ion source text benches with a 4-grid analyzer provided by CEA/Saclay. The technical design of the 4-grid analyzer is revised to verify its functionality for measurements at pulsed high-current heavy ion beams. The experimental investigation of space charge compensation processes is needed to increase the performance and quality of current and future accelerator facilities. Measurements are performed directly downstream a triode extraction system mounted to a multi-cusp ion source at a high-current test bench as well as downstream the post-acceleration system of the high-current test injector (HOSTI) with ion energies up to 120 keV/u for helium and argon. At HOSTI, a cold or hot reflex discharge ion source is used to change the conditions for the measurements. The measurements were performed with helium, argon, and xenon and are presented. Results from measurements with single aperture extraction systems are shown.

  5. 2D scattering of unpolarized beams of electrons by charged nanomagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senbeta, Teshome, E-mail: teshearada@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Mal' nev, V.N., E-mail: vnmalnev@aau.edu.et [Department of Physics, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

    2012-07-15

    2D spin-dependent scattering of slow unpolarized beams of electrons by charged nanomagnets is analyzed in the Born approximation. The obtained scattering lengths are larger than those from the neutral nanomagnets approximately by one order. It is shown that for particular parameters of the system it is possible to polarize completely the scattered electrons in a narrow range of scattering angles. The most suitable system for realization of these effects is 2D Si electron gas with immersed nanomagnets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study 2D spin dependent electron scattering by charged nanomagnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The applicability of the Born approximation to the problem is discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unpolarized incident beams used to obtain completely polarized scattered electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study shows peculiarities of 2D spin dependent scattering enhanced by Coulomb potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result obtained can be used as one method of controlling spin currents.

  6. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sumit; Nayak, Tapan K.; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity (η ) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of η distributions in heavy-ion (Au +Au or Pb +Pb ) collisions from √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the η distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged-particle multiplicity densities, η distributions, and energy densities for various centralities. Incidentally, these results match well with some of the recently published data by the ALICE Collaboration.

  7. Investigation of ion beam space charge compensation with a 4-grid analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, C.; Adonin, A.; Berezov, R.; Chauvin, N.; Delferrière, O.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Kester, O.; Senée, F.; Tuske, O.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments to investigate the space charge compensation of pulsed high-current heavy ion beams are performed at the GSI ion source text benches with a 4-grid analyzer provided by CEA/Saclay. The technical design of the 4-grid analyzer is revised to verify its functionality for measurements at pulsed high-current heavy ion beams. The experimental investigation of space charge compensation processes is needed to increase the performance and quality of current and future accelerator facilities. Measurements are performed directly downstream a triode extraction system mounted to a multi-cusp ion source at a high-current test bench as well as downstream the post-acceleration system of the high-current test injector (HOSTI) with ion energies up to 120 keV/u for helium and argon. At HOSTI, a cold or hot reflex discharge ion source is used to change the conditions for the measurements. The measurements were performed with helium, argon, and xenon and are presented. Results from measurements with single aperture extraction systems are shown.

  8. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W., E-mail: luwang@impcas.ac.cn; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China); Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, B.; Ruan, L. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Xie, D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O{sup 7+}, 620 eμA of Ar{sup 11+}, 430 eμA of Ar{sup 12+}, 430 eμA of Xe{sup 20+}, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  9. Investigation of ion beam space charge compensation with a 4-grid analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments to investigate the space charge compensation of pulsed high-current heavy ion beams are performed at the GSI ion source text benches with a 4-grid analyzer provided by CEA/Saclay. The technical design of the 4-grid analyzer is revised to verify its functionality for measurements at pulsed high-current heavy ion beams. The experimental investigation of space charge compensation processes is needed to increase the performance and quality of current and future accelerator facilities. Measurements are performed directly downstream a triode extraction system mounted to a multi-cusp ion source at a high-current test bench as well as downstream the post-acceleration system of the high-current test injector (HOSTI) with ion energies up to 120 keV/u for helium and argon. At HOSTI, a cold or hot reflex discharge ion source is used to change the conditions for the measurements. The measurements were performed with helium, argon, and xenon and are presented. Results from measurements with single aperture extraction systems are shown

  10. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  11. Charge-Induced Spin Torque in Anomalous Hall Ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kentaro; Kurebayashi, Daichi

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate that spin-orbit coupled electrons in a magnetically doped system exert a spin torque on the local magnetization, without a flowing current, when the chemical potential is modulated in a magnetic field. The spin torque is proportional to the anomalous Hall conductivity, and its effective field strength may overcome the Zeeman field. Using this effect, the direction of the local magnetization is switched by gate control in a thin film. This charge-induced spin torque is essentially an equilibrium effect, in contrast to the conventional current-induced spin-orbit torque, and, thus, devices using this operating principle possibly have higher efficiency than the conventional ones. In addition to a comprehensive phenomenological derivation, we present a physical understanding based on a model of a Dirac-Weyl semimetal, possibly realized in a magnetically doped topological insulator. The effect might be realized also in nanoscale transition materials, complex oxide ferromagnets, and dilute magnetic semiconductors.

  12. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 1011 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.)

  13. Direct and compound reactions induced by unstable helium beams near the Coulomb barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, A.; Tripathi, V.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Nanal, V.; Simenel, C.; Casandjian, J. M.; de France, G.; Raabe, R.; Bazin, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Dasgupta, M.; Kailas, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Mahata, K.; Pillay, R. G.; Pollacco, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Rejmund, M.; Shrivastava, A.; Sida, J. L.; Tryggestad, E.

    2004-10-01

    Reactions induced by radioactive 6,8 He beams from the SPIRAL facility were studied on 63,65 Cu and 188,190,192 Os targets and compared to reactions with the stable 4He projectiles from the Mumbai Pelletron. Partial residue cross sections for fusion and neutron transfer obtained from the measured intensities of characteristic in-beam γ rays for the 6He + 63,65 Cu systems are presented. Coincidence measurements of heavy reaction products, identified by their characteristic γ rays, with projectilelike charged particles, provide direct evidence for a large transfer cross section with Borromean nuclei 6He at 19.5 and 30 MeV and 8He at 27 MeV. Reaction cross sections were also obtained from measured elastic angular distributions for 6,8 He +Cu systems. Cross sections for fusion and direct reactions with 4,6 He beams on heavier targets of 188,192 Os at 30 MeV are also presented. The present work underlines the need to distinguish between various reaction mechanisms leading to the same products before drawing conclusions about the effect of weak binding on the fusion process. The feasibility of extracting small cross sections from inclusive in-beam γ -ray measurements for reaction studies near the Coulomb barrier with low intensity isotope separation on-line beams is highlighted.

  14. Photoinduced intramolecular charge-transfer reactions in 4-amino-3-methyl benzoic acid methyl ester: A fluorescence study in condensedphase and jet-cooled molecular beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amrita Chakraborty; Samiran Kar; D N Nath; Nikhil Guchhait

    2007-03-01

    Photoinduced intramolecular charge-transfer reactions in 4-amino-3-methyl benzoic acid methyl ester (AMBME) have been investigated spectroscopically. AMBME, with its weak charge donor primary amino group, shows dual emission in polar solvents. Absorption and emission measurements in the condensed phase support the premise that the short wavelength emission band corresponds to local emission and the long wavelength emission band to the charge transfer emission. Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra show the presence of two low-energy conformers in jet-cooled molecular beams. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory help to determine structure, vibrational modes, potential energy surface, transition energy and oscillator strength for correlating experimental findings with theoretical results.

  15. Overview of charged-particle beam diagnostics for the advanced photon source (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Votaw, A.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1992-07-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e-,e+) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest x-ray sources in the 10-keV to 100-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV booster synchrotron, 7-GeV storage ring, and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  16. Charged-particle beam diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1992-08-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e-), e(+) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest x-ray sources in the 10-keV to 100-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV booster synchrotron, 7-GeV storage ring, and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  17. Proceedings of photo-induced space charge effects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume consists of the proceedings of the Symposium on Photo-Induced Space Charge Effects in Semiconductors: Photoconductivity, Spectroscopy and Electro-Optics. The symposium was held at the Spring Meeting of the Materials Research Society in San Francisco from April 29 to May 1. Our motivation for organizing this symposium was fueled by a persistent feeling that several independent research communities were following much of the same physics. However, the lines of communication among the communities were relatively tenuous. These communities include the electrooptic, photodetector, photorefractive and defect spectroscopy communities. In each of these disciplines, one of the primary concerns is the presence of photo-induced space charge. Although there are problems that are specific to each group, there are many effects that they all have in common, with identical underlying physics. Despite the strong similarities, separate approaches and nomenclature have built up in the individual communities. Jargon form one community may be meaningless to another, although the physical effects themselves are easily recognizable

  18. Aggregation in charged nanoparticles solutions induced by different interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, S.; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles as induced through different interactions. The nanoparticle aggregation is induced by addition of salt (NaCl), cationic protein (lysozyme) and non-ionic surfactant (C12E10) employing different kind of interactions. The results show that the interaction in presence of salt can be explained using DLVO theory whereas non-DLVO forces play important role for interaction of nanoparticles with protein and surfactant. The presence of salt screens the repulsion between charged nanoparticles giving rise to a net attraction in the DLVO potential. On the other hand, strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticle and oppositely charged protein leads to protein-mediated nanoparticle aggregation. In case of non-ionic surfactant, the relatively long-range attractive depletion interaction is found to be responsible for the particle aggregation. Interestingly, the completely different interactions lead to similar kind of aggregate morphology. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are found to have mass fractal nature having a fractal dimension (~2.5) consistent with diffusion limited type of fractal morphology in all three cases.

  19. Generation and characterization of a perfect vortex beam with a large topological charge through a digital micromirror device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Gong, Lei; Lu, Rong-De

    2015-09-20

    Optical vortices are associated with a spatial phase singularity. Such a beam with a vortex is valuable in optical microscopy, hyper-entanglement, and optical levitation. In these applications, vortex beams with a perfect circle shape and a large topological charge are highly desirable. But the generation of perfect vortices with high topological charges is challenging. We present a novel method to create perfect vortex beams with large topological charges using a digital micromirror device (DMD) through binary amplitude modulation and a narrow Gaussian approximation. The DMD with binary holograms encoding both the spatial amplitude and the phase could generate fast switchable, reconfigurable optical vortex beams with significantly high quality and fidelity. With either the binary Lee hologram or the superpixel binary encoding technique, we were able to generate the corresponding hologram with high fidelity and create a perfect vortex with topological charge as large as 90. The physical properties of the perfect vortex beam produced were characterized through measurements of propagation dynamics and the focusing fields. The measurements show good consistency with the theoretical simulation. The perfect vortex beam produced satisfies high-demand utilization in optical manipulation and control, momentum transfer, quantum computing, and biophotonics. PMID:26406501

  20. Development of electron beam ion source charge breeder for rare isotopes at Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrashev, S.; Dickerson, C.; Levand, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Pardo, R. C.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kuznetsov, G. I.; Batazova, M. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    Recently, the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) was commissioned and became available for production of rare isotopes. Currently, an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used as a charge breeder for CARIBU beams. To further increase the intensity and improve the purity of neutron-rich ion beams accelerated by ATLAS, we are developing a high-efficiency charge breeder for CARIBU based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS). The CARIBU EBIS charge breeder will utilize the state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The electron beam current density in the CARIBU EBIS trap will be significantly higher than that in existing operational charge-state breeders based on the EBIS concept. The design of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder is nearly complete. Long-lead components of the EBIS such as a 6-T superconducting solenoid and an electron gun have been ordered with the delivery schedule in the fall of 2011. Measurements of expected breeding efficiency using the BNL Test EBIS have been performed using a Cs{sup +} surface ionization ion source for external injection in pulsed mode. In these experiments we have achieved {approx}70% injection/extraction efficiency and breeding efficiency into the most abundant charge state of {approx}17%.

  1. Development of electron beam ion source charge breeder for rare isotopes at Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrashev S.; Alessi J.; Dickerson, C.; Levand, A.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Pardo, R.C.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.; Kuznetsov, G.I.; Batazova, M.A.

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) was commissioned and became available for production of rare isotopes. Currently, an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used as a charge breeder for CARIBU beams. To further increase the intensity and improve the purity of neutron-rich ion beams accelerated by ATLAS, we are developing a high-efficiency charge breeder for CARIBU based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS). The CARIBU EBIS charge breeder will utilize the state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The electron beam current density in the CARIBU EBIS trap will be significantly higher than that in existing operational charge-state breeders based on the EBIS concept. The design of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder is nearly complete. Long-lead components of the EBIS such as a 6-T superconducting solenoid and an electron gun have been ordered with the delivery schedule in the fall of 2011. Measurements of expected breeding efficiency using the BNL Test EBIS have been performed using a Cs{sup +} surface ionization ion source for external injection in pulsed mode. In these experiments we have achieved {approx}70% injection/extraction efficiency and breeding efficiency into the most abundant charge state of {approx}17%.

  2. Final Report for 'Design calculations for high-space-charge beam-to-RF conversion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator facility upgrades, new accelerator applications, and future design efforts are leading to novel klystron and IOT device concepts, including multiple beam, high-order mode operation, and new geometry configurations of old concepts. At the same time, a new simulation capability, based upon finite-difference 'cut-cell' boundaries, has emerged and is transforming the existing modeling and design capability with unparalleled realism, greater flexibility, and improved accuracy. This same new technology can also be brought to bear on a difficult-to-study aspect of the energy recovery linac (ERL), namely the accurate modeling of the exit beam, and design of the beam dump for optimum energy efficiency. We have developed new capability for design calculations and modeling of a broad class of devices which convert bunched beam kinetic energy to RF energy, including RF sources, as for example, klystrons, gyro-klystrons, IOT's, TWT's, and other devices in which space-charge effects are important. Recent advances in geometry representation now permits very accurate representation of the curved metallic surfaces common to RF sources, resulting in unprecedented simulation accuracy. In the Phase I work, we evaluated and demonstrated the capabilities of the new geometry representation technology as applied to modeling and design of output cavity components of klystron, IOT's, and energy recovery srf cavities. We identified and prioritized which aspects of the design study process to pursue and improve in Phase II. The development and use of the new accurate geometry modeling technology on RF sources for DOE accelerators will help spark a new generational modeling and design capability, free from many of the constraints and inaccuracy associated with the previous generation of 'stair-step' geometry modeling tools. This new capability is ultimately expected to impact all fields with high power RF sources, including DOE fusion research, communications, radar and other

  3. Electromagnetic forces on plasmonic nanoparticles induced by fast electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total momentum transfer from fast electron beams, like those employed in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), to plasmonic nanoparticles is calculated. The momentum transfer is obtained by integrating the electromagnetic forces acting on the particles over time. Numerical results for single and dimer metallic nanoparticles are presented, for sizes ranging between 2 and 80 nm. We analyze the momentum transfer in the case of metallic dimers where the different relevant parameters such as particle size, interparticle distance, and electron beam impact parameter are modified. It is shown that depending on the specific values of the parameters, the total momentum transfer yields a force that can be either attractive or repulsive. The time-average forces calculated for electron beams commonly employed in STEM are on the order of piconewtons, comparable in magnitude to optical forces and are thus capable of producing movement in the nanoparticles. This effect can be exploited in mechanical control of nanoparticle induced motion.

  4. Electrochemically induced surface charge effect on the properties of nanoporous Au-Fe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Hahn, Horst [Institute for Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Bansal, Chandrahas [Institute for Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India)

    2008-07-01

    Nanoporous Au-Fe alloys consisting of nanoparticles of about 5 nm diameter were synthesized by inert gas phase condensation. Charge was induced electrochemically on the surface of the nanoparticles, and in-situ measurements of strain, magnetization, and conductivity were carried out during the charging and decharging process taking place in the electrochemical cell. The observed strain could be explained to arise from a Coulomb pressure produced by the surface charge on the metal. The variation of magnetization with charging was also found to be consistent with the effect of this pressure. A charge induced variation in the dc electrical conductivity of about 6 percent was observed. An explanation of the rate of change of conductivity with charge was provided in terms of the additional charge density produced by the induced charge. Similarly at the microscopic level, Moessbauer isomer shift and quadrupole splitting were measured and showed a small but reversible behaviour with charge.

  5. Phase Space Tomography: A Simple, Portable and Accurate Technique to Map Phase Spaces of Beams with Space Charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the charged particle dynamics, e.g. the halo formation, emittance growth, x-y energy transfer and coupling, knowledge of the actual phase space is needed. Other the past decade there is an increasing number of articles who use tomography to map the beam phase space and measure the beam emittance. These studies where performed at high energy facilities where the effect of space charge was neglible and therefore not considered in the analysis. This work extends the tomography technique to beams with space charge. In order to simplify the analysis linear forces where assumed. By carefully modeling the tomography process using the particle-in-cell code WARP we test the validity of our assumptions and the accuracy of the reconstructed phase space. Finally, we report experimental results of phase space mapping at the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) using tomography

  6. Comparison of laser and charged particle induced DSB formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splinter, Joern; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [GSI - Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA damage response processes like the fast accumulation of early repair-related proteins can be observed in real time by our newly developed beamline microscope. For this purpose ion beams offer the advantage to generate strictly localized DNA lesions in cell nuclei, thus inducing distinguishable spots of protein formation. In addition to our beamline microscope, we established a laser system for localized generation of DSBs to look for differences in the recruitment and spatiotemporal behaviour of repair related proteins due to differences in the radiation quality. Therefore we tested the Laser Microdissection System Leica AS LMD and its VSL-337ND-S nitrogen laser ({lambda} = 337.1 nm) for its ability to produce DSBs. The emerging problems indicate that a laser system is not the simple and predictable DSB-inducing system people want it to be. Accompanied by temperature dependent variation of the laser power and the intermittent understandings of the mechanisms of UV-laser-induced DSB formation, the main problem are the complications in dosimetry. A discussion of these complications is done on the vivid example of the only known approach of a visual based comparing dosimetry of {gamma}H2AX signals first introduced by Bekker-Jensen.

  7. Electron beam induced surface activation of oxide surfaces for nanofabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollnhals, Florian; Seiler, Steffen; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials (ICMM), Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Woolcot, Tom; Thornton, Geoff [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The controlled fabrication of structures on the nanoscale is a major challenge in science and engineering. Direct-write techniques like Electron Beam Induced Deposition (EBID) were shown to be suitable tools in this context. Recently, Electron Beam Induced Surface Activation (EBISA) has been introduced as a new focused electron beam technique. In EBISA, a surface, e.g. SiO{sub 2}, is irradiated by a focused electron beam, resulting in an activation of the exposed area. The activated area can then react and decompose precursor gases like iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO){sub 5}. This leads to a primary deposit, which continues to grow autocatalytically as long as Fe(CO){sub 5} is supplied, resulting in pure (> 90 % at.), crystalline iron nanostructures. We expand the use of this concept by exploring EBISA to produce metallic nanostructures on TiO{sub 2}(110) in UHV; atomistic insight into the process is obtained via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and chemical insight via Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES).

  8. Quantitative Traits of Ion Beam Induced Mutagenesis in Triticum aestivum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan FANG; Zhen JIAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this study was to elucidate the quantitative traits of plants mutagenized by ion beam. [Method] The particular variation phenotypes, a- gronomic traits, and protein and wet gluten contents of progenies derived from the same ion beam induced mutant were investigated. [Result] Morphological polymor- phism existed in some individuals. Plant height, spike length and protein content were significantly influenced by ion beam, and effective tiller number and wet gluten content were moderately influenced. Multiple comparisons of all the indices within groups indicated genomic instability among these groups. Coefficient of variation im- plied the differences within group were very low. [Conclusion] Ion beam irradiation displayed characteristics of multi-directivity and non-directiveness. It aroused multiple variations in the same mutant. Instability among progeny indicates cells had different fate even in the same irradiated tissue. It may take several generations for mutants to stabilize particular phenotypes. The effects of ion beam irradiation may be the in- terrelated direct irradiation damage, indirect irradiation damage and late effect, such as bystander effect and adaptive response.

  9. Limits for Beam Induced Damage: Reckless or too Cautious?

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Accidental events implying direct beam impacts on collimators are of the utmost importance as they may lead to serious limitations of the overall LHC Performance. In order to assess damage threshold of components impacted by high energy density beams, entailing changes of phase and extreme pressures, state-of-the-art numerical simulation methods are required. In this paper, a review of the different dynamic response regimes induced by particle beams is given along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each regime. Particular attention is paid to the most critical case, that of shock waves, for which standard Finite Element codes are totally unfit. A novel category of numerical tools, named Hydrocodes, has been adapted and used to analyse the consequences of an asynchronous beam abort on Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT). A number of simulations has been carried out with varying beam energy, number of bunches and bunch sizes allowing to identify different damage levels for the TCT up to catastr...

  10. (d,p)-transfer induced fission of heavy radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, Martin

    2012-01-01

    (d,p)-transfer induced fission is proposed as a tool to study low energy fission of exotic heavy nuclei. Primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission offers a possibility for systematic study the low energy fission of heavy exotic nuclei at the ISOLDE.

  11. Transverse Emittance reconstruction in presence of space charge and application to the 50 MeV beam of Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Tudela, M; Posocco, P A

    2011-01-01

    During the commissioning stage of Linac4 a test bench is planned to be used in order to characterize the 50 MeV beam after the DTL. Among other parameters, it will be possible to measure the transverse emittance using both the 3 monitors and the quadrupole scan method. As the space charge effects are not negligible at this energy, classical techniques of emittance reconstruction become questionable and a different approach based on recursive beam dynamics simulations must be applied.

  12. Electron beam induced current in photovoltaics with high recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Koirala, Prakash; Collins, Robert W.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Ideally, an EBIC measurement reflects the spatially resolved quantum efficiency of the device. In this work, a model for EBIC measurements is presented which applies when recombination within the depletion region is substantial. This model is motivated by cross-sectional EBIC experiments on CdS-CdTe photovoltaic cells which show th...

  13. Stationary self-consistent distributions for a charged particle beam in the longitudinal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivotin, O. I.; Ovsyannikov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    A review of analytical solutions of the Vlasov equation for a beam of charged particles is given. These results are analyzed on the basis of a unified approach developed by the authors. In the context of this method, a space of integrals of motion is introduced in which the integrals of motion of particles are considered as coordinates. In this case, specifying a self-consistent distribution is reduced to defining a distribution density in this space. This approach allows us to simplify the construction and analysis of different self-consistent distributions. In particular, it is possible, in some cases, to derive new solutions by considering linear combinations of well-known solutions. This approach also makes it possible in many cases to give a visual geometric representation of self-consistent distributions in the space of integrals of motion.

  14. A Multimedia Tutorial for Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 1995 WhistleSoft, Inc., began developing a computer-based multimedia tutorial for charged-particle beam dynamics under Phase II of a Small Business Innovative Research grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. In Phase I of this project (see its Final Report) we had developed several prototype multimedia modules using an authoring system on NeXTStep computers. Such a platform was never our intended target, and when we began Phase II we decided to make the change immediately to develop our tutorial modules for the Windows and Macintosh microcomputer market. This Report details our progress and accomplishments. It also gives a flavor of the look and feel of the presently available and upcoming modules

  15. Mass and charge distributions in Fe-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, H.; Mignerey, A.C.; Marchetti, A.A.; Weston-Dawkes, A.P.; Kehoe, W.L.; Obenshain, F.

    1995-02-21

    The charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 12-MeV/nucleon {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho reaction were measured at a laboratory scattering angle of 16 degrees. The mass and charge distributions of the projectile-like fragments were generated as a function of total kinetic energy loss (TKEL), and characterized by their neutron and proton centroids and variances, and correlation factors. A weak drift of the system towards mass asymmetry, opposite to the direction which minimizes the potential energy of the composite system, was observed. The increase in the variances with energy loss is consistent with a nucleon exchange mechanism as a means for energy dissipation. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup`s and, Tassan-Got`s models, are compared to the experimental results of the 672-MeV {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho reaction and to other Fe-induced reactions. The proton and neutron centroids were found to be generally better reproduced by Tassan-Got`s model than by Randrup`s model. The variances and correlation factor are well reproduced for asymmetric systems by both models.

  16. Coulomb charging energy of vacancy-induced states in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, V. G.; Dias da Silva, Luis G. G. V.; Lewenkopf, C. H.

    2016-08-01

    Vacancies in graphene have been proposed to give rise to π -like magnetism in carbon materials, a conjecture which has been supported by recent experimental evidence. A key element in this "vacancy magnetism" is the formation of magnetic moments in vacancy-induced electronic states. In this work we compute the charging energy U of a single-vacancy-generated localized state for bulk graphene and graphene ribbons. We use a tight-binding model to calculate the dependency of the charging energy U on the amplitudes of the localized wave function on the graphene lattice sites. We show that for bulk graphene U scales with the system size L as (lnL) -2, confirming the predictions in the literature, based on heuristic arguments. In contrast, we find that for realistic system sizes U is of the order of eV, a value that is orders of magnitude higher than the previously reported estimates. Finally, when edges are considered, we show that U is very sensitive to the vacancy position with respect to the graphene flake boundaries. In the case of armchair nanoribbons, we find a strong enhancement of U in certain vacancy positions as compared to the value for vacancies in bulk graphene.

  17. Direct observation of the topological charge of a terahertz vortex beam generated by a Tsurupica spiral phase plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K., E-mail: k-miyamoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Suizu, K.; Akiba, T. [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Omatsu, T. [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); CREST Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-06-30

    A terahertz (THz) spiral phase plate with high transmission (>90% after Fresnel correction) and low dispersion has been developed based on the Tsurupica olefin polymer. Direct observations of the topological charge (both magnitude and sign) of a THz vortex beam are performed by using a THz camera with tilted lens focusing and radial defect introduction. The vortex outputs with a topological charge of ±1 (or ±2) are obtained at a frequency of 2 (or 4) THz.

  18. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Angulo, C; Rayet, M; Descouvemont, P; Baye, D; Leclercq-Willain, C; Coc, A; Barhoumi, S; Aguer, P; Rolfs, C; Kunz, R; Hammer, J W; Mayer, A; Paradelis, T; Kossionides, S; Chronidou, C; Spyrou, K; Degl'Innocenti, S; Fiorentini, G; Ricci, B; Zavatarelli, S; Providência, C; Wolters, H; Soares, J; Grama, C; Rahighi, J; Shotter, A; Rachti, M L

    1999-01-01

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 <= Z <= 14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 10 sup 6 K to 10 sup 1 sup 0 K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  19. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leclercq-Willain, C.; Coc, A.; Barhoumi, S.; Aguer, P.; Rolfs, C.; Kunz, R.; Hammer, J.W.; Mayer, A.; Paradellis, T.; Kossionides, S.; Chronidou, C.; Spyrou, K.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Fiorentini, G.; Ricci, B.; Zavatarelli, S.; Providencia, C.; Wolters, H.; Soares, J.; Grama, C.; Rahighi, J.; Shotter, A.; Rachti, M. Lamehi

    1999-08-23

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 {<=} Z {<=} 14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 10{sup 6} K to 10{sup 10} K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  20. Charge-induced optical bistability in thermal Rydberg vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Weller, Daniel; Rico, Andy; Löw, Robert; Kübler, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of optical bistability in a driven ensemble of Rydberg atoms. By performing two experiments with thermal vapors of rubidium and cesium, we are able to shed light onto the underlying interaction mechanisms causing such a non-linear behavior. Due to the different properties of these two atomic species, we conclude that the large polarizability of Rydberg states in combination with electric fields of spontaneously ionized Rydberg atoms is the relevant interaction mechanism. In the case of rubidium, we directly measure the electric field in a bistable situation via two-species spectroscopy. In cesium, we make use of the different sign of the polarizability for different l-states and the possibility of applying electric fields. Both these experiments allow us to rule out dipole-dipole interactions, and support our hypothesis of a charge-induced bistability.

  1. Atomic collision experiments utilizing low-velocity, highly-charged ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intense beams of highly-stripped ions are now routinely produced at low velocities using the Brookhaven dual MP-tandens in a unique four-stage accel/decel mode. This mode of operation combines three stages of acceleration, stripping at high energy, and one stage of deceleration to near-zero velocity. To date, experiments have used 10-100 nA beams of bare and few-electron heavy ions at energies as low as 0.2 MeV/amu, and upgrades of the facility should push the lower limit below 0.1 MeV/amu. Recent experiments, such as measurements of charge transfer and x-ray production for S/sup 6-16+/ on He and Ar at 6 to 20 MeV and P(b) measurements for MO x-rays produced in Cl/sup 16 +/ + Ar collisions at 20, 10, and 5 MeV have demonstrated the usefulness of highly-stripped, low-velocity projectiles. These experiments and a few possibilities for future experiments are discussed.

  2. Atomic collision experiments utilizing low-velocity, highly-charged ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense beams of highly-stripped ions are now routinely produced at low velocities using the Brookhaven dual MP-tandems in a unique four-stage accel/decel mode. This mode of operation combines three stages of acceleration, stripping at high energy, and one stage of deceleration to near-zero velocity. To date, experiments have used 10-100 nA beams of bare and few-electron heavy ions at energies as low as 0.2 MeV/amu, and upgrades of the facility should push the lower limit below 0.1 MeV/amu. Recent experiments, such as measurements of charge transfer and x-ray production for S6-16+ on He and Ar at 6-20 MeV and P(b) measurements for MO x-rays produced in Cl16+ + Ar collisions at 20, 10 and 5 MeV have demonstrated the usefulness of highly-stripped, low-velocity projectiles. These experiments and a few possibilities for future experiments are discussed

  3. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam 7Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass (58Ni) and heavy (208Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×105 pps 7Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems

  4. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: Charged secondaries produced by 4He and 12C ion beams in a PMMA target at large angle

    CERN Document Server

    Rucinski, A; Battistoni, G; Collamati, F; Faccini, R; Frallicciardi, P M; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paramatti, R; Piersanti, L; Pinci, D; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Toppi, M; Traini, G; Voena, C; Patera, V

    2016-01-01

    Measurements performed with the purpose of characterizing the charged secondary radiation for dose release monitoring in particle therapy are reported. Charged secondary yields, energy spectra and emission profiles produced in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) target by 4He and 12C beams of different therapeutic energies were measured at 60 and 90 degree with respect to the primary beam direction. The secondary yields of protons produced along the primary beam path in PMMA target were obtained. The energy spectra of charged secondaries were obtained from time-of-flight information, whereas the emission profiles were reconstructed exploiting tracking detector information. The measured charged secondary yields and emission profiles are in agreement with the results reported in literature and confirm the feasibility of ion beam therapy range monitoring using 12C ion beam. The feasibility of range monitoring using charged secondary particles is also suggested for 4He ion beam.

  5. Heavy Inertial Confinement Energy: Interactions Involoving Low charge State Heavy Ion Injection Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Robert D

    2006-04-14

    During the contract period, absolute cross sections for projectile ionization, and in some cases for target ionization, were measured for energetic (MeV/u) low-charge-state heavy ions interacting with gases typically found in high and ultra-high vacuum environments. This information is of interest to high-energy-density research projects as inelastic interactions with background gases can lead to serious detrimental effects when intense ion beams are accelerated to high energies, transported and possibly confined in storage rings. Thus this research impacts research and design parameters associated with projects such as the Heavy Ion Fusion Project, the High Current and Integrated Beam Experiments in the USA and the accelerator upgrade at GSI-Darmstadt, Germany. Via collaborative studies performed at GSI-Darmstadt, at the University of East Carolina, and Texas A&M University, absolute cross sections were measured for a series of collision systems using MeV/u heavy ions possessing most, or nearly all, of their bound electrons, e.g., 1.4 MeV/u Ar{sup +}, Xe{sup 3+}, and U{sup 4,6,10+}. Interactions involving such low-charge-state heavy ions at such high energies had never been previously explored. Using these, and data taken from the literature, an empirical model was developed for extrapolation to much higher energies. In order to extend our measurements to much higher energies, the gas target at the Experimental Storage Ring in GSI-Darmstadt was used. Cross sections were measured between 20 and 50 MeV/u for U{sup 28+}- H{sub 2} and - N{sub 2}, the primary components found in high and ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage lifetime measurements, information inversely proportional to the cross section, were performed up to 180 MeV/u. The lifetime and cross section data test various theoretical approaches used to calculate cross sections for many-electron systems. Various high energy density research projects directly benefit by this information. As a result, the general

  6. A critical literature review of focused electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Hagen, C. W.

    2008-10-01

    An extensive review is given of the results from literature on electron beam induced deposition. Electron beam induced deposition is a complex process, where many and often mutually dependent factors are involved. The process has been studied by many over many years in many different experimental setups, so it is not surprising that there is a great variety of experimental results. To come to a better understanding of the process, it is important to see to which extent the experimental results are consistent with each other and with the existing model. All results from literature were categorized by sorting the data according to the specific parameter that was varied (current density, acceleration voltage, scan patterns, etc.). Each of these parameters can have an effect on the final deposit properties, such as the physical dimensions, the composition, the morphology, or the conductivity. For each parameter-property combination, the available data are discussed and (as far as possible) interpreted. By combining models for electron scattering in a solid, two different growth regimes, and electron beam induced heating, the majority of the experimental results were explained qualitatively. This indicates that the physical processes are well understood, although quantitatively speaking the models can still be improved. The review makes clear that several major issues remain. One issue encountered when interpreting results from literature is the lack of data. Often, important parameters (such as the local precursor pressure) are not reported, which can complicate interpretation of the results. Another issue is the fact that the cross section for electron induced dissociation is unknown. In a number of cases, a correlation between the vertical growth rate and the secondary electron yield was found, which suggests that the secondary electrons dominate the dissociation rather than the primary electrons. Conclusive evidence for this hypothesis has not been found. Finally

  7. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  8. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U90+ beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  9. Unresolved puzzles in the x-ray emission produced by charge exchange measured on electron beam ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge exchange recombination, the transfer of one or more electrons from an atomic or molecular system to a positive ion, is a common phenomenon affecting laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Controlled studies of this process in electron beam ion traps during the past one and a half decades have produced multiple observations that are difficult to explain with available spectral models. Some of the most recent observations are so puzzling that they bring in doubt the existence of a coherent predictive capability for line formation by charge exchange, making investigations of charge exchange a fertile ground for continued measurements and theoretical development.

  10. Unresolved puzzles in the x-ray emission produced by charge exchange measured on electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Clementson, J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Schweikhard, L. [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    Charge exchange recombination, the transfer of one or more electrons from an atomic or molecular system to a positive ion, is a common phenomenon affecting laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Controlled studies of this process in electron beam ion traps during the past one and a half decades have produced multiple observations that are difficult to explain with available spectral models. Some of the most recent observations are so puzzling that they bring in doubt the existence of a coherent predictive capability for line formation by charge exchange, making investigations of charge exchange a fertile ground for continued measurements and theoretical development.

  11. Self-consistent simulation of radiation and space-charge in high-brightness relativistic electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, David R.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to preserve the quality of relativistic electron beams through transport bend elements such as a bunch compressor chicane is increasingly difficult as the current increases because of effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and space-charge. Theoretical CSR models and simulations, in their current state, often make unrealistic assumptions about the beam dynamics and/or structures. Therefore, we have developed a model and simulation that contains as many of these elements as possible for the purpose of making high-fidelity end-to-end simulations. Specifically, we are able to model, in a completely self-consistent, three-dimensional manner, the sustained interaction of radiation and space-charge from a relativistic electron beam in a toroidal waveguide with rectangular cross-section. We have accomplished this by combining a time-domain field solver that integrates a paraxial wave equation valid in a waveguide when the dimensions are small compared to the bending radius with a particle-in-cell dynamics code. The result is shown to agree with theory under a set of constraints, namely thin rigid beams, showing the stimulation resonant modes and including comparisons for waveguides approximating vacuum, and parallel plate shielding. Using a rigid beam, we also develop a scaling for the effect of beam width, comparing both our simulation and numerical integration of the retarded potentials. We further demonstrate the simulation calculates the correct longitudinal space-charge forces to produce the appropriate potential depression for a converging beam in a straight waveguide with constant dimensions. We then run fully three-dimensional, self-consistent end-to-end simulations of two types of bunch compressor designs, illustrating some of the basic scaling properties and perform a detailed analysis of the output phase-space distribution. Lastly, we show the unique ability of our simulation to model the evolution of charge/energy perturbations on a

  12. Photo-induced changes in charge-ordered state of Ti4O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated photo-induced effects on the charge-ordered state of Ti4O7 with pump-probe spectroscopy. Reflectivity of the probe light changes after the pulsed pump excitation, and then recovers. The photo-induced effects are observed only when the pump power exceeds a threshold value, indicative of cooperative nature of the formation process, and the recovery rate shows thermally activated behaviour. We propose that the photo-induced state is a metastable charge localized state where charge disorder is induced by a photon-assisted charge transfer process from Ti26+ dimers to the neighbouring Ti4+ions. Moreover, it is found that subsequent cw laser irradiation converts the photo-induced state into the charge-ordered state. We interpret this result in terms of formation of Ti26+ dimers via an inverse charge transfer process assisted by the cw optical excitation.

  13. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arduini, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruce, R.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β* are studied.

  14. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do

  15. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.;

    atmospheric conditions using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear and significant contribution from ion induced nucleation and consider this to be an unambiguous observation of the ion-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions not far......The effect of ions in aerosol nucleation is a subject where much remains to be discovered. That ions can enhance nucleation has been shown by theory, observations, and experiments. However, the exact mechanism still remains to be determined. One question is if the nature of the ionization affects...... the nucleation. This is an essential question since many experiments have been performed using radioactive sources that ionize differently than the cosmic rays which are responsible for the majority of atmospheric ionization. Here we report on an experimental study of sulphuric acid aerosol nucleation under near...

  16. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H+ beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO

  17. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J. C.; Salomon, J.; Tonezzer, M.; Scian, C.; Beck, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Della Mea, G.

    2008-05-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H+ beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO.

  18. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  19. Plane density of induced vacuum charge in a supercritical Coulomb potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khalilov, V R

    2016-01-01

    An expression for the density of a planar induced vacuum charge is obtained in a strong Coulomb potential in coordinate space. Treatment is based on a self-adjoint extension approach for constructing of the Green's function of a charged fermion in this potential. Induced vacuum charge density is calculated and analyzed at the subcritical and supercritical Coulomb potentials for massless and massive fermions. The behavior of the obtained vacuum charge density is investigated at long and short distances from the Coulomb center. The induced vacuum charge has a screening sign. Screening of a Coulomb impurity in graphene is briefly discussed. We calculate the real vacuum polarization charge density that acquires the quantum electrodynamics vacuum in the supercritical Coulomb potential due to the so-called real vacuum polarization. It is shown that the vacuum charge densities essentially differ in massive and massless cases. We expect that our results can, as a matter of principle, be tested in graphene with a supe...

  20. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  1. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Jin, T.; Shang, Y.; Zhan, W. L.; Wei, B. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6T at injection, 2.2T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5kW by two 18GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810eμA of O7+, 505eμA of Xe20+, 306eμA of Xe27+, and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  2. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007. PMID:18315105

  3. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H Y; Zhang, J J; Jin, Q Y; Liu, W; Wang, G C; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 10(13) W cm(-2) in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  4. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, J. J.; Jin, Q. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, W.; Wang, G. C. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup −2} in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  5. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Jin, Q. Y.; Liu, W.; Wang, G. C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 1013 W cm-2 in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  6. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 1013 W cm−2 in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications

  7. Optimisation of numerical methods for plasma physics. Application to charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents different numerical methods in order to simulate plasmas or charged particles beams with reduced cost. Movement of charged particles in an electromagnetic field is given by the Vlasov equation. This equation is coupled to the Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic field, or to the Poisson equation in a more simple case. Several models exist for solving this system. In kinetic models, particles are represented by a distribution function f(x,v,t) verifying the Vlasov equation. In the general 3-dimensional case, 7 variables appear in the system and computations become heavy. Fluid models consider macroscopic quantities linked to f, such as density, mean velocity and temperature. These quantities only depend on position x and time t. The cost, but also the precision, are reduced. In the first part of this thesis, a multi-fluid method is used for solving the 1-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system. It is based on the 'a priori' knowledge of the shape of f. Two possibilities are studied: a sum of Dirac masses and the multi-water-bag model. This kind of methods is rather adapted to systems staying close to the equilibrium. The second part presents the decomposition of f between an equilibrium part and a perturbation. The equilibrium part is solved by a fluid method whereas we use a kinetic method for the perturbation. We construct an asymptotic preserving scheme for the Vlasov-Poisson-BGK system using such a decomposition. The third part deals with the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method in 2D axisymmetric geometry. A work based on iso-geometric analysis is presented, and then a PIC - Discontinuous Galerkin program computed on graphic card (GPU). This architecture reduces significantly calculation time. (author)

  8. Industrial perspective on focused electron beam-induced processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, Tristan; Hofmann, Thorsten; Edinger, Klaus [Betriebsstaette Rossdorf, Carl Zeiss SMS GmbH, Rossdorf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    After a short overview of the historical developments of the technique of gas-assisted focused electron beam-induced processing (mostly deposition and etching), this paper deals with the applications of this technology to photolithographic mask repair. A commented list of results is shown on different mask types, for different types of defects, and at different node generations. The scope of this article is double: summarize the state of the art in a fast-paced highly specific industrial environment driven by ''Moore's law'' and feedback to academic researchers some technologically relevant directions for further investigations. (orig.)

  9. Volume changes in glass induced by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three glasses (float, borosilicate float and Schott D263 glasses) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 0.21–318.5 kC/m2. Volume changes induced by electron bombarding were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. Incubation doses, related to mobility of alkali ions, were measured. Low doses showed compaction of all glasses while higher doses revealed volume inflation, except for borosilicate float glass. Both surfaces of float glass were irradiated and significant differences between them were found

  10. Enhanced particle trapping performance of induced charge electroosmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Wu, Yupan; Jia, Yankai; Lang, Qi; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    By increasing the number of floating electrodes or enlarging the width of single floating electrode, this work provides effective ways to strongly improve the particle trapping performance of induced charge electroosmosis (ICEO). Particle trapping with double or triple separate narrow floating electrodes increases the effective actuating range of ICEO flow and therefore enhance the optimum trapping ability to be 1.63 or 2.34 times of that with single narrow electrode (width of L=200μm), and the ideal trapping frequency is independent of the electrode number due to the mutual independence of electrochemical ion relaxation over each electrode. Furthermore, using a single wide floating electrode with the effective width equal to three separate narrow floating electrodes (L=600μm) instead of a single narrow one slightly lowers the ideal trapping frequency due to an increase in the characteristic polarization length, but the trapping performance is only up to 1.59 times of that with original single narrow electrode, implying that vertical channel confinement effect may severely suppresses the effective actuating range of ICEO flow and renders the trapping performance not as expected. Trapping experiments over wide floating electrode with different channel height were carried out, showing that the trapping performance increases by correctly increasing the channel height. PMID:26914414

  11. Fission modes in charged-particle induced fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthies, A.; Kotte, R.; Seidel, W.; Stary, F.; Wohlfarth, D. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-12-01

    The population of the three fission modes predicted by Brosa's multi-channel fission model for the uranium region was studied in different fissioning systems. They were produced bombarding {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U targets by light charged particles with energies slightly above the Coulomb barrier. Though the maximum excitation energy of the compound nucleus amounted to about 22 MeV, the influences of various spherical and deformed nuclear shells on the mass and total kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments are still pronounced. The larger variances of the total kinetic energy distributions compared to those of thermal neutron induced fission were explained by temperature dependent fluctuations of the amount and velocity of alteration of the scission point elongation of the fissioning system. From the ratio of these variances the portion of the potential energy dissipated among intrinsic degrees of freedom before scission was deduced for the different fission channels. It was found that the excitation remaining after pre-scission neutron emission is mainly transferred into intrinsic heat and less into pre-scission kinetic energy. (orig.).

  12. Refractive index changes induced by sheet beams with various intensity distributions in LiNbO3:Fe crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; ZHAO Jianlin; XU Honglai; SUN Yidong; YANG Dexing; WANG Meirong

    2005-01-01

    According to the Kukhtarev equations and a simplified model based on the photovoltaic charge carriers transport mechanism, the distributions of the index changes (DICs) in LiNbO3:Fe crystals induced by sheet beams with various intensity profiles are theoretically analyzed. The numerically simulated results coincide with the analytic expressions deduced from the simplified model. The DICs in a LiNbO3:Fe crystal induced by sheet beams with rectangular, Gaussian and square law profiles are measured by using the interferometric method. By employing the analytic expressions, the experimental data points are well fitted. By utilizing the angular spectrum theory and the ray equation, the uniformities of the intensity profiles of the writing beams along the propagation directions and the influences of the self-defocusing effect of the crystal are numerically simulated, respectively. The results show that the experimental results are reliable. The numerically simulated method and the analytic expressions can be both employed to predict the DICs induced by sheet beams with various light intensity profiles. Furthermore, utilizing writing beams with proper intensity profiles, any desired index distributions could be obtained.

  13. Radioactive Beams from 252CF Fission Using a Gas Catcher and an ECR Charge Breeder at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Pardo, Richard C; Hecht, Adam; Moore, Eugene F; Savard, Guy

    2005-01-01

    An upgrade to the radioactive beam capability of the ATLAS facility has been proposed using 252Cf fission fragments thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam using a helium gas catcher. In order to reaccelerate these beams an existing ATLAS ECR ion source will be reconfigured as a charge breeder source. A 1Ci 252Cf source is expected to provide sufficient yield to deliver beams of up to ~106 far from stability ions per second on target. A facility description, the expected performance and the expected performance will be presented in this paper. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract W-31-109-ENG-38.

  14. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N

    2013-01-01

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  15. Measurement of charged particle yields from therapeutic beams in view of the design of an innovative hadrontherapy dose monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G; Bini, F; Collamati, F; Collini, F; De Lucia, E; Durante, M; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Frallicciardi, P M; La Tessa, C; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Miraglia, F; Morganti, S; Ortega, P G; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Pinci, D; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Schuy, C; Sciubba, A; Senzacqua, M; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Vanstalle, M; Voena, C

    2015-01-01

    Particle Therapy (PT) is an emerging technique, which makes use of charged particles to efficiently cure different kinds of solid tumors. The high precision in the hadrons dose deposition requires an accurate monitoring to prevent the risk of under-dosage of the cancer region or of over-dosage of healthy tissues. Monitoring techniques are currently being developed and are based on the detection of particles produced by the beam interaction into the target, in particular: charged particles, result of target and/or projectile fragmentation, prompt photons coming from nucleus de-excitation and back-to-back γ s, produced in the positron annihilation from β + emitters created in the beam interaction with the target. It has been showed that the hadron beam dose release peak can be spatially correlated with the emission pattern of these secondary particles. Here we report about secondary particles production (charged fragments and prompt γ s) performed at different beam and energies that have a particular relevan...

  16. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields

  17. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Salomon, J.; Dran, J. C.; Tonezzer, M.; Della Mea, G.

    2007-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields.

  18. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The operation of the LHCb RICH photon detection system in a charged particle test beam

    CERN Document Server

    Brisbane, Sean

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN employs two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors to provide particle identification over the range 1 to 100 GeV/$c$. The RICH detectors use custom-built Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) to detect the Cherenkov photons over the wavelength range 200-600 nm. Three colums of 16 HPDs with final readout electronics and data acquisition were installed in a prototype Cherenkov gas enclosure. Two gas radiators were studied, nitrogen and $C_{4}F_{10}$. Saturated Cherenkov rings ($\\beta \\approx$ 1) were focused onto the plane of HPDs by exposing the radiators to a beam of 80 GeV/$c$ charged pions from the CERN SPS, operated with a 25 ns bunch structure. The HPDs and the on- and off-detector electronics performed to specification, and the DAQ system was verified under the sustained 40 MHz readout mode required for LHC running. The analysis verified the local alignment across the HPDs and their relative timing. The photon yields from both radiators are in good agreement with expectations.

  20. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097, USA and Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 and the Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) of the Technical Design Report (TDR) (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  1. Method for extremal control of the beam parameters in charged particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of extremal control of charged particle beam parameters is suggested for the solution of the timization problem ophe IHEP boster operation mode. Motion along the estimation of drift direction with simultaneous adaptation to the value of drift rate is organized in the suggested method of extremal control. It is assumed that trajectory of the drift extremum can be approximated by the piecewise-linear function. Estimation of the drift direction is exercised on the base of fixation of two consequent positions of the extremum in the control space. The identification of the drift-direction are introduced in the algorithm of tracing the extrenum drift. Investigation of the method on the test two-dimensional square surface has shown that the method provides drift tracing within the rate of 0.01 a deg - 2 a deg where a deg - the initial working step of the stochastic approximation method. The average deviation does not exceed 0.7 a deg, and the accuracy of adaptation to the value of drift rate 10-3 K

  2. Rapid ion-beam-induced Ostwald ripening in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-beam-induced grain coarsening in initially amorphous (Zr,Y)Ox layers is observed by atomic force microscopy. The films were bombarded at room temperature. Grain-boundary grooves indicate that the larger grains have a diameter of about 83 nm at 2 min, and 131 nm at 5 min. Up to 5 min, the grain size evolves with time as tβ, with β=0.5±0.2. Based on a new parametrization of ion-induced grain-boundary translation, we derive a theoretical estimate of β=3/7, consistent with our measurement. By 7.5 min, many of the grain-boundary grooves are shallow and indistinct, suggesting that the surviving grains are mutually well aligned. Such rapid grain growth at room temperature is unusual and is enabled by the ion bombardment. Similar grain growth processes are expected during ion-beam-assisted deposition film growth. The status of ion-textured yttria stabilized zirconia films as buffer layers for high-current high-temperature superconducting films is briefly summarized

  3. Electron-Beam Induced Transformations of Layered Tin Dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, E; Huang, Y; Komsa, H-P; Ghorbani-Asl, M; Krasheninnikov, A V; Sutter, P

    2016-07-13

    By combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated analytical methods with first-principles calculations, we study the behavior of layered tin dichalcogenides under electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate that the controllable removal of chalcogen atoms due to electron irradiation, at both room and elevated temperatures, gives rise to transformations in the atomic structure of Sn-S and Sn-Se systems so that new phases with different properties can be induced. In particular, rhombohedral layered SnS2 and SnSe2 can be transformed via electron beam induced loss of chalcogen atoms into highly anisotropic orthorhombic layered SnS and SnSe. A striking dependence of the layer orientation of the resulting SnS-parallel to the layers of ultrathin SnS2 starting material, but slanted for transformations of thicker few-layer SnS2-is rationalized by a transformation pathway in which vacancies group into ordered S-vacancy lines, which convert via a Sn2S3 intermediate to SnS. Absence of a stable Sn2Se3 intermediate precludes this pathway for the selenides, hence SnSe2 always transforms into basal plane oriented SnSe. Our results provide microscopic insights into the transformation mechanism and show how irradiation can be used to tune the properties of layered tin chalcogenides for applications in electronics, catalysis, or energy storage.

  4. Electron-Beam Induced Transformations of Layered Tin Dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, E; Huang, Y; Komsa, H-P; Ghorbani-Asl, M; Krasheninnikov, A V; Sutter, P

    2016-07-13

    By combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated analytical methods with first-principles calculations, we study the behavior of layered tin dichalcogenides under electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate that the controllable removal of chalcogen atoms due to electron irradiation, at both room and elevated temperatures, gives rise to transformations in the atomic structure of Sn-S and Sn-Se systems so that new phases with different properties can be induced. In particular, rhombohedral layered SnS2 and SnSe2 can be transformed via electron beam induced loss of chalcogen atoms into highly anisotropic orthorhombic layered SnS and SnSe. A striking dependence of the layer orientation of the resulting SnS-parallel to the layers of ultrathin SnS2 starting material, but slanted for transformations of thicker few-layer SnS2-is rationalized by a transformation pathway in which vacancies group into ordered S-vacancy lines, which convert via a Sn2S3 intermediate to SnS. Absence of a stable Sn2Se3 intermediate precludes this pathway for the selenides, hence SnSe2 always transforms into basal plane oriented SnSe. Our results provide microscopic insights into the transformation mechanism and show how irradiation can be used to tune the properties of layered tin chalcogenides for applications in electronics, catalysis, or energy storage. PMID:27336595

  5. Photopolymerization-Induced Two-Beam Coupling and Light-Induced Scattering in Polymethyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; GAO Feng; TANG Bai-Quan; Christian Pruner; ZHANG Xin-Zheng; SHI Yan-Li; XU Jing-Jun; QIAO Hai-Jun; WU Qiang; Romano A. Rupp; LOU Ci-Bo; WANG Zhen-Hua

    2008-01-01

    @@ Light amplification due to two-beam coupling is realized in doped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) glasses. A coupling gain as large as 14 cm-1 is obtained. The dynamic behaviour of absorption and light-induced scattering due to the process of photopolymerization are also studied. The results show that the amplification and its dynamic process enable possible applications of PMMA in optical devices.

  6. Vlasov's kinetic theory of the collective charged particle beam transport through a magnetized plasma in the strongly nonlocal regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma-based accelerator schemes represent the first step of the research-development of the future accelerator machines. Within the Vlasov's kinetic theory, describing the plasma wake field interaction, the collective transport of a warm non-laminar relativistic charged particle beam is analyzed in the strongly nonlocal regime, where the beam spot-size is much less than the plasma wavelength. This is done in the overdense regime, i.e., the beam density is much less than the plasma density. The beam is supposed to be sufficiently long to experience the adiabatic shielding by the plasma. In these conditions, we neglect the longitudinal beam dynamics and focus on the transverse one only. We derive the virial description (envelope description) from the 2D Vlasov-Poisson-type system of equations that governs the transverse self-consistent plasma wake field excitation. The resulting envelope equation is then reduced, in the aberration-less approximation, to a differential equation for the beam spot size, where the role of the ambient magnetic field is evaluated in both laboratory and astrophysical environments. An analysis of the beam envelope self-modulation is then carried out and the criteria for the occurrence of the instability are found. (authors)

  7. Steering of sub-GeV charged particle beams by use of reflections in thin crystal targets

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Chirkov, P N; Giannini, G; Maisheev, V A; Yazynin, I A

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of deflection of a charged particle beam due to channeling in a bent crystal has been well investigated and successfully applied for beam extraction at high-energy accelerators, for energies about 10 GeV and higher. However, it is of a big practical interest to consider the task of bending and extracting charged particles with energies below 1 GeV, for example, for production of ultrastable beams of low emittance for medical and biological applications. However, for low energy, i.e. below 1 GeV, the bent crystal channeling is not efficient. That motivates us to consider in this article an other crystal technique, based on thin straight crystal targets, as elements for the extraction and collimation of the circulating beam in an accelerator ring. The main advantages of reflection in straight crystals, in comparison with bent crystal channeling, consist in the small length of straight crystals along the beam, that reduces the amount of nuclear interactions and improves the background.

  8. Estimation of Charge Exchange Recombination Emission Based on Diagnostic Neutral Beam on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-Mei; WAN Bao-Nian; WU Zhen-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) attenuation and charge exchange recombination emission are estimated on EAST tokamak. Approximately 40% of the beam with the energy of 50 keV can reach the plasma centre (r = 0) for the typical parameters of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) plasma. Emissivities of CVI (n = 8 → 7, 529.0nm) and OVⅢ (n = 10 → 9, 607.0 nm) visible charge exchange recombination emissions based on the DNB are estimated. The emissivities of the visible bremsstrahlung emission near this wavelength are also calculated for comparison. The results show that the charge exchange recombination emission is about two orders of magnitude greater than the bremsstrahlung emission. It is theoretically indicated that the ratio of signal of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy to the noise from background bremsstrahlung emission,S/N, is large enough in the EAST tokamak with the typical designed parameters. The present results are helpful for experiment design of charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy based on the DNB in the EAST tokamak.

  9. Equilibrium charge state distributions of Ni, Co, and Cu beams in molybdenum foil at 2 MeV/u

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastis, Panagiotis; Perdikakis, George; Robertson, Daniel; Bauder, Will; Skulski, Michael; Collon, Phillipe; Anderson, Tyler; Ostdiek, Karen; Aprahamian, Ani; Lu, Wenting; Almus, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The charge states of heavy-ions are important for the study of nuclear reactions in inverse kinematics when electromagnetic recoil mass spectrometers are used. The passage of recoil products through a material, like the windows of gas cells or charge state boosters, results a charge state distribution (CSD) in the exit. This distribution must be known for the extraction of any cross section since only few charge-state can be transmitted through a magnetic separator separator for a given setting. The calculation of CSDs for heavy ions is challenging. Currently we rely on semi-empirical models with unknown accuracy for ion/target combinations in the Z > 20 region. In the present study were measured the CSDs of the stable 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu beams while passing through a 1 μm molybdenum foil. The beam energies were 1.84 MeV/u, 2.09 MeV/u, and 2.11 MeV/u for the 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu respectively. The results of this study mainly check the accuracy of the semi-empirical models used by the program LISE++, on calculating CSDs for ion/target combinations of Z > 20. In addition, other empirical models on calculating mean charge states were compared and checked.

  10. Diffraction pattern by nanometric thin films under illumination of an orbital angular momentum beam with integer topological charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, J. H.; Díaz, C. F.; Acevedo, C. H.; Torres, Y.

    2016-02-01

    The orbital angular momentum of light has a big contribution in many engineering applications like optical communications, because this physical property allows eigenstates characteristic of the wavefront rotation when the beam is propagated. The nature of these eigenstates allows that information can be encoded and gives immunity to electromagnetic interference, allowing an increase of bandwidth, cadence and capacity of the communication channel. This work shown the methodology using nanometric thin films like Titanium based (TiO2) grown over strontium titanate (SrTiO3) support, to distinguish and discriminate a well- defined integer value of the topological charge of an OAM beam.

  11. Method of the ion beam emittance measurement in the injection beam line of DC-72 cyclotron in the presence of its space charge using the scanner to determine beam dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Kasarinov, N Y; Kalagin, I V; Kazacha, V I

    2002-01-01

    The gradient method for measuring the transversal emittance of a high current ion beam in the injection channel of the cyclotron DC-72 is considered. The standard scanner is proposed for measuring the transversal dimensions of the beam. The formulae for determination of the mean square beam dimensions by current signals from the scanner needle are adduced. The method of the emittance recovery for axial-symmetric ion beam is set for the case when the space charge effect is essential. The algorithm for tuning of the quadrupole lenses in the injection channel of the cyclotron DC-72 for obtaining the axial-symmetric ion beam is proposed. The evaluations of the expected accuracy of the proposed method for the emittance recovery have been carried out.

  12. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arduini, Gianluigi; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruce, Roderik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muskinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palm, Marcus; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was obse...

  13. Initial observations of high-charge, low-emittance electron beams at HIBAF (High Brightness Accelerator FEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Carsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Sheffield, R.L.; Stein, W.E.; Johnson, W.J.; Thode, L.E.; Bender, S.C.; Busch, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    We report our initial measurements of bright (high-charge, low-emittance) electron beams generated at the Los Alamos High Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) Facility. Normalized emittance values of less than 50 {pi} mm-mrad for charges ranging from 0.7 to 8.7 nC were obtained for single micropulses at a y-waist and at an energy of 14.7 MeV. These measurements were part of the commissioning campaign on the HIBAF photoelectric injector. Macropulse measurements have also been performed and are compared with PARMELA simulations. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Energy Recovery from a Space-Charge Neutralized Positive Ion Beam by Means of Magnetic Electron Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Philip Michael

    The charge-exchange neutralization efficiency of positive ion based neutral beams used in plasma heating applications decreases as the beam energy increases. Direct energy recovery from the charged particles can be accomplished by electrostatically decelerating the positive ions; the problem is to effect this without accelerating the space -charge neutralizing electrons residing in the beam. Prior work with both electrostatic and magnetic electron suppression is reviewed. A finite difference ion optics code which solves the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equation is adapted to energy recovery application and used to analyze the transverse magnetic field electron suppression experiments carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1980 and 1982. Three numerical models are discussed and evaluated. The double plasma model, which assumes an equilibrium Boltzmann distribution of electrons at both the neutralizer potential and the ion collector potential, most successfully duplicates the experimental results with beams in the 40 keV, 10 A range. It is used to analyze the effects of the magnetic field strength, the ion "boost" energy, and the ion beam current density on the ion collection efficiency. Conclusions of the study are: (1) the electron leakage current scales as B('-1), necessitating magnetic suppression fields in excess of 0.1 tesla; (2) the neutralizer geometry should provide an electrostatic field to counteract the magnetic force on the ions; (3) fractional energy beam ions should be confined to the neutralizer interior; (4) the neutral line density in the recovery region should be less than 3 x 10('-3) torr(.)cm. Recovery efficiency decreases with increasing beam current density; a net recovery efficiency of 30% (ion collection efficiency of 75%) at 5 mA/cm('2) falls to zero at 10 mA/cm('2) for a 40 keV beam. New designs are presented and analyzed: an ion collection efficiency of close to 90% is predicted for an 80 keV D ion beam with an ion current

  15. Cost based interconnection charges as a way to induce competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    The objective of this paper is to analyse the relationship between regulation of interconnection charges and the level of competition. One of the most important issues in the debate on interconnect regulation has been use of forward looking costs for setting of interconnection charges. This debate...... has been ongoing within the EU as well as in US. This paper discusses the European experiences and in particular the Danish experiences with use of cost based interconnection charges, and their impact on competition in the telecom market....

  16. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt [1]. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration [2–4]. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattic...

  17. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 1034 cm-2s-1 in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  18. Beam-induced backgrounds in detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Adrian

    2008-11-15

    There is general consensus in the high-energy physics community that the next particle collider to be built should be a linear electron-positron accelerator. Such a machine, colliding point-like particles with a well-defined initial state, would be an ideal complement to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and would allow high-precision measurements of the new physics phenomena that are likely to be discovered at the TeV energy scale. The most advanced project in that context is the International Linear Collider (ILC), aiming for a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and a luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in its first stage. One of the detector concepts that are currently being developed and studied is the so-called International Large Detector (ILD). A prime feature of the ILD concept is the usage of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as the main tracker, which allows to reach the required momentum resolution, but which also has excellent particle identification capabilities and a highly robust and efficient tracking. The beam-beam interaction of the strongly focused particle bunches at the ILC will produce beamstrahlung photons, which can in turn scatter to electron-positron pairs. These pairs are a major source of detector backgrounds. This thesis explains the methods to study the effects of beam-induced electron-positron pair backgrounds with Mokka, a full detector simulation for the ILC that is based on Geant4, and it presents the simulation results for different detector configurations and various small modifications. The main focus of the simulations and their analysis is on the vertex detector and the TPC, but results for the inner silicon trackers and the hadronic calorimeters are shown as well. (orig.)

  19. Nanoengineered field induced charge separation membranes manufacture thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Kevin C.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Bourcier, William L.; Floyd, III, William Clary

    2016-08-02

    A device according to one embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge and pore configuration characterized by a double layer overlap effect being present in pores of the membrane, where the porous membrane includes functional groups that preferentially interact with either cations or anions. A device according to another embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge in pores thereof sufficient to impart anion or cation selectivity in the pores. Additional devices, systems and methods are also presented.

  20. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulfrad, Yacine, E-mail: yacine.boulfrad@crystals.no; Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska [SolarWorld Innovations GmbH, Berthelsdorfer Str. 111A, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  1. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  2. Numerical computation of space-charge fields of electron bunches in a beam pipe of elliptical shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovik, A.

    2005-09-28

    This work deals in particularly with 3D numerical simulations of space-charge fields from electron bunches in a beam pipe with elliptical cross-section. To obtain the space-charge fields it is necessary to calculate the Poisson equation with given boundary condition and space charge distribution. The discretization of the Poisson equation by the method of finite differences on a Cartesian grid, as well as setting up the coefficient matrix A for the elliptical domain are explained in the section 2. In the section 3 the properties of the coefficient matrix and possible numerical algorithms suitable for solving non-symmetrical linear systems of equations are introduced. In the following section 4, the applied solver algorithms are investigated by numerical tests with right hand side function for which the analytical solution is known. (orig.)

  3. Experimental measurement of emittance growth in mismatched space-charge-dominated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Single Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE) at LBL, we have measured the emittance of a well-matched 4.6-mA beam of 122-keV Cs+ to be conserved from injection into through exit from an 80-lens segment of the AG focussing channel. We then mismatched the beam into the same channel such that the maximum (minimum) radius of the beam at the midplane between lenses was about 1.5 (0.5) times the former value. We caused mismatches in the envelope of the beam in both transverse dimensions (labeled a and b) in modes both symmetric (δa = δb) and antisymmetric (δa = -δb). We found the mismatch amplitude to decay during the beam transit through the channel for both modes of mismatch, although more so for the antisymmetric mode. We also found the emittance of the symmetrically mismatched beam to be the same as for the matched beam, while the emittance of the antisymmetrically mismatched beam grew by as much as a factor of four over that for the matched beam

  4. Transverse Beam Size Effects in Beam Position Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2001-04-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The corrections to BPM signals due to a finite beam size are found analytically for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current. The results for fields can also be directly applied for calculating the beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities.

  5. A laser beam quality definition based on induced temperature rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harold C

    2012-12-17

    Laser beam quality metrics like M(2) can be used to describe the spot sizes and propagation behavior of a wide variety of non-ideal laser beams. However, for beams that have been diffracted by limiting apertures in the near-field, or those with unusual near-field profiles, the conventional metrics can lead to an inconsistent or incomplete description of far-field performance. This paper motivates an alternative laser beam quality definition that can be used with any beam. The approach uses a consideration of the intrinsic ability of a laser beam profile to heat a material. Comparisons are made with conventional beam quality metrics. An analysis on an asymmetric Gaussian beam is used to establish a connection with the invariant beam propagation ratio.

  6. Gas dynamics considerations in a non-invasive profile monitor for charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Tzoganis, Vasilis; Welsch, Carsten P

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive, gas jet-based, beam profile monitor has been developed in the QUASAR Group at the Cockcroft Institute, UK. This allows on-line measurement of the 2-dimensional transverse profile of particle beams with negligible disturbance to either primary beam or accelerator vacuum. The monitor is suitable for use with beams across a wide range of energies and intensities. In this setup a nozzle-skimmer system shapes a thin supersonic gas jet into a curtain. However, the small dimensions of the gas inlet nozzle and subsequent skimmers were shown to be the cause of many operational problems. In this paper, the dynamics of gas jet formation transport and shaping is discussed before an image-processing based alignment technique is introduced. Furthermore, experimental results obtained with a 5 keV electron beam are discussed and the effects of gas stagnation pressure on the acquired beam are presented.

  7. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Robert H.; /Colorado U.

    2010-04-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CC{pi}{sup 0}) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics ({approx} 1,000,000 interactions) low-energy (E{sub {nu}} {element_of} 0.5-2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CC{pi}{sup 0} events is presented. The {pi}{sup 0} and {mu}{sup -} are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CC{pi}{sup 0} cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q{sup 2}. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <{sigma}>{sub {Phi}} = (9.2 {+-} 0.3{sub stat.} {+-} 1.5{sub syst}.) x 10{sup -39} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  8. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Robert H. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCπ0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (~ 1, 000, 000 interactions) low-energy (Evϵ 2 0.5 - 2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCπ0 events is presented. The π0 and μ- are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCπ0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <σ>Φ = (9.2 ± 0.3stat. ± 1.5syst.) × 10-39 cm2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  9. Ion beam induced effects at 15 K in z-cutLiNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary effects of the damage formation in z-cut LiNbO3 due to ion irradiation was investigated. Therefor the samples were irradiated stepwise and subsequently measured by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) at 15 K without changing the temperature of the sample. The irradiation was done with 30 keV H-, 50 keV Li-, 160 keV O- and 350 keV Ar-ions at ion fluences between 5 x 1011 cm-2 and 2 x 1017 cm-2. The RBS measurements were performed with 1.4 MeV He-ions in steps of equal charges providing a series of subspectra. It was observed that the backscattering yield of the damaged region decreases with increasing number of subspectra indicating an annealing of defects as a consequence of the RBS measurement. The energy deposited into electronic processes by the analyzing He beam is mostly responsible for the observed defect annealing. The amount of annealing depends on the defect concentration and the ion species. The undisturbed defect accumulation which will be observed without any effect of measurement was calculated for the different ion species by an analytical formula taking into account the He-beam induced annealing

  10. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; /UC, Davis; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  11. Neutrino induced charged-current coherent $\\rho$ production

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    We present the latest results of coherent $\\rho$ (Coh$\\rho$) production using the large data set collected by the NOMAD detector in which the momenta, charges, and photons are precisely measured. We discuss the application of using Coh$\\rho$ process to constrain the neutrino flux with the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment Near Detector, the high resolution Straw Tube Tracker.

  12. Study of the liquid water luminescence induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many observations suggested that liquid water (with impurities) could give a luminescence output when irradiated with charged particles. We investigate theoretical and practical possibility of detecting such luminescence. Preliminary results on this possibility are presented, and a layout of the device proposed for measuring luminescence is given. (authors)

  13. Focused electron beam induced deposition of magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Teresa, Jose M.

    2011-03-01

    Nanopatterning strategies of magnetic materials normally rely on standard techniques such as electron-beam lithography using electron-sensitive resists. Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is currently being investigated as an alternative single-step route to produce functional magnetic nanostructures. Thus, Co-based and Fe-based precursors have been recently investigated for the growth of magnetic nanostructures by FEBID. In the present contribution, I will give an overview of the existing literature on magnetic nanostructures by FEBID and I will focus on the growth of Co nanostructures by FEBID using Co 2 (CO)8 as precursor gas. The Co content in the nanostructures can reach 95%. Magnetotransport experiments indicate that full metallic behaviour is displayed with relatively low residual resistivity and standard anisotropic magnetoresistance (0.8%). The coercive field of nanowires with changing aspect ratio has been determined in nanowires with width down to 150 nm by means of Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and the magnetization reversal has been imaged by means of Magnetic Force Microscopy, Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy as well as Lorentz Microscopy experiments. Nano-Hall probes have been grown with remarkable minimum detectable magnetic flux. Noticeably, it has been found that the domain-wall propagation field is lower than the domain-wall nucleation field in L-shaped nanowires, with potential applications in magnetic logic, sensing and storage. The spin polarization of these Co nanodeposits has been determined through Andreev-Reflection experiments in ferromagnetic-superconducting nanocontacts and amounts to 35%. Recent results obtained in Fe-based nanostructures by FEBID using Fe 2 (CO)9 precursor will be also presented. I acknowledge the collaboration in this field with A. Fernandez-Pacheco, R. Cordoba, L. Serrano, S. Sangiao, L.A. Rodriguez, C. Magen, E. Snoeck, L. Morellon, M.R. Ibarra.

  14. A method to restrain the charging effect on an insulating substrate in high energy electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyan, Yu; Shirui, Zhao; Yupeng, Jing; Yunbo, Shi; Baoqin, Chen

    2014-12-01

    Pattern distortions caused by the charging effect should be reduced while using the electron beam lithography process on an insulating substrate. We have developed a novel process by using the SX AR-PC 5000/90.1 solution as a spin-coated conductive layer, to help to fabricate nanoscale patterns of poly-methyl-methacrylate polymer resist on glass for phased array device application. This method can restrain the influence of the charging effect on the insulating substrate effectively. Experimental results show that the novel process can solve the problems of the distortion of resist patterns and electron beam main field stitching error, thus ensuring the accuracy of the stitching and overlay of the electron beam lithography system. The main characteristic of the novel process is that it is compatible to the multi-layer semiconductor process inside a clean room, and is a green process, quite simple, fast, and low cost. It can also provide a broad scope in the device development on insulating the substrate, such as high density biochips, flexible electronics and liquid crystal display screens.

  15. High Charge PHIN Photo Injector at CERN with Fast Phase switching within the Bunch Train for Beam Combination

    CERN Document Server

    Csatari Divall, M; Bolzon, B; Bravin, E; Chevallay, E; Dabrowski, A; Doebert, S; Drozdy, A; Fedosseev, V; Hessler, C; Lefevre, T; Livesley, S; Losito, R; Olvegaard, M; Petrarca, M; Rabiller, A N; Egger, D; Mete, O

    2011-01-01

    The high charge PHIN photo-injector was developed within the framework of the European CARE program to provide an alternative to the drive beam thermionic gun in the CTF3 (CLIC Test Facility) at CERN. In PHIN 1908 electron bunches are delivered with bunch spacing of 1.5 GHz and 2.33 nC charge per bunch. Furthermore the drive beam generated by CTF3 requires several fast 180 deg phase-shifts with respect to the 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency in order to allow the beam combination scheme developed at CTF3. A total of 8 subtrains, each 140 ns long and shifted in phase with respect to each other, have to be produced with very high phase and amplitude stability. A novel fiber modulator based phase-switching technique developed on the laser system provides this phase-shift between two consecutive pulses much faster and cleaner than the base line scheme, where a thermionic electron gun and sub-harmonic bunching are used. The paper describes the fiber-based switching system and the measurements verifying the schem...

  16. A Method for Real Time Monitoring of Charged Particle Beam Profile and Fluence

    CERN Document Server

    Palni, Prabhakar; Taylor, Aaron; Vora, Sandip; McDuff, Haley; Gu, Qufei; Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Detectors planned for use at the Large Hadron Collider will operate in a radiation field produced by beam collisions. To predict the radiation damage to the components of the detectors, prototype devices are irradiated at test beam facilities that reproduce the radiation conditions expected. The profile of the test beam and the fluence applied per unit time must be known. Techniques such as thin metal foil activation and radiographic image analysis have been used to measure these; however, some of these techniques do not operate in real time, have low sensitivity, or have large uncertainties. We have developed a technique to monitor in real time the beam profile and fluence using an array of $p-i-n$ semiconductor diodes whose forward voltage is linear with fluence over the fluence regime relevant to, for example, tracking in the LHC Upgrade era. We have demonstrated this technique in the 800 MeV proton beam at the LANSCE facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  17. Understanding the focusing of charged particle for 2D sheet beam in a cusped magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Tusharika S; Reddy, K T V

    2016-01-01

    The requirement of axial magnetic field for focusing and transportation of sheet beam using cusped magnets is less as compared to solenoid magnetic fields which is uniform. There is often some confusion about how a cusped magnetic field focuses high current density sheet beam because it is generally understood that non-uniform magnetic field cannot guide the particle beam along its axis of propagation .In this paper, we perform simple analysis of the dynamics of sheet beam in a cusped magnetic field with single electron model and emphasize an intuitive understanding of interesting features (as beam geometry, positioning of permanent magnets, particle radius,particle velocity,radius of curvature of particle inside cusped magnetic field)

  18. Beam-plasma instability in charged plasma in the absence of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinov, Alexander E.; Petrik, Alexey G.; Kurkin, Semen A.; Frolov, Nikita S.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the possibility of the beam-plasma instability development in the system with electron beam interacting with the single-component hot electron plasma without ions. As considered system, we analyse the interaction of the low-current relativistic electron beam (REB) with squeezed state in the high-current REB formed in the relativistic magnetically insulated two-section vircator drift space. The numerical analysis is provided by means of 3D electromagnetic simulation in CST Particle Studio. We have conducted an extensive study of characteristic regimes of REB dynamics determined by the beam-plasma instability development in the absence of ions. As a result, the dependencies of instability increment and wavelength on the REB current value have been obtained. The considered process brings the new mechanism of controlled microwave amplification and generation to the device with a virtual cathode. This mechanism is similar to the action of the beam-plasma amplifiers and oscillators.

  19. The effect of laser beam size on laser-induced damage performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Wei; Wang Fang; Zhou Li-Dan; Feng Bin; Jia Huai-Ting; Li Ke-Yu; Xiang Yong; Zheng Wan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The influence of laser beam size on laser-induced damage performance,especially damage probability and the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT),is investigated.It is found that damage probability is dependent on beam size when various damage precursors with different potential behaviors are involved.This causes the damage probability and the LIDT to be different between cases under a large-aperture beam and a small-aperture beam.Moreover,the fluence fluctuation of the large-aperture laser beam brings out hot spots,which move randomly across the beam from shot to shot.Thus this leads the most probable maximum fluence after many shots at any location on the optical component to be several times the average beam fluence.These two effects result in the difference in the damage performance of the optical component between the cases under a large-aperture and small-aperture laser.

  20. Beam-Energy and System-Size Dependence of Dynamical Net Charge Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, B I; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bültmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevshchikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; García-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Sen-Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Kolk, N; Van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in $Au + Au$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, $Cu + Cu$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 62.4, 200 GeV, and $p + p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure $\

  1. Polyelectrolyte (PE) induced interactions between Charged and zwitterionic Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryamitsyn, Victor; Ganesan, Venkat

    2014-03-01

    A numerical self-consistent field (SCF) theory approach was developed for studying mixture of polyelectrolytes with charged and uncharged nanoparticles. Such an approach was used to analyze within the mean-field limit the polyelectrolyte-mediated effective interactions between the particles. The system considered allows for the local PE and particle charges to be defined by the local concentration of ionizable on groups on the particles and polyelectrolytes, ambient conditions like pH and the local electrostatic potential. Calculation of the free energy of a system of one, two and three particles in the polyelectrolyte solution allowdd us to calculate the particle insertion free energy, two and three body particle-particle interactions as a function of the properties of solution, polymer-particle interactions and the particle size. For the situation involving acidic PE and a base type positively charged particles, the PE mediated particle-particle interaction is purely repulsive for the larger particle-particle distances at low polymer concentrations. At short-particle particle distances and/or higher polyelectrolyte concentrations the particle-particle interaction becomes a depletion-type attraction. For Zwitterionic positively chaged paticles particles we have found a a range

  2. Profile distortion by beam space-charge in Ionization Profile Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vilsmeier, D; Wettig, T

    Measuring the transverse beam size in the Large Hadron Collider by using Ionization Profile Monitors is a difficult task for energies above injection during the energy ramp from 450 GeV to 6.5TeV. The beam size decreases from around 1mm to 200um and the brightness of the beam is high enough to destroy the structure of any form of interacting matter. While the electron trajectories are confined by an external electro-magnetic field which forces the electrons accordingly on helix paths with certain gyroradii, this gyration is heavily increased under the influence of the electric field of the beam. Smaller beam sizes, which go hand in hand with increased bunch electric fields, lead to larger gyroradii of the ionized electrons, which results in strongly distorted profiles. In addition, this distortion becomes more visible for smaller beam sizes as the extent of gyration grows compared to the actual beam size. Depending on the initial momentum distribution of the electrons, emerging from the ionization process wit...

  3. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓永锋; 谭畅; 韩先伟; 谭永华

    2012-01-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  4. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command

  5. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, D.C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  6. Beam-line considerations for experiments with highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The APS offers exciting possibilities for a bright future in x-ray research. For example, measurements on the inner-shell photoionization of ions will be feasible using stored ions in ion traps or ion beams from an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source, or perhaps even a heavy-ion storage ring. Such experiments with ionic targets are the focus for the APS. The performance of beam lines X26C, X26A, and X17 on the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will be discussed as specific examples of beam-line design considerations

  7. High temperature electron beam ion source for the production of single charge ions of most elements of the Periodic Table

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V N; Barzakh, A E; Fedorov, D V; Ivanov, V S; Moroz, F V; Orlov, S Y; Seliverstov, D M; Stroe, L; Tecchio, L B; Volkov, Y M

    2003-01-01

    A new type of a high temperature electron beam ion source (HTEBIS) with a working temperature up to 2500 deg. C was developed for production of single charge ions of practically all elements. Off-line tests and on-line experiments making use of the developed ion source coupled with uranium carbide targets of different density, have been carried out. The ionization efficiency measured for stable atoms of many elements varied in the interval of 1-6%. Using the HTEBIS, the yields and on-line production efficiency of neutron rich isotopes of Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn and isotopes of heavy elements Pb, Bi, Po and some others have been determined. The revealed confinement effect of the ions produced in the narrow electron beam inside a hot ion source cavity has been discussed.

  8. Localization of the large-angle foil-scattering beam loss caused by the multiturn charge-exchange injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazami; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kinsho, Michikazu

    2013-07-01

    In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, significant losses were observed at the branching of the H0 dump line and the beam position monitor that was inserted downstream of the H0 dump branch duct. These losses were caused by the large-angle scattering of the injection and circulating beams at the charge-exchange foil. To realize high-power operation, these losses must be mitigated. Therefore, a new collimation system was developed and installed in October 2011. To efficiently optimize this system, the behavior of particles scattered by the foil and produced by the absorber were simulated, and the optimal position and angle of the absorber were investigated. During this process, an angle regulation method for the absorber was devised. An outline of this system, the angle regulation method for the absorber, and the performance of this new collimation system are described.

  9. Resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to 12C ion beams, stimulation of high-energy charged particles in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Junxiong; Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    To monitor the response of live microbes in space radiation environment with high-energy charged particles, we carry out ground stimulation radiation experiments. Spores of Bacillus (CGMCC 1.1849) species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. (12) C ion beams served as stimulated space radiation from 5gry, 10gry, 20gry, 40gry, to 80gry at a rate of 15gry/min Death rates are measured and mutant strains are isolated. Five representative strains are analyzed for their corresponding gene sequences, protein sequences and gene expression index of DNA repair system gene recA and recO. The statistic results showed the strains resistance to (12) C ion beams radiation is partially due to the increase of gene expression index of recA and recO. In conclusion, our research provide a surrogate system to monitor the live microbial response in resistant to space radiation environment.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of ion beam induced secondary electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, U; Cho, W; Joy, D C

    2016-09-01

    Ion induced secondary electrons (iSE) can produce high-resolution images ranging from a few eV to 100keV over a wide range of materials. The interpretation of such images requires knowledge of the secondary electron yields (iSE δ) for each of the elements and materials present and as a function of the incident beam energy. Experimental data for helium ions are currently limited to 40 elements and six compounds while other ions are not well represented. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple procedure based on the comprehensive work of Berger et al. Here we show that between the energy range of 10-100keV the Berger et al. data for elements and compounds can be accurately represented by a single universal curve. The agreement between the limited experimental data that is available and the predictive model is good, and has been found to provide reliable yield data for a wide range of elements and compounds. PMID:27337603

  11. Manufacturing and characterization of bent silicon crystals for studies of coherent interactions with negatively charged particles beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient steering of GeV-energy negatively charged particle beams was demonstrated to be possible with a new generation of thin bent silicon crystals. Suitable crystals were produced at the Sensor Semiconductor Laboratory of Ferrara starting from Silicon On Insulator wafers, adopting proper revisitation of silicon micromachining techniques such as Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition, photolithography and anisotropic chemical etching. Mechanical holders, which allow to properly bend the crystal and to reduce unwanted torsions, were employed. Crystallographic directions and crystal holder design were optimized in order to excite quasi-mosaic effect along (1 1 1) planes. Prior to exposing the crystal to particle beams, a full set of characterizations were performed. Infrared interferometry was used to measure crystal thickness with high accuracy. White-light interferometry was employed to characterize surface deformational state and its torsion. High-resolution X-rays diffraction was used to precisely measure crystal bending angle along the beam. Manufactured crystals were installed and tested at the MAMI MAinz MIcrotron to steer sub-GeV electrons, and at SLAC to deflect an electron beam in the 1 to 10 GeV energy range

  12. Manufacturing and characterization of bent silicon crystals for studies of coherent interactions with negatively charged particles beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Bagli, E.; Guidi, V.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient steering of GeV-energy negatively charged particle beams was demonstrated to be possible with a new generation of thin bent silicon crystals. Suitable crystals were produced at the Sensor Semiconductor Laboratory of Ferrara starting from Silicon On Insulator wafers, adopting proper revisitation of silicon micromachining techniques such as Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition, photolithography and anisotropic chemical etching. Mechanical holders, which allow to properly bend the crystal and to reduce unwanted torsions, were employed. Crystallographic directions and crystal holder design were optimized in order to excite quasi-mosaic effect along (1 1 1) planes. Prior to exposing the crystal to particle beams, a full set of characterizations were performed. Infrared interferometry was used to measure crystal thickness with high accuracy. White-light interferometry was employed to characterize surface deformational state and its torsion. High-resolution X-rays diffraction was used to precisely measure crystal bending angle along the beam. Manufactured crystals were installed and tested at the MAMI MAinz MIcrotron to steer sub-GeV electrons, and at SLAC to deflect an electron beam in the 1 to 10 GeV energy range.

  13. Electron-Beam-Induced Antiphase Boundary Reconstructions in a ZrO2-LSMO Pillar-Matrix System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Sigle, Wilfried; Kelsch, Marion; Habermeier, Hanns-Ulrich; van Aken, Peter A

    2016-09-14

    The availability of aberration correctors for the probe-forming lenses makes simultaneous modification and characterization of materials down to atomic scale inside a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) realizable. In this work, we report on the electron-beam-induced reconstructions of three types of antiphase boundaries (APBs) in a probe-aberration-corrected TEM. With the utilization of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), annular bright-field STEM, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, the motion of both heavy element Mn and light element O atomic columns under moderate electron beam irradiation are revealed at atomic resolution. Besides, Mn segregated in the APBs was observed to have reduced valence states which can be directly correlated with oxygen loss. Charge states of the APBs are finally discussed on the basis of these experimental results. This study provides support for the design of radiation-engineering solid-oxide fuel cell materials.

  14. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam {sup 7}Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzocco, M., E-mail: marco.mazzocco@pd.infn.it; Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Lay, J. A.; Molini, P.; Soramel, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Boiano, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Di Meo, P. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy); Boiano, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133, Napoli (Italy); La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Silvestri, R. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, via Cintia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy); Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Acosta, L. [Departamento de Fìsica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, E-21071 Huelva (Spain); INFN-Sezione di Catania, via Santa Sofia 64, I-95123, Catania (Italy); Fernandez-Garcia, J. P. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, via Santa Sofia 64, I-95123, Catania (Italy); Glodariu, T. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), 30 Reactorului St., 077125 Magurele (Romania); and others

    2015-10-15

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam {sup 7}Be (S{sub α} = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass ({sup 58}Ni) and heavy ({sup 208}Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×10{sup 5} pps {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  15. Beam energy dependence of moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments -mean ($M$), variance ($\\sigma^{2}$), skewness ($S$) and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) -of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from $\\sqrt {{s_{\\rm NN}}}$=7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net-charge, which are expected to diverge at the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, $\\sigma^{2}/M$, $S\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBD). The $S\\sigma$ values deviate from Poisson and are close to NBD baseline, while the $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show clear evidence of non-monotonic behavior as a function of collision energy.

  16. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  17. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  18. Measurement of Azimuthal Asymmetries With Respect To Both Beam Charge and Transverse Target Polarization in Exclusive Electroproduction of Real Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetisyan, E; Barion, L; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Bttcher, H; Bonomo, C; Borisov, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapiks, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lu, S; Lü, X; Ma, B Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W D; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rock, S E; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ruiz, A L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B

    2008-01-01

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons are measured for the first time with respect to transverse target polarisation, providing new constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions. From the same data set on a hydrogen target, new results for the beam-charge asymmetry are also extracted with better precision than those previously reported. By comparing model calculations with measured asymmetries attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes, a model-dependent constraint is obtained on the total angular momenta carried by up and down quarks in the nucleon.

  19. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries with respect of both beam charge and transverse target polarization in exclusive electroproduction of real photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z. [Yerevan Physics Institute (AR)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons are measured for the first time with respect to transverse target polarisation, providing new constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions. From the same data set on a hydrogen target, new results for the beam-charge asymmetry are also extracted with better precision than those previously reported. By comparing model calculations with measured asymmetries attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes, a model-dependent constraint is obtained on the total angular momenta carried by up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  20. Radiological physics of heavy charged-particle beams used for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beams available for biological investigations at the Bevatron or at the Bevalac range from helium to iron ions. However, only carbon, neon, and argon beams have been used for therapy. The treatment techniques are arbitrarily divided into two categories: small field and large field irradiation. Examples of the small field treatments are pituitary irradiation, which generaly utilizes the plateau portion of the helium depth-dose curve, and treatment of ocular melanoma, which uses a modified Bragg peak of the helium beam. Large field treatments for cancer therapy generally requires a beam that has a large uniform transverse profile and a modified Bragg peak. Procedures and instrumentation for patient irradiations at the Bevatron/Bevalac have been based on the prior experience obtained at the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron, and for that reason both facilities are discussed

  1. High-power, electron beam-induced switching in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are developing a high-voltage, high-average-power, electron beam-controlled diamond switch that could significantly impact high power solid-state electronics in industrial and defense applications. An electron beam-controlled, thin film diamond could switch, with high efficiency, well over 100 kW average power at MHz frequencies greater than 5kV. This performance is due to the excellent thermal and electronic properties of diamond, the high efficiency achieved with electron beam control, and the demonstrated effectiveness of microchannel cooling. The authors' electron beam penetration-depth measurements agree with their Monte Carlo calculations. They have not observed electron beam damage in diamond for beam energies up to 150 keV. This report describes their experimental and calculational results and research objectives

  2. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob;

    Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self-assemble into c......Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self......-assemble into crystalline nanofibers by vapor deposition onto muscovite mica substrates, and we have recently shown that such nanofibers can be transferred to different substrates by roll-printing and used as the active material in e.g. organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs......), and organic phototransistors (OPTs). However, several device-related issues incl. charge-separation and local band structure remain poorly understood. In this work, we use electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) combined with optical microscopy to study the local surface charge of an individual organic nanofiber...

  3. Light-Induced Charge Transport within a Single Asymmetric Nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIU, CHONG; HWANG, YUN YEONG; JEONG, HOON EIU; YANG, PEIDONG

    2011-01-21

    Artificial photosynthetic systems using semiconductor materials have been explored for more than three decades in order to store solar energy in chemical fuels such as hydrogen. By mimicking biological photosynthesis with two light-absorbing centers that relay excited electrons in a nanoscopic space, a dual-band gap photoelectrochemical (PEC) system is expected to have higher theoretical energy conversion efficiency than a single band gap system. This work demonstrates the vectorial charge transport of photo-generated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Under UV illumination, higher surface potential was observed on the n-TiO₂ side, relative to the potential of the p-Si side, as a result of majority carriers’ recombination at the Si/TiO₂ interface. These results demonstrate a new approach to investigate charge separation and transport in a PEC system. This asymmetric nanowire heterostructure, with a dual band gap configuration and simultaneously exposed anode and cathode surfaces represents an ideal platform for the development of technologies for the generation of solar fuels, although better photoanode materials remain to be discovered.

  4. Position sensitive anodes for MCP read-out using induced charge measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Jagutzki, O; Mergel, V; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Spillmann, U; Worth, L B C

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the method of an indirect detection of a MCP charge avalanche projected onto a resistive layer (G. Battistoni, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth., 202 (1982) 459). If the sheet resistance is favourable one can detect the charge cloud by the capacitive coupling to an anode structure a few millimetres behind the layer. The anode structure can be, for example, a wedge-and-strip electrode pattern (M. Unverzagt, Diplomarbeit, Universitaet Frankfurt 1992, private communication) as it is used for directly collecting the electron avalanche from a MCP. Detection of the induced charge is beneficial in several respects. Firstly, image distortions produced by secondary electron mediated charge redistribution are eliminated. Secondly, the noise component due to quantized charge collection, commonly referred to as partition noise, is not present. In addition, the dielectric substrate can function both as an element of the vacuum enclosure and HV insulator, making the electrical connections easily accessible and ...

  5. Large-angle production of charged pions with incident pion beams on nuclear targets

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonio, M; Bagulya, A; Barr, G; Blondel, A; Bobisut, F; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C; Borghi, S; Bunyatov, S; Burguet-Castell, J; Catanesi, M G; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Chimenti, P; Coney, L; Di Capua, E; Dore, U; Dumarchez, J; Edgecock, R; Ellis, M; Ferri, F; Gastaldi, U; Giani, S; Giannini, G; Gibin, D; Gilardoni, S; Gorbunov, P; Gößling, C; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Grant, A; Graulich, J S; Grégoire, G; Grichine, V; Grossheim, A; Guglielmi, A; Howlett, L; Ivanchenko, A; Ivanchenko, V; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Kirsanov, M; Kolev, D; Krasnoperov, A; MartíinAlbo, J; Meurer, C; Mezzetto, M; B Mills, G; Morone, M C; Novella, P; Orestano, D; Palladino, V; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I; Pastore, F; Piperov, S; Polukhina, N; Popov, B; Prior, G; Radicioni, E; Schmitz, D; Schroeter, R; Skoro, G; Sorel, M; Tcherniaev, E; Temnikov, P; Tereschenko, V; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tsenov, R; Tsukerman, I; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Wiebusch, C; Zucchelli, P

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the double-differential pi+/- production cross-section in the range of momentum 100 MeV/c <= p <= 800 MeV/c and angle 0.35 rad <= theta <= 2.15 rad using pi+/- beams incident on beryllium, aluminium, carbon, copper, tin, tantalum and lead targets are presented. The data were taken with the large acceptance HARP detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN PS. The secondary pions were produced by beams in a momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 12.9 GeV/c hitting a solid target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The tracking and identification of the produced particles was performed using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) placed inside a solenoidal magnet. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross-sections d2sigma/dpdtheta at six incident beam momenta. Data at 3 GeV/c, 5 GeV/c, 8 GeV/c, and 12 GeV/c are available for all targets while additional data at 8.9 GeV/...

  6. Development of a magnetic beam guiding system for tumor-specific radiotherapy using heavy, charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An active, magnetic beam guiding system was developed and tested for the purpose of enhanced and tumor-specific irradiation of irregularly shaped target volumina. Combining intensity-controlled wobbling in rapidly changing magnetic fields with the heavy-ion synchrotron's capacity of fast energy variation achieved a new technique allowing good range modulation. This technique allows the calculated dose distribution to be exactly matched to target contours, and at the same time guarantees best possible quality of the radiation beam, since there is no need for use of mechanical beam shaping members. The components of the scanning system and a specifically designed instrumentation and control concept for this configuration were integrated into the synchrotron's control system, so that there is now a system available offering free selection of beam characteristics combined with energy variation along with the pulsed operation of the accelerator. The system was tested at the biophysical measuring unit of the GSI implementing an elaborated irradiation method at this unit equipped with tools for physico-technical irradiation planning and performance. Methods were designed and tested for optimizing the beam path within a given contour, the optimization taking into account the effects of transmission functions of the scanner components on the results of radiation treatments. (orig.)

  7. Charge-induced reversible bending in nanoporous alumina-aluminum composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuan; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2013-05-01

    Upon electrical charging, reversible bending was found in nanoporous anodic alumina-aluminum foil composites, as directly observed by an optical microscope and detected by in situ nanoindentation. The bending is thought to be the result of charge-induced surface stresses in the nanoporous alumina. The results suggest the possibility of a type of composite foil materials for applications as micro-scale actuators to transform electrical energy into mechanical energy.

  8. Analysis of the Contribution of Charge Transport in Iodine-125 induced DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Ndlebe, Thabisile; Panyutin, Igor; Neumann, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Auger electron emitters, like iodine-125, are the radionuclides of choice for gene-targeted radiotherapy. The highly localized damage they induced in DNA is produced by three mechanisms: direct damage by the emitted Auger electrons, indirect damage by diffusible free radicals produced by Auger electrons travelling in water, and charge neutralization of the residual, highly positively charged, tellurium daughter atom by stripping electrons from covalent bonds of neighboring residues. The purpo...

  9. High magnetic field induced charge density waves and sign reversal of the Hall coefficient in graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Amit; POUMIROL, Jean-Marie; Escoffier, Walter; Goiran, Michel; Raquet, Bertrand; Pivin, Jean Claude

    2010-01-01

    We report on the investigation of magnetic field induced charge density wave and Hall coefficient sign reversal in a quasi-two dimensional electronic system of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite under very strong magnetic field. The change of Hall sign coefficient from negative to positive occurs at low temperature and high magnetic field just after the charge density wave transition, suggesting the role of hole-like quasi-particles in this effect. Angular dependent measurements show that the...

  10. Plasma-induced evolution behavior of space-charge-limited current for multiple-needle cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the plasma and beam flow produced by tufted carbon fiber cathodes in a diode powered by a ∼500 kV, ∼400 ns pulse are investigated. Under electric fields of 230-260 kV cm-1, the electron current density was in the range 210-280 A cm-2, and particularly at the diode gap of 20 mm, a maximum beam power density of about 120 MW cm-2 was obtained. It was found that space-charge-limited current exhibited an evolution behavior as the accelerating pulse proceeded. There exists a direct relation between the movement of plasma within the diode and the evolution of space-charge-limited current. Initially in the accelerating pulse, the application of strong electric fields caused the emission sites to explode, forming cathode flares or plasma spots, and in this stage the space-charge-limited current was approximately described by a multiple-needle cathode model. As the pulse proceeded, these plasma spots merged and expanded towards the anode, thus increasing the emission area and shortening the diode gap, and the corresponding space-charge-limited current followed a planar cathode model. Finally, the space-charge-limited current is developed from a unipolar flow into a bipolar flow as a result of the appearance of anode plasma. In spite of the nonuniform distribution of cathode plasma, the cross-sectional uniformity of the extracted electron beam is satisfactory. The plasma expansion within the diode is found to be a major factor in the diode perveance growth and instability. These results show that these types of cathodes can offer promising applications for high-power microwave tubes.

  11. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and its Beam Charge Asymmetry in $e^{\\pm} p$ Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alexa, C; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R.C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M.P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D.P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of elastic deeply virtual Compton scattering gamma* p -> gamma p using e^+ p and e^- p collision data recorded with the H1 detector at HERA is presented. The analysed data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 306 pb^-1, almost equally shared between both beam charges. The cross section is measured as a function of the virtuality Q^2 of the exchanged photon and the centre-of-mass energy W of the gamma* p system in the kinematic domain 6.5 < Q^2 < 80 GeV^2, 30 < W < 140 GeV and |t| < 1 GeV^2, where t denotes the squared momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The cross section is determined differentially in t for different Q^2 and W values and exponential t-slope parameters are derived. Using e^+ p and e^- p data samples, a beam charge asymmetry is extracted for the first time in the low Bjorken x kinematic domain. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. Experimental results are dis...

  12. Beam-line considerations for experiments with highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The APS offers exciting possibilities for a bright future in x-ray research. For example, measurements on the inner-shell photoionization of ions will be feasible using stored ions in ions traps or ion beams from an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source, or perhaps even a heavy-ion storage ring. Such experiments with ionic targets are the focus for the discussion given here on the optimization of photon flux on a generic beamline at the APS. The performance of beam lines X26C, X26A, and X17 on the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will be discussed as specific examples of beam-line design considerations

  13. Beam-Induced Deposition of Thin Metallic Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, Herbert Oliver, III

    1990-01-01

    Ion and electron beam induced deposition (BID) of thin (1 μm), conductive films is accomplished by dissociating and removing the nonmetallic components of an adsorbed, metal-based, molecular gas. Current research has focused primarily on room temperature (monolayer adsorption) BID using electrons and slow, heavy ions. This study investigates low temperature (50 to 200 K) BID in which the condensation of the precursor gases (SnCl _4 and (CH_3) _4Sn) maximizes the efficiency of the incident radiation which can create and remove nonmetallic fragments located several monolayers below the film surface. The desired properties of the residual metallic films are produced by using as incident radiation either nuclear (35 keV Ar ^+) or electronic (2 keV electrons, 25 keV H^+, or 50 keV H ^+) energy loss mechanisms. Residual films are analyzed ex situ by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thickness measurements, resistivity measurements, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and infrared spectroscopy. Low temperature BID film growth models, which are derived from both a computer simulation and a mathematical analysis, closely agree. Both the fragmentation and sputtering cross sections for a particular ion and energy are derived for films created from (CH_3) _4Sn. The fragmentation cross section, which corresponds to film growth, is roughly related to the electronic stopping power by the 1.9 power. The loss of carbon in films which were created from (CH_3) _4Sn is strongly dependent on the nuclear stopping power. Film growth rates for low temperature BID have been found to be 10 times those of room temperature BID.

  14. The local transformation of the chemical structures induced in polymer by heavy ion-beam irradiation: the characterization of ion in the interaction with material-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local transformations of the chemical structure induced in low density polyethylene (LDPE) by ion-beams with different characteristics are investigated by using micro-FT-IR system. On irradiation by heavier ions than H+, the remarkable LET effect is found in the transformation of the trans-vinylene and the end-vinyl groups. This can not be found on irradiation by H+. Moreover, an importance of the charge number in calculation of the stopping power is pointed out. (author)

  15. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Foster, G W

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors. (7 refs).

  16. Polarizability Tensor Calculation: Induced Local Charge and Current Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Mohammad; Albooyeh, Mohammad; Komjani, Nader; Simovski, Constantin

    2015-01-01

    We develop a semi-analytical approach to calculate the polarizability tensors of an arbitrary individual scatterer. The approach is based on the calculation of induced electric and/or magnetic dipole moments on the scatterer. By taking the advantages of the present approach, we calculate the individual polarizability tensors of an isolated scatterer in a homogeneous isotropic medium. Moreover, we obtain the polarizability tensors of scatterers located between two different isotropic media. Fu...

  17. Energy Spectra from Electromagnetic Fields Generated by Ultra-relativistic Charged Bunches in a Perfectly Conducting Cylindrical Beam Pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Alison C

    2009-01-01

    The spectrum of electromagnetic fields satisfying perfectly conducting boundary conditions in a segment of a straight beam pipe with a circular cross-section is discussed as a function of various source models. These include charged bunches that move along the axis of the pipe with constant speed for which an exact solution to the initial-boundary value problem for Maxwell's equations in the beam pipe is derived. In the ultra-relativistic limit all longitudinal components of the fields tend to zero and the spectral content of the transverse fields and average total electromagnetic energy crossing any section of the beam pipe are directly related to the properties of the ultra-relativistic source. It is shown that for axially symmetric ultra-relativistic bunches interference effects occur that show a striking resemblance to those that occur due to CSR in cyclic machines despite the fact that in this limit the source is no longer accelerating. The results offer an analytic description showing how such enhanced ...

  18. Behaviour of pulsed vortex beam with high topological charge in ionized dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volyar A.V.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of powerful femtosecond singular-phase pulsed beams in a dielectric medium is analyzed under the ionization conditions. The multiphoton ionization is revealed to contribute to the stable (quasi-soliton regime of pulse propagation over the distances exceeding several diffraction lengths.

  19. Charging suppression in focused-ion beam fabrication of visible subwavelength dielectric grating reflector using electron conducting polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2015-08-19

    Nanoscale periodic patterning on insulating materials using focused-ion beam (FIB) is challenging because of charging effect, which causes pattern distortion and resolution degradation. In this paper, the authors used a charging suppression scheme using electron conducting polymer for the implementation of FIB patterned dielectric subwavelength grating (SWG) reflector. Prior to the FIB patterning, the authors numerically designed the optimal structure and the fabrication tolerance for all grating parameters (period, grating thickness, fill-factor, and low refractive index layer thickness) using the rigorous-coupled wave analysis computation. Then, the authors performed the FIB patterning on the dielectric SWG reflector spin-coated with electron conducting polymer for the anticharging purpose. They also performed similar patterning using thin conductive film anticharging scheme (30 nm Cr coating) for comparison. Their results show that the electron conducting polymer anticharging scheme effectively suppressing the charging effect during the FIB patterning of dielectric SWG reflector. The fabricated grating exhibited nanoscale precision, high uniformity and contrast, constant patterning, and complied with fabrication tolerance for all grating parameters across the entire patterned area. Utilization of electron conducting polymer leads to a simpler anticharging scheme with high precision and uniformity for FIB patterning on insulator materials.

  20. On the self-induced charge currents in electromagnetic materials and its effects in the torsion balance experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2003-01-01

    We concern ourselves with the self-induced charge currents in electromagnetic materials and some related topics on its effects in the present paper. The contribution of self-induced charge currents of metamaterial media to photon effective rest mass is briefly discussed. We concentrate primarily on the torque, which is caused by the interaction of self-induced charge currents in dilute plasma with interstellar magnetic fields, acting on the torsion balance in the torsion balance experiment. I...

  1. Charge-transport-induced dissociation in donor-bridge-acceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisker, Daria; Peskin, Uri

    2008-12-28

    Possible mechanisms for charge-transport-induced dissociation in donor-bridge-acceptor complexes are studied. Two mechanisms for dissociation at the molecular bridge are captured within a simple model of an anharmonic bridge vibration coupled nonlinearly to an electronic degree of freedom. A direct mechanism is associated with vibronic excitations to the nuclear continuum and an alternative dissociation mechanism involves intermediate quasibound vibrational states (Feshbach resonances). The two different mechanisms of charge-transport-induced dissociation are analyzed and their interplay as a function of the system parameters is examined. A parameter regime is suggested where the phenomenon should be experimentally accessible.

  2. Negative charge induced degradation of PMOSFETs with BF2-implanted p+-poly gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new degradation phenomenon on thin gate oxide PMOS-FETs with BF2 implanted p+-poly gate has been demonstrated and investigated. The cause of this type of degradation is a combination of the boron penetration through the gate oxide and charge trap generation due to the presence of fluorine in the gate oxide and some other processing-induced effects. The negative charge-induced degradation other than enhanced boron diffusion has been studied in detail here. The impact of this process-sensitive p+-poly gate structure on deep submicron CMOS process integration has been discussed. (author)

  3. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  4. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Small Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-08-01

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self-electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytical model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite-length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytical studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to influence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce ≥ ωpeβb, where ωce = eΒ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytical theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  5. Physico-chemical study of the focused electron beam induced deposition process

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, Tristan; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    The focused electron beam induced deposition process is a promising technique for nano and micro patterning. Electrons can be focused in sub-angström dimensions, which allows atomic-scale resolution imaging, analysis, and processing techniques. Before the process can be used in controlled applications, the precise nature of the deposition mechanism must be described and modelled. The aim of this research work is to present a physical and chemical description of the focused electron beam induc...

  6. Beam-helicity asymmetries in double-charged-pion photoproduction on the proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, S; Berman, B L; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Bennhold, C; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Devita, R; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Fix, A; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Roberts, W; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J

    2005-10-14

    Beam-helicity asymmetries for the two-pion-photoproduction reaction gammap-->ppi(+)pi(-) have been studied for the first time in the resonance region for center-of-mass energies between 1.35 and 2.30 GeV. The experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer using circularly polarized tagged photons incident on an unpolarized hydrogen target. Beam-helicity-dependent angular distributions of the final-state particles were measured. The large cross-section asymmetries exhibit strong sensitivity to the kinematics and dynamics of the reaction. The data are compared with the results of various phenomenological model calculations, and show that these models currently do not provide an adequate description for the behavior of this new observable. PMID:16241787

  7. Thin chamber for profile measuring intensive beams of high-energy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-coordinate profile meter developed on the basis of the multichnnel chamber of secondary emission (MCSE) for operation in intense (1010-3x1012 cm-2s-1) 70 GeV proton beams is described. MCSE electrodes are produced by spraying metal at thickness equal to several hundreds angstrem on 10-micron polyamide film. Resource tests have revealed high workability of MCSE when passing 6.5x1017 protons through it

  8. Ionization chambers for monitoring in high-intensity charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J; Viren, B; Diwan, M; Erwin, A R; Naples, D; Ping, H

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-hard ionization chambers were tested using an intense electron beam from the accelerator test facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detectors were designed to be used as the basic element for monitoring muons in the Main Injector Neutrino beamline at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Measurements of linearity of response, voltage dependence, and the onset of ionization saturation as a function of gap voltage were performed.

  9. Polarizability Tensor Calculation: Induced Local Charge and Current Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Yazdi, Mohammad; Komjani, Nader; Simovski, Constantin

    2015-01-01

    We develop a semi-analytical approach to calculate the polarizability tensors of an arbitrary individual scatterer. The approach is based on the calculation of induced electric and/or magnetic dipole moments on the scatterer. By taking the advantages of the present approach, we calculate the individual polarizability tensors of an isolated scatterer in a homogeneous isotropic medium. Moreover, we obtain the polarizability tensors of scatterers located between two different isotropic media. Furthermore, due to the nature of the proposed method, we may determine the effective polarizability of a scatterer in a periodic array. To this end and for comparison reasons, we investigate two other methods for calculating effective polarizability tensors of scatterers in a two-dimensional periodic array. The proposed approach, in comparison to other reported approaches, is simpler, easily implemented, and does not require spherical harmonic expansion or complicated far-field calculations. We examine the validity of the ...

  10. STUDY OF THE BEAM INDUCED RADIATION IN THE CMS DETECTOR AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Amandeep P; Mokhov, Nikolai; Beri, Suman Bala

    2009-01-01

    point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. We have recently carried out extensive monte carlo simulation studies using MARS program to estimate particle fluxes and radiation dose in the CMS silicon pixel and strip trackers from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt s $=14 TeV and from machine induced background such as beam-gas interactions and beam-halo. We will present results on radiation dose, particle fluxes and spectra from these studies and discuss implications for radiation damage and performance of the CMS silicon tracker detec...

  11. Lateral resolution in focused electron beam-induced deposition: scaling laws for pulsed and static exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkudlarek, Aleksandra [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Szmyt, Wojciech; Kapusta, Czeslaw [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Utke, Ivo [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we review the single-adsorbate time-dependent continuum model for focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID). The differential equation for the adsorption rate will be expressed by dimensionless parameters describing the contributions of adsorption, desorption, dissociation, and the surface diffusion of the precursor adsorbates. The contributions are individually presented in order to elucidate their influence during variations in the electron beam exposure time. The findings are condensed into three new scaling laws for pulsed exposure FEBID (or FEB-induced etching) relating the lateral resolution of deposits or etch pits to surface diffusion and electron beam exposure dwell time for a given adsorbate depletion state. (orig.)

  12. Development of semiconductor regulation of capacitor charge for a compact high power ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new power supplier for high power ion sources has been developed with using the Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching units, where the capacitor banks are employed as the electric power storage. This can make the supplier more compact and cheaper than that of usual beam sources, though the output is 10 ms order of duration. The designed maximum beam power is 1 MW for 10 ms and the repetition time is 5 min so as to avoid the heat problem of the electrodes. One switching unit consists of parallel and serial IGBT elements which can be simultaneously driven by a set of photo pulses via each optical fiber. The dummy local test gives the rise time 4 μs and the rear edge fall-down 125 μs on the switching speed of 44 IGBT elements with the applied voltage 25 keV. As for the power test of another switching unit of 26 IGBT elements and 15 kV voltage for the acceleration source the power of 650 kW is obtained in this circuit. Using the medium-size backet ion source constructed, the extracted ion beam power of 40 kW is attained at present. Also, the arcing control and the electrode aging are found to be sufficiently achieved by the inter-lock system in our developed circuit. (author)

  13. Surface chemical reactions induced by well-controlled molecular beams: translational energy and molecular orientation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Michio, E-mail: okada@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j, E-mail: mokada@cw.osaka-u.ac.j [Renovation Center of Instruments for Science Education and Technology, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 and 1-2 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2010-07-07

    I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams suggest that the translational energy of the incident molecules plays a significant role. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. Oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility for controlling surface chemical reactions by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of achieving material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for creating new materials on surfaces with well-controlled chemical reactions. (topical review)

  14. Radiation response of multi-quantum well solar cells: Electron-beam-induced current analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximenko, S. I., E-mail: sergey.maximenko@nrl.navy.mil; Scheiman, D. A.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lumb, M. P.; Hoheisel, R. [The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Gonzalez, M. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Herndon, Virginia 20171 (United States); Messenger, S. R. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Tibbits, T. N. D. [QuantaSol Ltd, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 3GZ (United Kingdom); Imaizumi, M. [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Ohshima, T.; Sato, S. I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    Solar cells utilizing multi-quantum well (MQW) structures are considered promising candidate materials for space applications. An open question is how well these structures can resist the impact of particle irradiation. The aim of this work is to provide feedback about the radiation response of In{sub 0.01}Ga{sub 0.99}As solar cells grown on Ge with MQWs incorporated within the i-region of the device. In particular, the local electronic transport properties of the MQW i-regions of solar cells subjected to electron and proton irradiation were evaluated experimentally using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique. The change in carrier collection distribution across the MQW i-region was analyzed using a 2D EBIC diffusion model in conjunction with numerical modeling of the electrical field distribution. Both experimental and simulated findings show carrier removal and type conversion from n- to p-type in MQW i-region at a displacement damage dose as low as ∼6.06–9.88 × 10{sup 9} MeV/g. This leads to a redistribution of the electric field and significant degradation in charge carrier collection.

  15. On combining Thole's induced point dipole model with fixed charge distributions in molecular mechanics force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Hanne S; Salonen, Emppu

    2015-04-15

    The Thole induced point dipole model is combined with three different point charge fitting methods, Merz-Kollman (MK), charges from electrostatic potentials using a grid (CHELPG), and restrained electrostatic potential (RESP), and two multipole algorithms, distributed multipole analysis (DMA) and Gaussian multipole model (GMM), which can be used to describe the electrostatic potential (ESP) around molecules in molecular mechanics force fields. This is done to study how the different methods perform when intramolecular polarizability contributions are self-consistently removed from the fitting done in the force field parametrization. It is demonstrated that the polarizable versions of the partial charge models provide a good compromise between accuracy and computational efficiency in describing the ESP of small organic molecules undergoing conformational changes. For the point charge models, the inclusion of polarizability reduced the the average root mean square error of ESP over the test set by 4-10%.

  16. Measurement of total and partial charge changing and charge pick-up cross-sections for 300A MeV Fe26+ beam in Al with a new system of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, total and partial charge changing cross-sections of 300A MeV Fe26+ ion beam in aluminum target were measured by a new system of analysis installed with the Leica QWin Plus software. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident charged particles and their fragments. The CR39 detectors just before and just after the target were calibrated and found to have the same charge response and the charge resolution, which were 0.19e and 0.20e, respectively. The response points were fitted with a polynomial of degree one and all the points are within the limits of experimental errors. The value of total charge changing cross-section was calculated to be σtot=(1663±236) mb. To determine the partial charge changing cross-sections for ΔZ=−23,−22,…,−1, number of events corresponding to each fragment were determined from multiple Gaussian fitting of diameter distributions within 95.5% confidence levels and the numbers of incident and survived beam ions were counted within 99.7% confidence levels. Charge pick-up cross-section for ΔZ=+1 was calculated and is (92±6) mb. -- Highlights: ► A good charge resolution was achieved by a new system of analysis. ► Total, partial and charge pick-up cross-sections were calculated. ► Improved threshold Z/β=4.6 was achieved. ► Beam contamination was quantified.

  17. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  18. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing.

  19. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing. PMID:27610923

  20. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing. PMID:27610923

  1. Solvent-induced reversible solid-state colour change of an intramolecular charge-transfer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Maier, Josef M; Hwang, Jungwun; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Mullis, Brian T; Strickland, Sharon M S; Shimizu, Ken D

    2015-10-11

    A dynamic intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) complex was designed that displayed reversible colour changes in the solid-state when treated with different organic solvents. The origins of the dichromatism were shown to be due to solvent-inclusion, which induced changes in the relative orientations of the donor pyrene and acceptor naphthalenediimide units. PMID:26299357

  2. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  3. Topology and shape optimization of induced-charge electro-osmotic micropumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Okkels, Fridolin; Bazant, M. Z.;

    2009-01-01

    For a dielectric solid surrounded by an electrolyte and positioned inside an externally biased parallel-plate capacitor, we study numerically how the resulting induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flow depends on the topology and shape of the dielectric solid. In particular, we extend existing...

  4. Spontaneous oil-in-water emulsification induced by charge-stabilized dispersions of various inorganic colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacanna, S.; Kegel, W.K.; Philipse, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Charge-stabilized dispersions of inorganic colloids are shown to induce spontaneous emulsification of hydrophobic (TPM) molecules to stable oil-in-water emulsions, with monodisperse, mesoscopic oil droplet diameters in the range of 30-150 nm, irrespective of the polydispersity of the starting disper

  5. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  6. Site-selective nanoscale-polymerization of pyrrole on gold nanoparticles via plasmon induced charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Furukawa, Y; Ishida, T; Yamada, S

    2016-04-28

    We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs.

  7. Dose control in electron beam processing: Comparison of results from a graphite charge collector, routine dosimeters and the ISS alanine-based dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuochi, P. G.; Onori, S.; Casali, F.; Chirco, P.

    1993-10-01

    A 12 MeV linear accelerator is currently used for electron beam processing of power semiconductor devices for lifetime control and, on an experimental basis, for food irradiation, sludge treatment etc. In order to control the irradiation process a simple, quick and reliable method for a direct evaluation of dose and fluence in a broad electron beam has been developed. This paper presents the results obtained using a "charge collector" which measures the charge absorbed in a graphite target exposed in air. Calibration of the system with super-Fricke dosimeter and comparison of absorbed dose results obtained with plastic dosimeters and alanine pellets are discussed.

  8. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering

    CERN Document Server

    Zunino, Luciano; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  9. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere. PMID:26125388

  10. RF Cavity Induced Sensitivity Limitations on Beam Loss Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastriotou, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Sousa, F. S. Domingues; Effinger, E.; Holzer, E. B.; Quirante, J. L. Navarro; del Busto, E. N.; Tecker, F.; Viganò, W.; Welsch, C. P.; Woolley, B. J.

    Due to the secondary showers generated when a particle hits the vacuum chamber, beam losses at an accelerator may be detected via radiation detectors located near the beam line. Several sources of background can limit the sensitivity and reduce the dynamic range of a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM). This document concentrates on potential sources of background generated near high gradient RF cavities due to dark current and voltage breakdowns. An optical fibre has been installed at an experiment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3), where a dedicated study of the performance of a loaded and unloaded CLIC accelerating structure is undergoing. An analysis of the collected data and a benchmarking simulation are presented to estimate BLM sensitivity limitations. Moreover, the feasibility for the use of BLMs optimised for the diagnostics of RF cavities is discussed.

  11. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  12. Production of intense highly charged ion beams by IMP 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source has been constructed over the last two years. The source was designed and tested by making use of the latest results from ECR ion source development, such as high mirror magnetic field, large plasma volume, and biased probe. 140μA of O7+, 185μA of Ar11+ and 50 μA of Xe26+ could be produced with a RF power of 800 W. The intense beams of highly charged metallic ions are produced by means of the method of a metal evaporation oven and volatile compound through axial access. The test results are 130μA of Ca11+, 70μA of Ca12+ and 65μA of Fe10+. The ion source has been put into operation for the cyclotron at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP).

  13. Energy dependent charge spread function in a dedicated synchrotron beam pnCCD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Hazem

    2011-05-20

    A scan on the pixel edges is the method which is used to resolve the electron cloud size in the pixel array of the pnCCD detector. The EDR synchrotron radiation in BESSY is the source of the X-ray photons which are used in the scans. The radius of the electron cloud as a function of the impinging photon energy is analyzed. The angle of incidence of the X-ray beam is employed in the measurements. The measurements are validated by the numerical simulation models. The inclined X-ray track leads to distribute the electron clouds in a certain number of pixels according to the incident angle of the X-ray beam. The pixels detect different electron clouds according to their generation position in the detector bulk. A collimated X-ray beam of 12.14 keV is used in the measurements with 30 and 40 entrance angles. It is shown that the two factors that leads to expand the electron clouds namely the diffusion and the mutual electrostatic repulsion can be separated from the measured electron clouds. It is noticed as well that the influence of the mutual electrostatic repulsion dominates the cloud expansion over the diffusion process in the collection time of the detector. The perpendicular X-ray track leads to determine the average radius of the electron cloud per photon energy. The results show that the size of the electron clouds (RMS) in the energy range of [5.0-21.6] keV is smaller than the pixel size. (orig.)

  14. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  15. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, Mateusz Karol; Calabrese, Roberto; Cardinale, Roberta; Carniti, Paolo; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cojocariu, Lucian Nicolae; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dorosz, Piotr Andrzej; Easo, Sajan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frei, Christoph; Gambetta, Silvia; Gibson, Valerie; Gotti, Claudio; Harnew, Neville; He, Jibo; Keizer, Floris; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Maciuc, Florin; Maino, Matteo; Malaguti, Roberto; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mccann, Michael Andrew; Morris, Adam; Muheim, Franz; Papanestis, Antonis; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedigrossi, Didier; Pistone, Alessandro; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Sigurdsson, Saevar; Simi, Gabriele; Smith, Jackson William; Spradlin, Patrick; Tomassetti, Luca; Wotton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to use the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors are one of the key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper, we describe the setup and the results of the first tests in a particle beam carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded optoelectronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  16. Intense, pulsed, charged particle beams and associated applications to materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsui, K.; Grigoriu, C.; Masugata, K.; Jiang, W.; Sonegawa, T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Eka Prijono, A.C. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    We have demonstrated successful preparation of thin films and nanosize powders by using the technique of intense pulsed ion beam evaporation. In this paper, we review the experimental results of thin film deposition of ZnS, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, BaTiO{sub 3}, cBN, ZrO{sub 2}, ITO, and apatite, as well as the experimental results of the synthesis of nanosize powders of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (author)

  17. Wake-field and space charge effects on high brightness beams calculations and measured results for the laser driven photoelectrons at BNL-ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the formalism used to study the effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, including space charge and wake fields. Some of our calculations and numerical simulation results obtained for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) high-brightness photoelectron beam at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and the measured data at ATF are also included

  18. Self-modulation of a long externally injected relativistic charged-particle beam in a laser wake field acceleration scheme. A preliminary quantum-like investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent investigations indicate that sufficiently long beams of charged particles, travelling in a plasma, experience the phenomenon of self-modulation. The self-modulation is driven by the plasma wake field excitation due to the beam itself, and it may become unstable under certain conditions. A preliminary theoretical investigation of the self-modulation of a relativistic charged-particle beam in overdense plasma in the presence of a preformed plasma wave is carried out, within the quantum-like description of charged particle beams provided by the Thermal Wave Model. A simple physical model for the self-modulation is put forward, described by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation coupled with the Poisson-like equation for the plasma wake potential (so-called Fedele–Shukla equations). The physical mechanism is based on the interplay of three concomitant effects, the radial thermal dispersion (associated with the emittance ε), the radial ponderomotive effects of a preexisting plasma wave (which provides the guidance for the beam), and the self-interaction of the plasma wake field generated by the beam itself

  19. Beam energy dependence of charged pion ratio in $^{28}$Si + In reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Nakai, Y; Ichikawa, Y; Ieki, K; Imajo, S; Isobe, T; Matsushita, M; Murata, J; Nishimura, S; Sakurai, H; Sameshima, R D; Takada, E

    2014-01-01

    The double differential cross sections for $^{nat}$In($^{28}$Si, $\\pi ^{\\pm}$) reactions are measured at 400, 600, and 800 MeV/nucleon. Both $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$ are found to be emitted isotropically from a single moving source. The $\\pi^- / \\pi^+$ yield ratio is determined as a function of the charged pion energy between 25 and 100 MeV. The experimental results significantly differ from the prediction of the standard transport model calculation using the code PHITS. This discrepancy suggests that more theoretical works are required to deduce firm information on the nuclear symmetry energy from the $\\pi^- / \\pi^+$ yield ratio.

  20. Beam-Energy Dependence of Charge Balance Functions from Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    OpenAIRE

    STAR Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Balance functions have been measured in terms of relative pseudorapidity ($\\Delta \\eta$) for charged particle pairs at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 7.7 GeV to 200 GeV using the STAR detector. These results are compared with balance functions measured at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV by the ALICE Collaboration. The width of the balance function decreases as the collisions beco...

  1. Matching the phase volume of a transported charged particle beam by a doublet of quadrupole lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of matching the phase volume of a transported beam is commonly solved by nonlinear programming methods. Writing a system of matching equations that is transcendental, one can turn to the following stage: its solution by direct numerical methods. In this paper the system of matching equations will be reduced to one equation with one unknown by means of successive analytical transformations. This was achieved by the corresponding substitution of the variables. The last equation was solved on a computer. As a result, such characteristics as drift lengths, lengths and gradients of magnetic lenses are written analytically depending on the chosen vector of the parameters and the unknown quantity as indicated. The formulas obtained are realized as a FORTRAN program on a CDC-6500 computer. In the user's dialogue with the computer, this program allows to correct fast all values of free parameters and to choose the most economical version of the calculated matching structure. Geometrical and magnetic characteristics of the beam transport system under investigation are presented in the version conclusively chosen. (orig.)

  2. Transparency induced by two photon interference in a beam splitter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai-Ge; Yang Guo-Jian

    2004-01-01

    We propose a special two-photon state which is completely transparent in a 50/50 beam splitter. This effect is caused by the destructive two-photon interference and shows the signature of photon entanglement. We find that the symmetry of the two-photon spectrum plays the key role for the properties of two-photon interference.

  3. Beam induced deposition of platinum using a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, C.A.; Stern, L.; Barriss, L.; Farkas, L.; DiManna, M.; Mello, R.; Maas, D.J.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Helium ion microscopy is now a demonstrated practical technology that possesses the resolution and beam currents necessary to perform nanofabrication tasks, such as circuit edit applications. Due to helium’s electrical properties and sample interaction characteristics relative to gallium, it is like

  4. Beam induced deposition of platinum using a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, C.A.; Stern, L.; Barriss, L.; Farkas, L.; DiManna, M.; Mello, R.; Maas, D.J.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Helium ion microscopy is now a demonstrated practical technology that possesses the resolution and beam currents necessary to perform nanofabrication tasks, such as circuit edit applications. Due to helium's electrical properties and sample interaction characteristics relative to gallium, it is like

  5. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, Naeem Ahmad; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  6. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Meijer, J.

    1995-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature fo

  7. Locally Resonant Gaps of Phononic Beams Induced by Periodic Arrays of Resonant Shunts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Sheng-Bing; WEN Ji-Hong; WANG Gang; HAN Xiao-Yun; WEN Xi-Sen

    2011-01-01

    @@ Periodic arrays of shunted piezoelectric patches are employed to control the propagation of elastic waves in phononic beams.Each piezo-patch is connected to a single resistance-inductance-capacitance shunting circuit.Therefore,the resonances of the shunting circuits will produce locally resonant gaps in the phononic beam.However,the existence of locally resonant gaps induced by resonant shunts has not been clearly proved by experiment so far.In this work,the locally resonant gap in a piezo-shunted phononic beam is investigated theoretically and verified by experiment.The results prove that resonances of shunting circuits can produce locally resonant gaps in phononic beams.%Periodic arrays of shunted piezoelectric patches are employed to control the propagation of elastic waves in phononic beams. Each piezo-patch is connected to a single resistance-inductance-capacitance shunting circuit. Therefore, the resonances of the shunting circuits will produce locally resonant gaps in the phononic beam. However, the existence of locally resonant gaps induced by resonant shunts has not been clearly proved by experiment so far. In this work, the locally resonant gap in a piezo-shunted phononic beam is investigated theoretically and verified by experiment. The results prove that resonances of shunting circuits can produce locally resonant gaps in phononic beams.

  8. Acetone and the precursor ligand acetylacetone : distinctly different electron beam induced decomposition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warneke, Jonas; Van Dorp, Willem F.; Rudolf, Petra; Stano, Michal; Papp, Peter; Matejcik, Stefan; Borrmann, Tobias; Swiderek, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) acetylacetone plays a role as a ligand in metal acetylacetonate complexes. As part of a larger effort to understand the chemical processes in FEBID, the electron-induced reactions of acetylacetone were studied both in condensed layers and in the ga

  9. Induced fields, charges and currents on a lineman engaged in transmission-line insulator washing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Salam, M.; El-Mohandes, M.T. [Assiut Univ. (Egypt). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Alghamdi, A.S. [Junior Coll. of Technology, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is aimed to calculate the distribution of the field, induced charges and currents on a lineman engaged in transmission-line insulator washing. The method of analysis is based on the charge simulation technique. The lineman is modeled by small sphere for the head and a large sphere for the body. For simplicity, the tower is chosen of the duct type and the insulator of the suspension type. The transmission-line conductor is simulated by finite and semi-infinite line charges to account for the nonuniform distribution of conductor charge resulting from the suspension insulator and the supporting tower. As the purity of the washing water is high, the water spray is simulated by a thin conducting stick extending between the column insulator and the lineman sitting on the crossarm of the tower. This represents a three-dimensional field problem and care has been devoted in the choice of the number and coordinates of charges simulating the tower, the insulator, the conductor, the water spray and the lineman. The induced currents increase as the lineman approaches the insulator with the suspended line conductor. These currents are higher than those for insulated lineman and may exceed the safe limits.

  10. Beam Energy Dependence of Moments of the Net-Charge Multiplicity Distributions in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments—mean (M), variance (σ2), skewness (S), and kurtosis (κ)—of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from √sNN =7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net charge, and are sensitive to the location of the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, σ2/M, Sσ, and κσ2, with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBDs). The Sσ values deviate from the Poisson baseline and are close to the NBD baseline, while the κσ2 values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show nonmonotonic behavior as a function of collision energy. These measurements provide a valuable tool to extract the freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions by comparing with theoretical models.

  11. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied

  12. Design of super-efficient mixer based on induced charge electroosmotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The super-efficient sample mixing induced by the induced-charge electrokinetic flow around conducting/Janus cylinder was numerically studied in a confined |U-shaped microchannel with suddenly applied DC weak electric filed. It’s found that there are four large circulations around the conducting cylinder and two smaller circulations around the Janus cylinder. The results show that samples can still be well mixed with high flux due to the induced electroosmosis. It is demonstrated that the local flow circulations provide effective means to enhance the flow mixing between different solutions. The dependence of the degree of mixing enhancement on the electric field is also predicted.

  13. Experimental and theoretical JINR studies on the development of stochastic cooling of charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorin, A. O.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Shurkhno, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    In 2010, based on the superconducting heavy-ion synchrotron Nuclotron, a new accelerating complex NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) started to be constructed at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, its key facility being the 1.0 - 4.5 GeV per nucleon heavy ion collider. For the purpose of effectively collecting statistics, an average collider luminosity of 1027 cm -2 s -1 is required. With this collider energy, the cooling of the beam both in the process of storage and during the experiment is mandatory to ensure the required parameters. In this paper, a possible new regime of stochastic cooling is examined.

  14. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to {approx}3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved

  15. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to ~3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the

  16. Charge exchange produced K-shell x-ray emission from Ar16+ in a tokamak plasma with neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; Marion, M; Olson, R E

    2004-12-27

    High-resolution spectroscopy of hot tokamak plasma seeded with argon ions and interacting with an energetic, short-pulse neutral hydrogen beam was used to obtain the first high-resolution K-shell x-ray spectrum formed solely by charge exchange. The observed K-shell emission of Ar{sup 16+} is dominated by the intercombination and forbidden lines, providing clear signatures of charge exchange. Results from an ab initio atomic cascade model provide excellent agreement, validating a semiclassical approach for calculating charge exchange cross sections.

  17. Coherent instabilities of intense high-energy "white" charged-particle beams in the presence of nonlocal effects within the context of the Madelung fluid description

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, R; Lisak, M

    2005-01-01

    A hydrodynamical description of coherent instabilities that take place in the longitudinal dynamics of a charged-particle coasting beam in a high-energy accelerating machine is presented. This is done in the framework of the Madelung fluid picture provided by the Thermal Wave Model. The well known coherent instability charts in the complex plane of the longitudinal coupling impedance for monochromatic beams are recovered. The results are also interpreted in terms of the deterministic approach to modulational instability analysis usually given for monochromatic large amplitude wave train propagation governed by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The instability analysis is then extended to a non-monochromatic coasting beam with a given thermal equilibrium distribution, thought as a statistical ensemble of monochromatic incoherent coasting beams ("white" beam). In this hydrodynamical framework, the phenomenon of Landau damping is predicted without using any kinetic equation governing the phase space evolutio...

  18. Suppression of Divergence of Low Energy Ion Beams by Space Charge Neutralization with Low Energy Electrons Emitted from Field Emitter Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppression of divergence of low energy neon ion beam was experimentally demonstrated by neutralizing the space charge of ion beam with low energy electrons emitted from silicon field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). Treatment of the FEAs with trifluoromethane plasma realized surface carbonization which was efficient to elongate the lifetime of the FEA and to improve the electron energy distribution. Together with the improvement of the performance of Si-FEA, we have developed a novel electron deceleration system to produce low energy electrons. A low energy neon ion beam was produced and the beam property was investigated with and without the electron supply from surface carbonized Si-FEA (Si:C-FEA). As a result, the divergence of the neon ion beam was largely suppressed with presence of the electrons.

  19. Systematic studies on the effect of linear lattice optics for space-charge limited beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Molodozhentsev, A; Müller, A S

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) project aims to an increase of the luminosity of the LHC by a factor of 10. In order to realize this ambitious goal, the LHC itself has to undergo a major upgrade accompanied by an extensive upgrade of the complete injector complex referred to as LHC injector upgrade (LIU). In the framework of the LIU project, a new rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) as an alternative to the energy upgrade of the existing PS Booster has been proposed. Motivated by the optics studies conducted for this RCS, the more general question of the influence of the linear optics on the machine performance has been raised. In this paper, we want to investigate this question by comparing different lattices with the final aim of identifying lattice characteristics advantageous under strong space-charge effects.

  20. Current-induced spin polarization in transition metals and Bi/Ag bilayers observed by spin-polarized positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjun; Yamamoto, Shunya; Fukaya, Yuki; Maekawa, Masaki; Li, Hui; Kawasuso, Atsuo; Seki, Takeshi; Saitoh, Eiji; Takanashi, Koki; JAEA Team; Tohoku Team

    2015-03-01

    Current-induced spin polarization (CISP) on the outermost surfaces of Au, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ta, and W films were studied by spin-polarized positron beam (SPPB). The Au and Cu surfaces showed no significant CISP. In contrast, the Pt, Pd, Ta, and W films exhibited large CISP (3 ~ 15% per charge current of 105 A/cm2) and the CISP of Ta and W were opposite to those of Pt and Pd. The sign of the CISP obeys the same rule in spin Hall effect suggesting that the spin-orbit coupling is mainly responsible for the CISP. The outermost spin poalrization of Bi/Ag/Al2O3andAg/Bi/Al2O3 (charge currents directly connected to Ag layers) were probed by SPPB. The opposite outermost spin polarization of Bi/Ag/Al2O3andAg/Bi/Al2O3 clarified the charge-to-spin conversion in Bi/Ag bilayers. Nevertheless, the magnitudes of the outermost spin polarization of Bi(0.3 ~5)/Ag(25)/Al2O3 (numbers in parentheses denote thickness in nm) and Ag(25 ~500)/Bi(8)/Al2O3 decrease exponentially with increasing Bi thickness and Ag thickness, respectively. This provides probably the first direct evidence for spin diffusion mechanism. Financial support from JSPS Kakenhi Grant 24310072.