WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam image system

  1. An electron beam imaging system for quality assurance in IORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, F.; Rossi, M.; Morigi, M. P.; Brancaccio, R.; Paltrinieri, E.; Bettuzzi, M.; Romani, D.; Ciocca, M.; Tosi, G.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, M.

    2004-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy is a special radiotherapy technique, which enables a high dose of radiation to be given in a single fraction during oncological surgery. The major stumbling block to the large-scale application of the technique is the transfer of the patient, with an open wound, from the operating room to the radiation therapy bunker, with the consequent organisational problems and the increased risk of infection. To overcome these limitations, in the last few years a new kind of linear accelerator, the Novac 7, conceived for direct use in the surgical room, has become available. Novac 7 can deliver electron beams of different energies (3, 5, 7 and 9 MeV), with a high dose rate (up to 20 Gy/min). The aim of this work, funded by ENEA in the framework of a research contract, is the development of an innovative system for on-line measurements of 2D dose distributions and electron beam characterisation, before radiotherapy treatment with Novac 7. The system is made up of the following components: (a) an electron-light converter; (b) a 14 bit cooled CCD camera; (c) a personal computer with an ad hoc written software for image acquisition and processing. The performances of the prototype have been characterised experimentally with different electron-light converters. Several tests have concerned the assessment of the detector response as a function of impulse number and electron beam energy. Finally, the experimental results concerning beam profiles have been compared with data acquired with other dosimetric techniques. The achieved results make it possible to say that the developed system is suitable for fast quality assurance measurements and verification of 2D dose distributions.

  2. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  3. Development of an image intensifier-TV digital imaging system with a multiple-slit scanning x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Y.; Doi, K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors are developing a new digital x-ray imaging system employing a multiple-slit assembly (MSA) and an image intensifier (II)-TV digital system. The final image consisting of primary radiation is digitally reconstructed from multiple slit images obtained with the MSA. This system can significantly reduce the scattered radiation from an object and the veiling glare from II-TV system. The quality of the reconstructed image is related to many parameters, such as slit width, the number of image frames, and the image reconstruction algorithm. They present the effect of these various parameters on basic imaging properties and the practicability of the method in comparison with conventional wide beam imaging

  4. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. Methods: A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Results: Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins, as

  5. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  6. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Rim; Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon; Jung, Won Gyun; Lim, Hansang; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2017-06-01

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a 90Sr beta source, a 60Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  7. Alignment of multiple-off-axis-beam imaging/interference systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivel, Shruthi K; Leibovici, Matthieu C R; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2016-04-20

    The alignment of components in complex multibeam arrangements is typically prone to errors that limit the performance of the system. A systematic procedure for aligning such systems is presented here. The method facilitates the precision alignment of the optical elements to achieve the accurate projection of multiple on- and off-axis images and the simultaneous interference of the multiple beams. In addition to the multibeam imaging/interference system presented, the procedure can be employed in other multibeam imaging and/or interfering configurations.

  8. Revisit of combined parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2013-10-01

    This aim of this paper is to revisit the parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging configuration, and to investigate whether this configuration has any advantages. Twenty years ago, it was suggested to simultaneously use a parallel-beam (or a fan-beam) collimator and a cone-beam collimator to acquire single photon emission computed tomography data. The motivation was that the parallel-beam (or the fan-beam) collimator can provide sufficient sampling, while the cone-beam collimator is able to provide higher photon counts. Even with higher total counts, this hybrid system does not give significant improvement (if any) in terms of image noise and artifacts reduction. If a conventional iterative maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm is used to reconstruct the image, the resultant reconstruction may be worse than the parallel-beam-only (or fan-beam-only) system. This paper uses the singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to explain this phenomenon. The SVD results indicate that the parallel-beam-only and the fan-beam-only system outperform the combined systems. The optimal imaging system does not necessary to be the one that generates the projections with highest signal-to-noise ratio and best resolution.

  9. Hard real-time beam scheduler enables adaptive images in multi-probe systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time embedded-system concepts were adapted to allow an imaging system to responsively control the firing of multiple probes. Large-volume, operator-independent (LVOI) imaging would increase the diagnostic utility of ultrasound. An obstacle to this innovation is the inability of current systems to drive multiple transducers dynamically. Commercial systems schedule scanning with static lists of beams to be fired and processed; here we allow an imager to adapt to changing beam schedule demands, as an intelligent response to incoming image data. An example of scheduling changes is demonstrated with a flexible duplex mode two-transducer application mimicking LVOI imaging. Embedded-system concepts allow an imager to responsively control the firing of multiple probes. Operating systems use powerful dynamic scheduling algorithms, such as fixed priority preemptive scheduling. Even real-time operating systems lack the timing constraints required for ultrasound. Particularly for Doppler modes, events must be scheduled with sub-nanosecond precision, and acquired data is useless without this requirement. A successful scheduler needs unique characteristics. To get close to what would be needed in LVOI imaging, we show two transducers scanning different parts of a subjects leg. When one transducer notices flow in a region where their scans overlap, the system reschedules the other transducer to start flow mode and alter its beams to get a view of the observed vessel and produce a flow measurement. The second transducer does this in a focused region only. This demonstrates key attributes of a successful LVOI system, such as robustness against obstructions and adaptive self-correction.

  10. The rapid secondary electron imaging system of the proton beam writer at CIBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalagama, C.N.B.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kan, J.A. van; Teo, E.J.; Watt, F.

    2007-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed a proliferation of research involving proton beam (p-beam) writing. This has prompted investigations into means of optimizing the process of p-beam writing so as to make it less time consuming and more efficient. One such avenue is the improvement of the pre-writing preparatory procedures that involves beam focusing and sample alignment which is centred on acquiring images of a resolution standard or sample. The conventional mode of imaging used up to now has utilized conventional nuclear microprobe signals that are of a pulsed nature and are inherently slow. In this work, we report the new imaging system that has been introduced, which uses proton induced secondary electrons. This in conjunction with software developed in-house that uses a National Instruments DAQ card with hardware triggering, facilitates large data transfer rates enabling rapid imaging. Frame rates as much as 10 frames/s have been achieved at an imaging resolution of 512 x 512 pixels

  11. Verification of IMRT dose distributions using a water beam imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.S.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Ma, C.-M.

    2001-01-01

    A water beam imaging system (WBIS) has been developed and used to verify dose distributions for intensity modulated radiotherapy using dynamic multileaf collimator. This system consisted of a water container, a scintillator screen, a charge-coupled device camera, and a portable personal computer. The scintillation image was captured by the camera. The pixel value in this image indicated the dose value in the scintillation screen. Images of radiation fields of known spatial distributions were used to calibrate the device. The verification was performed by comparing the image acquired from the measurement with a dose distribution from the IMRT plan. Because of light scattering in the scintillator screen, the image was blurred. A correction for this was developed by recognizing that the blur function could be fitted to a multiple Gaussian. The blur function was computed using the measured image of a 10 cmx10 cm x-ray beam and the result of the dose distribution calculated using the Monte Carlo method. Based on the blur function derived using this method, an iterative reconstruction algorithm was applied to recover the dose distribution for an IMRT plan from the measured WBIS image. The reconstructed dose distribution was compared with Monte Carlo simulation result. Reasonable agreement was obtained from the comparison. The proposed approach makes it possible to carry out a real-time comparison of the dose distribution in a transverse plane between the measurement and the reference when we do an IMRT dose verification

  12. Small animal imaging using a flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Yong; Lu, Xianghua; Wood, Ronald W.; Reeder, Jay E.; Johnson, Aimee M.

    2005-04-01

    Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT (FPD-CBCT) imaging system prototypes have been constructed based on modified clinical CT scanners (a modified GE 8800 CT system and a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) spiral CT system) each with a Varian PaxScan 2520 imager. The functions of the electromechanical and radiographic subsystems of the CT system were controlled through specially made hardware, software and data acquisition modules to perform animal cone beam CT studies. Small animal (mouse) imaging studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of an optimized CBCT imaging system to have the capability to perform longitudinal studies to monitor the progression of cancerous tumors or the efficacy of treatments. Radiographic parameters were optimized for fast (~10 second) scans of live mice to produce good reconstructed image quality with dose levels low enough to avoid any detectable radiation treatment to the animals. Specifically, organs in the pelvic region were clearly imaged and contrast studies showed the feasibility to visualize small vasculature and space-filling bladder tumors. In addition, prostate and mammary tumors were monitored in volume growth studies.

  13. A robotic C-arm cone beam CT system for image-guided proton therapy: design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chiaho; Yao, Weiguang; Kidani, Takao; Tomida, Kazuo; Ozawa, Saori; Nishimura, Takenori; Fujisawa, Tatsuya; Shinagawa, Ryousuke; Merchant, Thomas E

    2017-11-01

    A ceiling-mounted robotic C-arm cone beam CT (CBCT) system was developed for use with a 190° proton gantry system and a 6-degree-of-freedom robotic patient positioner. We report on the mechanical design, system accuracy, image quality, image guidance accuracy, imaging dose, workflow, safety and collision-avoidance. The robotic CBCT system couples a rotating C-ring to the C-arm concentrically with a kV X-ray tube and a flat-panel imager mounted to the C-ring. CBCT images are acquired with flex correction and maximally 360° rotation for a 53 cm field of view. The system was designed for clinical use with three imaging locations. Anthropomorphic phantoms were imaged to evaluate the image guidance accuracy. The position accuracy and repeatability of the robotic C-arm was high (beam proton systems with the added advantage of acquiring images at the treatment isocentre.

  14. Evaluation of Algebraic Iterative Image Reconstruction Methods for Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT performs volumetric imaging using a stack of fan beams generated by a multiple pixel X-ray source. While the TBCT system was designed to overcome the scatter and detector issues faced by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, it still suffers the same large cone angle artifacts as CBCT due to the use of approximate reconstruction algorithms. It has been shown that iterative reconstruction algorithms are better able to model irregular system geometries and that algebraic iterative algorithms in particular have been able to reduce cone artifacts appearing at large cone angles. In this paper, the SART algorithm is modified for the use with the different TBCT geometries and is tested using both simulated projection data and data acquired using the TBCT benchtop system. The modified SART reconstruction algorithms were able to mitigate the effects of using data generated at large cone angles and were also able to reconstruct CT images without the introduction of artifacts due to either the longitudinal or transverse truncation in the data sets. Algebraic iterative reconstruction can be especially useful for dual-source dual-detector TBCT, wherein the cone angle is the largest in the center of the field of view.

  15. Multi-beam backscatter image data processing techniques employed to EM 1002 system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.; Chakraborty, B.

    to compensate outer-beam backscatter strength data in such a way that the effect of angular backscatter strength is removed. In this work we have developed backscatter data processing techniques for EM1002 multi-beam system...

  16. System and method for dose verification and gamma ray imaging in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, Lucian

    2017-12-26

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to ion beam therapy. In one aspect, a system includes a position sensitive detector and a collimator. The position sensitive detector configured to detect gamma rays generated by an ion beam interacting with a target. The collimator is positioned between the target and the position sensitive detector. The collimator includes a plurality of knife-edge slits, with a first knife-edge slit intersecting with a second knife-edge slit.

  17. Accuracy of cranial coplanar beam therapy using an oblique, stereoscopic x-ray image guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinci, Justin P.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Neck, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    A system for measuring two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in orthogonal anatomical planes in the cranium was developed and used to evaluate the accuracy of coplanar conformal therapy using ExacTrac image guidance. Dose distributions were measured in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes using a CIRS (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc.) anthropomorphic head phantom with a custom internal film cassette. Sections of radiographic Kodak EDR2 film were cut, processed, and digitized using custom templates. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy and precision of the film system were assessed. BrainScan planned a coplanar-beam treatment to conformally irradiate a 2-cm-diameterx2-cm-long cylindrical planning target volume. Prior to delivery, phantom misalignments were imposed in combinations of ±8 mm offsets in each of the principal directions. ExacTrac x-ray correction was applied until the phantom was within an acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (first two measurement sets) or 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. (last two measurement sets). Measured dose distributions from film were registered to the treatment plan dose calculations and compared. Alignment errors, displacement between midpoints of planned and measured 70% isodose contours (Δc), and positional errors of the 80% isodose line were evaluated using 49 2D film measurements (98 profiles). Comparison of common, but independent measurements of Δc showed that systematic errors in the measurement technique were 0.2 mm or less along all three anatomical axes and that random error averaged (σ±σ σ ) 0.29±0.06 mm for the acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. and 0.15±0.02 mm for the acceptance criteria of 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. . The latter was consistent with independent estimates that showed the precision of the measurement system was 0.3 mm (2σ). Values of Δc were as great as 0.9, 0.3, and 1.0 mm along the P-A, R-L, and I-S axes, respectively. Variations in Δc along the P-A axis were correlated to misalignments between laser

  18. An algorithm to unveil the inner structure of objects concealed by beam divergence in radiographic image acquisition systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, G. L.; Silvani, M. I. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - CNEN, Caixa Postal 68550, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, R. T. [Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear - UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68509, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    Two main parameters rule the performance of an Image Acquisition System, namely, spatial resolution and contrast. For radiographic systems using cone beam arrangements, the farther the source, the better the resolution, but the contrast would diminish due to the lower statistics. A closer source would yield a higher contrast but it would no longer reproduce the attenuation map of the object, as the incoming beam flux would be reduced by unequal large divergences and attenuation factors. This work proposes a procedure to correct these effects when the object is comprised of a hull - or encased in it - possessing a shape capable to be described in analytical geometry terms. Such a description allows the construction of a matrix containing the attenuation factors undergone by the beam from the source until its final destination at each coordinate on the 2D detector. Each matrix element incorporates the attenuation suffered by the beam after its travel through the hull wall, as well as its reduction due to the square of distance to the source and the angle it hits the detector surface. When the pixel intensities of the original image are corrected by these factors, the image contrast, reduced by the overall attenuation in the exposure phase, are recovered, allowing one to see details otherwise concealed due to the low contrast. In order to verify the soundness of this approach, synthetic images of objects of different shapes, such as plates and tubes, incorporating defects and statistical fluctuation, have been generated, recorded for further comparison and afterwards processed to improve their contrast. The developed algorithm which, generates processes and plots the images has been written in Fortran 90 language. As the resulting final images exhibit the expected improvements, it therefore seemed worthwhile to carry out further tests with actual experimental radiographies.

  19. Beam scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enge, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system for deflecting a beam of particles having different momenta, preferably through a 90 0 angle, so as to cause the beam to impinge upon a moving target and to scan across the target is described. The system includes a means responsive to a beam from a suitable source for causing the beam to periodically scan in a scanning plane and further means for deflecting the periodically scanned beam through the desired angle in a deflection plane so that the deflected beam impinges on the target. Means are included in the system for reducing the momentum dispersion at the target in both the deflection and the scanning planes and for spatially focussing the beam so as to produce a desired beam diameter at the target

  20. CEBAF beam viewer imaging software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; McDowell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the various software used in the analysis of beam viewer images at CEBAF. This software, developed at CEBAF, includes a three-dimensional viewscreen calibration code which takes into account such factors as multiple camera/viewscreen rotations and perspective imaging, and maintaining a calibration database for each unit. Additional software allows single-button beam spot detection, with determination of beam location, width, and quality, in less than three seconds. Software has also been implemented to assist in the determination of proper chopper RF control parameters from digitized chopper circles, providing excellent results

  1. Development of a multi-detector and a systematic imaging system on the AGLAE external beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, L., E-mail: laurent.pichon@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Moignard, B.; Lemasson, Q.; Pacheco, C. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Walter, P. [Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS/Ministère de la Culture/UPMC, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS-UMR 8220, Laboratoire d’archéologie moléculaire et structurale, LAMS, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-01-01

    The New AGLAE external beamline provides analytical data for the understanding of the structure of archaeological and artistic objects, their composition, properties, and changes over time. One of the objectives of this project is to design and set up a new non-invasive acquisition system increasing the quality of the X-ray spectra and reducing the beam current on sensitive materials from work of art. To that end, the surface and the number of PIXE detectors have been increased to implement a cluster of SDD detectors. This can also provide the possibility to accomplish large and/or fast maps on artifacts with a scanning of the beam on the sample. During the mapping, a multi-parameter system saves each event from X-ray, gamma and particle detectors, simultaneously with the X and Y positions of the beam on the sample. To process the data, different softwares have been developed or updated. A first example on a decorated medieval shard highlights the perspectives of the technique.

  2. Development of a multi-detector and a systematic imaging system on the AGLAE external beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L.; Moignard, B.; Lemasson, Q.; Pacheco, C.; Walter, P.

    2014-01-01

    The New AGLAE external beamline provides analytical data for the understanding of the structure of archaeological and artistic objects, their composition, properties, and changes over time. One of the objectives of this project is to design and set up a new non-invasive acquisition system increasing the quality of the X-ray spectra and reducing the beam current on sensitive materials from work of art. To that end, the surface and the number of PIXE detectors have been increased to implement a cluster of SDD detectors. This can also provide the possibility to accomplish large and/or fast maps on artifacts with a scanning of the beam on the sample. During the mapping, a multi-parameter system saves each event from X-ray, gamma and particle detectors, simultaneously with the X and Y positions of the beam on the sample. To process the data, different softwares have been developed or updated. A first example on a decorated medieval shard highlights the perspectives of the technique

  3. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. Comparison of vessel contrast measured with a scanning-beam digital x-ray system and an image intensifier/television system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Wilfley, Brian P.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Betts, Timothy D.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    Vessel contrast was measured in the fluoroscopic images produced by a scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system and an image intensifier/television (II/TV) based system. The SBDX system electronically scans a series of pencil x-ray beams across the patient, each of which is directed at a distant small-area detector array. The reduction in detected scatter achieved with this geometry was expected to provide an increase in image contrast. Vessel contrast was evaluated from images of a phantom containing iodinated tubes. The vessels were inserted into an acrylic stack to provide a patient-mimicking scattering medium. Vessel diameter ranged from 0.3 to 3.1 mm. Images were acquired at 100 kVp with the SBDX and II/TV systems and averaged to reduce x-ray noise. The II/TV system was operated in the 6-in. image intensifier mode with an anti-scatter grid. The increase in contrast in the SBDX images, expressed as a ratio of the measured SBDX and II/TV contrasts, ranged from 1.63 to 1.79 for individual vessels. This agreed well with a prediction of the contrast improvement ratio for this experiment, based on measurements of the scatter fraction, object-plane line spread functions, and consideration of the source spectrum and detector absorption properties. The predicted contrast improvement ratio for SBDX relative to II/TV images was 1.62 to 1.77

  5. SU-F-J-40: Evaluation of Sensitivity of the Automatic Matching Between Cone-Beam CT Image and Simulation CT Image in TrueBeam 2.0 Imaging System 6DoF Considering Different Uncertainty Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaque, J; Bautista-Ballesteros, J; Ibanez-Rosello, B; Lliso, F; Carmona, V; Gimeno, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the sensitivity of TrueBeam 2.0 Imaging System 6DoF automatic matching tool through the acquisition of cone-beam CT images in different phantoms applying submillimeter translations and rotations of tenths of a degree and registered with image simulation CT. Methods: To evaluate overall system-wide image, we consider two uncertainties source; First, the uncertainty of the manual phantom displacement (ε-m). This uncertainty is calculated by a digital caliper (0.01 mm) for vertical (Vrt), lateral (Lat) and longitudinal (Lng). A digital inclinometer (0.01°) for the pitch and roll and the own phantom scale to evaluate the coordinate rotation (Rtn). The second uncertainty is the displacement detected by the algorithm system of matching (σ-d) that we obtain from the standard deviations of the different measurements. We use three different phantoms. The BrainLab Radiosurgery system for supporting masks with an anthropomorphic dummy adapted to allow displacements of 0.1 mm in Vrt, Lat and Lng dimensions and rotations of 0.1° in Pitch dimension. For the analysis of the Rtn and Roll dimensions we use two homemade phantoms (RinoRot and RinoRoll, La Fe Hospital, Valencia, Spain) that allow rotations of 0.3°. Results: In the case of manual displacement of 0.10 ± 0.03 mm in the translations, the system detect 0.10 ± 0.07 mm, 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and 0.13 ± 0.07 mm (mean ± SD) in Lat, Vrt and Lng respectively. In the case of rotational dimension, manual displacement of 0.3 ± 0.1° was detected with 0.19 ± 0.06°, 0.29 ± 0.03° and 0.27 ± 0.06° in Pitch, Roll and Rtn. Conclusion: We conclude that the sensitivity of the automatic matching system is within 0.10 mm in translations and 0.3° in rotations. These values are under the own sensitivity of the software.

  6. Edge imaging in intense beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bernal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of rings of charge observed near the edge of beams from high-perveance guns is described with a simple ray tracing technique inspired by the particle-core model. We illustrate the technique, which has no analog in light optics, with examples from experiments employing solenoid focusing of an electron beam. The rings of charge result from the combined effects of external focusing and space-charge forces acting on paraxial fringe particles with relatively large initial transverse velocities. The model is independent of the physical mechanisms responsible for the fringe particles. Furthermore, the focal length for edge imaging in a uniform focusing channel is derived using a linearized trajectory equation for the motion of fringe particles. Counterintuitively, the focal length decreases as the beam current increases.

  7. Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object by use of an X-ray beam having a polychromatic distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong; Pisano, Etta; Connor, Dean; Chapman, Leroy D.

    2010-06-22

    Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object using an X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution are disclosed. According to one aspect, a method can include detecting an image of an object. The method can include generating a first X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution. Further, the method can include positioning a single monochromator crystal in a predetermined position to directly intercept the first X-ray beam such that a second X-ray beam having a predetermined energy level is produced. Further, an object can be positioned in the path of the second X-ray beam for transmission of the second X-ray beam through the object and emission from the object as a transmitted X-ray beam. The transmitted X-ray beam can be directed at an angle of incidence upon a crystal analyzer. Further, an image of the object can be detected from a beam diffracted from the analyzer crystal.

  8. SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, U; Ganesh, T; Saini, V; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Mohanti, B [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify inherent uncertainty associated with a volumetric imaging system in its determination of positional shifts. Methods: The study was performed on an Elekta Axesse™ linac’s XVI cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system. A CT image data set of a Penta- Guide phantom was used as reference image by placing isocenter at the center of the phantom.The phantom was placed arbitrarily on the couch close to isocenter and CBCT images were obtained. The CBCT dataset was matched with the reference image using XVI software and the shifts were determined in 6-dimensions. Without moving the phantom, this process was repeated 20 times consecutively within 30 minutes on a single day. Mean shifts and their standard deviations in all 6-dimensions were determined for all the 20 instances of imaging. For any given day, the first set of shifts obtained was kept as reference and the deviations of the subsequent 19 sets from the reference set were scored. Mean differences and their standard deviations were determined. In this way, data were obtained for 30 consecutive working days. Results: Tabulating the mean deviations and their standard deviations observed on each day for the 30 measurement days, systematic and random errors in the determination of shifts by XVI software were calculated. The systematic errors were found to be 0.03, 0.04 and 0.03 mm while random errors were 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 mm in lateral, craniocaudal and anterio-posterior directions respectively. For rotational shifts, the systematic errors were 0.02°, 0.03° and 0.03° and random errors were 0.06°, 0.05° and 0.05° in pitch, roll and yaw directions respectively. Conclusion: The inherent uncertainties in every image guidance system should be assessed and baseline values established at the time of its commissioning. These shall be periodically tested as part of the QA protocol.

  9. SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, U; Ganesh, T; Saini, V; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Mohanti, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify inherent uncertainty associated with a volumetric imaging system in its determination of positional shifts. Methods: The study was performed on an Elekta Axesse™ linac’s XVI cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system. A CT image data set of a Penta- Guide phantom was used as reference image by placing isocenter at the center of the phantom.The phantom was placed arbitrarily on the couch close to isocenter and CBCT images were obtained. The CBCT dataset was matched with the reference image using XVI software and the shifts were determined in 6-dimensions. Without moving the phantom, this process was repeated 20 times consecutively within 30 minutes on a single day. Mean shifts and their standard deviations in all 6-dimensions were determined for all the 20 instances of imaging. For any given day, the first set of shifts obtained was kept as reference and the deviations of the subsequent 19 sets from the reference set were scored. Mean differences and their standard deviations were determined. In this way, data were obtained for 30 consecutive working days. Results: Tabulating the mean deviations and their standard deviations observed on each day for the 30 measurement days, systematic and random errors in the determination of shifts by XVI software were calculated. The systematic errors were found to be 0.03, 0.04 and 0.03 mm while random errors were 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 mm in lateral, craniocaudal and anterio-posterior directions respectively. For rotational shifts, the systematic errors were 0.02°, 0.03° and 0.03° and random errors were 0.06°, 0.05° and 0.05° in pitch, roll and yaw directions respectively. Conclusion: The inherent uncertainties in every image guidance system should be assessed and baseline values established at the time of its commissioning. These shall be periodically tested as part of the QA protocol.

  10. Novel digital K-edge imaging system with transition radiation from an 855-MeV electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Hagenbuck, F; Clawiter, N; Euteneuer, H; Görgen, F; Holl, P; Johann, K; Kiser, K H; Kemmer, J; Kerschner, T; Kettig, O; Koch, H; Kube, G; Lauth, W; Mauhay, H; Schütrumpf, M; Stotter, R; Strüder, L; Walcher, T; Wilms, A; von Zanthier, C; Zemter, M

    2001-01-01

    A novel K-edge imaging method has been developed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI aiming at a very efficient use of the transition radiation (TR) flux generated by the external 855-MeV electron beam in a foil stack. A fan-like quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray beam is produced from the +or-1-mrad-wide TR cone with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystal. The absorption of the object in front of a 30 mm*10 mm pn charge-coupled device (pn-CCD) photon detector is measured at every pixel by a broad-band energy scan around the K-absorption edge. This is accomplished by a synchronous variation of the lateral crystal position and the electron beam direction which defines also the direction of the TR cone. The system has been checked with a phantom consisting of a 2.5- mu m thick molybdenum sample embedded in a 136- or 272- mu m-thick copper bulk foil. A numerical analysis of the energy spectrum for every pixel demonstrates that data as far as +or-0.75 keV away from the K edge of molybdenum at 20 keV still improv...

  11. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L.; Stone, Jon M.; Krantz, Patrick W.; Royston, John M.; Zeller, Ryan M.; Mapes, Meghan R.; Roland, Paul J.; Dorogi, Mark D.; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T.; Ellingson, Randy J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm2) can be produced in a ˜40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm2) to full modules (1 m2). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  12. A dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging: Design, optimization, and initial performance characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Carestream Health, Rochester, New York 14615 (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This paper reports on the design and initial imaging performance of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for musculoskeletal (MSK) extremities. The system complements conventional CT and MR and offers a variety of potential clinical and logistical advantages that are likely to be of benefit to diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response in MSK radiology, orthopaedic surgery, and rheumatology. Methods: The scanner design incorporated a host of clinical requirements (e.g., ability to scan the weight-bearing knee in a natural stance) and was guided by theoretical and experimental analysis of image quality and dose. Such criteria identified the following basic scanner components and system configuration: a flat-panel detector (FPD, Varian 3030+, 0.194 mm pixels); and a low-power, fixed anode x-ray source with 0.5 mm focal spot (SourceRay XRS-125-7K-P, 0.875 kW) mounted on a retractable C-arm allowing for two scanning orientations with the capability for side entry, viz. a standing configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a sitting configuration for imaging of tensioned upper extremity and unloaded lower extremity. Theoretical modeling employed cascaded systems analysis of modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computed as a function of system geometry, kVp and filtration, dose, source power, etc. Physical experimentation utilized an imaging bench simulating the scanner geometry for verification of theoretical results and investigation of other factors, such as antiscatter grid selection and 3D image quality in phantom and cadaver, including qualitative comparison to conventional CT. Results: Theoretical modeling and benchtop experimentation confirmed the basic suitability of the FPD and x-ray source mentioned above. Clinical requirements combined with analysis of MTF and DQE yielded the following system geometry: a {approx}55 cm source-to-detector distance; 1.3 magnification; a

  13. Optimization and evaluation of multiple gating beam delivery in a synchrotron-based proton beam scanning system using a real-time imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Naoki; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Fujii, Yusuke; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Koyano, Hidenori; Umezawa, Masumi; Nihongi, Hideaki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-07-01

    To find the optimum parameter of a new beam control function installed in a synchrotron-based proton therapy system. A function enabling multiple gated irradiation in the flat top phase has been installed in a real-time-image gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system. This function is realized by a waiting timer that monitors the elapsed time from the last gate-off signal in the flat top phase. The gated irradiation efficiency depends on the timer value, Tw. To find the optimum Tw value, gated irradiation efficiency was evaluated for each configurable Tw value. 271 gate signal data sets from 58 patients were used for the simulation. The highest mean efficiency 0.52 was obtained in TW=0.2s. The irradiation efficiency was approximately 21% higher than at TW=0s, which corresponds to ordinary synchrotron operation. The irradiation efficiency was improved in 154 (57%) of the 271 cases. The irradiation efficiency was reduced in 117 cases because the TW value was insufficient or the function introduced an unutilized wait time for the next gate-on signal in the flat top phase. In the actual treatment of a patient with a hepatic tumor at Tw=0.2s, 4.48GyE irradiation was completed within 250s. In contrast, the treatment time of ordinary synchrotron operation was estimated to be 420s. The results suggest that the multiple gated-irradiation function has potential to improve the gated irradiation efficiency and to reduce the treatment time. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. COMP report: CPQR technical quality control guidelines for accelerator-integrated cone-beam systems for verification imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2018-03-06

    The Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists, in close partnership with the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy has developed a series of Technical Quality Control (TQC) guidelines for radiation treatment equipment. These guidelines outline the performance objectives that equipment should meet in order to ensure an acceptable level of radiation treatment quality. The TQC guidelines have been rigorously reviewed and field tested in a variety of Canadian radiation treatment facilities. The development process enables rapid review and update to keep the guidelines current with changes in technology. This article presents the quality control guideline accelerator-integrated cone-beam systems for verification imaging that has resulted from this process. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Electron beam processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam Processing Systems (EPS) are used as useful and powerful tools in many industrial application fields such as the production of cross-linked wire, rubber tire, heat shrinkable film and tubing, curing, degradation of polymers, sterilization and environmental application. In this paper, the feature and application fields, the selection of machine ratings and safety measures of EPS will be described. (author)

  16. Exposure reduction in general dental practice using digital x-ray imaging system for intraoral radiography with additional x-ray beam filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Hitoshi; Mori, Toshimichi; Hayakawa, Yoshihiko; Kuroyanagi, Kinya; Ota, Yoshiko

    1997-01-01

    To measure exposure reduction in general dental practice using digital x-ray imaging systems for intraoral radiography with additional x-ray beam filter. Two digital x-ray imaging systems, Pana Digital (Pana-Heraus Dental) and CDR (Schick Technologies), were applied for intraoral radiography in general dental practice. Due to the high sensitivity to x-rays, additional x-ray beam filters for output reduction were used for examination. An Orex W II (Osada Electric Industry) x-ray generator was operated at 60 kVp, 7 mA. X-ray output (air-kerma; Gy) necessary for obtaining clinically acceptable images was measured at 0 to 20 cm in 5 cm steps from the cone tip using an ionizing chamber type 660 (Nuclear Associates) and compared with those for Ektaspeed Plus film (Eastman Kodak). The Pana Digital system was used with the optional filter supplied by Pana-Heraus Dental which reduced the output to 38%. The exposure necessary to obtain clinically acceptable images was only 40% of that for the film. The CDR system was used with the Dental X-ray Beam Filter Kit (Eastman Kodak) which reduced the x-ray output to 30%. The exposure necessary to obtain clinically acceptable images was only 20% of that for the film. The two digital x-ray imaging systems, Pana Digital and CDR, provided large dose savings (60-80%) compared with Ektaspeed Plus film when applied for intraoral radiography in general dental practice. (author)

  17. The beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The first proton beams have been transported along the transfer beamline and the diagnostic components have thus been used and tested under real operating conditions. The various electronic systems have been linked to the control system and the equipment can now be operated from the control console. The performance of the diagnostic system for the transfer beamline is satisfactory. The beam diagnostic components for the high-energy beamlines up to the isotope production and neutron therapy vaults and the first experimental target rooms have been installed. The high-energy slits have been delivered. The scanner and harp electronics have been installed and linked to their respective components in the beamlines. The pneumatic acuator control electronics has been manufactured, installed and is operational; provision has been made for special control features of the equipment in the therapy beamline. The high-voltage bias supply for the Faraday cups has been implemented. The installation of the beam current measurement system is nearing completion although part of it is already operational. A coaxial relay multiplexer for the capacitive phase probe signals has been manufactured and installed. The diagnostic equipment for the beamlines to isotope production and neutron therapy is thus ready for operation. 4 figs

  18. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  19. Design of a Multi-Pinhole Collimator for I-123 DaTscan Imaging on Dual-Headed SPECT Systems in Combination with a Fan-Beam Collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M; Könik, Arda; Zubal, I George; Dey, Joyoni; Licho, Robert

    2016-02-01

    For the 2011 FDA approved Parkinson's Disease (PD) SPECT imaging agent I-123 labeled DaTscan, the volume of interest (VOI) is the interior portion of the brain. However imaging of the occipital lobe is also required with PD for calculation of the striatal binding ratio (SBR), a parameter of significance in early diagnosis, differentiation of PD from other disorders with similar clinical presentations, and monitoring progression. Thus we propose the usage of a combination of a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator on one head of the SPECT system and a fan-beam on the other. The MPH would be designed to provide high resolution and sensitivity for imaging of the interior portion of the brain. The fan-beam collimator would provide lower resolution but complete sampling of the brain addressing data sufficiency and allowing a volume-of-interest to be defined over the occipital lobe for calculation of SBR's. Herein we focus on the design of the MPH component of the combined system. Combined reconstruction will be addressed in a subsequent publication. An analysis of 46 clinical DaTscan studies was performed to provide information to define the VOI, and design of a MPH collimator to image this VOI. The system spatial resolution for the MPH was set to 4.7 mm, which is comparable to that of clinical PET systems, and significantly smaller than that of fan-beam collimators employed in SPECT. With this set, we compared system sensitivities for three aperture array designs, and selected the 3 × 3 array due to it being the highest of the three. The combined sensitivity of the apertures for it was similar to that of an ultra-high resolution fan-beam (LEUHRF) collimator, but smaller than that of a high-resolution fan-beam collimator (LEHRF). On the basis of these results we propose the further exploration of this design through simulations, and the development of combined MPH and fan-beam reconstruction.

  20. Image distortion in narrow beam rotation radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, U.; Wickman, G.

    1978-01-01

    A general mathematical analysis of the image distortion in narrow beam rotation radiography has been performed. Distortion effects are often evident in panoramic images exposed in clinical practice. It is found that in spite of this general experience panoramic images, exposed with the aid of a rotating narrow beam, are reliable for ordinary clinical demands when the object morphology is to be assessed. This statement is valid provided that the object has been properly positioned at the exposure. (Auth.)

  1. Production of an {sup 15}O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Akram, E-mail: mohammadi.akram@qst.go.jp; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-21

    In advanced ion therapy, the {sup 15}O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an {sup 15}O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable {sup 16}O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors’ group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of {sup 15}O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of {sup 15}O fragments. The highest production rate of {sup 15}O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the {sup 15}O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is

  2. Production of an 15O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Akram; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-01

    In advanced ion therapy, the 15O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an 15O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable 16O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors' group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of 15O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of 15O fragments. The highest production rate of 15O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the 15O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is sufficiently high. In-beam PET imaging was also

  3. Dynamic imaging with a triggered and intensified CCD camera system in a high-intensity neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vontobel, P.; Frei, G.; Brunner, J.; Gildemeister, A.E.; Engelhardt, M.

    2005-01-01

    When time-dependent processes within metallic structures should be inspected and visualized, neutrons are well suited due to their high penetration through Al, Ag, Ti or even steel. Then it becomes possible to inspect the propagation, distribution and evaporation of organic liquids as lubricants, fuel or water. The principle set-up of a suited real-time system was implemented and tested at the radiography facility NEUTRA of PSI. The highest beam intensity there is 2x10 7 cm -2 s -1 , which enables to observe sequences in a reasonable time and quality. The heart of the detection system is the MCP intensified CCD camera PI-Max with a Peltier cooled chip (1300x1340 pixels). The intensifier was used for both gating and image enhancement, where as the information was accumulated over many single frames on the chip before readout. Although, a 16-bit dynamic range is advertised by the camera manufacturers, it must be less due to the inherent noise level from the intensifier. The obtained result should be seen as the starting point to go ahead to fit the different requirements of car producers in respect to fuel injection, lubricant distribution, mechanical stability and operation control. Similar inspections will be possible for all devices with repetitive operation principle. Here, we report about two measurements dealing with the lubricant distribution in a running motorcycle motor turning at 1200rpm. We were monitoring the periodic stationary movements of piston, valves and camshaft with a micro-channel plate intensified CCD camera system (PI-Max 1300RB, Princeton Instruments) triggered at exactly chosen time points

  4. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  5. Update on MEMS-based scanned beam imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard; Gibson, Greg; Metting, Frank; Davis, Wyatt; Drabe, Christian

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, Microvision presented "Scanned Beam Medical Imager" as an introduction to our MEMS-based, full color scanned beam imaging system. This presentation will provide an update of the technological advancements since this initial work from 2004. This recent work includes the development of functional prototypes that are much smaller than previous prototypes using a design architecture that is easily scalable. Performance has been significantly improved by increasing the optical field of views and video refresh rate. Real-time image processing capabilities have been developed to enhance the image quality and functionality over a wide range of operating conditions. Actual images of various objects will be presented.

  6. Assessment of image quality in soft tissue and bone visualization tasks for a dedicated extremity cone-beam CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demehri, S; Muhit, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Yorkston, J; Packard, N; Senn, R; Yang, D; Foos, D; Thawait, G K; Fayad, L M; Chhabra, A; Carrino, J A; Siewerdsen, J H

    2015-06-01

    To assess visualization tasks using cone-beam CT (CBCT) compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) for musculoskeletal extremity imaging. Ten cadaveric hands and ten knees were examined using a dedicated CBCT prototype and a clinical multi-detector CT using nominal protocols (80 kVp-108mAs for CBCT; 120 kVp- 300 mAs for MDCT). Soft tissue and bone visualization tasks were assessed by four radiologists using five-point satisfaction (for CBCT and MDCT individually) and five-point preference (side-by-side CBCT versus MDCT image quality comparison) rating tests. Ratings were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and observer agreement was assessed using the Kappa-statistic. Knee CBCT images were rated "excellent" or "good" (median scores 5 and 4) for "bone" and "soft tissue" visualization tasks. Hand CBCT images were rated "excellent" or "adequate" (median scores 5 and 3) for "bone" and "soft tissue" visualization tasks. Preference tests rated CBCT equivalent or superior to MDCT for bone visualization and favoured the MDCT for soft tissue visualization tasks. Intraobserver agreement for CBCT satisfaction tests was fair to almost perfect (κ ~ 0.26-0.92), and interobserver agreement was fair to moderate (κ ~ 0.27-0.54). CBCT provided excellent image quality for bone visualization and adequate image quality for soft tissue visualization tasks. • CBCT provided adequate image quality for diagnostic tasks in extremity imaging. • CBCT images were "excellent" for "bone" and "good/adequate" for "soft tissue" visualization tasks. • CBCT image quality was equivalent/superior to MDCT for bone visualization tasks.

  7. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography is an attractive alternative for submicron patterning because it may provide high throughput; it uses demagnification to gain advantages in reticle fabrication, inspection, and lifetime; and it enjoys the precise deposition characteristics of ions which cause essentially no collateral damage. This lithographic option involves extracting low-mass ions (e.g., He + ) from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto a resist-coated wafer. While the advantages of this technology have been demonstrated experimentally by the work of IMS (Austria), many difficulties still impede extension of the technology to the high-volume production of microelectronic devices. We report a computational study of a lithography system designed to address problem areas in field size, telecentricity, and chromatic and geometric aberration. We present a novel ion-column-design approach and conceptual ion-source and column designs which address these issues. We find that image-projection ion-beam technology should in principle meet high-volume-production requirements. The technical success of our present relatively compact-column design requires that a glow-discharge-based ion source (or equivalent cold source) be developed and that moderate further improvement in geometric aberration levels be obtained. Our system requires that image predistortion be employed during reticle fabrication to overcome distortion due to residual image nonlinearity and space-charge forces. This constitutes a software data preparation step, as do correcting for distortions in electron lithography columns and performing proximity-effect corrections. Areas needing further fundamental work are identified

  8. Optical synchrotron radiation beam imaging with a digital mask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fiorito, Ralph [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Corbett, Jeff [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shkvarunets, Anatoly [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tian, Kai [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fisher, Alan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Douglas, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mok, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mitsuhashi, T. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    The 3GeV SPEAR3 synchrotron light source operates in top-up injection mode with up to 500mA circulating in the storage ring (equivalently 392nC). Each injection pulse contains only 40-80 pC producing a contrast ratio between total stored charge and injected charge of about 6500:1. In order to study transient injected beam dynamics during User operations, it is desirable to optically image the injected pulse in the presence of the bright stored beam. In the present work this is done by re-imaging visible synchrotron radiation onto a digital micro-mirror-array device (DMD), which is then used as an optical mask to block out light from the bright central core of the stored beam. The physical masking, together with an asynchronously-gated, ICCD imaging camera makes it is possible to observe the weak injected beam component on a turn-by-turn basis. The DMD optical masking system works similar to a classical solar coronagraph but has some distinct practical advantages: i.e. rapid adaption to changes in the shape of the stored beam, high extinction ratio for unwanted light and minimum scattering from the primary beam into the secondary optics. In this paper we describe the DMD masking method, features of the high dynamic range point spread function for the SPEAR3 optical beam line and measurements of the injected beam in the presence of the stored beam.

  9. Image Processing In Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, James R.; Ansari, Homayoon; Chen, Chien-Chung; Russell, Donald W.

    1996-01-01

    Conceptual design of image-processing circuitry developed for proposed tracking apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem For Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). In proposed system, desired frame rate achieved by "windowed" readout scheme in which only pixels containing and surrounding two spots read out and others skipped without being read. Image data processed rapidly and efficiently to achieve high frequency response.

  10. Rainbow correlation imaging with macroscopic twin beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2017-06-01

    We present the implementation of a correlation-imaging protocol that exploits both the spatial and spectral correlations of macroscopic twin-beam states generated by parametric downconversion. In particular, the spectral resolution of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an EMCCD camera is used in a proof-of-principle experiment to encrypt and decrypt a simple code to be transmitted between two parties. In order to optimize the trade-off between visibility and resolution, we provide the characterization of the correlation images as a function of the spatio-spectral properties of twin beams generated at different pump power values.

  11. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  12. Beam based systems and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, D

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will give a review from the operations team of the performance and issues of the beam based systems, namely RF, ADT, beam instrumentation, controls and injection systems. For each of these systems, statistics on performance and availability will be presented with the main issues encountered in 2012. The possible improvements for operational efficiency and safety will be discussed, with an attempt to answer the question "Are we ready for the new challenges brought by the 25ns beam and increased energy after LSI? ".

  13. Beam imaging sensor and method for using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-03

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature. In another embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other things, a discontinuous partially circumferential slit. Also disclosed is a method for using the various beams sensor embodiments of the present invention.

  14. An imaging informatics-based system to support animal studies for treating pain in spinal cord injury utilizing proton-beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mao, Xiao W.; Kotha, Nikhil

    2015-03-01

    In previous years we demonstrated an imaging informatics system designed to support multi-institutional research focused on the utilization of proton radiation for treating spinal cord injury (SCI)-related pain. This year we will demonstrate an update on the system with new modules added to perform image processing on evaluation data using immunhistochemistry methods to observe effects of proton therapy. The overarching goal of the research is to determine the effectiveness of using the proton beam for treating SCI-related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The research is a joint collaboration between three major institutes, University of Southern California (data collection/integration and image analysis), Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach (patient subject recruitment), and Loma Linda University and Medical Center (human and preclinical animal studies). The system that we are presenting is one of its kind which is capable of integrating a large range of data types, including text data, imaging data, DICOM objects from proton therapy treatment and pathological data. For multi-institutional studies, keeping data secure and integrated is very crucial. Different kinds of data within the study workflow are generated at different stages and different groups of people who process and analyze them in order to see hidden patterns within healthcare data from a broader perspective. The uniqueness of our system relies on the fact that it is platform independent and web-based which makes it very useful in such a large-scale study.

  15. Proton beam writing for producing holographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ow, Y.S.; Breese, M.B.H.; Bettiol, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the writing of computer generated hologram diffraction patterns using focused 2 MeV proton beam irradiation. These patterns were designed using a ray tracing algorithm and written directly into a thick polymethylmethacrylate layer. When the developed holographic pattern was illuminated with a 650 nm laser it produced a good reconstructed image. This work provides means of forming high-resolution, high aspect ratio holographic images in polymers for applications in data storage using switchable holography.

  16. Beam Cleaning and Collimation Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S

    2016-01-01

    Collimation systems in particle accelerators are designed to dispose of unavoidable losses safely and efficiently during beam operation. Different roles are required for different types of accelerator. The present state of the art in beam collimation is exemplified in high-intensity, high-energy superconducting hadron colliders, like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where stored beam energies reach levels up to several orders of magnitude higher than the tiny energies required to quench cold magnets. Collimation systems are essential systems for the daily operation of these modern machines. In this document, the design of a multistage collimation system is reviewed, taking the LHC as an example case study. In this case, unprecedented cleaning performance has been achieved, together with a system complexity comparable to no other accelerator. Aspects related to collimator design and operational challenges of large collimation systems are also addressed.

  17. Optimal usage of cone beam computed tomography system with different field of views in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Venkata Naga Madhusudhana Sresty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find methods for optimal usage of XVI (X-ray volume imaging system in Elekta synergy linear accelerator with different field of views for same lesion in order to minimize patient dose due to imaging.Methods: 20 scans of 2 individual patients with ca sigmoid colon and ca lung were used in this study. Kilo voltage collimators with medium field of view were used as per the preset information. Images were reconstructed for another collimator with small field of view. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software. Shift results of both methods were compared. Results: Variation in treatment set up errors with M20 and S20 collimators were ≤ 0.2 mm in translational and 0.30 in rotational shifts. Results showed almost equal translational and rotational shifts in both medium and small field of views with different collimators in all the scans. Visualization of target and surrounding structures were good enough and sufficient for XVI auto matching.Conclusion: Imaging with small field of view results less patient dose compared with medium or large field of views. It is Suggestible to use collimators with small field of view wherever possible. In this study, collimators with small field of view were sufficient for both patients though the preset information indicated medium field of view. But, it always depends on the area required for matching purpose. So, individual selection is important than preset information in the XVI system.

  18. Laser beam welding quality monitoring system based in high-speed (10 kHz) uncooled MWIR imaging sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Rodrigo; Vergara, German; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Fernández, Carlos; Villamayor, Víctor; Gómez, Luis; González-Camino, Maria; Baldasano, Arturo; Castro, G.; Arias, R.; Lapido, Y.; Rodríguez, J.; Romero, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    The combination of flexibility, productivity, precision and zero-defect manufacturing in future laser-based equipment are a major challenge that faces this enabling technology. New sensors for online monitoring and real-time control of laserbased processes are necessary for improving products quality and increasing manufacture yields. New approaches to fully automate processes towards zero-defect manufacturing demand smarter heads where lasers, optics, actuators, sensors and electronics will be integrated in a unique compact and affordable device. Many defects arising in laser-based manufacturing processes come from instabilities in the dynamics of the laser process. Temperature and heat dynamics are key parameters to be monitored. Low cost infrared imagers with high-speed of response will constitute the next generation of sensors to be implemented in future monitoring and control systems for laser-based processes, capable to provide simultaneous information about heat dynamics and spatial distribution. This work describes the result of using an innovative low-cost high-speed infrared imager based on the first quantum infrared imager monolithically integrated with Si-CMOS ROIC of the market. The sensor is able to provide low resolution images at frame rates up to 10 KHz in uncooled operation at the same cost as traditional infrared spot detectors. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new sensor technology, a low-cost camera was assembled on a standard production laser welding head, allowing to register melting pool images at frame rates of 10 kHz. In addition, a specific software was developed for defect detection and classification. Multiple laser welding processes were recorded with the aim to study the performance of the system and its application to the real-time monitoring of laser welding processes. During the experiments, different types of defects were produced and monitored. The classifier was fed with the experimental images obtained. Self

  19. ITER Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Akiba, Masato

    1991-03-01

    A Japanese design proposal of the ITER Neutral Beam Injection System (NBS) which is consistent with the ITER common design requirements is described. The injection system is required to deliver a neutral deuterium beam of 75MW at 1.3MeV to the reactor plasma and utilized not only for plasma heating but also for current drive and current profile control. The injection system is composed of 9 modules, each of which is designed so as to inject a 1.3MeV, 10MW neutral beam. The most important point in the design is that the injection system is based on the utilization of a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source which can produce an intense negative ion beam with high current density at a low source operating pressure. The design value of the source is based on the experimental values achieved at JAERI. The utilization of the cesium-seeded volume source is essential to the design of an efficient and compact neutral beam injection system which satisfies the ITER common design requirements. The critical components to realize this design are the 1.3MeV, 17A electrostatic accelerator and the high voltage DC acceleration power supply, whose performances must be demonstrated prior to the construction of ITER NBI system. (author)

  20. High intensity beam dump for the Tevatron beam abort system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, J.; Mokhov, N.; Murphy, T.; Palmer, M.; Toohig, T.; Turkot, F.; VanGinneken, A.

    1981-01-01

    The beam abort system proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron Accelerator will extract the proton beam from the ring in a single turn (approximately 20/mu/s) and direct it to an external beam dump. It is the function of the beam dump to absorb the unwanted beam and limit the escaping radiation to levels that are acceptable to the surrounding populace and apparatus. A beam dump that is expected to meet these requirements has been designed and constructed. Detailed design of the dump, including considerations leading to the choice of materials, are given. 6 refs

  1. Corrected electrostatic lens systems for ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgish, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work in our laboratory has introduced a new class of electrostatic focus forming element for beams, the ELCO lens. It compares favourably with the electrostatic and magnetic quadrupole elements conventionally used for microbeam formation. The ELCO lens does however have disadvantages associated with apertures and alignment. We have continued with the development of ion beam lenses and have evolved a further class of lens element which eliminates aperture and alignment problems. This new element can be combined like optical lenses into an aberration corrected system. Experimental measurement on the basic lens element has confirmed mathematical analysis of ion trajectories through the element. This mathematical analysis predicts that the basic element can be combined into a corrected lens system for, either: (1) high resolution microprobe formation with intrinsic rastering ability, the spot size limited only by the beam properties; or (2) high quality image formation with large magnification/demagnification ratio and wide angular aperture. (orig.)

  2. PLT neutral beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) neutral beam injection system is given and its performance characteristics are outlined. A detailed operational procedure is included, as are some tips on troubleshooting. Proper operation of the source is shown to be a crucial factor in system performance

  3. Final focus system for high intensity beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Henestroza

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The neutralized transport experiment (NTX at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final-focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final-focus scenario in a heavy ion fusion driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r_{s} at a given distance (f from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  4. The ELENA Beam Diagnostics Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G

    2013-01-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) to be built at CERN is aimed at substantially increasing the number of antiprotons to the low energy antiproton physics community. It will be a small machine which will decelerate low intensity beams (<4x107) from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV and will be equipped with an electron cooler to avoid beam losses during the deceleration and to significantly reduce beam phase space at extraction. To measure the beam parameters from the extraction point of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), through the ELENA ring and all the way to the experiments, many systems will be needed to ensure that the desired beam characteristics are obtained. Particular attention needs to be paid to the performance of the electron cooler which depends on reliable instrumentation in order to efficiently cool the antiprotons. This contribution will present the different monitors that have been proposed to measure the various beam parameters as well as some of the developments going on to further improve th...

  5. Imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froggatt, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a two dimensional imaging system in which a pattern of radiation falling on the system is detected to give electrical signals for each of a plurality of strips across the pattern. The detection is repeated for different orientations of the strips and the whole processed by compensated back projection. For a shadow x-ray system a plurality of strip x-ray detectors are rotated on a turntable. For lower frequencies the pattern may be rotated with a Dove prism and the strips condensed to suit smaller detectors with a cylindrical lens. (author)

  6. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  7. Reliability of a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks of the maxillofacial skeleton. An evaluation method for three-dimensional images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Momoko; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Kazuhito; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Fuyamada, Mariko; Goto, Shigemi; Ariji, Eiichiro; Tokumori, Kenji; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method for evaluating the reliability of a coordinate system based on maxillofacial skeletal landmarks and use it to assess two coordinate systems. Scatter plots and 95% confidence ellipses of an objective landmark were defined as an index for demonstrating the stability of the coordinate system. A head phantom was positioned horizontally in reference to the Frankfurt horizontal and occlusal planes and subsequently scanned once in each position using cone-beam computed tomography. On the three-dimensional images created with a volume-rendering procedure, six dentists twice set two different coordinate systems: coordinate system 1 was defined by the nasion, sella, and basion, and coordinate system 2 was based on the left orbitale, bilateral porions, and basion. The menton was assigned as an objective landmark. The scatter plot and 95% ellipse of the menton indicated the high-level reliability of coordinate system 2. The patterns with the two coordinate systems were similar between data obtained in different head positions. The method presented here may be effective for evaluating the reliability (reproducibility) of coordinate systems based on skeletal landmarks. (author)

  8. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  9. Bevalac beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.; Behrsing, G.; Morgado, R.; Rondeau, D.; Salsig, W.; Selph, F.; Staples, J.; Yourd, R.

    1975-03-01

    The Bevalac consists of, in part, a 200 meter long transfer line between the SuperHILAC and the Bevatron, which are at differing elevation. Unique features in the construction of the transfer line are described. The line, located largely outside, must cope with a natural environment. Part of the line passes through a hillside, requiring some unique support and alignment techniques. The dipoles are of the tape-wound variety and the steering magnets use printed circuit conductors. The vacuum system and an inexpensive and effective destructive monitoring system are described. (U.S.)

  10. Design and construction of a flat-panel-based cone-beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system through the adaptation of a commercially available CT system: recent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how a commercially available spiral CT has been modified for use as the electro-mechanical scanner hardware for a prototype flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system. FPD-CBCT has the benefits of isotropic high resolution, low contrast sensitivity and 3D visualization. In contrast to spiral CT, which acquires a series of narrow slices, FPD-CBCT acquires a full volume of data (limited by the cone angle and the FPD active area) in one time, repetition rate) and image data acquisition. Also, a 2D full field FPD replaced the 1D detector, as well as the existing slit collimator was retrofitted to a full field collimator to allow x-ray exposure over the entire active area of the FPD. In addition, x-ray projection data was acquired at 30 fps. Power and communication signals to control modules on the rotating part of the gantry were transmitted through integrated slip rings on the gantry. A stationary host computer controlled mechanical motion of the gantry and sent trigger signals to on-board electronic interface modules to control data acquisition and radiographic functions. Acquired image data was grabbed to the system memory of an on-board industrial computer, saved to hard disk and downloaded through a network connection to the stationary computer for 3D reconstruction. Through the synchronized control of the pulsed x-ray exposures, data acquisition, and gantry rotation the system achieved a circle cone beam image acquisition protocol. With integrated control of the gantry tilt and of the position and translation speed of the patient table, spiral cone beam and circle-plus-arc cone beam image acquisition protocols will also be achieved. Performance is being evaluated with optical encoders, standard dosimetry equipment and phantom studies.

  11. Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogovac, M.; Jaksic, M.; Wegrzynek, D.; Markowicz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Capabilities of spectroscopic ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques that are available in ion microprobe facilities can be greatly improved by the use of digital pulse processing. We report here development of a digital multi parameter data acquisition system suitable for IBA imaging applications. Input signals from charge sensitive preamplifier are conditioned by using a simple circuit and digitized with fast ADCs. The digitally converted signals are processed in real time using FPGA. Implementation of several components of the system is presented.

  12. TFTR neutral beam power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, A.; Murray, H.; Winje, R.

    1977-01-01

    The TFTR NB System will be composed of four beam lines, each containing three ion sources presently being developed for TFTR by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) will provide the necessary power required to operate these Ion Sources in both an experimental or operational mode as well as test mode. This paper describes the technical as well as the administrative/management aspects involved in the development and building of this system. The NBPS will combine the aspects of HV pulse (120 kV) and long pulse width (0.5 sec) together to produce a high power system that is unique in the Electrical Engineering field

  13. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschel, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy √(s)=8 TeV and √(s)=2.76 TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. Therefore, a new method has been developed using all reconstructed vertices in order to improve the understanding of the vertex resolution. In addition to the overlap integral, the knowledge of the colliding bunch populations is required to measure the luminosity. The determination of the bunch populations relies on LHC instruments to measure the bunch population fractions and the total beam intensity. Studies performed as part of this work resulted in a reduction of the bunch current normalization uncertainty from ±2.7% to ±0.2% and making it possible to achieve precision luminosity measurements at all LHC experiments. Furthermore, information on beam-gas interactions not originating from nominally filled bunches was analyzed to determine the charge fraction not participating in bunch collisions. The knowledge of this fraction is required to correct the total beam intensity. The reference cross-section of pp interactions with at least two tracks in the vertex detector

  14. Extended ellipse-line-ellipse trajectory for long-object cone-beam imaging with a mounted C-arm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Noo, Frédéric; Lauritsch, Günter; Dennerlein, Frank; Mao, Yanfei; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports show that three-dimensional cone-beam (CB) imaging with a floor-mounted (or ceiling-mounted) C-arm system has become a valuable tool in interventional radiology. Currently, a circular short scan is used for data acquisition, which inevitably yields CB artifacts and a short coverage in the direction of the patient table. To overcome these two limitations, a more sophisticated data acquisition geometry is needed. This geometry should be complete in terms of Tuy’s condition and should allow continuous scanning, while being compatible with the mechanical constraints of mounted C-arm systems. Additionally, the geometry should allow accurate image reconstruction from truncated data. One way to ensure such a feature is to adopt a trajectory that provides full R-line coverage within the field-of-view (FOV). An R-line is any segment of line that connects two points on a source trajectory, and the R-line coverage is the set of points that belong to an R-line. In this work, we propose a novel geometry called the extended ellipse-line-ellipse (ELE) for long-object imaging with a mounted C-arm system. This trajectory is built from modules consisting of two elliptical arcs connected by a line. We demonstrate that the extended ELE can be configured in many ways so that full R-line coverage is guaranteed. Both tight and relaxed parametric settings are presented. All results are supported by extensive mathematical proofs provided in appendices. Our findings make the extended ELE trajectory attractive for axially-extended FOV imaging in interventional radiology. (paper)

  15. Extended ellipse-line-ellipse trajectory for long-object cone-beam imaging with a mounted C-arm system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicong; Lauritsch, Günter; Dennerlein, Frank; Mao, Yanfei; Hornegger, Joachim; Noo, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    Recent reports show that three-dimensional cone-beam (CB) imaging with a floor-mounted (or ceiling-mounted) C-arm system has become a valuable tool in interventional radiology. Currently, a circular short scan is used for data acquisition, which inevitably yields CB artifacts and a short coverage in the direction of the patient table. To overcome these two limitations, a more sophisticated data acquisition geometry is needed. This geometry should be complete in terms of Tuy’s condition and should allow continuous scanning, while being compatible with the mechanical constraints of mounted C-arm systems. Additionally, the geometry should allow accurate image reconstruction from truncated data. One way to ensure such a feature is to adopt a trajectory that provides full R-line coverage within the field-of-view (FOV). An R-line is any segment of line that connects two points on a source trajectory, and the R-line coverage is the set of points that belong to an R-line. In this work, we propose a novel geometry called the extended ellipse-line-ellipse (ELE) for long-object imaging with a mounted C-arm system. This trajectory is built from modules consisting of two elliptical arcs connected by a line. We demonstrate that the extended ELE can be configured in many ways so that full R-line coverage is guaranteed. Both tight and relaxed parametric settings are presented. All results are supported by extensive mathematical proofs provided in appendices. Our findings make the extended ELE trajectory attractive for axially-extended FOV imaging in interventional radiology.

  16. Extended ellipse-line-ellipse trajectory for long-object cone-beam imaging with a mounted C-arm system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicong; Lauritsch, Günter; Dennerlein, Frank; Mao, Yanfei; Hornegger, Joachim; Noo, Frédéric

    2016-02-21

    Recent reports show that three-dimensional cone-beam (CB) imaging with a floor-mounted (or ceiling-mounted) C-arm system has become a valuable tool in interventional radiology. Currently, a circular short scan is used for data acquisition, which inevitably yields CB artifacts and a short coverage in the direction of the patient table. To overcome these two limitations, a more sophisticated data acquisition geometry is needed. This geometry should be complete in terms of Tuy's condition and should allow continuous scanning, while being compatible with the mechanical constraints of mounted C-arm systems. Additionally, the geometry should allow accurate image reconstruction from truncated data. One way to ensure such a feature is to adopt a trajectory that provides full R-line coverage within the field-of-view (FOV). An R-line is any segment of line that connects two points on a source trajectory, and the R-line coverage is the set of points that belong to an R-line. In this work, we propose a novel geometry called the extended ellipse-line-ellipse (ELE) for long-object imaging with a mounted C-arm system. This trajectory is built from modules consisting of two elliptical arcs connected by a line. We demonstrate that the extended ELE can be configured in many ways so that full R-line coverage is guaranteed. Both tight and relaxed parametric settings are presented. All results are supported by extensive mathematical proofs provided in appendices. Our findings make the extended ELE trajectory attractive for axially-extended FOV imaging in interventional radiology.

  17. SU-E-P-54: Evaluation of the Accuracy and Precision of IGPS-O X-Ray Image-Guided Positioning System by Comparison with On-Board Imager Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D; Wang, W; Jiang, B; Fu, D [Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, Tianjin (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the positioning accuracy and precision of IGPS-O system which is a novel radiographic kilo-voltage x-ray image-guided positioning system developed for clinical IGRT applications. Methods: IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system consists of two oblique sets of radiographic kilo-voltage x-ray projecting and imaging devices which were equiped on the ground and ceiling of treatment room. This system can determine the positioning error in the form of three translations and three rotations according to the registration of two X-ray images acquired online and the planning CT image. An anthropomorphic head phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were used for this study. The phantom was set up on the treatment table with correct position and various “planned” setup errors. Both IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system and the commercial On-board Imager Cone-beam Computed Tomography (OBI CBCT) were used to obtain the setup errors of the phantom. Difference of the Result between the two image-guided positioning systems were computed and analyzed. Results: The setup errors measured by IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system and the OBI CBCT system showed a general agreement, the means and standard errors of the discrepancies between the two systems in the left-right, anterior-posterior, superior-inferior directions were −0.13±0.09mm, 0.03±0.25mm, 0.04±0.31mm, respectively. The maximum difference was only 0.51mm in all the directions and the angular discrepancy was 0.3±0.5° between the two systems. Conclusion: The spatial and angular discrepancies between IGPS-O system and OBI CBCT for setup error correction was minimal. There is a general agreement between the two positioning system. IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system can achieve as good accuracy as CBCT and can be used in the clinical IGRT applications.

  18. Feasibility study of a synchronized-moving-grid (SMOG) system to improve image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chetty, Indrin J; Jaffray, David A; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) system to remove scatter artifacts, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and reduce image lag artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The SMOG system proposed here uses a rapidly oscillating, synchronized moving grid attached to the kV source. Multiple partial projections are taken at different grid positions to form a complete projection in each gantry position, before the gantry moves to the next position during a scan. The grid has a low transmission factor, and it is used for both scatter reduction and scatter measurement for postscan scatter correction. Experimental studies using a static grid and an enlarged CATphan phantom were performed to evaluate the potential CNR enhancement for different SMOG exposure numbers (1, 2, and 4). Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the image lag correction for different exposure numbers (2, 3, and 4) and grid interspace widths in SMOG using the data from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom scan. Imaging dose of SMOG was also estimated by measuring the imaging dose in a CIRS CT dose phantom using a static grid. SMOG can enhance the CNR by 16% and 13% when increasing exposure number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 4, respectively. This enhancement was more dramatic for larger phantoms and smaller initial exposure numbers. Simulation results indicated that SMOG could reduce the lag to less than 4.3% for 2-exposure mode and to less than 0.8% for 3-exposure mode when the grid interspace width was 1.4 cm. Increasing the number of exposures in SMOG dramatically reduced the residual lag in the image. Reducing the grid interspace width somewhat reduced the residual lag. Skin line artifacts were removed entirely in SMOG. Point dose measurement showed that imaging dose of SMOG at isocenter was similar as that of a conventional CBCT. Compared to our previously developed static-grid dual-rotation method, the proposed SMOG technique has the advantages of enhancing the CNR

  19. Feasibility study of a synchronized-moving-grid (SMOG) system to improve image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Lei; Yin Fangfang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Jaffray, David A.; Jin Jianyue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) system to remove scatter artifacts, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and reduce image lag artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: The SMOG system proposed here uses a rapidly oscillating, synchronized moving grid attached to the kV source. Multiple partial projections are taken at different grid positions to form a complete projection in each gantry position, before the gantry moves to the next position during a scan. The grid has a low transmission factor, and it is used for both scatter reduction and scatter measurement for postscan scatter correction. Experimental studies using a static grid and an enlarged CATphan phantom were performed to evaluate the potential CNR enhancement for different SMOG exposure numbers (1, 2, and 4). Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the image lag correction for different exposure numbers (2, 3, and 4) and grid interspace widths in SMOG using the data from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom scan. Imaging dose of SMOG was also estimated by measuring the imaging dose in a CIRS CT dose phantom using a static grid. Results: SMOG can enhance the CNR by 16% and 13% when increasing exposure number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 4, respectively. This enhancement was more dramatic for larger phantoms and smaller initial exposure numbers. Simulation results indicated that SMOG could reduce the lag to less than 4.3% for 2-exposure mode and to less than 0.8% for 3-exposure mode when the grid interspace width was 1.4 cm. Increasing the number of exposures in SMOG dramatically reduced the residual lag in the image. Reducing the grid interspace width somewhat reduced the residual lag. Skin line artifacts were removed entirely in SMOG. Point dose measurement showed that imaging dose of SMOG at isocenter was similar as that of a conventional CBCT. Conclusions: Compared to our previously developed static-grid dual-rotation method, the proposed SMOG technique

  20. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five...... lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU...

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael A [Riverside, CA; Beloussov, Alexandre V [Bernardino, CA; Bakir, Julide [Alta Loma, CA; Armon, Deganit [Redlands, CA; Olsen, Howard B [Colton, CA; Salem, Dana [Riverside, CA

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. KTeV beam systems design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocean, V.; Childress, S.; Coleman, R. [and others

    1997-09-01

    The primary and secondary beams for the KTeV experiments E799-II and E832 are discussed. The specifications are presented and justified. The technical details of the implementation of the primary beam transport and stability are detailed. The target, beam dump, and radiation safety issues are discussed. The details of the collimation system for the pair of secondary beams are presented.

  3. H- beam neutralization measurements in a solenoidal beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Pitcher, E.; Stevens, R.; Allison, P.

    1992-01-01

    H minus beam space-charge neutralization is measured for 65-mA, 35-keV beams extracted from a circular-aperture Penning surface-plasma source, the small-angle source. The H minus beam is transported to a RFQ matchpoint by a two-solenoid magnet system. Beam noise is typically ±4%. A four-grid analyzer is located in a magnetic-field-free region between the two solenoid magnets. H minus potentials are deduced from kinetic energy measurements of particles (electrons and positive ions) ejected radially from the beam channel by using a griddled energy analyzer. Background neutral gas density is increased by the introduction of additional Xe and Ar gases, enabling the H minus beam to become overneutralized

  4. Noise simulation in cone beam CT imaging with parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, S.-J.; Shaw, Chris C; Chen, Lingyun

    2006-01-01

    We developed a computer noise simulation model for cone beam computed tomography imaging using a general purpose PC cluster. This model uses a mono-energetic x-ray approximation and allows us to investigate three primary performance components, specifically quantum noise, detector blurring and additive system noise. A parallel random number generator based on the Weyl sequence was implemented in the noise simulation and a visualization technique was accordingly developed to validate the quality of the parallel random number generator. In our computer simulation model, three-dimensional (3D) phantoms were mathematically modelled and used to create 450 analytical projections, which were then sampled into digital image data. Quantum noise was simulated and added to the analytical projection image data, which were then filtered to incorporate flat panel detector blurring. Additive system noise was generated and added to form the final projection images. The Feldkamp algorithm was implemented and used to reconstruct the 3D images of the phantoms. A 24 dual-Xeon PC cluster was used to compute the projections and reconstructed images in parallel with each CPU processing 10 projection views for a total of 450 views. Based on this computer simulation system, simulated cone beam CT images were generated for various phantoms and technique settings. Noise power spectra for the flat panel x-ray detector and reconstructed images were then computed to characterize the noise properties. As an example among the potential applications of our noise simulation model, we showed that images of low contrast objects can be produced and used for image quality evaluation

  5. Online measurement of electron beam parameters by image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Y.; Puntambekar, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    The basic image acquisition software which was developed earlier has been recently upgraded to support online measurement of beam centroid, beam height and beam width from the diagnostic devices namely fluorescent screen beam profile monitors and beam slit monitor installed in Transport Line -1(TL-1) at Indus Accelerator Complex at RRCAT, Indore. The online measurement of these electron beam parameters has helped the Indus operation team to take necessary corrective action if required before injection of the electron beam into booster synchrotron. This paper presents the methodology adopted for online measurement of above parameters in the software. (author)

  6. An imaging informatics-based system utilizing DICOM objects for treating pain in spinal cord injury patients utilizing proton beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Chun, Sophia; Gridley, Daila S.

    2014-03-01

    Many US combat personnel have sustained nervous tissue trauma during service, which often causes Neuropathic pain as a side effect and is difficult to manage. However in select patients, synapse lesioning can provide significant pain control. Our goal is to determine the effectiveness of using Proton Beam radiotherapy for treating spinal cord injury (SCI) related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The project is a joint collaboration of USC, Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach, and Loma Linda University. This is first system of its kind that supports integration and standardization of imaging informatics data in DICOM format; clinical evaluation forms outcomes data and treatment planning data from the Treatment planning station (TPS) utilized to administer the proton therapy in DICOM-RT format. It also supports evaluation of SCI subjects for recruitment into the clinical study, which includes the development, and integration of digital forms and tools for automatic evaluation and classification of SCI pain. Last year, we presented the concept for the patient recruitment module based on the principle of Bayesian decision theory. This year we are presenting the fully developed patient recruitment module and its integration to other modules. In addition, the DICOM module for integrating DICOM and DICOM-RT-ION data is also developed and integrated. This allows researchers to upload animal/patient study data into the system. The patient recruitment module has been tested using 25 retrospective patient data and DICOM data module is tested using 5 sets of animal data.

  7. Antares automatic beam alignment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appert, Q.; Swann, T.; Sweatt, W.; Saxman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Antares is a 24-beam-line CO 2 laser system for controlled fusion research, under construction at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). Rapid automatic alignment of this system is required prior to each experiment shot. The alignment requirements, operational constraints, and a developed prototype system are discussed. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed that uses a telescope/TV system to view point light sources appropriately located down the beamline. Auto-alignment is accomplished by means of a video centroid tracker, which determines the off-axis error of the point sources. The error is nulled by computer-driven, movable mirrors in a closed-loop system. The light sources are fiber-optic terminations located at key points in the optics path, primarily at the center of large copper mirrors, and remotely illuminated to reduce heating effects

  8. Limitations of dynamic beam delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Kuenning, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The heavy charged-particle beams which have been extracted from the accelerator and channeled to the treatment rooms are usually small in diameter compared to the target volumes. Many different methods have been devised to spread out the beams in order to cover the entire target volume with a uniform dose. When using the double-scattering beam delivery method, the entire target volume is irradiated simultaneously; whereas, in the other beam delivery methods, such as the wobbler system or the raster scanning system, a relatively small beam spot is moved around to cover the entire target volume with a uniform dose and only a part of the target volume is irradiated at a time. The latter methods are therefore called dynamic beam delivery methods, and the double scattering method is called a passive beam delivery method. In this note, the dose uniformities achievable using the dynamic beam delivery systems are analyzed, and the requirements placed on the systems specifications are discussed

  9. Orthogonal image pairs coupled with OSMS for noncoplanar beam angle, intracranial, single-isocenter, SRS treatments with multiple targets on the Varian Edge radiosurgery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine A. Oliver, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Based on our study, CR-induced shifts with the Varian Edge radiosurgery system will not produce noticeable dosimetric effects for SRS treatments. Thus, replacing cone beam CT with orthogonal kV/kV pairs coupled with OSMS at the treatment couch angle could reduce the number of cone beam CT scans that are acquired during a standard SRS treatment while providing an accurate and safe treatment with negligible dosimetric effects on the treatment plan.

  10. Commissioning of a proton gantry equipped with dual x-ray imagers and a robotic patient positioner, and evaluation of the accuracy of single-beam image registration for this system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ning; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Patyal, Baldev, E-mail: bpatyal@llu.eduss [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To check the accuracy of a gantry equipped with dual x-ray imagers and a robotic patient positioner for proton radiotherapy, and to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of single-beam registration using the robotic positioner. Methods: One of the proton treatment rooms at their institution was upgraded to include a robotic patient positioner (couch) with 6 degrees of freedom and dual orthogonal kilovoltage x-ray imaging panels. The wander of the proton beam central axis, the wander of the beamline, and the orthogonal image panel crosswires from the gantry isocenter were measured for different gantry angles. The couch movement accuracy and couch wander from the gantry isocenter were measured for couch loadings of 50–300 lb with couch rotations from 0° to ±90°. The combined accuracy of the gantry, couch, and imagers was checked using a custom-made 30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3} Styrofoam phantom with beekleys embedded in it. A treatment in this room can be set up and registered at a setup field location, then moved precisely to any other treatment location without requiring additional image registration. The accuracy of the single-beam registration strategy was checked for treatments containing multiple beams with different combinations of gantry angles, couch yaws, and beam locations. Results: The proton beam central axis wander from the gantry isocenter was within 0.5 mm with gantry rotations in both clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) directions. The maximum wander of the beamline and orthogonal imager crosswire centers from the gantry isocenter were within 0.5 and 0.8 mm, respectively, with the gantry rotations in CW and CCW directions. Vertical and horizontal couch wanders from the gantry isocenter were within 0.4 and 1.3 mm, respectively, for couch yaw from 0° to ±90°. For a treatment with multiple beams with different gantry angles, couch yaws, and beam locations, the measured displacements of treatment beam locations from the one based on

  11. Therapy imaging: Limitations of imaging with high energy x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, P.; Rawlinson, J.A.; Fenster, A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the major problems in radiation therapy is ensuring that the correct region of the patient receives the prescribed x-ray treatment and that the surrounding tissues are spared. One way to identify patient positioning errors is to make an image using the radiotherapy treatment beam. The authors have examine4d two of the factors that can influence the quality of images made with high energy x-ray beams: (i) the size of the x-ray source, and; (ii) the signal-to-noise characteristics of the detectors used to form images with high energy x-ray beams. They have developed a novel method of measuring the source distributions for /sup 60/Co machines and linear accelerators and from the measurements have been able to obtain the modulation transfer functions of their x-ray sources. They also measured the modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and the noise power spectra (NPS) of the x-ray detectors. Based on these measurements, the authors conclude that images made with high energy x-ray beams are limited by film granularity and that improved images can be obtained by alternative detector systems

  12. Dose calculation based on Cone Beam CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging is frequently used in modern radiotherapy to ensure the proper positioning of the patient prior to each treatment fraction. With the increasing use of CBCT imaging for image guidance, interest has grown in exploring the potential use of these 3– or 4–D medical images...... image lag, scatter within the CBCT detector assembly, x-ray beam hardening from the patient, and truncation of the CBCT field of view were implemented for clinical CBCT imaging of lung cancer patients. Through the artefact corrections, Hounsfield Units in the CBCT images were recovered and shown...

  13. Image reconstruction of cyclotron beam based on Hopfield network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Tetsuya; Murakami, Thoru; Tanizaki, Naoaki (Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Tanashi, Tokyo (Japan). Systems Engineering Lab.)

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes a beam image reconstruction method based on Hopfield neural networks. The images of beam emitted from cyclotrons are measured as three projection patterns by 3-wire beam sensors. The reconstruction of beam image is necessary because the measured projection patterns are not easy to understand for inexperienced operators. First, the energy function is defined using the measured projection patterns as constraints. Then surface tension terms, which make the surface area minimal, are added to it in order to generate smooth images. The weights of links of the Hopfield network are determined by the coefficients of the energy function. Through the convergence of the network, beam images which satisfy the projection patterns and look natural for human sense can be reconstructed. (author).

  14. Integrated control system for electron beam processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, L.; Koleva, E.; Batchkova, I.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    The ISO/IEC 62264 standard is widely used for integration of the business systems of a manufacturer with the corresponding manufacturing control systems based on hierarchical equipment models, functional data and manufacturing operations activity models. In order to achieve the integration of control systems, formal object communication models must be developed, together with manufacturing operations activity models, which coordinate the integration between different levels of control. In this article, the development of integrated control system for electron beam welding process is presented as part of a fully integrated control system of an electron beam plant, including also other additional processes: surface modification, electron beam evaporation, selective melting and electron beam diagnostics.

  15. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  16. Cone-beam and fan-beam image reconstruction algorithms based on spherical and circular harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2004-01-01

    A cone-beam image reconstruction algorithm using spherical harmonic expansions is proposed. The reconstruction algorithm is in the form of a summation of inner products of two discrete arrays of spherical harmonic expansion coefficients at each cone-beam point of acquisition. This form is different from the common filtered backprojection algorithm and the direct Fourier reconstruction algorithm. There is no re-sampling of the data, and spherical harmonic expansions are used instead of Fourier expansions. As a special case, a new fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm is also derived in terms of a circular harmonic expansion. Computer simulation results for both cone-beam and fan-beam algorithms are presented for circular planar orbit acquisitions. The algorithms give accurate reconstructions; however, the implementation of the cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is computationally intensive. A relatively efficient algorithm is proposed for reconstructing the central slice of the image when a circular scanning orbit is used

  17. Parallel beam scanning system for flatness measurements of thin plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kuang-Chao; Wu, John H.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the work to develop a Parallel Beam Scanning System (PBSS) for the non-contact measurement of surface flatness of thin plates. The PBSS consists of a He-Ne laser source having good pointing stability a scanner to create divergent scanning beams a large aplanatic meniscus lens to convert the divergent beams to parallel beams a linear stage to drive the testpiece to each sampling position a screen for the projection of reflected beams from the tested surface and an image processing unit to analyze the projected image. Due to the out-of-flatness of the surface the straight line formed by the incident parallel beams will be distorted and magnified on the screen as it is reflected from the tested surface. The stage then positions the testpiece step-by-step to carry out measurements in the line-by-line sequence. A CCD camera is employed to capture the image of the distorted line on the screen each time. With the proposed mathematical model the flatness data of the testpiece can be computed from the input image data. Experimental results by the use of this system have shown in good agreement with the results obtained from the coordinate measuring machine. This system can be applied to the flatness measurements of thin plates such as sheet metals sheet moulding compound (SMC) plates glass plates etc. which are difficult to measure by traditional methods.

  18. Parametric study of uniformly polarized stochastic electromagnetic beam and its imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xinyue; Zhao Daomu

    2009-01-01

    A parametric study is performed in investigating the stochastic electromagnetic beam generated by a uniformly polarized electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model source and passing through ABCD optical systems. Through theoretical analysis, the requirement is derived that the uniformly polarized electromagnetic field can be obtained at the output plane of the imaging optical system. Furthermore, the general imaging formula of the stochastic electromagnetic beam is derived. Numerical examples are also presented to illustrate the application.

  19. Beam monitoring system for intense neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tron, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring system realizing novel principle of operation and allowing to register a two-dimensional beam current distribution within entire aperture (100...200 mm) of ion pipe for a time in nanosecond range has been designed and accomplished for beam control of the INR intense neutron source, for preventing thermo-mechanical damage of its first wall. Key unit of the system is monitor of two-dimensional beam current distribution, elements of which are high resistant to heating by the beam and to radiation off the source. The description of the system and monitor are presented. Implementation of the system for the future sources with more high intensities are discussed. (author)

  20. Quantitative image quality evaluation for kV cone-beam CT-based IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S Y; Zin, Hafiz M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the image quality of a kV cone-beam CT-based IGRT system (Elekta, XVI) using two commercial CT image quality phantoms, Catphan-600 and CIRS-062QA. Both phantoms consist of similar image quality test modules (uniformity, CT linearity and spatial resolution) but each phantom has different diameter and test pattern design. Each test module was imaged separately using an optimised cone-beam CT imaging parameter. The quality metrics of the reconstructed images were analysed using algorithms developed with MatLab. The image uniformity and the spatial resolution measured with Catphan were of 4% and 40% greater respectively, compared to those measured with CIRS phantom. The differences were due to the beam scattering and hardening originated from the CIRS phantom holder. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values measured with CIRS phantom were at least 2% higher than that of Catphan. The diameter of CIRS phantom is smaller and resulted in lower beam attenuation. The quantitative image quality assessment algorithms developed for both phantoms provided a phantom-specific set of reference values for a cone-beam CT imaging system as recommended by AAPM TG-142. Further investigation will be performed to resolve beam hardening issue arising from the CIRS phantom holder. (paper)

  1. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams

  2. Concrescence: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali Zakir; Alluri, LeelaSubhashini Choudary; Mallela, Dhiraj; Frazee, Troy

    2016-01-01

    Concrescence is a form of twinning, formed by the confluence of cementum of two teeth at the root level. The diagnosis of concrescence has largely relied on the conventional 2D imaging. The 2D imaging has inherent limitations such as distortion and superimposition. Cone-Beam CT eliminates these limitations. The aim of this article was to describe a case of dental abnormality using Cone-Beam CT imaging modality. Volumetric data demonstrated confluence of left mandibular third molar with a paramolar, a supernumerary tooth. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the dental literature reported demonstrating the use of Cone-Beam CT in the diagnosis of concrescence.

  3. Medical Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The MD Image System, a true-color image processing system that serves as a diagnostic aid and tool for storage and distribution of images, was developed by Medical Image Management Systems, Huntsville, AL, as a "spinoff from a spinoff." The original spinoff, Geostar 8800, developed by Crystal Image Technologies, Huntsville, incorporates advanced UNIX versions of ELAS (developed by NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory for analysis of Landsat images) for general purpose image processing. The MD Image System is an application of this technology to a medical system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer, and can accept, store and analyze images from other sources such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  4. Secure transmission of static and dynamic images via chaotic encryption in acousto-optic hybrid feedback with profiled light beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Almehmadi, Fares S.

    2015-01-01

    Secure information encryption via acousto-optic (AO) chaos with profiled optical beams indicates substantially better performance in terms of system robustness. This paper examines encryption of static and time-varying (video) images onto AO chaotic carriers using Gaussian-profile beams with diffracted data numerically generated using transfer functions. The use of profiled beams leads to considerable improvement in the encrypted signal. While static image encryption exhibits parameter tolerances within about +/-10% for uniform optical beams, profiled beams reduce the tolerance to less than 1%, thereby vastly improving both the overall security of the transmitted information as well as the quality of the image retrieval.

  5. Fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Tingliang; Leng Shuai; Nett, Brian E; Chen Guanghong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new image reconstruction scheme is presented based on Tuy's cone-beam inversion scheme and its fan-beam counterpart. It is demonstrated that Tuy's inversion scheme may be used to derive a new framework for fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction. In this new framework, images are reconstructed via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data. The new framework is mathematically exact and is applicable to a general source trajectory provided the Tuy data sufficiency condition is satisfied. By choosing a piece-wise constant function for one of the components in the factorized weighting function, the filtering kernel is one dimensional, viz. the filtering process is along a straight line. Thus, the derived image reconstruction algorithm is mathematically exact and efficient. In the cone-beam case, the derived reconstruction algorithm is applicable to a large class of source trajectories where the pi-lines or the generalized pi-lines exist. In addition, the new reconstruction scheme survives the super-short scan mode in both the fan-beam and cone-beam cases provided the data are not transversely truncated. Numerical simulations were conducted to validate the new reconstruction scheme for the fan-beam case

  6. Confocal retinal imaging using scanning laser opthalmoscopy with annular beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Lochocki, Benjamin; Vela-Garcia, Carmen; Rativa, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The human retina has been imaged in-vivo using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy employing annular incident beams adapted for resolution optimization. The pros and cons of the approach are discussed and the importance of coherence is explored.

  7. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rf-synchronized imaging for particle and photon beam characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    The usefulness of imaging electro-optics for rf-driven accelerators can be enhanced by synchronizing the instruments to the system fundamental frequency or an appropriate subharmonic. This step allows one to obtain micropulse bunch length and phase during a series of linac bunches or storage ring passes. Several examples now exist of the use of synchroscan and dual-sweep streak cameras and/or image dissector tubes to access micropulse scale phenomena (10 to 30 ps) during linac and storage ring operations in the US, Japan, and Europe. As space permits, selections will be presented from the list of phase stability phenomena on photoelectric injectors, micropulse length during a macropulse, micropulse elongation effects, transverse Wakefield effects within a micropulse, and submicropulse phenomena on a stored beam. Potential applications to the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be briefly addressed.

  9. New ORNL neutral beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.L.; Davis, R.C.; Haselton, H.H.; Schnechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The Princeton Large Torus (PLT) neutral beam injection systems have proven themselves to be a solid foundation on which next generation systems can be based. There are two areas in the new systems receiving particular emphasis: (a) increased power per beam line and (b) higher beam transmission efficiency. Two different methods are being investigated to improve the transmission efficiency. First the drift tube region, the region of the beam line between the vacuum chamber housing the ion source and the torus, is being enlarged. In this manner a second, large cryopump will be installed in the drift tube to lower the pressure to approx.10 -5 torr. Thus, neutral beam reionization on the background gas will be significantly reduced from the measured losses at a few 10 -4 torr of the PLT system. Second, the beam divergence will be reduced by application of one or more of three known techniques developed on a single aperture source in the laboratory. Each of these methods has shown a reduction in single beamlet divergence from theta/sub HWHM/ approx. 1 0 to approx.0.5 0 . The low beamlet divergence coupled with a differentially pumped drift tube will effectively accommodate the larger ion sources under development. All future beam line systems will benefit either directly or indirectly from the experience gained operating and upgrading the PLT beam line concept

  10. THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1999-01-01

    THE ENERGY STORED IN THE RHIC BEAM IS ABOUT 200 KJ PER RING AT DESIGN ENERGY AND INTENSITY. TO PREVENT QUENCHING OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS OR MATERIAL DAMAGE, THE BEAM WILL BE SAFELY DISPOSED OF BY AN INTERNAL BEAM ABORT SYSTEM, WHICH INCLUDES THE KICKER MAGNETS, THE PULSED POWER SUPPLIES, AND THE DUMP ABSORBER. DISPOSAL OF HEAVY IONS, SUCH AS GOLD, IMPOSES DESIGN CONSTRAINTS MORE SEVERE THAN THOSE FOR PROTON BEAMS OF EQUAL INTENSITY. IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE THE THERMAL SHOCK IN THE CARBON-FIBER DUMP BLOCK, THE BUNCHES MUST BE LATERALLY DISPERSED

  11. Advanced Light Source beam diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, has been recently commissioned. Beam diagnostics were very important to the success of the operation. Each diagnostic system is described in this paper along with detailed discussion of its performance. Some of the systems have been in operation for two years. Others, in the storage ring, have not yet been fully commissioned. These systems were, however, working well enough to provide the essential information needed to store beam. The devices described in this paper include wall current monitors, a beam charge monitor, a 50 ohm Faraday cup, DC current transformers, broad-hand striplines, fluorescence screens, beam collimators and scrapers, and beam position monitors. Also, the means by which waveforms are digitized and displayed in the control room is discussed

  12. Vibrations and stability of complex beam systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stojanović, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

     This book reports on solved problems concerning vibrations and stability of complex beam systems. The complexity of a system is considered from two points of view: the complexity originating from the nature of the structure, in the case of two or more elastically connected beams; and the complexity derived from the dynamic behavior of the system, in the case of a damaged single beam, resulting from the harm done to its simple structure. Furthermore, the book describes the analytical derivation of equations of two or more elastically connected beams, using four different theories (Euler, Rayleigh, Timoshenko and Reddy-Bickford). It also reports on a new, improved p-version of the finite element method for geometrically nonlinear vibrations. The new method provides more accurate approximations of solutions, while also allowing us to analyze geometrically nonlinear vibrations. The book describes the appearance of longitudinal vibrations of damaged clamped-clamped beams as a result of discontinuity (damage). It...

  13. Quality control beam of radiation through imaging system using a flat panel (ILD); Control de calidad de haz de radiacion mediante un sistema de imagen de panel plano (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Serrano, J. A.; Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    The daily quality checks of the accelerator include, among others, checks of the daily calibration, symmetry and uniformity of the radiation beam. Usually verification systems daily are used for this purpose, which employ arrays of detectors of solid-state or ionization chambers. This paper intends to carry out the control of quality through the irradiation of a number of fields in the portal imaging system and its subsequent analysis in software's own creation, as well as the comparison of results with the daily verification system. (Author)

  14. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  15. PLS beam position measurement and feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.Y.; Lee, J.; Park, M.K.; Kim, J.H.; Won, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time orbit correction system is proposed for the stabilization of beam orbit and photon beam positions in Pohang Light Source. PLS beam position monitoring system is designed to be VMEbus compatible to fit the real-time digital orbit feedback system. A VMEbus based subsystem control computer, Mil-1553B communication network and 12 BPM/PS machine interface units constitute digital part of the feedback system. With the super-stable PLS correction magnet power supply, power line frequency noise is almost filtered out and the dominant spectra of beam obtit fluctuations are expected to appear below 15 Hz. Using DSP board in SCC for the computation and using an appropriate compensation circuit for the phase delay by the vacuum chamber, PLS real-time orbit correction system is realizable without changing the basic structure of PLS computer control system. (author)

  16. Expanded beam (macro-imaging) ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, M.; Juhasz, G.; Major, C.; Petrik, P.; Polgar, O.; Horvath, Z.; Nutsch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to make possible to use spectroscopic ellipsometry for mapping purposes during one measuring cycle (minimum one rotation period of polarizer or analyzer) on many sample points. Our new technique uses non-collimated (non-parallel, mostly diffuse) illumination with an angle of incidence sensitive pinhole camera detector system and it works as an unusual kind of imaging ellipsometry. Adding multicolour supplemets, it provides spectral (a few wavelengths on a 2D image or a full spectrum along a line) information from rapid measurements of many points on a large (several dm2) area. This technique can be expanded by upscaling the geometry (upscaling the dimensions of the instrument, and characteristic imaging parameters such as focal lengths, distances, etc.). The lateral resolution is limited by the minimum resolved-angle determined by the detector system, mainly by the diameter of the pinhole. (The diameter of the pinhole is a compromise between the light intensity and the lateral resolution.) Small-aperture (25 mm diameter) polarizers are incorporated into both the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state detection (PSD) components of the instrument. The detection is almost without background because the pinhole serves as a filter against the scattered light. One rapid measuring cycle (less than 10 s) is enough to determine the polarization state at all the points inside the illuminated area. The collected data can be processed very fast (seconds) providing nearly real-time thicknesses and/or refractive index maps over many points of the sample surface even in the case of multilayer samples. The speed of the measuring system makes it suitable for using even on production lines. The necessary (in each sample-point different) angle-of-incidence and the mirror-effect calibration are made via well-known and optimized structures such as silicon/silicon-dioxide samples. The precision is suitable for detecting sub-nanometer thickness and a

  17. Comparison of two cone beam computed tomographic systems versus panoramic imaging for localization of impacted maxillary canines and detection of root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqerban, Ali; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2011-02-01

    The diagnostic accuracy for the localization of impacted canines and the detection of canine-induced root resorption of maxillary incisors were compared between conventional radiographic procedures using one two-dimensional (2D) panoramic radiograph with that of two three-dimensional (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The clinical records of 60 consecutive patients who had impacted or ectopically erupting maxillary canines were identified from those seeking orthodontic treatment. For each case, two sets of radiographic information were obtained. The study sample was divided into two groups: group A (n = 30) included those for whom a dental pantomograph (DPT) and CBCT obtained with a 3D Accuitomo-XYZ Slice View Tomograph were available and group B (n = 30) who had a DPT and CBCT obtained with a Scanora. The DPT and CBCT images were subsequently analysed by 11 examiners. Statistical analysis included an evaluation of the agreement between observers based on the standard error of the measurement, kappa statistics and coefficient of concordance, as well as an assessment of the differences between 2D and 3D imaging employing Wilcoxon signed rank and McNemar tests. There was a highly significant difference between the 2D and 3D images in the width of the canine crown (P radiography for both canine localization and identification of root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  18. Water imaging in living plant by nondestructive neutron beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, M. Tomoko

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of biological activity in intact cells or tissues is essential to understand many life processes. Techniques for these in vivo measurements have not been well developed. We present here a nondestructive method to image water in living plants using a neutron beam. This technique provides the highest resolution for water in tissue yet obtainable. With high specificity to water, this neutron beam technique images water movement in seeds or in roots imbedded in soil, as well as in wood and meristems during development. The resolution of the image attainable now is about 15um. We also describe how this new technique will allow new investigations in the field of plant research. (author)

  19. Fundamental limits to imaging resolution for focused ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, J.; Swanson, L.W.; Utlaut, M.

    1996-01-01

    This article investigates the limitations on the formation of focused ion beam images from secondary electrons. We use the notion of the information content of an image to account for the effects of resolution, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio and show that there is a competition between the rate at which small features are sputtered away by the primary beam and the rate of collection of secondary electrons. We find that for small features, sputtering is the limit to imaging resolution, and that for extended small features (e.g., layered structures), rearrangement, redeposition, and differential sputtering rates may limit the resolution in some cases. copyright 1996 American Vacuum Society

  20. Fluorescence imaging in vivo: raster scanned point-source imaging provides more accurate quantification than broad beam geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W; Gibbs, Summer L; Chen, Bin; Savellano, Mark

    2004-02-01

    Two fluorescence imaging systems were compared for their ability to quantify mean fluorescence intensity from surface-weighted imaging of tissue. A broad beam CCD camera system was compared to a point sampling system that raster scans to create the image. The effects of absorption and scattering in the background tissue volume were shown to be similar in their effect upon the signal, but the effect of the three-dimensional shape of the tissue was shown to be a significant distortion upon the signal. Spherical phantoms with Intralipid and blood for absorber and scatterer were used with a fixed concentration of aluminum phthalocyanine fluorophore to illustrate that the mean intensity observed with the broad beam system increased with size, while the mean intensity observed with the raster scanned system was not as significantly affected. Similar results were observed in vivo with mice injected with the fluorophore and imaged multiple times to observe the pharmacokinetics of the drug. The fluorescence in the tumor observed with the broad beam system was higher than that observed with the raster scanned system. Based upon the phantom and animal observations in this study, it should be concluded that using broad beam fluorescence imaging systems to quantify fluorescence in vivo may be problematic when comparing tissues with different three dimensional characteristics. In particular, the ratio of fluorescence from tumor to normal tissue can yield inaccurate results when the tumor is large. However, similar measurements with a narrow beam system that is raster scanned to create the images are not as significantly affected by the three dimensional shape of the tissue. Raster scanned imaging appears to provide a more uniform and accurate way to quantify fluorescence signals from distributed tissues in vivo.

  1. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Bøggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit...... of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50 x 50 pm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 run. We demonstrate how the EBL system can...

  2. Real time neutron image processing system in NRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Yi Kyung; Nam, Ki Yong; Lee, Chang Hee; Chang, Jong Hwa

    1999-01-01

    The neutron radiography facility was installed at the neutron radiography beam tube of the HANARO research reactor. The NRF is used for the nondestructive test to inspect and evaluate the material defect and homogeneity by detecting the transmitted neutron image in the nuclear as well as non-nuclear industry. To analyze the dynamical neutron image effectively and efficiently, the real-time image processing system was developed in background subtraction, normalization, geometry correction and beam uniformity, contrast control, filtering. The image quality test and dimension measurements were performed for the neutron beam purity and sensitivity indication. The NRF beam condition represents the highest beam quality for neutron radiography.

  3. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts

  4. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  5. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moelhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Noergaard; Boeggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50x50 μm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 nm. We demonstrate how the EBL system can be used to write three-dimensional nanostructures by electron-beam deposition

  6. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  7. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  8. Concrescence: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakir Syed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrescence is a form of twinning, formed by the confluence of cementum of two teeth at the root level. The diagnosis of concrescence has largely relied on the conventional 2D imaging. The 2D imaging has inherent limitations such as distortion and superimposition. Cone-Beam CT eliminates these limitations. The aim of this article was to describe a case of dental abnormality using Cone-Beam CT imaging modality. Volumetric data demonstrated confluence of left mandibular third molar with a paramolar, a supernumerary tooth. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the dental literature reported demonstrating the use of Cone-Beam CT in the diagnosis of concrescence.

  9. Beam transport optics for high-power laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Beam transport optics receive output energy from the laser cavity and deliver it to the work site. Depending on the application, this may require a few simple elements or large complex systems. Collection of the laser energy depends on the spatial and temporal energy distribution as well as the wavelength and polarization of the laser cavity and output coupler. Transport optics can perform a variety of functions, including beam formatting, frequency doubling, and distribution to one or more work sites while maintaining or even improving the beam quality. The beam may be delivered to work sites as focused spots or images, projected to distant targets, or propagated through various media for sensing or photochemical processing. Design may involve optical modeling of the system, including diffraction effects and thermal management. A Gaussian beam profile is often used for convenience in modeling. When deviations from this ideal profile need to be considered, it is necessary to characterize the laser beam in detail. Design of the transport system requires understanding of the interaction of the laser energy with optical materials and components. Practical considerations include mounting the optics without stress and with the stability suitable for the intended application. Requirements for beam direction, stability, size, shape, and quality dictate the design approach for each specific situation. Attention also must be given to reliability, environmental, and commercial requirements. Damage to optics in high-power laser systems is a common concern. Environmental problems such as atmospheric turbulence, contamination by dust or vapor from the work site or other sources, or absorption of water vapor can directly degrade beam quality. Other potentially significant optical performance effects may result from instability and aging of the optics, temperature, humidity, pressure, transmitted vibration, and contamination from the work site or other sources

  10. TPX Neutral Beam Injection System design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Halle, A.; Bowen, O.N.; Edwards, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Neutral Beam system is proposed to be modified for long pulse operation on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Day one of TPX will call for one TFTR beamline modified for 1000 second pulse lengths oriented co-directional to the plasma current. The system design will be capable of accommodating an additional co-directional and a single counter directional beamline. For the TPX conceptual design, every attempt was made to use existing Neutral Beam hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary systems, service infrastructure, and control systems. This paper describes the moderate modifications required to the power systems, the ion sources, and the beam impinged surfaces of the ion dumps, the calorimeters, the various beam scrapers, and the neutralizers. Also described are the minimal modifications required to the vacuum, cryogenic, and gas systems and the major modification of replacing the beamline-torus duct in its entirety. Operational considerations for Neutral Beam subsystems over 1000 second pulse lengths will be explored including proposed operating scenarios for full steady state operation

  11. The AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciardullo, D.J.; Abola, A.; Beadle, E.R.; Smith, G.A.; Thomas, R.; Van Zwienen, W.; Warkentien, R.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    To accelerate both protons and heavy ions, the AGS Booster requires a broadband (multi-octave) beam position monitoring system with a dynamic range spanning several orders of magnitude (2 x 10 10 to 1.5 x 10 13 particles per pulse). System requirements include the ability to acquire single turn trajectory and average orbit information with ± 0.1 mm resolution. The design goal of ± 0.5 mm corrected accuracy requires that the detectors have repeatable linear performance after periodic bakeout at 300 degree C. The system design and capabilities of the Booster Beam Position Monitor will be described, and initial results presented. 7 refs., 5 figs

  12. A beam diagnostic system for ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillo, M.; Althoff, K.H.; Drachenfels, W.; Goetz, T.; Husmann, D.; Neckenig, M.; Picard, M.; Schittko, F.J.; Schauerte, W.; Wenzel, J.

    1991-01-01

    A beam diagnostic system, which is based on capacitive beam-position monitors combined with fast electronics, has been developed for the Bonn ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA. The position signal of each monitor is digitized at an adjustable sampling rate (max.: 10 MHz) and the most recent 8192 position and intensity values are buffered. This allows a wide range of different beam diagnostic measurements. The main purpose is the closed-orbit correction, which can be carried out on various time scales. To optimize the duty factor of the extracted beam, the system can also be used as a fast relative intensity monitor resolving the intensity distribution of the bunches or of the injected beam. It is designed to support betatron tune and phase measurements with very high accuracy, offering the choice to select any of the beam position monitors. This enables the measuring of many optical parameters. Furthermore any pair of suitable monitors can be used for experimental particle tracking or phase space measurements

  13. Small angle scatter imaging from wide beam diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Steven J; Rogers, Keith D; Hall, Chris J; Round, Adam R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on the extension of the technique of mapping small angle x-ray scatter (SAXS) across a soft material specimen several millimetres square. In the conventional SAXS mapping technique a pencil beam of x-rays is raster scanned over the specimen with the scatter pattern recorded from each point in the raster. In our technique a wide, parallel beam is used, speeding up the data collection time considerably. An image processing algorithm is used to separate the scatter pattern features from individual points along the line of the beam. To test the efficacy of the technique a phantom was constructed using gelatin and rat tail tendon collagen. Collagen fibres in the phantom were arranged in quarters horizontally, diagonally and vertically leaving one quarter with just gelatin. The phantom was used to collect both raster scanned sets of SAXS patterns spaced at 0.25 mm horizontally and vertically and also a wide beam data set. The width of the beam in this case was approximately 7 mm. Using the third-order diffraction of rat tail tendon intensity data were gathered from each SAXS pattern and used to construct a map. Data from the raster scan image and that from the wide beam are compared. Finally using a phantom made from dehydrated rat tail tendon and paraffin wax a tomographic slice constructed using data from SAXS patterns is shown

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy in near real time with intensity-modulated radiotherapy megavoltage treatment beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing, Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  15. Geometric considerations of polar mesospheric summer echoes in tilted beams using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The radar is able to resolve PMSE at high spatial and temporal resolution and to perform pulse-to-pulse beam steering. In this experiment, 81 oblique beam directions were used with off-zenith angles up to 25°. For each beam pointing direction and range gate, coherent radar imaging was applied to determine the mean backscatter location. The location of the mean scatterer in the beam volume was calculated by the deviation from the nominal off-zenith angle of the brightest pixel. It shows that in tilted beams with an off-zenith angle greater than 5°, structures appear at the altitudinal edges of the PMSE layer. Our results indicate that the mean influence of the location of the maximum depends on the tilt of the beam and on the observed area of the PMSE layer. At the upper/lower edge of the PMSE layer, the mean backscatter has a greater/smaller off-zenith angle than the nominal off-zenith angle. This effect intensifies with greater off-zenith beam pointing direction, so the beam filling factor plays an important role in the observation of PMSE layers for oblique beams.

  16. Fast 3D multiple fan-beam CT systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlbrenner, Adrian; Haemmerle, Stefan; Laib, Andres; Koller, Bruno; Ruegsegger, Peter

    1999-09-01

    Two fast, CCD-based three-dimensional CT scanners for in vivo applications have been developed. One is designed for small laboratory animals and has a voxel size of 20 micrometer, while the other, having a voxel size of 80 micrometer, is used for human examinations. Both instruments make use of a novel multiple fan-beam technique: radiation from a line-focus X-ray tube is divided into a stack of fan-beams by a 28 micrometer pitch foil collimator. The resulting wedge-shaped X-ray field is the key to the instrument's high scanning speed and allows to position the sample close to the X-ray source, which makes it possible to build compact CT systems. In contrast to cone- beam scanners, the multiple fan-beam scanner relies on standard fan-beam algorithms, thereby eliminating inaccuracies in the reconstruction process. The projections from one single rotation are acquired within 2 min and are subsequently reconstructed into a 1024 X 1024 X 255 voxel array. Hence a single rotation about the sample delivers a 3D image containing a quarter of a billion voxels. Such volumetric images are 6.6 mm in height and can be stacked on top of each other. An area CCD sensor bonded to a fiber-optic light guide acts as a detector. Since no image intensifier, conventional optics or tapers are used throughout the system, the image is virtually distortion free. The scanner's high scanning speed and high resolution at moderately low radiation dose are the basis for reliable time serial measurements and analyses.

  17. Iterative image-domain ring artifact removal in cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaokun; Zhang, Zhicheng; Niu, Tianye; Yu, Shaode; Wu, Shibin; Li, Zhicheng; Zhang, Huailing; Xie, Yaoqin

    2017-07-01

    Ring artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are caused by pixel gain variations using flat-panel detectors, and may lead to structured non-uniformities and deterioration of image quality. The purpose of this study is to propose a method of general ring artifact removal in CBCT images. This method is based on the polar coordinate system, where the ring artifacts manifest as stripe artifacts. Using relative total variation, the CBCT images are first smoothed to generate template images with fewer image details and ring artifacts. By subtracting the template images from the CBCT images, residual images with image details and ring artifacts are generated. As the ring artifact manifests as a stripe artifact in a polar coordinate system, the artifact image can be extracted by mean value from the residual image; the image details are generated by subtracting the artifact image from the residual image. Finally, the image details are compensated to the template image to generate the corrected images. The proposed framework is iterated until the differences in the extracted ring artifacts are minimized. We use a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom, Catphan©504 phantom, uniform acrylic cylinder, and images from a head patient to evaluate the proposed method. In the experiments using simulated data, the spatial uniformity is increased by 1.68 times and the structural similarity index is increased from 87.12% to 95.50% using the proposed method. In the experiment using clinical data, our method shows high efficiency in ring artifact removal while preserving the image structure and detail. The iterative approach we propose for ring artifact removal in cone-beam CT is practical and attractive for CBCT guided radiation therapy.

  18. Response analysis for an approximate 3-D image reconstruction in cone-beam SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo; Nohara, Norimasa

    1991-01-01

    Cone-beam single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers the potential for a large increase in sensitivity as compared with parallel hole or fan-beam collimation. Three-dimensional image reconstruction was approximately accomplished by backprojecting filtered projections using a two-dimensional fan-beam algorithm. The cone-beam projection data were formed from mathematical phantoms as analytically derived line integrals of the density. In order to reduce the processing time, the filtered projections were backprojected into each plane parallel to the circle on which the focal point moved. Discrepancy of source position and degradation of resolution were investigated by computer simulation in three-dimensional image space. The results obtained suggest that, the nearer to the central plane or the axis of rotation, the less image degradation is performed. By introducing a parameter of angular difference between the focal point and a fixed point in the image space during rotation, degradation of the reconstructed image can be estimated for any cone-beam SPECT system. (author)

  19. The diagnostic neutral beam system for text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, D.P.; Burgin, D.; Coupland, J.R.; DeVere, A.P.C.; Green, T.S.; Klein, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of highly stripped impurity ions in a Tokamak plasma by means of charge exchange with a probing neutral beam is an interesting and developing technique. Such a beam system is being designed and manufactured by the Culham Laboratory under contract to the University of Texas at Austin. The specification is for a high brightness beam of hydrogen atoms of 30-50 keV energy with a current density of 30 mA/cm/sup 2/ in the target plane. The pulse length is 100 mS, and the beam has to be capable of being modulated at high frequency (≥ 1 KHz) to improve the overall detection capability of the diagnostic system. The total extracted current at 50 KV is 7.2A. The design has been based on a ''bucket'' type plasma source with a four-electrode extraction array of circular apertures. Low perveance extraction is used to obtain both high brightness and freedom from high voltage breakdown, in view of the high degree of reliability needed. Details of performance of the beam line measured during commissioning tests at Culham are given

  20. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 x 10 13 protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 x 10 9 ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs

  1. Dual self-image technique for beam collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Fernandez, Jose Maria; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Morlanes, Tomas; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2016-07-01

    We propose an accurate technique for obtaining highly collimated beams, which also allows testing the collimation degree of a beam. It is based on comparing the period of two different self-images produced by a single diffraction grating. In this way, variations in the period of the diffraction grating do not affect to the measuring procedure. Self-images are acquired by two CMOS cameras and their periods are determined by fitting the variogram function of the self-images to a cosine function with polynomial envelopes. This way, loss of accuracy caused by imperfections of the measured self-images is avoided. As usual, collimation is obtained by displacing the collimation element with respect to the source along the optical axis. When the period of both self-images coincides, collimation is achieved. With this method neither a strict control of the period of the diffraction grating nor a transverse displacement, required in other techniques, are necessary. As an example, a LED considering paraxial approximation and point source illumination is collimated resulting a resolution in the divergence of the beam of δ φ =+/- 1.57 μ {rad}.

  2. Nondestructive water imaging by neutron beam analysis in living plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.M.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of biological activity in intact cells or tissues is essential to understand many life processes. Techniques for these in vivo measurements have not been well developed. We present here a nondestructive method to image water in living plants using a neutron beam. This technique provides the highest resolution for water in tissue yet obtainable. With high specificity to water, this neutron beam technique images water movement in seeds or in roots imbedded in soil, as well as in wood and meristems during development. The resolution of the image attainable now is about 15 μm. We also describe how this new technique will allow new investigations in the field of plant research. (author)

  3. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K. (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: aste.sovik@nvh.no; Roedal, Jan (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)); Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-10-15

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  4. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K.; Roedal, Jan; Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  5. Ion beam pulse radiolysis system at HIMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitose, N.; Katsumura, Y.; Domae, M.; Ishigure, K. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Murakami, T.

    1997-03-01

    An ion beam pulse radiolysis system has been constructed at HIMAC facility. Ion beam of 24MeV He{sup 2+} with the duration longer than 1 {mu}s is available for irradiation. Three kinds of aqueous solutions, (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}CO, NaHCO{sub 3}, and KSCN, were irradiated and the absorption signals corresponding to (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}CO{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup -}, and (SCN){sub 2}{sup -} respectively were observed. Ghost signals which interfere with the measurement are also discussed. (author)

  6. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to suppress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will describ...

  7. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Stifter, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to supress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will descri...

  8. Implementation of EPICS based Control System for Radioisotope Beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae-Ha; Ahn, Tae-Sung; Song, Young-Gi; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2015-01-01

    Korea Mult-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) has been operating 100 MeV proton linear accelerator . For operating 100 MeV linac, various control system has been implemented such as vacuum, power supply, RCCS and etc. KOMAC is operating two beam lines so that clients can use 100 MeV proton beam for their experiment. KOMAC sends beam to beam line and target room using two dipole magnets and several quadrupole magnets. As demand for experiments and Radius Isotope using beam is increased, another beam line is under construction and RI beam line control system is need. To synchronize with KOMAC control system, RI beam line control system is based on Experimental Physics and Industrial control System (EPICS) software. The beam is transported to RI beam line to control magnet power supply and vacuum. Implementation of RI beam line control system is presented and some preliminary results are reported. The base RI beam line control system is implemented. It can control beam direction and vacuum. Comparing archived data and current data, RI beam line and control system will be improved. In the future, scroll pump and gate control system will be implemented using programmable logic controller PLC. RI beam interlock sequence will be added to KOMAC interlock system to protect linac

  9. Development of KSTAR Neutral Beam Heating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, B. H.; Song, W. S.; Yoon, B. J. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    The prototype components of a neutral beam injection (NBI) system have been developed for the KSTAR, and a capability of the manufactured components has been tested. High power ion source, acceleration power supply, other ion source power supplies, neutralizer, bending magnet for ion beam separation, calorimeter, and cryo-sorption pump have been developed by using the domestic technologies and tested for a neutral beam injection of 8 MW per beamline with a pulse duration of 300 seconds. The developed components have been continuously upgraded to achieve the design requirements. The development technology of high power and long pulse neutral beam injection system has been proved with the achievement of 5.2 MW output for a short pulse length and 1.6 MW output for a pulse length of 300 seconds. Using these development technologies, the domestic NB technology has been stabilized under the development of high power ion source, NB beamline components, high voltage and current power supplies, NB diagnostics, NB system operation and control.

  10. Geometry calibration method for a cone-beam CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongkai; Kang, Kejun; Xing, Yuxiang

    2017-05-01

    The positioning accuracy of each component is important to ensure the image quality of cone-beam CT. However, accurate positioning is not easy and requires experience and time. The option is to calibrate the geometric parameters and then plug them into a reconstruction algorithm which is the preferred solution in practice. In this case, the image quality is determined by the accuracy and precision of the calibration method. This work describes a method to independently calibrate an imaging system in each pose (projection angle) for a cone-beam CT with a nonideal circular trajectory. The calibration method uses a phantom with 12 beads on 2 planes that are observed on the radiographic images. This pose-independent calibration method (PIC) can decorrelate the relationships among the geometric parameters so that the parameters can be estimated one-by-one. This simplifies the calibration process. Besides the pose-independent calibration method, this paper also describes an extended calibration method with additional constraints on the system geometry. Both methods are validated with numerical simulations and then experimentally on a practical system with a scanning object loosely supported by rotating wheels. The object rotates during the CT data acquisition. The angular and pose information of the CT system are not accurately known a priori in this case. The numerical simulations and the experiments both provide satisfactory results. The relative error of the calibrated source-to-detector distance in the simulation is less than 0.1%. The errors in the calibrated roll, pitch, and yaw angles are less than 0.04°. A sensitivity study using various bead position uncertainties in random directions shows that the pose-independent calibration method is robust to measurement errors. Tests were also done with a nonideal circular trajectory for further validation. Images reconstructed using the geometric parameters from both the pose-independent and the extended calibration

  11. Measurement and simulation for a complementary imaging with the neutron and X-ray beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hara Kaoru Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By using a composite source system, we measured radiographs of the thermal neutron and keV X-ray in the 45-MeV electron linear accelerator facility at Hokkaido University. The source system provides the alternative beam of neutron and X-ray by switching the production target onto the electron beam axis. In the measurement to demonstrate a complementary imaging, the detector based on a vacuum-tube type neutron color image intensifier was applied to the both beams for dual-purpose. On the other hand, for reducing background in a neutron transmission spectrum, test measurements using a gadolinium-type neutron grid were performed with a cold neutron source at Hokkaido University. In addition, the simulations of the neutron and X-ray transmissions for various substances were performed using the PHITS code. A data analysis procedure for estimating the substance of sample was investigated through the simulations.

  12. Measurement and simulation for a complementary imaging with the neutron and X-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kaoru Y.; Sato, Hirotaka; Kamiyama, Takashi; Shinohara, Takenao

    2017-09-01

    By using a composite source system, we measured radiographs of the thermal neutron and keV X-ray in the 45-MeV electron linear accelerator facility at Hokkaido University. The source system provides the alternative beam of neutron and X-ray by switching the production target onto the electron beam axis. In the measurement to demonstrate a complementary imaging, the detector based on a vacuum-tube type neutron color image intensifier was applied to the both beams for dual-purpose. On the other hand, for reducing background in a neutron transmission spectrum, test measurements using a gadolinium-type neutron grid were performed with a cold neutron source at Hokkaido University. In addition, the simulations of the neutron and X-ray transmissions for various substances were performed using the PHITS code. A data analysis procedure for estimating the substance of sample was investigated through the simulations.

  13. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  14. Absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam-Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used *van der Meer scan* method (VDM). The technique has been used in 10 LHC fills during 2012 including and also provided a first luminosity measurement for proton-lead collisions. This talk presents the principles of the gas injection and the improvements reached with the increased pressure. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch. Those uncertainties are becoming the dominating factor because the uncertainty on the total beam current have been reduced.

  15. Multipurpose Hyperspectral Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye; Smith, David; Lanoue, Mark A.; Poole, Gavin H.; Heitschmidt, Jerry; Martinez, Luis; Windham, William A.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon

    2005-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system of high spectral and spatial resolution that incorporates several innovative features has been developed to incorporate a focal plane scanner (U.S. Patent 6,166,373). This feature enables the system to be used for both airborne/spaceborne and laboratory hyperspectral imaging with or without relative movement of the imaging system, and it can be used to scan a target of any size as long as the target can be imaged at the focal plane; for example, automated inspection of food items and identification of single-celled organisms. The spectral resolution of this system is greater than that of prior terrestrial multispectral imaging systems. Moreover, unlike prior high-spectral resolution airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral imaging systems, this system does not rely on relative movement of the target and the imaging system to sweep an imaging line across a scene. This compact system (see figure) consists of a front objective mounted at a translation stage with a motorized actuator, and a line-slit imaging spectrograph mounted within a rotary assembly with a rear adaptor to a charged-coupled-device (CCD) camera. Push-broom scanning is carried out by the motorized actuator which can be controlled either manually by an operator or automatically by a computer to drive the line-slit across an image at a focal plane of the front objective. To reduce the cost, the system has been designed to integrate as many as possible off-the-shelf components including the CCD camera and spectrograph. The system has achieved high spectral and spatial resolutions by using a high-quality CCD camera, spectrograph, and front objective lens. Fixtures for attachment of the system to a microscope (U.S. Patent 6,495,818 B1) make it possible to acquire multispectral images of single cells and other microscopic objects.

  16. A new framework of image reconstruction from fan beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.-H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a unified framework to reconstruct images for both fan beam and cone beam projections. The important feature of our theoretical framework is that it does not depend on the classical concept of the Radon transform at all. This property allows us to directly generalize the ideas and techniques developed in this paper to the cone beam reconstruction problem. In this paper, we extract such a framework from developing a new image reconstruction scheme from fan beam projections. Our new scheme also provides us new understanding of fan beam reconstruction problem. Our main results for the fan beam reconstruction are the following: First, we derive a general reconstruction scheme, in which the data sufficiency condition is transparently revealed by the reconstruction formula. Specifically, the data sufficiency condition for an accurate reconstruction of a region of interest (ROI) is that all the lines passing through the ROI must intersect the source trajectory at least once. Second, we further simplify the general reconstruction scheme by following three major steps of our new framework: (i) using symmetries of intermediate function; (ii) handling the data redundancy; (iii) changing discrete summation over the possible focal points into an integral along the source trajectory. After these steps, we obtain a new filtered backprojection algorithm. The key characteristic of this new algorithm is to take derivative of measured data with respect to the trajectory parameter. In practice, we can trade this derivative to some other continuous functions. In the configuration of a circular source trajectory with a third generation arc/collinear detector, we demonstrate how to remove the undesirable derivative of measured projection data. It results in a new algorithm for the sequential reconstruction of a ROI with a general normalized weighting function

  17. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented

  18. An automatic beam focusing system for MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalagama, C. N. B.; Bettiol, A. A.; van Kan, J. A.; Teo, E. J.; Breese, M. B. H.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    2005-04-01

    An automatic focusing system for MeV protons has been developed. The focusing system utilises rapid real time proton induced secondary electron imaging of a calibration grid coupled with a modified Gaussian fit in order to take into account the enhanced secondary electron signal from the calibration grid edge. The focusing system has been successfully applied to MeV protons focused using a coupled triplet configuration of magnetic quadrupole lenses (Oxford triplet). Automatic beam focusing of a coarse beamspot of approximately (5 × 3.5) micrometres in the X and Y directions to a sub-micrometre beamspot of approximately (0.7 × 0.6) micrometers was achieved at a beam current of about 50 pA.

  19. An automatic beam focusing system for MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalagama, C.N.B.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kan, J.A. van; Teo, E.J.; Breese, M.B.H.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    2005-01-01

    An automatic focusing system for MeV protons has been developed. The focusing system utilises rapid real time proton induced secondary electron imaging of a calibration grid coupled with a modified Gaussian fit in order to take into account the enhanced secondary electron signal from the calibration grid edge. The focusing system has been successfully applied to MeV protons focused using a coupled triplet configuration of magnetic quadrupole lenses (Oxford triplet). Automatic beam focusing of a coarse beamspot of approximately (5 x 3.5) micrometres in the X and Y directions to a sub-micrometre beamspot of approximately (0.7 x 0.6) micrometers was achieved at a beam current of about 50 pA

  20. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  1. Development of beam monitoring system for proton pencil beam scanning using fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaeman; Koo, Jihye; Moon, Sunyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Sun-Young; Lim, Youngkyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Meyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to develop a beam monitoring system based on a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS), which can be used in real time in a beam control room, to monitor a beam in proton therapy, where patients are treated using a pencil beam scanning (PBS) mode, by measuring the beam spot width (BSW) and beam spot position (BSP) of the PBS. We developed two-dimensional detector arrays to monitor the PBS beam in the beam control room. We measured the BSW for five energies of the PBS beam and compared the measurements with those of Lynx and EBT3 film. In order to confirm the BSP, we compared the BSP values of the PBS calculated from radiation treatment planning (RTP), to five BSP values measured using FORS at 224.2 MeV. When comparing BSW values obtained using developed monitoring system to the measurements obtained using commercial EBT3 film, the average difference in BSW value of the PBS beam was 0.1 ± 0.1 mm. In the comparison of BSW values with the measurements obtained using Lynx, the average difference was 0.2 ± 0.1 mm. When comparing BSP measurements to the values calculated from RTP, the average difference was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. The study results confirmed that the developed FORS-based beam monitoring system can monitor a PBS beam in real time in a beam control room, where proton beam is controlled for the patient.

  2. Extracted-beam-detection system around synchrotron saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anne, Remy; Milleret, Gerard; Giuliani, Arlette; Lefol, Andre; Perret, Robert; Poupard, Joseph; Trogno, Andre; Van den Bossche, Maurice; N'Guyen Sieu Viet.

    1977-07-01

    The extracted-beam-detection system working around the synchrotron Saturne is presented. The whole system is composed of about forty multiwire chambers used for beam tuning and providing beams profiles. Optic beam parameters such as position, divergence, dimension, emittance can be easily measured, or calculated with a program running on a computer. They are working in large range intensity beams (10 2 to 5.10 11 p/cm 2 /s of protons, alpha particles, deutons, pions, tritons and electrons [fr

  3. Three-dimensional dose distribution of proton beams derived from luminescence images of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S.; Watabe, H.; Toshito, T.; Komori, M.

    2017-05-01

    We recently found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation at lower energy than the Cerenkov-light threshold and imaging was possible by using a CCD camera. However, since the measured distributions were projection images of the luminescence, precise dose estimations from the images were not possible. If the 3 dimensional images can be formed from the projection images, more precise dose information could be obtained. For this purpose, we calculate the 3-dimensional distribution of the proton beams from the luminescence images and use them for beam width estimations. We assumed that the proton beams have circular shape and the transverse images were reconstructed from the projection images using the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm for positron emission tomography (PET). The reconstructed images were compared to estimate the proton-beam widths with those obtained from the projection images and simulation results. We obtained 3-dimensional distributions of the proton beams from the projection images and also the reconstructed sagittal, coronal, and transverse images as well as volume rendering images. The estimated beam widths from the reconstructed images, which were slightly smaller than those obtained from the projection images, were identical to those calculated with the simulation. The 3-dimensional distributions of the luminescence images of water of proton beams could be reconstructed from the projection images and showed improved accuracy in estimating the beam widths of the proton beams.

  4. Initial results from beam commissioning of the LHC beam dump system

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Carlier, E; Ducimetière, L; Gallet, E; Gyr, M; Jensen, L; Jones, R; Kain, V; Kramer, T; Lamont, M; Meddahi, M; Mertens, V; Risselada, Thys; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; Weterings, W

    2010-01-01

    Initial commissioning of the LHC beam dump system with beam took place in August and September 2008. The preparation, setting-up and the tests performed are described together with results of the extractions of beam into the dump lines. Analysis of the first detailed aperture measurements of the extraction channels and kicker performance derived from dilution sweep shapes are presented. The performance of the other equipment subsystems is summarised, in particular that of the dedicated dump system beam instrumentation.

  5. Fan beam image reconstruction with generalized Fourier slice theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuangren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    For parallel beam geometry the Fourier reconstruction works via the Fourier slice theorem (or central slice theorem, projection slice theorem). For fan beam situation, Fourier slice can be extended to a generalized Fourier slice theorem (GFST) for fan-beam image reconstruction. We have briefly introduced this method in a conference. This paper reintroduces the GFST method for fan beam geometry in details. The GFST method can be described as following: the Fourier plane is filled by adding up the contributions from all fanbeam projections individually; thereby the values in the Fourier plane are directly calculated for Cartesian coordinates such avoiding the interpolation from polar to Cartesian coordinates in the Fourier domain; inverse fast Fourier transform is applied to the image in Fourier plane and leads to a reconstructed image in spacial domain. The reconstructed image is compared between the result of the GFST method and the result from the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The major differences of the GFST and the FBP methods are: (1) The interpolation process are at different data sets. The interpolation of the GFST method is at projection data. The interpolation of the FBP method is at filtered projection data. (2) The filtering process are done in different places. The filtering process of the GFST is at Fourier domain. The filtering process of the FBP method is the ramp filter which is done at projections. The resolution of ramp filter is variable with different location but the filter in the Fourier domain lead to resolution invariable with location. One advantage of the GFST method over the FBP method is in short scan situation, an exact solution can be obtained with the GFST method, but it can not be obtained with the FBP method. The calculation of both the GFST and the FBP methods are at O(N^3), where N is the number of pixel in one dimension.

  6. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V [Wayland, MA

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  7. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated.

  8. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated

  9. Dehydration process of fish analyzed by neutron beam imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoi, K.; Hamada, Y.; Seyama, S.; Saito, T.; Iikura, H.; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Since regulation of water content of the dried fish is an important factor for the quality of the fish, water-losing process during drying (squid and Japanese horse mackerel) was analyzed through neutron beam imaging. The neutron image showed that around the shoulder of mackerel, there was a part where water content was liable to maintain high during drying. To analyze water-losing process more in detail, spatial image was produced. From the images, it was clearly indicated that the decrease of water content was regulated around the shoulder part. It was suggested that to prevent deterioration around the shoulder part of the dried fish is an important factor to keep quality of the dried fish in the storage.

  10. SU-E-J-99: Reconstruction of Cone Beam CT Image Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Exit Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K; Goddard, L; Savacool, M; Mynampati, D; Godoy Scripes, P; Tome' , W [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Kuo, H; Basavatia, A; Hong, L; Yaparpalvi, R; Kalnicki, S [Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To test the possibility of obtaining an image of the treated volume during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with exit beams. Method: Using a Varian Clinac 21EX and MVCT detector the following three sets of detector projection data were obtained for cone beam CT reconstruction with and without a Catphan 504 phantom. 1) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm{sup 2} open beam with 3 MUs, 2) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm{sup 2} MLC closed beam with 14 MUs. 3) 137 projection images from a test RapicArc QA plan. All projection images were obtained in ‘integrated image’ mode. We used OSCaR code to reconstruct the cone beam CT images. No attempts were made to reduce scatter or artifacts. Results: With projection set 1) we obtained a good quality MV CBCT image by optimizing the reconstruction parameters. Using projection set 2) we were not able to obtain a CBCT image of the phantom, which was determined to be due to the variation of interleaf leakage with gantry angle. From projection set 3), we were able to obtain a weak but meaningful signal in the image, especially in the target area where open beam signals were dominant. This finding suggests that one might be able to acquire CBCT images with rough body shape and some details inside the irradiated target area. Conclusion: Obtaining patient images using the VMAT exit beam is challenging but possible. We were able to determine sources of image degradation such as gantry angle dependent interleaf leakage and beams with a large scatter component. We are actively working on improving image quality.

  11. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  12. Beam-on imaging of short-lived positron emitters during proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Brzezinski, K. W.; Brandenburg, S.; Dendooven, P.

    2017-06-01

    In vivo dose delivery verification in proton therapy can be performed by positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron-emitting nuclei produced by the proton beam in the patient. A PET scanner installed in the treatment position of a proton therapy facility that takes data with the beam on will see very short-lived nuclides as well as longer-lived nuclides. The most important short-lived nuclide for proton therapy is 12N (Dendooven et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 8923-47), which has a half-life of 11 ms. The results of a proof-of-principle experiment of beam-on PET imaging of short-lived 12N nuclei are presented. The Philips Digital Photon Counting Module TEK PET system was used, which is based on LYSO scintillators mounted on digital SiPM photosensors. A 90 MeV proton beam from the cyclotron at KVI-CART was used to investigate the energy and time spectra of PET coincidences during beam-on. Events coinciding with proton bunches, such as prompt gamma rays, were removed from the data via an anti-coincidence filter with the cyclotron RF. The resulting energy spectrum allowed good identification of the 511 keV PET counts during beam-on. A method was developed to subtract the long-lived background from the 12N image by introducing a beam-off period into the cyclotron beam time structure. We measured 2D images and 1D profiles of the 12N distribution. A range shift of 5 mm was measured as 6  ±  3 mm using the 12N profile. A larger, more efficient, PET system with a higher data throughput capability will allow beam-on 12N PET imaging of single spots in the distal layer of an irradiation with an increased signal-to-background ratio and thus better accuracy. A simulation shows that a large dual panel scanner, which images a single spot directly after it is delivered, can measure a 5 mm range shift with millimeter accuracy: 5.5  ±  1.1 mm for 1  ×  108 protons and 5.2  ±  0.5 mm for 5  ×  108 protons. This makes

  13. Internally shielded beam transport and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildkamp, W.; Brewer, H.

    1996-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, the Advanced Photon Source has a policy that disallows any exposed lead within the facility. This creates a real problem for the beam transport system, not so much for the pipe but for the flexible coupling (bellows) sections. A complete internally shielded x-ray transport system, consisting of long transport lines joined by flexible coupling sections, has been designed for CARS sector 14 to operate either at high vacuum or as a helium flight tube. It can effectively shield against air scattering of wiggler or undulator white beam with proper placement of apertures, collimators, and masks for direct beam control. The system makes use of male- and female-style fittings that create a labyrinth allowing for continuous shielding through the flexible coupling sections. These parts are precision machined from a ternary hypereutectic lead alloy (cast under 15 inches of head pressure to assure a pinhole-free casting) then pressed into either end (rotatable vacuum flanges) of the bellows assembly. The transport pipe itself consists of a four part construction using a stepped transition ring (Z-ring) to connect an inner tube to the vacuum flange and also to a protective and supportive outer tube. The inner tube is wrapped with 1/16 double-prime pure lead sheet to a predetermined thickness following the shape of the stepped transition ring for continuous shielding. This design has been prototyped and radiation tested. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Beam position monitoring system at CESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billing, M.G.; Bergan, W.F.; Forster, M.J.; Meller, R.E.; Rendina, M.C.; Rider, N.T.; Sagan, D.C.; Shanks, J.; Sikora, J.P.; Stedinger, M.G.; Strohman, C.R.; Palmer, M.A.; Holtzapple, R.L.

    2017-01-01

    The Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring (CESR) has been converted from a High Energy Physics electron-positron collider to operate as a dedicated synchrotron light source for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) and to conduct accelerator physics research as a test accelerator, capable of studying topics relevant to future damping rings, colliders and light sources. Some of the specific topics that were targeted for the initial phase of operation of the storage ring in this mode, labeled CESRTA (CESR as a Test Accelerator), included 1) tuning techniques to produce low emittance beams, 2) the study of electron cloud development in a storage ring and 3) intra-beam scattering effects. The complete conversion of CESR to CESRTA occurred over a several year period and is described elsewhere. As a part of this conversion the CESR beam position monitoring (CBPM) system was completely upgraded to provide the needed instrumental capabilities for these studies. This paper describes the new CBPM system hardware, its function and representative measurements performed by the upgraded system.

  15. Rapid Process to Generate Beam Envelopes for Optical System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Joseph; Seals, Lenward

    2012-01-01

    The task of evaluating obstructions in the optical throughput of an optical system requires the use of two disciplines, and hence, two models: optical models for the details of optical propagation, and mechanical models for determining the actual structure that exists in the optical system. Previous analysis methods for creating beam envelopes (or cones of light) for use in this obstruction analysis were found to be cumbersome to calculate and take significant time and resources to complete. A new process was developed that takes less time to complete beam envelope analysis, is more accurate and less dependent upon manual node tracking to create the beam envelopes, and eases the burden on the mechanical CAD (computer-aided design) designers to form the beam solids. This algorithm allows rapid generation of beam envelopes for optical system obstruction analysis. Ray trace information is taken from optical design software and used to generate CAD objects that represent the boundary of the beam envelopes for detailed analysis in mechanical CAD software. Matlab is used to call ray trace data from the optical model for all fields and entrance pupil points of interest. These are chosen to be the edge of each space, so that these rays produce the bounding volume for the beam. The x and y global coordinate data is collected on the surface planes of interest, typically an image of the field and entrance pupil internal of the optical system. This x and y coordinate data is then evaluated using a convex hull algorithm, which removes any internal points, which are unnecessary to produce the bounding volume of interest. At this point, tolerances can be applied to expand the size of either the field or aperture, depending on the allocations. Once this minimum set of coordinates on the pupil and field is obtained, a new set of rays is generated between the field plane and aperture plane (or vice-versa). These rays are then evaluated at planes between the aperture and field, at a

  16. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, Peter; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Pauling, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  17. Beam imaging in the injection line of the INFN-LNS superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, Dario; Cosentino, Luigi; Mascali, David; Pappalardo, Alfio; Castro, Maurizio; Celona, Luigi; Marchetta, Carmelo; Marletta, Salvatore; Maugeri, Antonio; Rifuggiato, Danilo; Seminara, Angelo; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    A cheap and efficient diagnostic system for beam monitoring has been recently developed at INFN-LNS in Catania. It consists of a high sensitivity CCD camera detecting the light produced by an ion beam hitting the surface of a scintillating screen and a frame grabber for image acquisition. A scintillating screen, developed at INFN-LNS and consisting of a 2 μm BaF2 layer evaporated on an aluminium plate, has been tested by using 20Ne and 40Ar beams in the keV energy range. The CAESAR ECR ion source has been used for investigating the influence of the frequency and magnetic field tuning effects, the impact of the microwave injected power, and of the focusing solenoids along the low energy beam transport on the beam shape and current. These tests will allow to better understand the interplay between the plasma and beam dynamics and, moreover, to improve the transport efficiency along the low energy beam line and the matching with the superconducting cyclotron, particularly relevant in view of the expected upgrade of the machine.

  18. Beam imaging in the injection line of the INFN-LNS superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolosi, Dario, E-mail: dario.nicolosi@lns.infn.it; Cosentino, Luigi; Mascali, David; Pappalardo, Alfio; Castro, Maurizio; Celona, Luigi; Marchetta, Carmelo; Marletta, Salvatore; Maugeri, Antonio; Rifuggiato, Danilo; Seminara, Angelo; Gammino, Santo [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    A cheap and efficient diagnostic system for beam monitoring has been recently developed at INFN-LNS in Catania. It consists of a high sensitivity CCD camera detecting the light produced by an ion beam hitting the surface of a scintillating screen and a frame grabber for image acquisition. A scintillating screen, developed at INFN-LNS and consisting of a 2 μm BaF{sub 2} layer evaporated on an aluminium plate, has been tested by using {sup 20}Ne and {sup 40}Ar beams in the keV energy range. The CAESAR ECR ion source has been used for investigating the influence of the frequency and magnetic field tuning effects, the impact of the microwave injected power, and of the focusing solenoids along the low energy beam transport on the beam shape and current. These tests will allow to better understand the interplay between the plasma and beam dynamics and, moreover, to improve the transport efficiency along the low energy beam line and the matching with the superconducting cyclotron, particularly relevant in view of the expected upgrade of the machine.

  19. LHC beam dumping system Extraction channel layout and acceptance

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Uythoven, J; Veness, R; Weterings, W

    2003-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must safely abort the LHC beams under all conditions, including those resulting from abnormal behaviour of machine elements or subsystems of the beam dumping system itself. The extraction channels must provide sufficient aperture both for the circulating and extracted beams, over the whole energy range and under various beam parameters. These requirements impose tight constraints on the tolerances of various extraction channel components, and also on the allowed range of beam positions in the region of these components. Operation of the beam dumping system under various fault states has been considered, and the resulting apertures calculated. After describing briefly the beam dumping system and the extraction channel geometry, the various assumptions made in the analysis are presented, before deriving tolerance limits for the relevant equipment and beam parameters.

  20. Multi-beam synchrotron infrared chemical imaging with high spatial resolution: Beamline realization and first reports on image restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasse, Michael J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States); Mattson, Eric C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Reininger, Ruben [Scientific Answers and Solutions, 77 Constantine Way, Mount Sinai, NY 11766 (United States); Kubala, Tim; Janowski, Sebastian [Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States); El-Bayyari, Zuheir [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Department of Basic Sciences and Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Philadelphia University, P.O. Box 1, 19392 Aein Albasha, Jordan. (Jordan); Hirschmugl, Carol J., E-mail: cjhirsch@uwm.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging using focal plane array (FPA) multi-element detectors is an increasingly popular chemical microscopy technique because it can provide microspectroscopic images of large sample areas in short times at moderate spatial resolution. The novel IR beamline IRENI at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (Wisconsin, USA), the first dedicated multi-beam synchrotron-based FT-IR imaging system, offers, within minutes, high quality chemical images at the highest available spatial resolution (diffraction-limited at all mid-IR wavelengths) with a pixel size of 0.54x0.54 {mu}m{sup 2} for transmission measurements. Due to this very high spatial sampling, mathematical image enhancement algorithms such as deconvolution and total variation (TV) reconstruction can be implemented to improve image contrast and thus spatial resolution. This is demonstrated for US Air force (USAF) targets, micron-sized aluminum beads, and a single living algal cell.

  1. Contrastive Analysis and Research on Negative Pressure Beam Tube System and Positive Pressure Beam Tube System for Mine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyi; Shen, Jialong; Liu, Xinbo

    2018-01-01

    Against the technical defects of universally applicable beam tube monitoring system at present, such as air suction in the beam tube, line clogging, long sampling time, etc., the paper analyzes the current situation of the spontaneous combustion fire disaster forecast of mine in our country and these defects one by one. On this basis, the paper proposes a research thought that improving the positive pressure beam tube so as to substitute the negative pressure beam tube. Then, the paper introduces the beam tube monitoring system based on positive pressure technology through theoretical analysis and experiment. In the comparison with negative pressure beam tube, the paper concludes the advantage of the new system and draws the conclusion that the positive pressure beam tube is superior to the negative pressure beam tube system both in test result and test time. At last, the paper proposes prospect of the beam tube monitoring system based on positive pressure technology.

  2. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  3. A simple X-ray source of two orthogonal beams for small samples imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdý, J.

    2018-04-01

    A simple method for simultaneous imaging of small samples by two orthogonal beams is proposed. The method is based on one channel-cut crystal which is oriented such that the beam is diffracted on two crystallographic planes simultaneously. These planes are symmetrically inclined to the crystal surface. The beams are three times diffracted. After the first diffraction the beam is split. After the second diffraction the split beams become parallel. Finally, after the third diffraction the beams become convergent and may be used for imaging. The corresponding angular relations to obtain orthogonal beams are derived.

  4. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  5. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  6. Beam Position Monitor System for PEP II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stephen R.; Aiello, G.Roberto; Hendrickson, Linda J.; Johnson, Ronald G.; Mills, Mark R.; Olsen, Jeff J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12

    We describe the beam position monitor system built for PEP-II, the B-factory at SLAC. The system reports beam position for bunches of between 5 x 10{sup 8} and 8 x 10{sup 10} electron charges, either singly or as continuous streams of bunches every 4.2 ns. Resolution at full charge is to be better than 10 microns in a single turn. Higher resolution is available via on-board multi-turn averaging. The position signal is processed in a 20 MHz bandwidth around 952 MHz. This bandwidth, rather broader than that typical of RF position monitors, allows good resolution for low charge single bunches. Additional novel features include stringent control of return losses in order to minimize cross-talk between nearby bunches which may contain very different charges. The digitizing electronics is multiplexed between the two PEP-II storage rings. Design, construction, and installation experience, as well as first results with beam are presented.

  7. Design of CMS Beam Halo Monitor system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078842

    2015-01-01

    A fast and directional monitoring system for the CMS experiment is designed to provide an online, bunch-by-bunch measurement of beam background induced by beam halo interactions, separately for each beam. The background detection is based on Cherenkov radiation produced in synthetic fused silica read out by a fast, UV sensitive photomultiplier tube. Twenty detector units per end will be azimuthally distributed around the rotating shielding of CMS, covering ~408 cm2 at 20.6m from the interaction point, at a radius of ~180 cm. The directional and fast response of the system allows the discrimination of the background particles from the dominant flux in the cavern induced by pp collision debris, produced within the 25 ns bunch spacing. A robust multi-layered shielding will enclose each detector unit to protect the photomultiplier tube from the magnetic field and to eliminate the occupancy from low energy particles. The design of the front-end units is validated by experimental results. An overview of the new sy...

  8. Magnitude and effects of X-ray scatter of a cone-beam micro-CT for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Y.C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Jan, M.L. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.D. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Chuang, K.S. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Fu, Y.K. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: fufrank@iner.gov.tw

    2006-12-20

    We have developed a micro-CT system to provide high-resolution and anatomic information to combine with a microPET'' (registered) R4 system. This study was to evaluate the magnitude and effects of scatter for low kVp X-ray in this cone-beam micro-CT system. Slit collimators were used to simulate fan-beam micro-CT for comparison. The magnitudes of X-ray scatter were measured using the beam-stop method and were estimated by polynomial-fitting extrapolation to 0 mm size of stoppers. The scatter-to-primary ratio at center of the cone-beam system were 45% and 20% for rat and mouse phantoms, respectively, and were reduced to 5.86% and 4.2% in fan-beam geometric setup. The effects of X-ray scatter on image uniformity and contrast ratio were evaluated also. The uniformity response was examined by the profile of the reconstructed image. The degrees of 'cupping' in the fan-beam and cone-beam conditions were 1.75% and 3.81%, respectively, in rat phantom. A contrast phantom consisting of four inserts with physical densities similar to that of acrylic was used for measuring the effect of X-ray scatter on image contrast. Contrast ratios of the inserts and acrylic in cone-beam setup degraded 36.9% in average compared with fan-beam setup. A tumor-bearing mouse was scanned by the micro-CT system. The tumor-to-background contrast ratios were measured to be 0.331 and 0.249, respectively, with fan-beam and cone-beam setups.

  9. The LHC Beam Dumping System Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, A; Voumard, N

    2005-01-01

    Two LHC beam dumping systems (LBDS) will fast-extract the counter-rotating beams safely from the LHC collider during setting-up of the accelerator, at the end of a physics run and in case of emergencies. They consist of 15 fast pulsed magnets per ring for beam extraction from the accelerator combined with 10 fast pulsed magnets for horizontal and vertical beam dilution. Dump requests will come from 3 different sources: the machine protection system for emergency cases, the machine timing system for scheduled dumps or the LBDS itself in case of internal failures. These spontaneously issued dump requests will be synchronised with the 3 µs beam abort gap within a fail-safe trigger synchronisation unit (TSU) based on a digital phase lock loop (DPLL) locked on the beam revolution frequency with a maximum phase error of 40 ns. Afterwards, the synchronised trigger pulse will be distributed to the fast pulsed magnet high voltage generators through a redundant fault tolerant trigger distribution system based on the...

  10. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  11. Status of Beam Diagnostic Systems for the PEFP

    CERN Document Server

    Park Jang Ho; Choi Byung Ho; Ha Hwang Woon; Han, Sang-Hyo; Park, Sung-Ju; Woon Parc, Yong; Yun Huang Jung

    2005-01-01

    A proton linear accelerator is currently the construction at the KAERI (Korea Atomic Research Institute) to the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) in Korea. We are accomplished the technique development of beam diagnostic system to be currently the construction. We treat beam diagnostics for the high power proton linear accelerator. Prototype beam position & phase monitor (BPPM) electronics was made and tested successfully in one of the beam diagnostic systems. The beam position monitor pickup electrode is a capacitive type (electrostatic type) which has a button form. Button form electrode, in common use around electron synchrotrons and storage rings, are a variant of the electrode with small button form (e.g., sub mm diameter). However, we are designed button form electrode to measure beam position of proton beam. The BCM (Beam Current Monitor) is developed Tuned CT (Current Transformer) for collaborate with Bergoz Instruments. This paper describes the status of beam diagnostic systems for the P...

  12. Use of TrueBeam developer mode for imaging QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Morin, Olivier; Valenciaga, Yanisley; Kirby, Niel; Pouliot, Jean; Chuang, Cynthia

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to automate regular Imaging QA procedures to become more efficient and accurate. Daily and monthly imaging QA for SRS and SBRT protocols were fully automated on a Varian linac. A three-step paradigm where the data are automatically acquired, processed, and analyzed was defined. XML scripts were written and used in developer mode in a TrueBeam linac to automatically acquire data. MATLAB R013B was used to develop an interface that could allow the data to be processed and analyzed. Hardware was developed that allowed the localization of several phantoms simultaneously on the couch. 14 KV CBCTs from the Emma phantom were obtained using a TrueBeam onboard imager as example of data acquisition and analysis. The images were acquired during two months. Artifacts were artificially introduced in the images during the reconstruction process using iTool reconstructor. Support vector machine algorithms to automatically identify each artifact were written using the Machine Learning MATLAB R2011 Toolbox. A daily imaging QA test could be performed by an experienced medical physicist in 14.3 ± 2.4 min. The same test, if automated using our paradigm, could be performed in 4.2 ± 0.7 min. In the same manner, a monthly imaging QA could be performed by a physicist in 70.7 ± 8.0 min and, if fully automated, in 21.8 ± 0.6 min. Additionally, quantitative data analysis could be automatically performed by Machine Learning Algorithms that could remove the subjectivity of data interpretation in the QA process. For instance, support vector machine algorithms could correctly identify beam hardening, rings and scatter artifacts. Traditional metrics, as well as metrics that describe texture, are needed for the classification. Modern linear accelerators are equipped with advanced 2D and 3D imaging capabilities that are used for patient alignment, substantially improving IGRT treatment accuracy. However, this extra complexity exponentially increases the number of QA

  13. Mitigating illumination gradients in a SAR image based on the image data and antenna beam pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2013-04-30

    Illumination gradients in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of a target can be mitigated by determining a correction for pixel values associated with the SAR image. This correction is determined based on information indicative of a beam pattern used by a SAR antenna apparatus to illuminate the target, and also based on the pixel values associated with the SAR image. The correction is applied to the pixel values associated with the SAR image to produce corrected pixel values that define a corrected SAR image.

  14. Imaging nanometer-scale beamlets arrays of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, R. K.; To, H.; Musumeci, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California, 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    In this paper we study the evolution of nanometer scale transverse density modulation of a high brightness electron beam through a drift and simple focusing channel. With the help of particle tracking simulations we analyze the effects of space charge forces, emittance and energy spread on the feasibility of recovering an initial nm-scale transverse modulation after transport through a magnifying optical system. These studies are relevant for applications such as time-resolved MeV transmission electron microscopy and in the high brightness electron beam community due to the recent developments of nano-structured cathodes and due to the possibility of taking advantage of nm-structures in the beam for coherent radiation generation.

  15. Ghost reflections of Gaussian beams in anamorphic optical systems with an application to Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to model and analyze the effect of undesired (ghost) reflections of Gaussian beams that are produced by anamorphic optical systems. The superposition of these beams with the nominal beam modulates the nominal power distribution at the recording plane. This modulation may cause contrast reduction, veiling parts of the nominal image, and/or the formation of spurious interference fringes. The developed methodology is based on synthesizing the beam optical paths into nominal and ghost optical beam paths. Similar to the nominal beam, we present the concept that each ghost beam is characterized by a beam size, wavefront radius of curvature, and Gouy phase in the paraxial regime. The nominal and ghost beams are sequentially traced through the system and formulas for estimating the electric field magnitude and phase of each ghost beam at the recording plane are presented. The effective electric field is the addition of the individual nominal and ghost electric fields. Formulas for estimating Gouy phase, the shape of the interference fringes, and the central interference order are introduced. As an application, the theory of the formation of the interference fringes by Michelson interferometer is presented. This theory takes into consideration the ghost reflections that are formed by the beam splitter. To illustrate the theory and to show its wide applicability, simulation examples that include a Mangin mirror, a Michelson interferometer, and a black box optical system are provided.

  16. The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bell, A. J.; Dabrowski, A.; Guthoff, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hempel, M.; Henschel, H.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Müller, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Pfeiffer, D.; Ryjov, V.; Stickland, D.; Schimdt, R.; Walsh, R.

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the two large, general purpose experiments situated at the LHC at CERN. As with all high energy physics experiments, knowledge of the beam conditions and luminosity is of vital importance. The Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System (BRM) is installed in CMS to protect the detector and to provide feedback to LHC on beam conditions. It is composed of several sub-systems that measure the radiation level close to or inside all sub-detectors, monitor the beam halo conditions with different time resolution, support beam tuning and protect CMS in case of adverse beam conditions by firing a beam abort signal. This paper presents three of the BRM subsystems: the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F), which is designed for fast flux monitoring, measuring with nanosecond time resolution, both the beam halo and collision products; the Beam Scintillator Counters (BSC), that provide hit rates and time information of beam halo and collision products; and the Beam Conditions Monitors (BCM) used as a protection system that can trigger a beam dump when beam losses occur in order to prevent damage to the pixel and tracker detectors. A description of the systems and a characterization on the basis of data collected during LHC operation is presented.

  17. Non-Linear Beam Transport System for the LENS 7 MeV Proton Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, William P; Derenchuk, Vladimir Peter; Rinckel, Thomas; Solberg, Keith

    2005-01-01

    A beam transport system has been designed to carry a high-intensity low-emittance proton beam from the exit of the RFQ-DTL acceleration system of the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron System (LENS)* to the neutron production target. The goal of the design was to provide a beam of uniform density over a 3cm by 3cm area at the target. Two octupole magnets** are employed in the beam line to provide the necessary beam phase space manipulations to achieve this goal. First order calculations were done using TRANSPORT and second order calculations have been performed using TURTLE. Second order simulations have been done using both a Gaussian beam distribution and a particle set generated by calculations of beam transport through the RFQ-DTL using PARMILA. Comparison of the design characteristics with initial measurements from the LENS commissioning process will be made.

  18. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    neck phantoms. The conclusions of this investigation were: (1) the implementation of intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT produced improvements in image quality, with the largest impact occurring for smaller numbers of initially-acquired projections, (2) the SPECS scatter correction algorithm could be successfully incorporated into projection data acquired using an electronic portal imaging device during megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction, (3) a large range of SPECS parameters were shown to reduce cupping artifacts as well as improve reconstruction accuracy, with application to anthropomorphic phantom geometries improving the percent difference in reconstructed electron density for soft tissue from -13.6% to -2.0%, and for cortical bone from -9.7% to 1.4%, (4) dose measurements in the anthropomorphic phantoms showed consistent agreement between planar measurements using radiochromic film and point measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters, and (5) a comparison of normalized dose measurements acquired with radiochromic film to those calculated using multiple treatment planning systems, accelerator-detector combinations, patient geometries and accelerator outputs produced a relatively good agreement.

  19. Raster images vectorization system

    OpenAIRE

    Genytė, Jurgita

    2006-01-01

    The problem of raster images vectorization was analyzed and researched in this work. Existing vectorization systems are quite expensive, the results are inaccurate, and the manual vectorization of a large number of drafts is impossible. That‘s why our goal was to design and develop a new raster images vectorization system using our suggested automatic vectorization algorithm and the way to record results in a new universal vectorial file format. The work consists of these main parts: analysis...

  20. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  1. Performance with lead ions of the LHC beam dump system

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R; Jensen, L; Lefèvre, T; Weterings, W

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dump system must function safely with 208Pb82+ions. The differences with respect to the LHC proton beams are briefly recalled, and the possible areas for performance concerns discussed, in particular the various beam intercepting devices and the beam instrumentation. Energy deposition simulation results for the most critical elements are presented, and the conclusions drawn for the lead ion operation. The expected performance of the beam instrumentation systems are reviewed in the context of the damage potential of the ion beam and the required functionality of the various safety and post-operational analysis requirements.

  2. Cone beam volume tomography: an imaging option for diagnosis of complex mandibular third molar anatomical relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Robert A; Peck, Jerry; Hall, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Complex impacted third molars present potential treatment complications and possible patient morbidity. Objectives of diagnostic imaging are to facilitate diagnosis, decision making, and enhance treatment outcomes. As cases become more complex, advanced multiplane imaging methods allowing for a 3-D view are more likely to meet these objectives than traditional 2-D radiography. Until recently, advanced imaging options were somewhat limited to standard film tomography or medical CT, but development of cone beam volume tomography (CBVT) multiplane 3-D imaging systems specifically for dental use now provides an alternative imaging option. Two cases were utilized to compare the role of CBVT to these other imaging options and to illustrate how multiplane visualization can assist the pretreatment evaluation and decision-making process for complex impacted mandibular third molar cases.

  3. Slice image pretreatment for cone-beam computed tomography based on adaptive filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kuidong; Zhang Dinghua; Jin Yanfang

    2009-01-01

    According to the noise properties and the serial slice image characteristics in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system, a slice image pretreatment for CBCT based on adaptive filter was proposed. The judging criterion for the noise is established firstly. All pixels are classified into two classes: adaptive center weighted modified trimmed mean (ACWMTM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by Gauss noise and adaptive median (AM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by impulse noise. In ACWMTM filtering algorithm, the estimated Gauss noise standard deviation in the current slice image with offset window is replaced by the estimated standard deviation in the adjacent slice image to the current with the corresponding window, so the filtering accuracy of the serial images is improved. The pretreatment experiment on CBCT slice images of wax model of hollow turbine blade shows that the method makes a good performance both on eliminating noises and on protecting details. (authors)

  4. Characteristics of Local Modulation Beam Propagating through Spatial Filter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewei You

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As local defects may significantly harm beam quality and affect safe operation, a systematic analysis of the ability of a spatial filter to alleviate these adverse effects is required. Thus, the evolutional characteristics of a beam modulated by a local defect propagating through a spatial filter system at an image reply plane and a downstream plane are analyzed in detail. Modulation stripes appear at the image reply plane; these are caused by the pinhole cutoff effect. The modulation degree increases with increasing defect size. The maximum intensification factor can reach 3.2 under certain conditions. Thus, the defect size should be restricted to a reasonable size for safe operation with a specified pinhole size. Moreover, a maximal value appears at the downstream plane, and the intensity enhances with increasing defect size. To ensure beam quality, the maximum allowable defect size and angle of the spatial filter should meet special constraints. The maximum allowable defect size is calculated based on practical configuration parameters.

  5. SU-F-J-54: Towards Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Using the Treatment Beam and KV Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M; Rozario, T; Liu, A; Jiang, S; Lu, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Existing real-time imaging uses dual (orthogonal) kV beam fluoroscopies and may result in significant amount of extra radiation to patients, especially for prolonged treatment cases. In addition, kV projections only provide 2D information, which is insufficient for in vivo dose reconstruction. We propose real-time volumetric imaging using prior knowledge of pre-treatment 4D images and real-time 2D transit data of treatment beam and kV beam. Methods: The pre-treatment multi-snapshot volumetric images are used to simulate 2D projections of both the treatment beam and kV beam, respectively, for each treatment field defined by the control point. During radiation delivery, the transit signals acquired by the electronic portal image device (EPID) are processed for every projection and compared with pre-calculation by cross-correlation for phase matching and thus 3D snapshot identification or real-time volumetric imaging. The data processing involves taking logarithmic ratios of EPID signals with respect to the air scan to reduce modeling uncertainties in head scatter fluence and EPID response. Simulated 2D projections are also used to pre-calculate confidence levels in phase matching. Treatment beam projections that have a low confidence level either in pre-calculation or real-time acquisition will trigger kV beams so that complementary information can be exploited. In case both the treatment beam and kV beam return low confidence in phase matching, a predicted phase based on linear regression will be generated. Results: Simulation studies indicated treatment beams provide sufficient confidence in phase matching for most cases. At times of low confidence from treatment beams, kV imaging provides sufficient confidence in phase matching due to its complementary configuration. Conclusion: The proposed real-time volumetric imaging utilizes the treatment beam and triggers kV beams for complementary information when the treatment beam along does not provide sufficient

  6. SU-F-J-54: Towards Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Using the Treatment Beam and KV Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M; Rozario, T; Liu, A; Jiang, S; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Existing real-time imaging uses dual (orthogonal) kV beam fluoroscopies and may result in significant amount of extra radiation to patients, especially for prolonged treatment cases. In addition, kV projections only provide 2D information, which is insufficient for in vivo dose reconstruction. We propose real-time volumetric imaging using prior knowledge of pre-treatment 4D images and real-time 2D transit data of treatment beam and kV beam. Methods: The pre-treatment multi-snapshot volumetric images are used to simulate 2D projections of both the treatment beam and kV beam, respectively, for each treatment field defined by the control point. During radiation delivery, the transit signals acquired by the electronic portal image device (EPID) are processed for every projection and compared with pre-calculation by cross-correlation for phase matching and thus 3D snapshot identification or real-time volumetric imaging. The data processing involves taking logarithmic ratios of EPID signals with respect to the air scan to reduce modeling uncertainties in head scatter fluence and EPID response. Simulated 2D projections are also used to pre-calculate confidence levels in phase matching. Treatment beam projections that have a low confidence level either in pre-calculation or real-time acquisition will trigger kV beams so that complementary information can be exploited. In case both the treatment beam and kV beam return low confidence in phase matching, a predicted phase based on linear regression will be generated. Results: Simulation studies indicated treatment beams provide sufficient confidence in phase matching for most cases. At times of low confidence from treatment beams, kV imaging provides sufficient confidence in phase matching due to its complementary configuration. Conclusion: The proposed real-time volumetric imaging utilizes the treatment beam and triggers kV beams for complementary information when the treatment beam along does not provide sufficient

  7. Low-dose 2.5 MV cone-beam computed tomography with thick CsI flat-panel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace; Moussot, Christopher; Morf, Daniel; Seppi, Edward; Amols, Howard

    2016-07-08

    Most of the treatment units, both new and old models, are equipped with a megavoltage portal imager but its use for volumetric imaging is limited. This is mainly due to the poor image quality produced by the high-energy treatment beam (> 6MV). A linac at our center is equipped with a prototype 2.5 MV imaging beam. This study evaluates the feasibility of low-dose megavoltage cone-beam imaging with the 2.5MV beam and a thick cesium iodide detector, which is a high-efficiency imager. Basic imaging properties such as spatial resolution and modulation transfer function were assessed for the 2.5 MV prototype imaging system. For image quality and imaging dose, a series of megavoltage cone-beam scans were acquired for the head, thorax, and pelvis of an anthropomorphic phantom and were compared to kilovoltage cone-beam and 6X megavoltage cone-beam images. To demonstrate the advantage of MV imaging, a phantom with metallic inserts was scanned and the image quality was compared to CT and kilovoltage cone-beam scans. With a lower energy beam and higher detector efficiency, the 2.5 MV imaging system generally yields better image quality than does the 6 MV imaging system with the conventional MV imager. In particular, with the anthropomorphic phantom studies, the contrast to noise of bone to tissue is generally improved in the 2.5 MV images compared to 6 MV. With an image quality sufficient for bony alignment, the imaging dose for 2.5 MV cone-beam images is 2.4-3.4 MU compared to 26 MU in 6 MV cone-beam scans for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions of the phantom. Unlike kilovoltage cone-beam, the 2.5 MV imaging system does not suffer from high-Z image artifacts. This can be very useful for treatment planning in cases where high-Z prostheses are present. © 2016 The Authors.

  8. A beam position feedback system for beam lines at the photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, T.; Kamiya, Y.; Haga, K.; Mitsuhashi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The beam position of the synchrotron radiation produced from the Storage Ring was stabilized by a twofold position feedback system. A digital feedback system was developed to suppress the diurnal beam movement (one cycle of sin-like drifting motion per day) which became a serious problem in low-emittance operation. The feedback was applied to the closed-orbit-distortion (COD) correction system in order to cancel the position variation at all the beam lines proportionately to the variation monitored at one beam line. An analog feedback system is also used to suppress frequency components faster than the slow diurnal movement

  9. Diffraction measurements using the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Matti

    2017-03-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider protects the machine from beam induced damage by measuring the absorbed dose rates of beam losses, and by triggering beam dump if the rates increase above the allowed threshold limits. Although the detection time scales are optimized for multi-turn losses, information on fast losses can be recovered from the loss data. In this paper, methods in using the BLM system in diffraction studies are discussed.

  10. AIP Diffraction measurements using the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliokoski, Matti

    2017-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider protects the machine from beam induced damage by measuring the absorbed dose rates of beam losses, and by triggering beam dump if the rates increase above the allowed threshold limits. Although the detection time scales are optimized for multi-turn losses, information on fast losses can be recovered from the loss data. In this paper, methods in using the BLM system in di ff raction studies are discussed.

  11. Beam-Forming Concentrating Solar Thermal Array Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Thomas A. (Inventor); Dimotakis, Paul E. (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to concentrating solar-power systems and, more particularly, beam-forming concentrating solar thermal array power systems. A solar thermal array power system is provided, including a plurality of solar concentrators arranged in pods. Each solar concentrator includes a solar collector, one or more beam-forming elements, and one or more beam-steering elements. The solar collector is dimensioned to collect and divert incoming rays of sunlight. The beam-forming elements intercept the diverted rays of sunlight, and are shaped to concentrate the rays of sunlight into a beam. The steering elements are shaped, dimensioned, positioned, and/or oriented to deflect the beam toward a beam output path. The beams from the concentrators are converted to heat at a receiver, and the heat may be temporarily stored or directly used to generate electricity.

  12. Preliminary images from an adaptive imaging system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffiths, J.A.; Metaxas, M.G.; Pani, S.; Schulerud, H.; Esbrand, C.; Royle, G.J.; Price, B.; Rokvic, T.; Longo, R.; Asimidis, A.; Bletsas, E.; Cavouras, D.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Georgiou, H.; Hall, G.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Li, G.; Machin, D.; Manthos, N.; Matheson, J.; Noy, M.; Østby, J.M.; Psomadellis, F.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Theodoridis, S.; Triantis, F.; Turchetta, R.; Venanzi, C.; Speller, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    I-ImaS (Intelligent Imaging Sensors) is a European project aiming to produce real-time adaptive X-ray imaging systems using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) to create images with maximum diagnostic information within given dose constraints. Initial systems concentrate on mammography and

  13. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  14. The Beam Energy Tracking System of the LHC Beam Dumping System

    CERN Document Server

    Barlow, R A; Carlier, E; Gräwer, G; Voumard, N; Gjelsvik, R

    2005-01-01

    The LHC Beam Dumping System (LBDS) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, will be installed around the straight section 6. It comprises per ring 15 horizontally deflecting extraction kickers, followed by 1 quadrupole, 15 vertically deflecting steel septum magnets, 10 dilution kickers and, in a separate cavern several hundred meters away, an external absorber assembly. A beam dump request can occur at any moment during the operation of the collider, from injection at 450 GeV up to top energy at 7 TeV. The Beam Energy Tracking System (BETS) monitors the deflection strength of each active element of the LBDS with respect to the beam energy in order to guarantee the correct extraction trajectory over the complete operational range and under all operational conditions. Its main functions are the acquisition of the beam energy, the generation of the kick strength reference signals for the extraction and dilution kickers, the continuous checking that the kicker high voltage generat...

  15. The neutron beam users tape management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyall, B.; Johnson, M.W.

    1977-02-01

    Systems are described for dealing with data collected at the High Flux Reactor, Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and brought on magnetic tape to the Neutron Beam Research Unit at the Rutherford Laboratory. The first system, named GNAT, was designed to archive the incoming 800 bpi tapes onto 6250 bpi tapes (to enable them to return to the ILL). The archiving program, besides choosing the archive tapes, keeping a record of the data sets archived, and writing the archive tape, should be able to cope with incoming tapes whose formats are somewhat different from the standard IBM format. The second system, named FONT, was designed to maintain a record of all the tapes in the NBRU's possession, their whereabouts and what data, if any, are on them. (U.K.)

  16. Evaluation of MVCT images with skin collimation for electron beam treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardmore, Allen B; Rosen, Isaac I; Cheek, Dennis A; Fields, Robert S; Hogstrom, Kenneth R

    2008-06-23

    This study assessed the potential of using megavoltage CT (MVCT) images taken with high density skin collimation in place for electron beam treatment planning. MVCT images were taken using the TomoTherapy Hi-Art system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI), and the CT numbers were converted to density by calibrating the Hi-Art system using an electron density phantom. Doses were computed using MVCT images and kVCT images and compared by calculating dose differences in the uniform dose region ( > 90%, excluding buildup region) and calculating distance-to-agreement (DTA) in high dose-gradient regions (penumbra and distal falloff, 90%-10%). For 9 and 16 MeV electron beams of 10 x 10 cm calculated on a homogeneous CIRS Plastic Water (Computerized Imaging Research Systems Inc., Norfolk, VA) phantom without skin collimation, the maximum dose differences were 2.3% and the maximum DTAs were 2.0 mm for both beams. The same phantom was then MVCT scanned nine times with square skin collimators of Cerrobend on its surface - field sizes of 3 x 3, 6 x 6, and 10 x 10 cm and thicknesses of 6, 8, and 10 mm. Using the Philips Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems, N.A., Bothwell, WA), a treatment plan was created for combinations of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, and 16 MeV and each field size. The same treatment plans were calculated using kVCT images of the phantom with regions-of-interest (ROI) manually drawn to duplicate the sizes, shapes, and density of the skin collimators. With few exceptions, the maximum dose differences exceeded +/-5% and the DTAs exceeded 2 mm. We determined that the dose differences were due to small distortions in the MVCT images created by the high density material and manifested as errors in the phantom CT numbers and in the shape of the skin collimator edges. These results suggest that MVCT images without skin collimation have potential for use in patient electron beam treatment planning. However, the small distortion in images with

  17. Scorpion image segmentation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E.; Aibinu, A. M.; Sadiq, B. A.; Bello Salau, H.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Death as a result of scorpion sting has been a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite the high rate of death as a result of scorpion sting, little report exists in literature of intelligent device and system for automatic detection of scorpion. This paper proposed a digital image processing approach based on the floresencing characteristics of Scorpion under Ultra-violet (UV) light for automatic detection and identification of scorpion. The acquired UV-based images undergo pre-processing to equalize uneven illumination and colour space channel separation. The extracted channels are then segmented into two non-overlapping classes. It has been observed that simple thresholding of the green channel of the acquired RGB UV-based image is sufficient for segmenting Scorpion from other background components in the acquired image. Two approaches to image segmentation have also been proposed in this work, namely, the simple average segmentation technique and K-means image segmentation. The proposed algorithm has been tested on over 40 UV scorpion images obtained from different part of the world and results obtained show an average accuracy of 97.7% in correctly classifying the pixel into two non-overlapping clusters. The proposed 1system will eliminate the problem associated with some of the existing manual approaches presently in use for scorpion detection.

  18. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k......Rad. The precision limits of the measurement of dose were found to be ±4%. The procedure was simple and the holographic equipment stable and compact, thus allowing experimentation under routine laboratory conditions and limited space....

  19. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  20. Beam characterisation of the KIRAMS electron microbeam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, G. M.; Kim, E. H.; Song, K. B.; Jang, M.

    2006-01-01

    An electron microbeam system has been installed at the Korea Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) for use in radiation biology studies. The electron beam is produced from a commercial electron gun, and the beam size is defined by a 5 μm diameter pinhole. Beam energy can be varied in the range of 1-100 keV, covering a range of linear energy transfer from 0.4 to 12.1 keV μm -1 . The micrometer-sized electron beam selectively irradiates cells cultured in a Mylar-bottomed dish. The positioning of target cells one by one onto the beam exit is automated, as is beam shooting. The electron beam entering the target cells has been calibrated using a Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector. This paper describes the KIRAMS microbeam cell irradiation system and its beam characteristics. (authors)

  1. Beam systems without failures - What can be done?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, M.; Uythoven, J.

    2012-01-01

    The beam dumps at 3.5 TeV triggered by interlocks not related to the magnet powering are discussed. This concerns the systems like the RF, the transverse feedbacks, beam instrumentation, beam dumping system, collimators and control systems. An analysis of the reasons of these dumps is presented together with a possible strategy to mitigate the effect of these failures. It is very important to notice that no system has been identified to have any structural problem

  2. A megavoltage scatter correction technique for cone-beam CT images acquired during VMAT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boylan, C J; Marchant, T E; Rowbottom, C G; Stratford, J; Rodgers, J; Malik, J; Choudhury, A; Shrimali, R

    2012-01-01

    Kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV CBCT) can be acquired during the delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), in order to obtain an image of the patient during treatment. However, the quality of such CBCTs is degraded by megavoltage (MV) scatter from the treatment beam onto the imaging panel. The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel MV scatter correction method for simultaneous CBCT during VMAT, and to investigate its effectiveness when compared to other techniques. The correction requires the acquisition of a separate set of images taken during VMAT delivery, while the kV beam is off. These images—which contain only the MV scatter contribution on the imaging panel—are then used to correct the corresponding kV/MV projections. To test this method, CBCTs were taken of an image quality phantom during VMAT delivery and measurements of contrast to noise ratio were made. Additionally, the correction was applied to the datasets of three VMAT prostate patients, who also received simultaneous CBCTs. The clinical image quality was assessed using a validated scoring system, comparing standard CBCTs to the uncorrected simultaneous CBCTs and a variety of correction methods. Results show that the correction is able to recover some of the low and high-contrast signal to noise ratio lost due to MV scatter. From the patient study, the corrected CBCT scored significantly higher than the uncorrected images in terms of the ability to identify the boundary between the prostate and surrounding soft tissue. In summary, a simple MV scatter correction method has been developed and, using both phantom and patient data, is shown to improve the image quality of simultaneous CBCTs taken during VMAT delivery. (paper)

  3. Method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiotherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Macey, Daniel J [Birmingham, AL; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2011-11-01

    A method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiation therapy beams is designed to preferentially distinguish and image low energy radiation from high energy secondary radiation emitted from a target as the result of therapeutic beam deposition. A detector having low sensitivity to high energy photons combined with a collimator designed to dynamically image in the region of the therapeutic beam target is used.

  4. Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Breese, M.B.H.; Prawer, S.; Dooley, S.P.; Allen, M.G.; Bettiol, A.A.; Saint, A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Ryan, C.G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1993-12-31

    The technique of Nuclear Microscopy, utilizing a focused ion probe of typically MeV H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions, can produce images where the contrast depends on typical Ion Beam Analysis (lBA) processes. The probe forming lens system usually utilizes strong focusing, precision magnetic quadrupole lenses and the probe is scanned over the target to produce images. Originally, this imaging technique was developed to utilize backscattered particles with incident beam currents typically of a few nA, and the technique became known as Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). Recently, the technique has been developed further to utilize the forward scattering of ions incident along a major crystal axis in thin crystals. This technique is known as Channeling Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (CSTIM). Since nearly all incident ions are detected, CSTIM is highly efficient and very low beam currents are sufficient for imaging, typically as low as a few fA. This allows probes as small as 50 nm to be used. In this paper we briefly review the recent applications of these emerging techniques to a variety of single crystal materials (authors). 13 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesseur, E. J. R.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide range of applications of nanoantennas operating both in receiving and transmitting mode. This thesis presents how the dispersion and confinement of surface plasmons in nanoantennas are resolved and further engineered. Fabrication of nanostructures is done using focused ion beam milling (FIB) in metallic surfaces. We demonstrate that patterning in single-crystal substrates allows us to precisely control the geometry in which plasmons are confined. The nanoscale properties of the resonant plasmonic fields are resolved using a new technique developed in this thesis: angle- and polarization controlled cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy. The use of a tightly focused electron beam allows us to probe the optical antenna properties with deep subwavelength resolution. We show using this technique that nanoantennas consisting of 500-1200 nm long polycrystalline Au nanowires support standing plasmon waves. We directly observe the plasmon wavelengths which we use to derive the dispersion relation of guided nanowire plasmons. A 590-nm-long ridge-shaped nanoantenna was fabricated using FIB milling on a single-crystal Au substrate, demonstrating a level of control over the fabrication impossible with polycrystalline metals. CL experiments show that the ridge supports multiple-order resonances. The confinement of surface plasmons to the ridge is confirmed by boundary-element-method (BEM) calculations. The resonant modes in plasmonic whispering gallery cavities consisting of a FIB-fabricated circular groove are resolved. We find an excellent agreement between boundary element method calculations and the measured CL emission from the ring-shaped cavities. The calculations show

  6. Comparative assessment of subjective image quality of cross-sectional cone-beam computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamburoglu, K.; Murat, S.; Kolsuz, E.; Kurt, H.; Paksoy, C.; Yueksel, S.

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), several novel systems with different technical specifications and settings have become commercially available. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate CBCT systems for differences in the subjective quality of images obtained for various dental procedures. We evaluated the subjective image quality of cross-sectional scans obtained from various CBCT systems. Images of three cadaver mandibles were obtained from four different CBCT units: Veraviewepocs 3D 40 x 40 mm field of view (FOV) (voxel size: 0.125 x 0.125 x 0.125 mm), Iluma, low-resolution (voxel size: 0.3 x 0.3 x 0.3 mm), Kodak, 50 x 3.7 cm field of view (FOV) (voxel size: 0.076 x 0.076 x 0.076 mm), and Vatech 12 x 8.5 cm FOV (voxel size: 0.160 x 0.160 x 0.160 mm). We assessed subjective image quality and the visibility of 10 specific features, namely, caries, amalgam restoration, final implant drill, root canal filling, metal crown, mandibular canal, mental foramen, tooth (periodontal ligament space and lamina dura), trabecular pattern, and soft tissue. Images were viewed and scored by five calibrated observers, and image quality was ranked from best to worst. The Veraviewepocs 3D had the highest quality images for most of the assessed features, whereas the Iluma low-resolution scans were rated as the lowest quality images. (author)

  7. Reliability Analysis of the new Link between the Beam Interlock System and the LHC Beam Dumping System Zuverlässigkeitsanalyse der neuen Verbindung zwischen dem Beam Interlock System und dem LHC Beam Dumping System

    CERN Document Server

    Vatansever, Volkan

    The nominal stored energy in each LHC beam is 360 MJ, surpassing the beam energy of other accelerators by orders of magnitude. This energy threatens to damage accelerator components in case of uncontrolled beam losses To avoid damage of accelerator equipment due to impacting beam, the controlled removal of the LHC beams from the collider rings towards the dump block must be guaranteed at all times. Therefore, the LHC Beam Dumping System was built according to high reliability standards. To further reduce the risk of incapability to dump the beams in case of correlated failures in the redundant system, a new direct link from the LHC Beam Interlock System to the Re-triggering Lines of the LHC Beam Dumping System will be implemented for the startup with beam in 2015. This link represents a diverse redundancy to the current implementation, which should neither significantly increase the risk for so-called Asynchronous Beam Dumps nor compromise machine availability. Therefore, a reliability analysis down to the co...

  8. Estimation of the optical errors on the luminescence imaging of water for proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Takuya; Komori, Masataka; Horita, Ryo; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2018-04-01

    Although luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation can be applied to range estimation, the height of the Bragg peak of the luminescence image was smaller than that measured with an ionization chamber. We hypothesized that the reasons of the difference were attributed to the optical phenomena; parallax errors of the optical system and the reflection of the luminescence from the water phantom. We estimated the errors cause by these optical phenomena affecting the luminescence image of water. To estimate the parallax error on the luminescence images, we measured the luminescence images during proton-beam irradiation using a cooled charge-coupled camera by changing the heights of the optical axis of the camera from those of the Bragg peak. When the heights of the optical axis matched to the depths of the Bragg peak, the Bragg peak heights in the depth profiles were the highest. The reflection of the luminescence of water with a black wall phantom was slightly smaller than that with a transparent phantom and changed the shapes of the depth profiles. We conclude that the parallax error significantly affects the heights of the Bragg peak and the reflection of the phantom affects the shapes of depth profiles of the luminescence images of water.

  9. Nonlinear wave-beam kinetic equilibrium in decelerating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.K.; Shaposhnikova, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    The equilibrium state of the wave-beam system arising during the interaction of a particle beam and excited electromagnetic wave has been investigated on the basis of the analysis of the exact polution of a non-linear self-consistent linear equation using the complete system of conservation laws. A waveguide with a dielectric filler, into which a monoenergetic particle beam magnetized in a transverse plane is continuously injected, is used as a model of an decelerating system. A dispersion equation describing the system state and expression for the evaluation of efficiency of the beam energy conversion to the field energy have been obtained. It is concluded that larae fields and high efficiency of energy conversion are achieved during the marked beam reconstruction. States with different values of current and beam velocity but similar amplitudes of a longitudinal field are possible in the system considered [ru

  10. An elementary presentation of the PS ''beam control'' system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, D.

    1973-01-01

    The PS synchrotron control system is explained in general terms, covering the topics of frequency control, beam transfer, damping, stability, conservation of longitudinal emittance, and second order problems

  11. A new cone beam computerized tomography system for use in endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumachi, T; Honda, K

    2007-03-01

    To present a newly developed cone beam computerized tomography system (3DX Micro-CT) and its application in endodontic surgery. Cone beam CT has attracted considerable attention as a new diagnostic imaging technique in dentistry. The assessment of fractured endodontic instruments and the planning of endodontic surgery present challenges that conventional radiography cannot meet successfully. In this report, the value of the 3DX cone beam computerized radiography system is illustrated by the case of a fractured endodontic instrument protruding into the maxillary sinus.

  12. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  13. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  14. High precision electron beam diagnostic system for high current long pulse beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y J; Fessenden, T; Holmes, C; Nelson, S D; Selchow, N.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using stripline kicker technology for DARHT II applications, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams (6-40 MeV, 1-4 kA, 2 microseconds) for accurate position control. The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (<20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt measurements performed using capacitive pick-off probes. Likewise, transmission line traveling wave probes have problems with multi-bounce effects due to these longer pulse widths. Finally, the high energy densities experienced in these applications distort typical foil beam position measurements

  15. Multispectral Panoramic Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — International Electronic Machines Corporation, a leader in the design of precision imaging systems, will develop an innovative multispectral, panoramic imaging...

  16. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm

  17. Design of a negative ion neutral beam system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easoz, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A conceptual design of a neutral beam line based on the neutralization of negative deuterium ions is presented. This work is a detailed design of a complete neutral beam line based on using negative ions from a direct extraction source. Anticipating major technological advancements, beam line components have been scaled including the negative ion sources and components for the direct energy recovery of charged beams and high speed cryogenic pumping. With application to the next step in experimental fusion reactors (TNS), the neutral beam injector system that has been designed provides 10 MW of 200 keV neutral deuterium atoms. Several arms are required for plasma ignition

  18. Transmit beams adapted to reverberation noise suppression using dual-frequency SURF imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsholm, Sven Peter; Hansen, Rune; Måsøy, Svein-Erik; Johansen, Tonni F; Angelsen, Bjørn A J

    2009-10-01

    A method that uses dual-frequency pulse complexes of widely separated frequency bands to suppress noise caused by multiple scattering or multiple reflections in medical ultrasound imaging is presented. The excitation pulse complexes are transmitted to generate a second order ultrasound field (SURF) imaging synthetic transmit beam. This beam has reduced amplitude near the transducer, which illustrates the multiple scattering suppression ability of the imaging method. Field simulations solving a nonlinear wave equation are used to calculate SURF imaging beams, which are compared with beams for pulse inversion (PI) and fundamental imaging. In addition, a combined SURF and PI beam generation is described and compared with the beams mentioned above. A quality ratio, relating the energy within the near-field to that within the imaging region, is defined and used to score the multiple scattering and multiple reflection suppression abilities when imaging with the different beams. The realized combined SURF-PI beam scores highest, followed by SURF, PI (that score equally well), and the fundamental. The amplitude in the imaging region and therefore also the SNR is highest for the fundamental followed by SURF, PI, and SURF-PI. The work hence indicates that when substituting PI for SURF, one may trade increased SNR into use of increased imaging frequencies without loss of multiple scattering and multiple reflection noise suppression.

  19. Image characteristics of cone beam computed tomography using a CT performance phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Choong Wan; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of (widely used) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Images were obtained with CT performance phantoms (The American Association of Physicists in Medicine; AAPM). CT phantom as the destination by using PSR 9000N TM dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Japan) and i-CAT CBCT (Imaging Science International Inc., USA) that have different kinds of detectors and field of view, and compared these images with the CT number for linear attenuation, contrast resolution, and spatial resolution. CT number of both PSR 9000N TM dental CT system and i-CAT CBCT did not conform to the base value of CT performance phantom. The contrast of i-CAT CBCT is higher than that of PSR 9000N T M dental CT system. Both contrasts were increased according to thickness of cross section. Spatial resolution and shapes of reappearance was possible up to 0.6 mm in PSR 9000N T M dental CT system and up to 1.0 mm in i-CAT CBCT. Low contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity revealed low level at PSR 9000N T M dental CT system and i-CAT CBCT. CBCT images revealed higher spatial resolution, however, contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity was the inferiority of image characteristics

  20. Non-contact high resolution Bessel beam probe for diagnostic imaging of cornea and trabecular meshwork region in eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murukeshan, V. M.; Jesmond, Hong Xun J.; Shinoj, V. K.; Baskaran, M.; Tin, Aung

    2015-07-01

    Primary angle closure glaucoma is a major form of disease that causes blindness in Asia and worldwide. In glaucoma, irregularities in the ocular aqueous outflow system cause an elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP) with subsequent death of retinal ganglion cells, resulting in loss of vision. High resolution visualization of the iridocorneal angle region has great diagnostic value in understanding the disease condition which enables monitoring of surgical interventions that decrease IOP. None of the current diagnostic techniques such as goniophotography, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and RetCam™ can image with molecular specificity and required spatial resolution that can delineate the trabecular meshwork structures. This paper in this context proposes new concepts and methodology using Bessel beams based illumination and imaging for such diagnostic ocular imaging applications. The salient features using Bessel beams instead of the conventional Gaussian beam, and the optimization challenges in configuring the probe system will be illustrated with porcine eye samples.

  1. State-of-the-art on cone beam CT imaging for preoperative planning of implant placement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrero, M.E.; Jacobs, R.; Loubele, M.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Suetens, P.; Steenberghe, D van

    2006-01-01

    Orofacial diagnostic imaging has grown dramatically in recent years. As the use of endosseous implants has revolutionized oral rehabilitation, a specialized technique has become available for the preoperative planning of oral implant placement: cone beam computed tomography (CT). This imaging

  2. Metal artefact reduction for a dental cone beam CT image using image segmentation and backprojection filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Khotanlou, Hassan; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Due to low dose delivery and fast scanning, the dental Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is the latest technology being implanted for a range of dental imaging. The presence of metallic objects including amalgam or gold fillings in the mouth produces an intuitive image for human jaws. The feasibility of a fast and accurate approach for metal artefact reduction for dental CBCT is investigated. The current study investigates the metal artefact reduction using image segmentation and modification of several sinigrams. In order to reduce metal effects such as beam hardening, streak artefact and intense noises, the application of several algorithms is evaluated. The proposed method includes three stages: preprocessing, reconstruction and post-processing. In the pre-processing stage, in order to reduce the noise level, several phase and frequency filters were applied. At the second stage, based on the specific sinogram achieved for each segment, spline interpolation and weighting backprojection filters were applied to reconstruct the original image. A three-dimensional filter was then applied on reconstructed images, to improve the image quality. Results showed that compared to other available filters, standard frequency filters have a significant influence in the preprocessing stage (ΔHU = 48 ± 6). In addition, with the streak artefact, the probability of beam hardening artefact increases. t e post-processing stage, the application of three-dimensional filters improves the quality of reconstructed images (See Fig. I). Conclusion The proposed method reduces metal artefacts especially where there are more than one metal implanted in the region of interest.

  3. Accurate technique for complete geometric calibration of cone-beam computed tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho Youngbin; Moseley, Douglas J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography systems have been developed to provide in situ imaging for the purpose of guiding radiation therapy. Clinical systems have been constructed using this approach, a clinical linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy RP) and an iso-centric C-arm. Geometric calibration involves the estimation of a set of parameters that describes the geometry of such systems, and is essential for accurate image reconstruction. We have developed a general analytic algorithm and corresponding calibration phantom for estimating these geometric parameters in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) systems. The performance of the calibration algorithm is evaluated and its application is discussed. The algorithm makes use of a calibration phantom to estimate the geometric parameters of the system. The phantom consists of 24 steel ball bearings (BBs) in a known geometry. Twelve BBs are spaced evenly at 30 deg in two plane-parallel circles separated by a given distance along the tube axis. The detector (e.g., a flat panel detector) is assumed to have no spatial distortion. The method estimates geometric parameters including the position of the x-ray source, position, and rotation of the detector, and gantry angle, and can describe complex source-detector trajectories. The accuracy and sensitivity of the calibration algorithm was analyzed. The calibration algorithm estimates geometric parameters in a high level of accuracy such that the quality of CT reconstruction is not degraded by the error of estimation. Sensitivity analysis shows uncertainty of 0.01 deg. (around beam direction) to 0.3 deg. (normal to the beam direction) in rotation, and 0.2 mm (orthogonal to the beam direction) to 4.9 mm (beam direction) in position for the medical linear accelerator geometry. Experimental measurements using a laboratory bench Cone-beam CT system of known geometry demonstrate the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in the imaging geometry with an uncertainty of 0.1 mm in

  4. Cone beam CT imaging with limited angle of projections and prior knowledge for volumetric verification of non-coplanar beam radiation therapy: a proof of concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Bowen; Xing, Lei; Han, Bin; Koong, Albert; Chang, Daniel; Li, Ruijiang; Cheng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Non-coplanar beams are important for treatment of both cranial and noncranial tumors. Treatment verification of such beams with couch rotation/kicks, however, is challenging, particularly for the application of cone beam CT (CBCT). In this situation, only limited and unconventional imaging angles are feasible to avoid collision between the gantry, couch, patient, and on-board imaging system. The purpose of this work is to develop a CBCT verification strategy for patients undergoing non-coplanar radiation therapy. We propose an image reconstruction scheme that integrates a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) technique with image registration. Planning CT or CBCT acquired at the neutral position is rotated and translated according to the nominal couch rotation/translation to serve as the initial prior image. Here, the nominal couch movement is chosen to have a rotational error of 5° and translational error of 8 mm from the ground truth in one or more axes or directions. The proposed reconstruction scheme alternates between two major steps. First, an image is reconstructed using the PICCS technique implemented with total-variation minimization and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction. Second, the rotational/translational setup errors are corrected and the prior image is updated by applying rigid image registration between the reconstructed image and the previous prior image. The PICCS algorithm and rigid image registration are alternated iteratively until the registration results fall below a predetermined threshold. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is evaluated with an anthropomorphic digital phantom and physical head phantom. The proposed algorithm provides useful volumetric images for patient setup using projections with an angular range as small as 60°. It reduced the translational setup errors from 8 mm to generally <1 mm and the rotational setup errors from 5° to <1°. Compared with the PICCS algorithm alone, the integration of rigid

  5. Beam current control system for a high-voltage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razin, G.I.; Val'tman, D.S.; Timofeev, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    A flowsheet of the beam current control system for commercial accelerators is given. Setting and stabilization of a given beam current value are accomplished by the automatic change of a current of a diode electron gun heater or potential of a qrid of three-electrode gun. Beam current coming to an electron-optical converter generates a control signal supplying electron gun. The system operates in the beam current stabilization regime as well as in the radiation dose stabilization regime. The system response amounts to [ru

  6. Double deflection system for an electron beam device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, N.W.; Crewe, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    A double deflection scanning system for electron beam instruments is provided embodying a means of correcting isotropic coma, and anisotropic coma aberrations induced by the magnetic lens of such an instrument. The scanning system deflects the beam prior to entry into the magnetic lens from the normal on-axis intersection of the beam with the lens according to predetermined formulas and thereby reduces the aberrations

  7. Radiographic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L. Jr.; Barrett, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    This invention describes a system for imaging a subject, such as a human being, in which there has been injected a contrast agent which absorbs radiation of a predetermined frequency. The system utilizes a source of high energy radiation such as X or gamma radiation. The source is a composite of first and second radiating materials each of which is arranged in a predetermined pattern or code, each pattern having both luminous and dark regions. In one embodiment, the luminous regions of one pattern are in registration with the dark regions of the other pattern, these regions being spaced apart in an alternative embodiment. The characteristic frequencies of radiation emitted by the first and second materials are respectively lower and higher than the predetermined absorption frequency. A detector of radiation is positioned relative to the subject and the source such that radiation propagating through the subject is incident upon the detector. Since the absorption edge of the contrast agent lies between the two characteristic frequencies of radiation, radiation from the second material is preferentially absorbed by the contrast agent with the result that the contrast agent appears to be illuminated by a coded source while the remainder of the subject may be regarded as illuminated essentially by a uniform uncoded source. Imaging is accomplished by a decoding of a detected coded image. Substances within the subject having other absorption frequencies are not imaged since the radiations of both materials are essentially equally absorbed by the subject so that the source appears uncoded

  8. Impact of large x-ray beam collimation on image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Damien; Ba, Alexandre; Ott, Julien G.; Bochud, François O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2016-03-01

    Large X-ray beam collimation in computed tomography (CT) opens the way to new image acquisition techniques and improves patient management for several clinical indications. The systems that offer large X-ray beam collimation enable, in particular, a whole region of interest to be investigated with an excellent temporal resolution. However, one of the potential drawbacks of this option might be a noticeable difference in image quality along the z-axis when compared with the standard helical acquisition mode using more restricted X-ray beam collimations. The aim of this project is to investigate the impact of the use of large X-ray beam collimation and new iterative reconstruction on noise properties, spatial resolution and low contrast detectability (LCD). An anthropomorphic phantom and a custom made phantom were scanned on a GE Revolution CT. The images were reconstructed respectively with ASIR-V at 0% and 50%. Noise power spectra, to evaluate the noise properties, and Target Transfer Functions, to evaluate the spatial resolution, were computed. Then, a Channelized Hotelling Observer with Gabor and Dense Difference of Gaussian channels was used to evaluate the LCD using the Percentage correct as a figure of merit. Noticeable differences of 3D noise power spectra and MTF have been recorded; however no significant difference appeared when dealing with the LCD criteria. As expected the use of iterative reconstruction, for a given CTDIvol level, allowed a significant gain in LCD in comparison to ASIR-V 0%. In addition, the outcomes of the NPS and TTF metrics led to results that would contradict the outcomes of CHO model observers if used for a NPWE model observer (Non- Prewhitening With Eye filter). The unit investigated provides major advantages for cardiac diagnosis without impairing the image quality level of standard chest or abdominal acquisitions.

  9. Computerized treatment planning systems for external photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Computerized treatment planning systems (TPSs) are used in external beam radiotherapy to generate beam shapes and dose distributions with the intent to maximize tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. Patient anatomy and tumour targets can be represented as 3-D models. The entire process of treatment planning involves many steps and the medical physicist is responsible for the overall integrity of the computerized TPS to accurately and reliably produce dose distributions and associated calculations for external beam radiotherapy. The planning itself is most commonly carried out by a dosimetrist, and the plan must be approved by a radiation oncologist before implementation in actual patient treatments. Treatment planning prior to the 1970s was generally carried out through the manual manipulation of standard isodose charts on to patient body contours that were generated by direct tracing or lead wire representation, and relied heavily on the judicious choice of beam weight and wedging by an experienced dosimetrist. The simultaneous development of computed tomography (CT), along with the advent of readily accessible computing power from the 1970s on, led to the development of CT based computerized treatment planning, providing the ability to view dose distributions directly superimposed upon a patient's axial anatomy. The entire treatment planning process involves many steps, beginning from beam data acquisition and entry into the computerized TPS, through patient data acquisition, to treatment plan generation and the final transfer of data to the treatment machine. Successive improvements in treatment planning hardware and software have been most notable in the graphics, calculation and optimization aspects of current systems. Systems encompassing the 'Virtual Patient' are able to display beam's eye views (BEVs) of radiation beams and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for arbitrary dose distributions. Dose calculations have evolved from

  10. Quality assessment and enhancement for cone-beam computed tomography in dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Sung Chae

    2006-02-01

    Cone-beam CT will become increasingly important in diagnostic imaging modality in the dental practice over the next decade. For dental diagnostic imaging, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system based on large area flat panel imager has been designed and developed for three-dimensional volumetric image. The new CBCT system can provide a 3-D volumetric image during only one circular scanning with relatively short times (20-30 seconds) and requires less radiation dose than that of conventional CT. To reconstruct volumetric image from 2-D projection images, FDK algorithm was employed. The prototype of our CBCT system gives the promising results that can be efficiently diagnosed. This dissertation deals with assessment, enhancement, and optimization for dental cone-beam computed tomography with high performance. A new blur estimation method was proposed, namely model based estimation algorithm. Based on the empirical model of the PSF, an image restoration is applied to radiological images. The accuracy of the PSF estimation under Poisson noise and readout electronic noise is significantly better for the R-L estimator than the Wiener estimator. In the image restoration experiment, the result showed much better improvement in the low and middle range of spatial frequency. Our proposed algorithm is more simple and effective method to determine 2-D PSF of the x-ray imaging system than traditional methods. Image based scatter correction scheme to reduce the scatter effects was proposed. This algorithm corrects scatter on projection images based on convolution, scatter fraction, and angular interpolation. The scatter signal was estimated by convolving a projection image with scatter point spread function (SPSF) followed by multiplication with scatter fraction. Scatter fraction was estimated using collimator which is similar to SPECS method. This method does not require extra x-ray dose and any additional phantom. Maximum estimated error for interpolation was less than 7

  11. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, C.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the

  12. LHC Beam Dump System: Analysis of beam commissioning, performance and the consequences of abnormal operation

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The LHC accelerates proton beams to a momentum of up to 7 TeV/c. At this energy level and with nominal beam intensity the stored energy of 360 MJ per beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper. In addition up to 10 GJ are stored within the LHC magnet system at top energy. It is obvious that such a machine needs well designed safety and protection systems. The LHC Beam Dump System (LBDS) is such a system and one of the most critical once concerning machine protection and safe operation. It is used to dispose of high intensity beams between 450 GeV and 7 TeV and is thus designed to fast extract beam in a loss free way and to transfer it to an external absorber. For each ring systems of 15 horizontal fast kicker magnets (MKD), 15 vertically deflecting magnetic septa (MSD) and 10 diluter kicker magnets (MKB) are installed. This thesis is concerned with the analysis of the LBDS performance under normal operating parameters as well as under abnormal conditions like in the event of asynchronous beam abort or missin...

  13. Experimental study on beam for composite CES structural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tomoya

    2017-10-01

    Development study on Concrete Encase Steel (CES) composite structure system has been continuously conducted toward the practical use. CES structure is composed of steel and fiber reinforced concrete. In previous study, it was found that CES structure has good seismic performance from experimental study of columns, beam - column joints, shear walls and a two story two span frame. However, as fundamental study on CES beam could be lacking, it is necessary to understand the structural performance of CES beam. In this study, static loading tests of CES beams were conducted with experimental valuable of steel size, the presence or absence of slab and thickness of slab. And restoring characteristics, failure behavior, deformation behavior, and strength evaluation method of CES beam were investigated. As the results, it was found that CES beam showed stable hysteresis behavior. Furthermore it was found that the flexural strength of the CES beam could be evaluated by superposition strength theory.

  14. Enhancement of image quality with a fast iterative scatter and beam hardening correction method for kV CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Irmtraud; Hesse, Bernd-Michael; Nill, Simeon; Tuecking, Thomas; Oelfke, Uwe [DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The problem of the enormous amount of scattered radiation in kV CBCT (kilo voltage cone beam computer tomography) is addressed. Scatter causes undesirable streak- and cup-artifacts and results in a quantitative inaccuracy of reconstructed CT numbers, so that an accurate dose calculation might be impossible. Image contrast is also significantly reduced. Therefore we checked whether an appropriate implementation of the fast iterative scatter correction algorithm we have developed for MV (mega voltage) CBCT reduces the scatter contribution in a kV CBCT as well. This scatter correction method is based on a superposition of pre-calculated Monte Carlo generated pencil beam scatter kernels. The algorithm requires only a system calibration by measuring homogeneous slab phantoms with known water-equivalent thicknesses. In this study we compare scatter corrected CBCT images of several phantoms to the fan beam CT images acquired with a reduced cone angle (a slice-thickness of 14 mm in the isocenter) at the same system. Additional measurements at a different CBCT system were made (different energy spectrum and phantom-to-detector distance) and a first order approach of a fast beam hardening correction will be introduced. The observed, image quality of the scatter corrected CBCT images is comparable concerning resolution, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio to the images acquired in fan beam geometry. Compared to the CBCT without any corrections the contrast of the contrast-and-resolution phantom with scatter correction and additional beam hardening correction is improved by a factor of about 1.5. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients and the CT numbers of the scatter corrected CBCT images are close to the values of the images acquired in fan beam geometry for the most pronounced tissue types. Only for extreme dense tissue types like cortical bone we see a difference in CT numbers of 5.2%, which can be improved to 4.4% with the additional beam hardening correction. Cupping

  15. A Large Aperture UWB Antenna Array for Real Beam Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsiang Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of four-element ultra-wideband (UWB comb taper slot antenna array with 18 cm element spacing for real beam radar imaging is described. The four-element UWB array system with optimum element spacing is analyzed by energy pattern. A wideband double ridge horn antenna is used as the transmitting antenna, the developed large aperture UWB array is used as the receiving antenna. The transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna are combined with impulse time domain measurement system to achieve real beam radar imaging. The receiving impulse signals at various positions are processed by the time delay and sum algorithm. The examples of several aluminum cans have been verified in the resolution and compared with using the UWB array as a receive antenna and the double ridge horn as a transmit antenna in the test setup. The crossrange resolution of UWB antenna array is better than wideband double ridge horn antenna because the beam width of UWB array is narrower.

  16. [Role of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnostic otorhinolaryngological imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perényi, Ádám; Bella, Zsolt; Baráth, Zoltán; Magyar, Péter; Nagy, Katalin; Rovó, László

    2016-01-10

    Accurate diagnosis and preoperative planning in modern otorhinolaryngology is strongly supported by imaging with enhanced visualization. Computed tomography is often used to examine structures within bone frameworks. Given the hazards of ionizing radiation, repetitive imaging studies exponentially increase the risk of damages to radiosensitive tissues. The authors compare multislice and cone-beam computed tomography and determine the role, advantages and disadvantages of cone-beam computed tomography in otorhinolaryngological imaging. They summarize the knowledge from the international literature and their individual imaging studies. They conclude that cone-beam computed tomography enables high-resolution imaging and reconstruction in any optional plane and in space with considerably lower effective radiation dose. Cone-beam computed tomography with appropriate indications proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool in otorhinolaryngological imaging. It makes an alternative to multislice computed tomography and it is an effective tool in perioperative and postoperative follow-up, especially in those cases which necessitate repetitive imaging with computed tomography.

  17. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  18. Data acquisition system for medium power neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1978-06-01

    The Medium Power Neutral Beam Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed in order to develop, test, and condition powerful neutral beam lines for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors source performance, beam characteristics, and power deposition profiles to determine if the beam line is operating up to its design specifications. The speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. Analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  19. Data acquisition system for PLT Neutral Beam Test Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The PLT Neutral Beam Test Stand at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed to test and condition powerful neutral beam sources for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors the beam characteristics and power output to determine if the beam is operating at its design specifications. The high speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. The analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  20. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography imaging with physical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratemann, S A; Huang, J C; Maki, K; Miller, A J; Hatcher, D C

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring linear distances between landmarks commonly used in orthodontic analysis on a human skull using two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems. Measurements of length were taken using volumetric data from two CBCT systems and were compared with physical measures using a calliper applied to one human adult skull. Landmarks were identified with chromium steel balls embedded at 32 cranial and 33 mandibular landmarks and the linear measures were taken with a digital calliper. The skull was then scanned with two different CBCT systems: the NewTom QR DVT 9000 (Aperio Inc, Sarasota, FL) and the Hitachi MercuRay (Hitachi Medico Technology, Tokyo, Japan). CT data including the landmark point data were threshold segmented using CyberMed's CB Works software (CB Works 1.0, CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The resulting segmentations were exported from CB Works as VRML (WRL) files to Amira software (Amira 3.1, Mercury Computer Systems GmbH, Berlin, Germany). The error was small compared with the gold standard of the physical calliper measures for both the NewTom (0.07+/-0.41 mm) and CB MercuRay (0.00+/-0.22 mm) generated data. Absolute error to the gold standard was slightly positive, indicating minor compression relative to the calliper measurement. The error was slightly smaller in the CB MercuRay than in the NewTom, probably related to a broader greyscale range for describing beam attenuation in 12-bit vs 8-bit data. The volumetric data rendered with both CBCT systems provided highly accurate data compared with the gold standard of physical measures directly from the skulls, with less than 1% relative error.

  1. Collected abstracts on particle beam diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains a compilation of abstracts on work related to particle beam diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. The abstracts were gathered in early 1978 and represent the status of the various programs as of that date. It is not suggested that this is a comprehensive list of all the work that is going on in the development of particle beam diagnostics, but it does provide a representative view of the work in this field. For example, no abstracts were received from the U.S.S.R. even though they have considerable activity in particle beam diagnostics

  2. Engineering aspects of particle beam fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy is supporting research directed toward demonstration of DT fuel ignition in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As part of the ICF effort, two major Particle Beam Fusion Accelerators (PBFA I and II) are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories with the objective of providing energetic light ion beams of sufficient power density for target implosion. Supporting light ion beam research is being performed at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Cornell University. If the answers to several key physics and engineering questions are favorable, pulsed power accelerators will be able to provide an efficient and inexpensive approach to high target gain and eventual power production applications

  3. Heart Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center's device to test astronauts' heart function in microgravity has led to the MultiWire Gamma Camera, which images heart conditions six times faster than conventional devices. Dr. Jeffrey Lacy, who developed the technology as a NASA researcher, later formed Proportional Technologies, Inc. to develop a commercially viable process that would enable use of Tantalum-178 (Ta-178), a radio-pharmaceutical. His company supplies the generator for the radioactive Ta-178 to Xenos Medical Systems, which markets the camera. Ta-178 can only be optimally imaged with the camera. Because the body is subjected to it for only nine minutes, the radiation dose is significantly reduced and the technique can be used more frequently. Ta-178 also enables the camera to be used on pediatric patients who are rarely studied with conventional isotopes because of the high radiation dosage.

  4. On-line image guided radiation therapy using cone-beam CT (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Jin O; Park, Suk Won; Jeong, Kyung Keun; Keum, Ki Chang

    2006-01-01

    Using cone beam CT, we can compare the position of the patients at the simulation and the treatment. In on-line image guided radiation therapy, one can utilize this compared data and correct the patient position before treatments. Using cone beam CT, we investigated the errors induced by setting up the patients when use only the markings on the patients' skin. We obtained the data of three patients that received radiation therapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology in Chung-Ang University during August 2006 and October 2006. Just as normal radiation therapy, patients were aligned on the treatment couch after the simulation and treatment planning. Patients were aligned with lasers according to the marking on the skin that were marked at the simulation time and then cone beam CTs were obtained. Cone beam CTs were fused and compared with simulation CTs and the displacement vectors were calculated. Treatment couches were adjusted according to the displacement vector before treatments. After the treatment, positions were verified with kV X-ray (OBI system). In the case of head and neck patients, the average sizes of the setup error vectors, given by the cone beam CT, were 0.19 cm for the patient A and 0.18 cm for the patient B. The standard deviations were 0.15 cm and 0.21 cm, each. On the other hand, in the case of the pelvis patient, the average and the standard deviation were 0.37 cm and 01 cm. Through the on-line IGRT using cone beam CT, were could correct the setup errors that could occur in the conventional radiotherapy. The importance of the on-line IGRT should be emphasized in the case of 3D conformal therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy, which have complex target shapes and steep dose gradients

  5. Triangular SPECT system for 3-D total organ volume imaging: Design concept and preliminary imaging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.B.; Anderson, J.; Covic, J.

    1985-01-01

    SPECT systems based on 2-D detectors for projection data collection and filtered back-projection image reconstruction have the potential for true 3-D imaging, providing contiguous slice images in any orientation. Anger camera-based SPECT systems have the natural advantage supporting planar imaging clinical procedures. However, current systems suffer from two drawbacks; poor utilization of emitted photons, and inadequate system design for SPECT. A SPECT system consisting of three rectangular cameras with radial translation would offer the variable cylindrical FOV of 25 cm to 40 cm diameter allowing close detector access to the object. This system would provide optimized imaging for both brain and body organs in terms of sensitivity and resolution. For brain imaging a tight detector triangle with fan beam collimation, matching detector UFOV to the head, allows full 2 π utilization of emitted photons, resulting in >4 times sensitivity increase over the single detector system. Minification of intrinsic detector resolution in fan beam collimation further improves system resolution. For body organ imaging the three detectors with parallel hole collimators, rotating in non-circular orbit, provide both improved resolution and three-fold sensitivity increase. Practical challenges lie in ensuring perfect image overlap from three detectors without resolution degradation and artifact generation in order to benefit from the above improvements. An experimental system has been developed to test the above imaging concept and we have successfully demonstrated the superior image quality of the overlapped images. Design concept will be presented with preliminary imaging results

  6. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for image-guided tibial plateau fracture reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, A; Siewerdsen, J H; Whyne, C M; Daly, M J; Kreder, H J; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A

    2007-07-01

    A mobile isocentric C-arm was modified in our laboratory in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions to include a large-area flat-panel detector providing multi-mode fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. This technology is an important advance over existing intraoperative imaging (e.g., Iso-C(3D)), offering superior image quality, increased field of view, higher spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility. The aim of this study was to assess the system's performance and image quality in tibial plateau (TP) fracture reconstruction. Three TP fractures were simulated in fresh-frozen cadaveric knees through combined axial loading and lateral impact. The fractures were reduced through a lateral approach and assessed by fluoroscopy. The reconstruction was then assessed using CBCT. If necessary, further reduction and localization of remaining displaced bone fragments was performed using CBCT images for guidance. CBCT image quality was assessed with respect to projection speed, dose and filtering technique. CBCT imaging provided exquisite visualization of articular details, subtle fragment detection and localization, and confirmation of reduction and implant placement. After fluoroscopic images indicated successful initial reduction, CBCT imaging revealed areas of malalignment and displaced fragments. CBCT facilitated fragment localization and improved anatomic reduction. CBCT image noise increased gradually with reduced dose, but little difference in images resulted from increased projections. High-resolution reconstruction provided better delineation of plateau depressions. This study demonstrated a clear advantage of intraoperative CBCT over 2D fluoroscopy and Iso-C(3D) in TP fracture fixation. CBCT imaging provided benefits in fracture type diagnosis, localization of fracture fragments, and intraoperative 3D confirmation of anatomic reduction.

  7. Investigation of the radiation dose from cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy: A comparison of methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jarryd G; Wilkinson, Dean; Malaroda, Alessandra; Metcalfe, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Four methodologies were evaluated for quantifying kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dose: the Cone-Beam Dose Index (CBDI), IAEA Report 5 recommended methodology (IAEA), the AAPM Task Group 111 methodology (TG111), and the current dose metric; the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) on two commercial Varian cone-beam CT imaging systems; the Clinac iX On-Board Imager (OBI); and the TrueBeam X-ray Imaging system (XI). The TG111 methodology measured the highest overall dose (21.199 ± 0.035 mGy OBI and 22.420 ± 0.002 XI for pelvis imaging) due to the full scatter of the TG111 phantom and was within 5% of CTDI measurements taken using a full scatter TG111 phantom and 30-cm film strips. CBDI measured the second highest overall dose, within 10% of the TG111, with IAEA measuring the third highest dose. For head CBCT protocols, CBDI measured the highest dose, followed by IAEA. The CTDI method measured lowest across all scan modes highlighting its limitations for CBCT dosimetry. The XI imaging system delivered lower doses for head and thorax scan modes and similar doses to the OBI system for pelvis scan modes due to additional beam hardening filtration in the XI system. The TG111 method measured the highest dose in the center of a CBCT scan during image guidance procedures; however, CBDI provided a good approximation to TG111 with existing CTDI equipment and may be more applicable clinically. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Slow beam raster system at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, C.; Beaufait, J.; Carlini, R.; Cuevas, C.; Vulcan, W.; Wines, R.

    1994-01-01

    A bedstead air-core raster magnet is being installed now, it will be used at CEBAF to scan the beam on the Hall C polarized target and the beam dump with fixed frequency 60 Hz in horizontal, 103.4 Hz in vertical. The x and y raster magnets are driven by Variac transformer and SUMIT-OMO inverter respectively. Both of them provide an approximate sine current waveform with peak current 20 A, corresponding to a maximum deflection angle 1 mr

  9. A system for online beam emittance measurements and proton beam characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesteruk, K. P.; Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Carzaniga, T. S.; Ereditato, A.; Scampoli, P.

    2018-01-01

    A system for online measurement of the transverse beam emittance was developed. It is named 4PrOBεaM (4-Profiler Online Beam Emittance Measurement) and was conceived to measure the emittance in a fast and efficient way using the multiple beam profiler method. The core of the system is constituted by four consecutive UniBEaM profilers, which are based on silica fibers passing across the beam. The 4PrOBεaM system was deployed for characterization studies of the 18 MeV proton beam produced by the IBA Cyclone 18 MeV cyclotron at Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). The machine serves daily radioisotope production and multi-disciplinary research, which is carried out with a specifically conceived Beam Transport Line (BTL). The transverse RMS beam emittance of the cyclotron was measured as a function of several machine parameters, such as the magnetic field, RF peak voltage, and azimuthal angle of the stripper. The beam emittance was also measured using the method based on the quadrupole strength variation. The results obtained with both techniques were compared and a good agreement was found. In order to characterize the longitudinal dynamics, the proton energy distribution was measured. For this purpose, a method was developed based on aluminum absorbers of different thicknesses, a UniBEaM detector, and a Faraday cup. The results were an input for a simulation of the BTL developed in the MAD-X software. This tool allows machine parameters to be tuned online and the beam characteristics to be optimized for specific applications.

  10. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  11. Tomographic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Horiba, I.; Kohno, H.; Nakaya, C.; Sekihara, K.; Shiono, H.; Tomura, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yanaka, S.

    1980-01-01

    A tomographic imaging system comprising: irradiating means for irradating a cross-section of an object under consideration with radiation rays from plural directions; detector means for detecting the radiation rays transmitted through the cross-section of said object to produce an output signal; first memory means for storing the output signal of said detector means; and an image jreconstructing section for performing a convolution integral operation on the contents of said first memory means by means of a first weighting function to reconstruct a three-dimensional image of the cross-section of said object, said image reconstructing section including (I) second memory means for storing a second weighting function, said second weighting function being provided with a predetermined positive and negative (N-1)th order when the output signal of said detector means produced by the irradiation of the cross-section of said object from one of said plural directions is sampled by N points, the value of the (N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the (N-1)th order to positive infinity and the value of -(N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the -(N-1)th order to negative infinity, (II) control means for successively reading out the contents of said first and second memory means, and (III) operational means for performing multiplying and summing operations on the read-out contents of said first and second memory means, said operational means producing the product of the values fo the (N-1)th and -(N-1)th orders of said second weighting function and a component of the output signal of said detector means relating to the radiation rays free from the absorption thereof by said object

  12. LHCb: A novel method for an absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb using beam-gas imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used van der Meer scan method (VDM). This poster presents the principles of the Beam Gas Imaging method used to measure the beam overlap integral. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch.

  13. Can Neutron Beam Components and Radiographic Image Quality be determined by the Use of Beam Purity and Sensitivity Indicators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    radiography f a c i l i t i e s of the European Community. The direct, transfer and track-etch methods using different f i lm recording materials were used. Neutron beam components were calculated from film density measurements under the beam purity indicators and radiographic image quality was assessed......In the Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group Test Program beam purity and s e n s i t i v i t y indicators, as prescribed by the ASTM E 545-81 were used together with the NRWG beam purity i n d i c a t o r - f u e l and c a l i b r a t i o n fuel pin. They were radiographed together at neutron...

  14. A beam energy measurement system at NIRS-930 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Miyahara, N.; Okada, T.; Komatsu, K.; Tsuji, N.; Yamada, S.

    2005-01-01

    A beam energy measurement system employing a set of capacitive probes has been developed at NIRS-930 cyclotron. Principle of the measurement is applying a modified-TOF method, so that the two proves are installed at one of the straight section in the beam transport line. Usually they are separated about 5.8 m, which is equivalent to the almost final path length of the beam extracted in the cyclotron. In the measurement, two beam signals are superimposed by adjusting a position of the downstream-probe along the beam direction with watching an oscilloscope screen roughly. In order to determine the beam energy accurately the signals are processed by MCA with suitable electric module. (author)

  15. Automatic segmentation of maxillofacial cysts in cone beam CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Fatemeh; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaeizadeh; Otake, Yoshito; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    Accurate segmentation of cysts and tumors is an essential step for diagnosis, monitoring and planning therapeutic intervention. This task is usually done manually, however manual identification and segmentation is tedious. In this paper, an automatic method based on asymmetry analysis is proposed which is general enough to segment various types of jaw cysts. The key observation underlying this approach is that normal head and face structure is roughly symmetric with respect to midsagittal plane: the left part and the right part can be divided equally by an axis of symmetry. Cysts and tumors typically disturb this symmetry. The proposed approach consists of three main steps as follows: At first, diffusion filtering is used for preprocessing and symmetric axis is detected. Then, each image is divided into two parts. In the second stage, free form deformation (FFD) is used to correct slight displacement of corresponding pixels of the left part and a reflected copy of the right part. In the final stage, intensity differences are analyzed and a number of constraints are enforced to remove false positive regions. The proposed method has been validated on 97 Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) sets containing various jaw cysts which were collected from various image acquisition centers. Validation is performed using three similarity indicators (Jaccard index, Dice's coefficient and Hausdorff distance). The mean Dice's coefficient of 0.83, 0.87 and 0.80 is achieved for Radicular, Dentigerous and KCOT classes, respectively. For most of the experiments done, we achieved high true positive (TP). This means that a large number of cyst pixels are correctly classified. Quantitative results of automatic segmentation show that the proposed method is more effective than one of the recent methods in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Aubin, Michele; Chen, Josephine; Descovich, Martina; Hashemi, Ali-Bani; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  17. Wave Propagation in an Ion Beam-Plasma System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T. D.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1979-01-01

    The spatial evolution of a velocity- or density-modulated ion beam is calculated for stable and unstable ion beam plasma systems, using the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equations. The propagation properties are found to be strongly dependent on the form of modulation. In the case of velocity...

  18. A Large Aperture UWB Antenna Array for Real Beam Radar Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chao-Hsiang; Chang, Dau-Chyrh

    2012-01-01

    The development of four-element ultra-wideband (UWB) comb taper slot antenna array with 18 cm element spacing for real beam radar imaging is described. The four-element UWB array system with optimum element spacing is analyzed by energy pattern. A wideband double ridge horn antenna is used as the transmitting antenna, the developed large aperture UWB array is used as the receiving antenna. The transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna are combined with impulse time domain measurement sys...

  19. [Digital volume tomography : Dedicated scanner and cone beam CT with C‑arm systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebich, M; Weber, D

    2018-03-01

    Digital volume tomography (DVT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) with C‑arm systems have become established three-dimensional imaging systems as an alternative to CT in some application areas. The technology of the systems is well developed so that they have become a competing method to CT imaging in terms of image quality and radiation exposure. An advantage is the better spatial resolution, preferably with dedicated scanner systems, especially in the z direction. The radiation exposure of CT, cone beam CT and DVT are comparable, if the exposure parameter in CT imaging can be adjusted to the lower exposure levels. Advantages of these systems are that they can be used for imaging in a better workflow or to acquire images under conditions not possible in CT, e. g. imaging under stress in orthopedics or to take images in the corona technique with a horizontal gantry in cone-beam CT mammography PRACTICAL RECOMMENDATIONS: The use of three-dimensional imaging is becoming more frequent and will replace planar radiography in additional clinical situations. The three-dimensional imaging without superpositioning of structures has advantages in the visibility of structures and the spatial relation to other organs and structures. In guidelines and recommendations, the number of recommendations given for the use of three-dimensional imaging is increasing. This leads to a small increase in the radiation exposure of patients, a trend which is reflected in the annual reports of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection.

  20. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  1. Beam Position and Phase Monitor - Wire Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Heath A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shurter, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-10

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) deploys many cylindrical beam position and phase monitors (BPPM) throughout the linac to measure the beam central position, phase and bunched-beam current. Each monitor is calibrated and qualified prior to installation to insure it meets LANSCE requirements. The BPPM wire mapping system is used to map the BPPM electrode offset, sensitivity and higher order coefficients. This system uses a three-axis motion table to position the wire antenna structure within the cavity, simulating the beam excitation of a BPPM at a fundamental frequency of 201.25 MHz. RF signal strength is measured and recorded for the four electrodes as the antenna position is updated. An effort is underway to extend the systems service to the LANSCE facility by replacing obsolete electronic hardware and taking advantage of software enhancements. This paper describes the upgraded wire positioning system's new hardware and software capabilities including its revised antenna structure, motion control interface, RF measurement equipment and Labview software upgrades. The main purpose of the wire mapping system at LANSCE is to characterize the amplitude response versus beam central position of BPPMs before they are installed in the beam line. The wire mapping system is able to simulate a beam using a thin wire and measure the signal response as the wire position is varied within the BPPM aperture.

  2. Lithium beam diagnostic system on the COMPASS tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anda, G.; Bencze, A. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Berta, M., E-mail: bertam@sze.hu [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Széchenyi István University, Győr (Hungary); Dunai, D. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Hacek, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Krbec, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Réfy, D.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Bató, S.; Ilkei, T.; Kiss, I.G.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Li-beam diagnostic system on the COMPASS tokamak is an improved and compact system to allow testing of Atomic Beam Probe. • The possibility to measure background corrected density profiles on the few microseconds time scale. • First Li-beam diagnostic system with recirculating neutralizer. • The system includes the redesigned ion source with longer lifetime. - Abstract: An improved lithium beam based beam emission spectroscopy system – installed on COMPASS tokamak – is described. The beam energy enhanced up to 120 keV for Atomic Beam Probe measurement. The size of the ion source is doubled, using a newly developed thermionic heater instead of the conventionally used heating (tungsten or molybdenum) filament. The neutralizer is also improved. It produces the same sodium vapor in a cell but minimize the loss condensing the vapor on a cold surface which is led back (in fluid state) into the sodium oven. This way we call it recirculating neutralizer. The observation system consists of a CCD camera and an avalanche photodiode array.

  3. Off-line system for particle beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Komolov, L.N.; Yudin, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    An off-line system in the CAMAC standard for beam diagnostics with the help of proportional chambers and the NTA-512B analyzer is described. The maximum number of wires in the system is 512. The accuracy of beam profile presentation is increased by selection of single-wire operations. The inquire time of one proportional chamber constitutes 15-20 μs and is comparable to the analyzer recording cycle. As a result, six chambers can detect 3000 particles per one accelerator cycle at the beam extraction duration of 400 ms. The system can be connected to a computer

  4. Measurement system with high accuracy for laser beam quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yi; Zeng, Ciling; Xie, Peiyuan; Jiang, Qingshan; Liang, Ke; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Ming

    2015-05-20

    Presently, most of the laser beam quality measurement system collimates the optical path manually with low efficiency and low repeatability. To solve these problems, this paper proposed a new collimated method to improve the reliability and accuracy of the measurement results. The system accuracy controlled the position of the mirror to change laser beam propagation direction, which can realize the beam perpendicularly incident to the photosurface of camera. The experiment results show that the proposed system has good repeatability and the measuring deviation of M2 factor is less than 0.6%.

  5. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  6. Dual ion beam irradiation system for in situ observation with electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Tetuo; Hojou, Kiiti; Furuno, Sigemi; Otsu, Hitosi; Izui, Kazuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a new in situ observation system for dynamic processes under dual ion beam irradiation. The system consists of a modified 400 keV analytical electron microscope (JEOL, JEM-4000FX) and two 40 kV ion beam accelerators. This system allows evaluation of microscopic changes of structure and chemical bonding state of materials in the dynamic processes under two kinds of ion beam irradiations, that is required for the simulation test of the first wall of nuclear fusion reactors onto which He + , H + , and H 2 + ions are irradiated simultaneously. These two ion accelerators were equipped symmetrically both sides of the electron microscope and individually controlled. Each ion beam extracted from a duo-plasmatron ion gun is bent downward by an angle of 30deg with a mass-separating magnet, and introduced into specimen chamber of the electron microscope. Inside the specimen chamber the beam is deflected again by an angle of 30deg with an electrostatic prism so as to be incident on the specimen surface. Finally, two ion beams from both side are incident on the specimen surface at an angle of 60deg. The maximum ion current density of helium is more than 250μA/cm 2 at the specimen at an ion energy of 17 keV. Images of the electron microscope during dual ion beam irradiation are observed through a TV camera and recorded with a VTR. (author)

  7. Neutral beam injection system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B.H.; Lee, K.W.; Chung, K.S.; Oh, B.H.; Cho, Y.S.; Bae, Y.D.; Han, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The NBI system for KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been designed based on conventional positive ion beam technology. One beam line consists of three ion sources, three neutralizers, one bending magnet, and one drift tube. This system will deliver 8 MW deuterium beam to KSTAR plasma in normal operation to support the advanced experiments on heating, current drive and profile control. The key technical issues in this design were high power ion source(120 kV, 65 A), long pulse operation (300 seconds; world record is 30 sec), and beam rotation from vertical to horizontal direction. The suggested important R and D points on ion source and beam line components are also included. (author). 7 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Accuracy of Linear Measurements in Stitched Versus Non-Stitched Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srimawong, P.; Krisanachinda, A.; Chindasombatjaroen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography images are useful in clinical dentistry. Linear measurements are necessary for accurate treatment planning.Therefore, the accuracy of linear measurements on CBCT images is needed to be verified. Current program called stitching program in Kodak 9000C 3D systems automatically combines up to three localized volumes to construct larger images with small voxel size.The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of linear measurements from stitched and non-stitched CBCT images in comparison to direct measurements.This study was performed in 10 human dry mandibles. Gutta-percha rods were marked at reference points to obtain 10 vertical and horizontal distances. Direct measurements by digital caliper were served as gold standard. All distances on CBCT images obtained by using and not using stitching program were measured, and compared with direct measurements.The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated.The ICC of direct measurements were 0.998 to 1.000.The ICC of intraobserver of both non-stitched CBCT images and stitched CBCT images were 1.000 indicated strong agreement made by a single observer.The intermethod ICC between direct measurements vs non-stitched CBCT images and direct measurements vs stitched CBCT images ranged from 0.972 to 1.000 and 0.967 to 0.998, respectively. No statistically significant differences between direct measurements and stitched CBCT images or non-stitched CBCT images (P > 0.05). The results showed that linear measurements on non-stitched and stitched CBCT images were highly accurate with no statistical difference compared to direct measurements. The ICC values in non-stitched and stitched CBCT images and direct measurements of vertical distances were slightly higher than those of horizontal distances. This indicated that the measurements in vertical orientation were more accurate than those in horizontal orientation. However, the differences were not statistically significant. Stitching

  9. Optical beam transport system at FEL-SUT

    CERN Document Server

    Nomaru, K; Yokoyama, M; Oda, F; Nakayama, A; Koike, H; Kuroda, H

    2000-01-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. has installed an FEL beam transport system at the IR FEL Research Center of the Science University of Tokyo (FEL-SUT). This system transports the FEL output beam from the FEL machine room to the optical diagnostic room through a vacuum tube. The in-vacuum multi-mirror synchronized system operated from the FEL control room enables the operator to control the multiple mirrors simultaneously on or off axis of the FEL beam and to distribute the FEL output to one of the laboratories. The essential component of the transport system is the passive control optics that is composed of an elliptical and parabolic mirror couple. Once the control optics is aligned, a parallel FEL beam with a good pointing stability is obtained without any active operation to tune the optical system for different wavelengths.

  10. Measurement of skin dose from cone-beam computed tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To measure surface skin dose from various cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners using point-dosimeters. Materials & methods A head anthropomorphic phantom was used with nanoDOT optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters (Landauer Corp., Glenwood, IL) attached to various anatomic landmarks. The phantom was scanned using multiple exposure protocols for craniofacial evaluations in three different CBCT units and a conventional x-ray imaging system. The dosimeters were calibrated for each of the scan protocols on the different imaging systems. Peak skin dose and surface doses at the eye lens, thyroid, submandibular and parotid gland levels were measured. Results The measured skin doses ranged from 0.09 to 4.62 mGy depending on dosimeter positions and imaging systems. The average surface doses to the lens locations were ~4.0 mGy, well below the threshold for cataractogenesis (500 mGy). The results changed accordingly with x-ray tube output (mAs and kV) and also were sensitive to scan field of view (SFOV). As compared to the conventional panoramic and cephalometric imaging system, doses from all three CBCT systems were at least an order of magnitude higher. Conclusions Peak skin dose and surface doses at the eye lens, thyroid, and salivary gland levels measured from the CBCT imaging systems were lower than the thresholds to induce deterministic effects. However, our findings do not justify the routine use of CBCT imaging in orthodontics considering the lifetime-attributable risk to the individual. PMID:24192155

  11. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  12. Beam Dynamics and Pulse Duration Control During Final Beam Bunching in Driver System for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Katayama, Takeshi; Kawata, Shigeo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Someya, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    Beam dynamics is investigated by multi-particle simulations during a final beam bunching in a driver system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). The longitudinal bunch compression causes the beam instability induced by the strong space charge effect. The multi-particle simulation can indicate the emittance growth due to the longitudinal bunch compression. Dependence in the beam pulse duration is also investigated for effective pellet implosion in HIF. Not only the spatial nonuniformity of the beam illumination, but also the errors of the beam pulse duration cause changes of implosion dynamics. The allowable regime of the beam pulse duration for the effective fusion output becomes narrow with decreasing the input beam energy. The voltage accuracy requirement at the beam velocity modulator is also estimated for the final beam bunching. It is estimated that the integrated voltage error is allowable as a few percent.

  13. Beam-plasma interaction in case of injection of the electron beam to the symmetrically open plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opanasenko, A.V.; Romanyuk, L.I.

    1992-01-01

    A beam-plasma interaction at the entrance of the symmetrically open plasma system with an electron beam injected through it is investigated. An ignition of the plasma-beam discharge on waves of upper hybrid dispersion branch of a magnetoactive plasma is found in the plasma penetrating into the vacuum contrary to the beam. It is shown that the beam-plasma discharge is localized in the inhomogeneous penetrating plasma in the zone where only these waves exist. Regularities of the beam-plasma discharge ignition and manifestation are described. It is determined that the electron beam crossing the discharge zone leads to the strong energy relaxation of the beam. It is shown possible to control the beam-plasma discharge ignition by changing the potential of the electron beam collector. (author)

  14. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J. C.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  15. Design study of the SPS beam dumping system

    CERN Document Server

    Faugeras, Paul E; Schröder, G H

    1973-01-01

    An internal beam dumping system is needed for the SPS, in order to prevent uncontrolled loss of the beam in the accelerator. Several possible dumping schemes have been studied and compared in Ref. (1), and the method using fast kicker magnets has been chosen. The beam dumping system will use a pair of kicker magnets, which deflect the beam verti-cally onto the absorber blocks, and the beam will be dumped in one SPS revolution. It has been shown$^{(1)}$ that dumping a ow emittance beam of 10$^{13}$ ppp at 400 GeV/c leads to severe thermal problems in the absorber blocks. In particular, dumping the beam with fast kickers induces in the absorber blocks instantaneous temperature rises. These depend on the proton density distributions in the beam and the material used for the block and can be at least as high as l000$^{°}$C in case of aluminium. Although the values of these temperature spikes cannot be calculated with good accuracy, they are certainly higher than permitted for a reliable absorber block design. It...

  16. LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System Verification Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Zamantzas, C; Jackson, S

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Mon­i­tor­ing (BLM) sys­tem is one of the most com­plex in­stru­men­ta­tion sys­tems de­ployed in the LHC. In ad­di­tion to protecting the col­lid­er, the sys­tem also needs to pro­vide a means of di­ag­nos­ing ma­chine faults and de­liv­er a feed­back of loss­es to the control room as well as to sev­er­al sys­tems for their setup and analysis. It has to trans­mit and pro­cess sig­nals from al­most 4’000 mon­i­tors, and has near­ly 3 mil­lion con­fig­urable pa­ram­e­ters. The system was de­signed with re­li­a­bil­i­ty and avail­abil­i­ty in mind. The spec­i­fied op­er­a­tion and the fail-safe­ty stan­dards must be guar­an­teed for the sys­tem to per­form its func­tion in pre­vent­ing su­per­con­duc­tive mag­net de­struc­tion caused by par­ti­cle flux. Main­tain­ing the ex­pect­ed re­li­a­bil­i­ty re­quires ex­ten­sive test­ing and ver­i­fi­ca­tion. In this paper we re­port our most re­cent ad­di­t...

  17. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J [INTEGRIS Cancer Institute of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  18. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  19. Beam extraction control systems of the fast-cycling synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumanian, A.; Zapolski, N.; Nickogosian, V.; Ananian, A.; Kazarian, A.; Khoetsian, M.; Agababian, A.; Matevosian, A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact system controlling the extraction of different beams (gamma, electron, synchrotron radiation) in single and simultaneous operation modes at high electromagnetic disturbances level based on using one computer of IBM PC/AT type is described. (author)

  20. Research of beam hardening correction method for CL system based on SART algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Daquan; Wang Yaxiao; Que Jiemin; Sun Cuili; Wei Cunfeng; Wei Long

    2014-01-01

    Computed laminography (CL) is a non-destructive testing technique for large objects, especially for planar objects. Beam hardening artifacts were wildly observed in the CL system and significantly reduce the image quality. This study proposed a novel simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) based beam hardening correction (BHC) method for the CL system, namely the SART-BHC algorithm in short. The SART-BHC algorithm took the polychromatic attenuation process in account to formulate the iterative reconstruction update. A novel projection matrix calculation method which was different from the conventional cone-beam or fan-beam geometry was also studied for the CL system. The proposed method was evaluated with simulation data and experimental data, which was generated using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4 and a bench-top CL system, respectively. All projection data were reconstructed with SART-BHC algorithm and the standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. The reconstructed images show that beam hardening artifacts are greatly reduced with the SART-BHC algorithm compared to the FBP algorithm. The SART-BHC algorithm doesn't need any prior know-ledge about the object or the X-ray spectrum and it can also mitigate the interlayer aliasing. (authors)

  1. Calculation of the beam injector steering system using Helmholtz coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passaro, A.; Sircilli Neto, F.; Migliano, A.C.C.

    1991-03-01

    In this work, a preliminary evaluation of the beam injector steering system of the IEAv electron linac is presented. From the existing injector configuration and with the assumptions of monoenergetic beam (100 keV) and uniform magnetic field, two pairs of Helmholtz coils were calculated for the steering system. Excitations of 105 A.turn and 37 A.turn were determined for the first and second coils, respectively. (author)

  2. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M; Toshito, T; Watabe, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  3. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, T [Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Watabe, H [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  4. Balancing dose and image registration accuracy for cone beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) for breast patient setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winey, B. A.; Zygmanski, P.; Cormack, R. A.; Lyatskaya, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To balance dose reduction and image registration accuracy in breast setup imaging. In particular, the authors demonstrate the relationship between scan angle and dose delivery for cone beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) when employed for setup verification of breast cancer patients with surgical clips. Methods: The dose measurements were performed in a female torso phantom for varying scan angles of CBTS. Setup accuracy was measured using three registration methods: Clip centroid localization accuracy and the accuracy of two semiautomatic registration algorithms. The dose to the organs outside of the ipsilateral breast and registration accuracy information were compared to determine the optimal scan angle for CBTS for breast patient setup verification. Isocenter positions at the center of the patient and at the breast-chest wall interface were considered. Results: Image registration accuracy was within 1 mm for the CBTS scan angles θ above 20 deg. for some scenarios and as large as 80 deg. for the worst case, depending on the imaged breast and registration algorithm. Registration accuracy was highest based on clip centroid localization. For left and right breast imaging with the isocenter at the chest wall, the dose to the contralateral side of the patient was very low (<0.5 cGy) for all scan angles considered. For central isocenter location, the optimal scan angles were 30 deg. - 50 deg. for the left breast imaging and 40 deg. - 50 deg. for the right breast imaging, with the difference due to the geometric asymmetry of the current clinical imaging system. Conclusions: The optimal scan angles for CBTS imaging were found to be between 10 deg. and 50 deg., depending on the isocenter location and ipsilateral breast. Use of the isocenter at the breast-chest wall locations always resulted in greater accuracy of image registration (<1 mm) at smaller angles (10 deg. - 20 deg.) and at lower doses (<0.1 cGy) to the contralateral organs. For chest wall isocenters, doses

  5. Beam Transfer Systems for the LAGUNA-LBNO Long Baseline Neutrino Beam from the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Efthymiopoulos, I; Papaphilippou, Y; Parfenova, A

    2013-01-01

    For the Long Baseline neutrino facility under study at CERN (LAGUNA-LBNO) it is initially planned to extract a 400 GeV beam from the second long straight section in the SPS into the existing transfer channel TT20 leading to the North Area experimental zone, to a new target aligned with a far detector at a distance of 2300 km [1]. In a second phase a new High-Power Proton Synchrotron (HPPS) accelerator is proposed, to give a 2 MW beam at about 50 GeV on the same target. In this paper the required beam transfer systems are outlined, including the new sections of transfer line between the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL), HP-PS and SPS, and from the SPS to the target, and also the injection and extraction systems in the long straight section of the HPPS. The feasibility of a 4 GeV H- injection system is discussed.

  6. Beam Tracking in Switched-Beam Antenna System for V2V Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settawit Poochaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the proposed switched beam antenna system for V2V communication including optimum antenna half power beamwidth determination in urban road environments. SQP optimization method is selected for the computation of optimum antenna half power beamwidth. In addition, beam tracking algorithm is applied to guarantee the best beam selection with maximum RSSI. The results present the success of the proposed system with the increasing of V2V performance metrics. Also, V2V data dissemination via the proposed system introduces the enhancement of V2V link in terms of RSSI, PER, BER, Tsafe, and Rsafe. The results indicate the improvement of V2V link reliability. Consequently, the road safety is improved.

  7. Optical diagnosis system for intense electron beam diode plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Fan Yuwei; Yang Jianhua; Liu Lie; Yin Yi; Luo Ling

    2012-01-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved imaging platform for diode plasmas diagnostics has been constructed based on the pulsed electron beam accelerator and high speed framing camera (HSFC). The accelerator can provide an electrical pulse with voltages of 200-500 kV, rise-time (from 10% to 90% amplitude) of 25 ns and duration of 110 ns. The diode currents up to kA level can be extracted. The trigger signal for camera was picked up by a water-resistor voltage divider after the main switch of the accelerator, which could avoid the disadvantageous influence of the time jitter caused by the breakdown of the gas gaps. Then the sampled negative electrical pulse was converted into a transistor-transistor logic (TTL) signal (5 V) with rise time of about 1.5 ns and time jitter less than 1 ns via a processor. And this signal was taken as the synchronization time base. According to the working characteristics of the camera, the synchronization scheme relying mainly on electrical pulse delay method supplemented by light signal delay method was determined to make sure that the camera can work synchronously with the light production and transportation from the diode plasma within the time scale of nanosecond. Moreover, shielding and filtering methods were used to restrain the interference on the measurement system from the accelerator. Finally, time resolved 2-D framing images of the diode plasma were acquired. (authors)

  8. Optical manipulation with two beam traps in microfluidic polymer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoury Arvelo, Maria; Matteucci, Marco; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl

    2015-01-01

    An optical trapping system with two opposing laser beams, also known as the optical stretcher, are naturally constructed inside a microfluidic lab-on-chip system. We present and compare two approaches to combine a simple microfluidic system with either waveguides directly written in the microflui......An optical trapping system with two opposing laser beams, also known as the optical stretcher, are naturally constructed inside a microfluidic lab-on-chip system. We present and compare two approaches to combine a simple microfluidic system with either waveguides directly written...... in the microfluidic chip or with optical fibers mounted in the chip....

  9. Beam propagation considerations in the Aurora laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosoche, L.A.; Mc Leod, J.; Hanlon, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Aurora is a high-power KrF laser system now being constructed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) studies. It will use optical angular multiplexing and serial amplification by electron-beam-driven KrF amplifiers to deliver a stacked, multikilojoule 5-ns-duration laser pulse to ICF targets. The requirements of angular multiplexing KrF lasers at the multikilojoule level dictate path lengths on the order of 1 km. The inherent complicated path crossings produced by angular multiplexing and pulse stacking do not allow isolation of individual beam lines, so the optical quality of the long beam paths must be controlled. Propagation of the 248-nm light beams over long paths in air is affected by scattering, absorption thermal gradients and turbulence, beam alignment, and control and optical component figure errors

  10. Beam forming system modernization at the MMF linac proton injector

    CERN Document Server

    Derbilov, V I; Nikulin, E S; Frolov, O T

    2001-01-01

    The isolation improvements of the beam forming system (BFS) of the MMF linac proton injector ion source are reported. The mean beam current and,accordingly, BFS electrode heating were increased when the MMF linac has began to operate regularly in long beam sessions with 50 Hz pulse repetition rate. That is why the BFS electrode high-voltage isolation that was made previously as two consequently and rigidly glued solid cylinder insulators has lost mechanical and electric durability. The substitution of large (160 mm) diameter cylinder insulator for four small diameter (20 mm) tubular rods has improved vacuum conditions in the space of beam forming and has allowed to operate without failures when beam currents being up to 250 mA and extraction and focusing voltage being up to 25 and 40 kV respectively. Moreover,the construction provides the opportunity of electrode axial move. The insulators are free from electrode thermal expansion mechanical efforts in a transverse direction.

  11. Program for beam optical computation of axial symmetrical electrostatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Jianlin; Wu Chunlei; Zhou Changgeng

    2012-01-01

    The beam optical computation of axial symmetrical electrostatic systems is very important in the design and test of low-energy accelerators such as Cock-Croft and Van de Graaf accelerators. In this paper, a program for the beam optical computation of these structures has been developed using transfer matrix method. The electrostatic field region is divided into several small intervals in the program, and then the beam envelope is calculated interval-to-interval from the axial potential distribution, which is calculated by other electromagnetic field simulation software such as Maxwell SV. Space charge effect is included so that the program can be used in the computation of intense beam, while nonlinear effect is beyond its ability. The program can be used in the calculation of beam optics in most complicated axial symmetrical electrostatic fields, and the computing time required is very short. (authors)

  12. LHC beam dump system : analysis of beam commissioning, performance and the consequences of abnormal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, T.

    2011-01-01

    The LHC accelerates proton beams to a momentum of up to 7 TeV/c. At this energy level and with nominal beam intensity the stored energy of 360 MJ per beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper. In addition up to 10 GJ are stored within the LHC magnet system at top energy. lt is obvious that such a machine needs well designed safety and protection systems. The LHC Beam Dump System (LBDS) is such a system and one of the most critical once concerning machine protection and safe operation. lt is used to dispose of high intensity beams between 450 GeV and 7 TeV and is thus designed to fast extract beam in a loss free way and to transfer it to an external absorber. For each ring systems of 15 horizontal fast kicker magnets (MKD), 15 vertically deflecting magnetic septa (MSD) and 10 diluter kicker magnets (MKB) are installed. This thesis is concerned with the analysis of the LBDS performance under normal operating parameters as well as under abnormal conditions like in the event of asynchronous beam abort or missing MKD elements. Therefore a sophisticated simulation environment was developed based on the use of the MAD-X tracking code. A system of tracking jobs was set up to study failure cases and losses for various dump events. Those jobs can be distributed to available CPU power and be calculated in parallel. Studies into the consequences of abnormal beam dump actions have been performed. Different error scenarios have been evaluated including an asynchronous dump action, prefire cases, and the impact of different orbit and collimator settings. Losses at locations in the ring and the beam dump transfer lines have been quantified as a function of different settings of the dump system protection elements. The implications for the setup and operation of these protection elements are discussed. Particle distributions can be created according to the used orbit. Simulations with different orbit parameters (including magnet field errors, beam position read out errors

  13. Ultrafast fiber beam delivery: system technology and industrial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck, Max C.; Eilzer, Sebastian; Wedel, Björn

    2017-02-01

    Flexible beam delivery of high power pico- and femtosecond pulses offers great advantages in industrial applications. Complex free space beam delivery as found in robot or gantry systems can be replaced, laser safety and uptime increased and system integration in production environment simplified. Only recently fiber beam delivery has become available for ultrafast lasers while it has been an established standard for cw and pulsed laser sources for many years. Using special kinds of fiber that guide the laser beam mostly inside a hollow core, nonlinear effects and catastrophic damage that would arise in conventional glass fibers can be avoided. Today, ultrafast pulses with several 100 μJ and hundreds of MW can be transmitted in quasi single mode fashion with micro-structured hollow core fibers. During the last years we have developed a modular beam delivery system that suits industrial ultrafast lasers and can be integrated into existing processing machines. Micro-structured hollow core fibers inside the sealed laser light cable efficiently guide high-power laser pulses over distances of several meters with excellent beam quality, while power, pulse duration and polarization are maintained. We report on the technology required for fiber beam delivery of ultrafast laser pulses and discuss requirements for successful integration into industrial production as well as achievable performance under realistic operation and show examples of micromachining applications.

  14. Laser beam riding guided system principle and design research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhou; Jin, Yi; Xu, Zhou; Xing, Hao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of science and technology, precision-strike weapons has been considered to be important for winning victory in military field. Laser guidance is a major method to execute precision-strike in modern warfare. At present, the problems of primary stage of Laser guidance has been solved with endeavors of countries. Several technical aspects of laser-beam riding guided system have been mature, such as atmosphere penetration of laser beam, clutter inhibition on ground, laser irradiator, encoding and decoding of laser beam. Further, laser beam quality, equal output power and atmospheric transmission properties are qualified for warfare situation. Riding guidance instrument is a crucial element of Laser-beam riding guided system, and is also a vital element of airborne, vehicle-mounted and individual weapon. The optical system mainly consist of sighting module and laser-beam guided module. Photoelectric detector is the most important sensing device of seeker, and also the key to acquire the coordinate information of target space. Currently, in consideration of the 1.06 u m of wavelength applied in all the semi-active laser guided weapons systems, lithium drifting silicon photodiode which is sensitive to 1.06 u m of wavelength is used in photoelectric detector. Compared to Solid and gas laser, diode laser has many merits such as small volume, simple construction, light weight, long life, low lost and easy modulation. This article introduced the composition and operating principle of Laser-beam riding guided system based on 980 nm diode laser, and made a analysis of key technology; for instance, laser irradiator, modulating disk of component, laser zooming system. Through the use of laser diode, Laser-beam riding guided system is likely to have smaller shape and very light.

  15. LHC beam dump system Consequences of abnormal operation

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, T; Uythoven, J

    2010-01-01

    The LHC beam dump system is one of the most critical systems concerning machine protection and safe operation. It is used to dispose of high intensity beams between 450 GeV and 7 TeV. Studies into the consequences of abnormal beam dump actions have been performed. Different error scenarios have been evaluated using particle tracking in MAD-X, including an asynchronous dump action, and the impact of different orbit and collimator settings. Losses at locations in the ring and the beam dump transfer lines have been quantified as a function of different settings of the dump system protection elements. The implications for the setting up and operation of these protection elements are discussed.

  16. Design of fast kickers for the ISABELLE beam abort system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Montemurro, P.A.; Baron, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ISA beam abort (extraction) system must be highly efficient, in the sense of producing minimum beam loss, and reliable to prevent serious damage to accelerator components by the circulating high-energy beams. Since the stored beams will be debunched, the low-loss requirement can be met only with ultra-thin extraction septa and/or fast-acting kickers. This paper examines the design of the ISA extraction kickers subject to a set of extraction channel constraints and a given maximum working voltage. Expressions are derived for determining system parameters for both a lumped parameter magnet and a delay-line magnet. Using these relationships, design parameters are worked out for several possible system configurations. The paper also describes the construction of a full-scale prototype module of the kicker and summarizes the preliminary test results obtained with the module

  17. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  18. Novel beam delivery system for microvia drilling using holographic and refractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest P.

    2003-07-01

    The research and development of the optical system described was due in part to the virtual stalemate of current microvia dirlling technology within the High Density Interconnect market. The desire by industry to acquire faster processes for drilling microvias led to our research in the utilization of hybrid optical systems, where standard refractive and computer generated diffractive optics could be meshed to create a system that would out perform the current technology in the marketplace. The outcome of this work is covered in the following paper and will, at the outset, briefly cover the targeted market segment for which the beam delivery system was developed, as well as its general capabilities. The paper will cover the basic architecture and technology behind the laser optical beam delivery system, as well as the unique components that make up the assembly. Each of the optical elements within the system will be briefly described, and the CGH elements will be briefly explained, including a description of the software used. The laser beam characteristics at several points along the beam delivery will be discussed, as well as the final image formed at the target plane where the microvia is drilled. Specific performance details will be shared with regards to component efficiency, i.e. diffraction efficiency losses, as well as total system performance throughout the beam line. The final section will cover materials processing, including the remarkable process rate increases and microvia hole quality achieved.

  19. Detection accuracy of proximal caries by phosphor plate and cone-beam computerized tomography images scanned with different resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Zu-Yan; Ma, Xu-Chen; Li, Gang

    2012-08-01

    This study was carried out to assess whether the spatial resolution has an impact on the detection accuracy of proximal caries in flat panel CBCT (cone beam computerized tomography) images and if the detection accuracy can be improved by flat panel CBCT images scanned with high spatial resolution when compared to digital intraoral images. The CBCT test images of 45 non-restored human permanent teeth were respectively scanned with the ProMax 3D and the DCT Pro scanners at different resolutions. Digital images were obtained with a phosphor plate imaging system Digora Optime. Eight observers evaluated all the test images for carious lesion within the 90 proximal surfaces. With the histological examination serving as the reference standard, observer performances were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The areas under the ROC curves were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance. No significant differences were found among the CBCT images and between CBCT and digital images when only proximal enamel caries was detected (p = 0.989). With respect to the detection of proximal dentinal caries, significant difference was found between CBCT and digital images (p proximal caries in flat panel CBCT images. The flat panel CBCT images scanned with high spatial resolution did not improve the detection accuracy of proximal enamel caries compared to digital intraoral images. CBCT images scanned with high spatial resolutions could not be used for proximal caries detection.

  20. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  1. Molecular beam sampling system with very high beam-to-background ratio: The rotating skimmer concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedikt, J.; Ellerweg, D.; Keudell, A. von

    2009-01-01

    A novel method of reducing the background pressure in a vacuum system used for sampling a molecular beam from a high pressure region is presented. A triple differential pumping stage is constructed with a chopper with rotating skimmer within the first pumping stage, which serves effectively as a valve separating periodically the vacuum system from the ambient environment. The mass spectrometry measurement of the species in the molecular beam show an excellent beam-to-background ratio of 14 and a detection limit below 1 ppm. The potential of this method for detection of low density reactive species in atmospheric pressure plasmas is demonstrated for the detection of oxygen atoms generated in an atmospheric pressure microplasma source.

  2. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutrakon, G; Wang, N; Miller, D W; Yang, Y

    2010-01-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 x 10 x 8 cm 3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  3. Phase and amplitude modification of a laser beam by two deformable mirrors using conventional 4f image encryption techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Rzasa, John Robertson; Davis, Christopher C.

    2017-08-01

    The image encryption and decryption technique using lens components and random phase screens has attracted a great deal of research interest in the past few years. In general, the optical encryption technique can translate a positive image into an image with nearly a white speckle pattern that is impossible to decrypt. However, with the right keys as conjugated random phase screens, the white noise speckle pattern can be decoded into the original image. We find that the fundamental ideas in image encryption can be borrowed and applied to carry out beam corrections through turbulent channels. Based on our detailed analysis, we show that by using two deformable mirrors arranged in similar fashions as in the image encryption technique, a large number of controllable phase and amplitude distribution patterns can be generated from a collimated Gaussian beam. Such a result can be further coupled with wavefront sensing techniques to achieve laser beam correction against turbulence distortions. In application, our approach leads to a new type of phase conjugation mirror that could be beneficial for directed energy systems.

  4. Imaging the surface stress and vibration modes of a microcantilever by laser beam deflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Javier; Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Prisicila; Martinez, Nicolas F; Ahumada, Oscar; Calleja, Montserrat

    2012-08-10

    There is a need for noninvasive techniques for simultaneous imaging of the stress and vibration mode shapes of nanomechanical systems in the fields of scanning probe microscopy, nanomechanical biological and chemical sensors and the semiconductor industry. Here we show a novel technique that combines a scanning laser, the beam deflection method and digital multifrequency excitation and analysis for simultaneous imaging of the static out-of-plane displacement and the shape of five vibration modes of nanomechanical systems. The out-of-plane resolution is at least 100 pm Hz⁻¹/² and the lateral resolution, which is determined by the laser spot size, is 1-1.5 μm. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by imaging the residual surface stress of a microcantilever together with the shape of the first 22 vibration modes. The vibration behavior is compared with rigorous finite element simulations. The technique is suitable for major improvements in the imaging of liquids, such as higher bandwidth and enhanced spatial resolution.

  5. Volume-of-change cone-beam CT for image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Schafer, Sebastian; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Khanna, A Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can provide intraoperative 3D imaging capability for surgical guidance, but workflow and radiation dose are the significant barriers to broad utilization. One main reason is that each 3D image acquisition requires a complete scan with a full radiation dose to present a completely new 3D image every time. In this paper, we propose to utilize patient-specific CT or CBCT as prior knowledge to accurately reconstruct the aspects of the region that have changed by the surgical procedure from only a sparse set of x-rays. The proposed methods consist of a 3D–2D registration between the prior volume and a sparse set of intraoperative x-rays, creating digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the registered prior volume, computing difference images by subtracting DRRs from the intraoperative x-rays, a penalized likelihood reconstruction of the volume of change (VOC) from the difference images, and finally a fusion of VOC reconstruction with the prior volume to visualize the entire surgical field. When the surgical changes are local and relatively small, the VOC reconstruction involves only a small volume size and a small number of projections, allowing less computation and lower radiation dose than is needed to reconstruct the entire surgical field. We applied this approach to sacroplasty phantom data obtained from a CBCT test bench and vertebroplasty data with a fresh cadaver acquired from a C-arm CBCT system with a flat-panel detector. The VOCs were reconstructed from a varying number of images (10–66 images) and compared to the CBCT ground truth using four different metrics (mean squared error, correlation coefficient, structural similarity index and perceptual difference model). The results show promising reconstruction quality with structural similarity to the ground truth close to 1 even when only 15–20 images were used, allowing dose reduction by the factor of 10–20. (paper)

  6. ADVANCEMENT OF THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; AHRENS, L.; MI, J.; OERTER, B.; SANDBERG, J.; WARBURTON, D.

    2003-01-01

    As one of the most critical system for RHIC operation, the beam abort kicker system has to be highly available, reliable, and stable for the entire operating range. Along with the RHIC commission and operation, consistent efforts have been spend to cope with immediate issues as well as inherited design issues. Major design changes have been implemented to achieve the higher operating voltage, longer high voltage hold-off time, fast retriggering and redundant triggering, and improved system protection, etc. Recent system test has demonstrated for the first time that both blue ring and yellow ring beam abort systems have achieved more than 24 hours hold off time at desired operating voltage. In this paper, we report break down, thyratron reverse arcing, and to build a fast re-trigger system to reduce beam spreading in event of premature discharge

  7. A BPF-FBP tandem algorithm for image reconstruction in reverse helical cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungryong; Xia, Dan; Pellizzari, Charles A.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Reverse helical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a scanning configuration for potential applications in image-guided radiation therapy in which an accurate anatomic image of the patient is needed for image-guidance procedures. The authors previously developed an algorithm for image reconstruction from nontruncated data of an object that is completely within the reverse helix. The purpose of this work is to develop an image reconstruction approach for reverse helical CBCT of a long object that extends out of the reverse helix and therefore constitutes data truncation. Methods: The proposed approach comprises of two reconstruction steps. In the first step, a chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm reconstructs a volumetric image of an object from the original cone-beam data. Because there exists a chordless region in the middle of the reverse helix, the image obtained in the first step contains an unreconstructed central-gap region. In the second step, the gap region is reconstructed by use of a Pack-Noo-formula-based filteredbackprojection (FBP) algorithm from the modified cone-beam data obtained by subtracting from the original cone-beam data the reprojection of the image reconstructed in the first step. Results: The authors have performed numerical studies to validate the proposed approach in image reconstruction from reverse helical cone-beam data. The results confirm that the proposed approach can reconstruct accurate images of a long object without suffering from data-truncation artifacts or cone-angle artifacts. Conclusions: They developed and validated a BPF-FBP tandem algorithm to reconstruct images of a long object from reverse helical cone-beam data. The chord-based BPF algorithm was utilized for converting the long-object problem into a short-object problem. The proposed approach is applicable to other scanning configurations such as reduced circular sinusoidal trajectories.

  8. OSPACS: Ultrasound image management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessant Conrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound scanning uses the medical imaging format, DICOM, for electronically storing the images and data associated with a particular scan. Large health care facilities typically use a picture archiving and communication system (PACS for storing and retrieving such images. However, these systems are usually not suitable for managing large collections of anonymized ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. Results We have developed a system enabling the accurate archiving and management of ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. It is based upon a Windows application utilizing an open-source DICOM image viewer and a relational database. The system automates the bulk import of DICOM files from removable media by cross-validating the patient information against an external database, anonymizing the data as well as the image, and then storing the contents of the file as a field in a database record. These image records may then be retrieved from the database and presented in a tree-view control so that the user can select particular images for display in a DICOM viewer or export them to external media. Conclusion This system provides error-free automation of ultrasound image archiving and management, suitable for use in a clinical trial. An open-source project has been established to promote continued development of the system.

  9. Central nervous system imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1973, computed tomography (CT) of the brain has had a revolutionary impact on neuroradiologic diagnosis. It has largely replaced radionuclide brain imaging as the initial, noninvasive neurologic screening examination. Although conventional radionuclide brain imaging still contributes useful and unique diagnostic information in a few clinical situations, it appears that new technology and applications must be found if nuclear imaging is to play a prominent future role in neurologic diagnosis as it did in the past. One of the main advantages of CT over radionuclide brain imaging at present is CT's ability to demonstrate the size, shape, and position of the cerebral ventricles and subarachnoid spaces. Another important strength of CT is the ability to differentiate ischemic cerebral infarction from intracerebral hemorrhage. The overall sensitivity of CT in detecting intracranial neoplasms is also greater than that of radionuclide brain imaging, and CT is very useful in demonstrating the effects of head trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging appears superior to CT in the evaluation of neurologic disorders. A renewed interest in radionuclide brain imaging has developed because of recent advances in emission computed tomographic imaging. When tracer kinetic models are used, cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume, metabolic rate, and glucose and amino acid transport can be measured. Other applications involve investigation of receptor bindings, evaluation of the blood-brain barrier, brain blood-volume measurement, and cisternography

  10. Pre-surgical treatment planning of maxillary canine impactions using panoramic vs cone beam CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqerban, A; Hedesiu, M; Baciut, M; Nackaerts, O; Jacobs, R; Fieuws, S; Willems, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the impact of using two-dimensional (2D) panoramic radiographs and three-dimensional (3D) cone beam CT for the surgical treatment planning of impacted maxillary canines. This study consisted of 32 subjects (19 females, 13 males) with a mean age of 25 years, referred for surgical intervention of 39 maxillary impacted canines. Initial 2D panoramic radiography was available, and 3D cone beam CT imaging was obtained upon clinical indication. Both 2D and 3D pre-operative radiographic diagnostic sets were subsequently analysed by six observers. Perioperative evaluations were conducted by the treating surgeon. McNemar tests, hierarchical logistic regression and linear mixed models were used to explore the differences in evaluations between imaging modalities. Significantly higher confidence levels were observed for 3D image-based treatment plans than for 2D image-based plans (p panoramic and cone beam CT images.

  11. Design of the AGS Booster beam position monitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beadle, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Savino, J.; Stanziani, V.; Thomas, R.; Van Zwienen, W.; Witkover, R.L.; Schulte, E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1989-01-01

    The AGS Booster beam position monitor system must cover a wide range of beam intensity and bunch length for proton and heavy ion acceleration. The detector is designed to maintain 0.1 mm local tolerance following 300{degree}C bakeout. The electronics will be located in the tunnel, communicating via fiber optic links to avoid ground loops. The design will be described and test results for prototype units presented. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario

  13. An index of beam hardening artifact for two-dimensional cone-beam CT tomographic images: establishment and preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Based on the pixel gray value measurements, establish a beam-hardening artifacts index of the cone-beam CT tomographic image, and preliminarily evaluate its applicability. Methods: The 5mm-diameter metal ball and resin ball were fixed on the light-cured resin base plate respectively, while four vitro molars were fixed above and below the ball, on the left and right respectively, which have 10mm distance with the metal ball. Then, cone beam CT was used to scan the fixed base plate twice. The same layer tomographic images were selected from the two data and imported into the Photoshop software. The circle boundary was built through the determination of the center and radius of the circle, according to the artifact-free images section. Grayscale measurement tools were used to measure the internal boundary gray value G0, gray value G1 and G2 of 1mm and 20mm artifacts outside the circular boundary, the length L1 of the arc with artifacts in the circular boundary, the circumference L2. Hardening artifacts index was set A = (G1 / G0) * 0.5 + (G2 / G1) * 0.4 + (L2 / L1) * 0.1. Then, the A values of metal and resin materials were calculated respectively. Results: The A value of cobalt-chromium alloy material is 1, and resin material is 0. Conclusion: The A value reflects comprehensively the three factors of hardening artifacts influencing normal oral tissue image sharpness of cone beam CT. The three factors include relative gray value, the decay rate and range of artifacts.

  14. Calibration and Stokes Imaging with Full Embedded Element Primary Beam Model for the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, M.; Colegate, T.; Sutinjo, A. T.; Ung, D.; Wayth, R.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Lenc, E.; Pindor, B.; Morgan, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, Bi-Qing; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-11-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science programme, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programmes for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20% in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 × 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen, and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200-231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.

  15. Cone beam computed tomography for dental and maxillofacial imaging: technique improvement and low-dose protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feragalli, Beatrice; Rampado, Osvaldo; Abate, Cecilia; Macrì, Monica; Festa, Felice; Stromei, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate images quality and radiation doses of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for dental and maxillofacial imaging testing five different acquisition protocols. Dose measurements of different acquisition protocols were calculated for Pax Zenith three-dimensional (3D) Cone Beam (Vatech, Korea) and for conventional orthopantomography (OPT) and cephalometric skull imaging Ortophos (Sirona Dental Systems, Bernsheim, Germany). The absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom loaded with thermoluminescent dosimeters at 58 sites related to sensitive organs. Five different CBCT protocols were evaluated for image quality and radiation doses. They differed in FOV, image resolution, kVp, mA, acquisition time in seconds and radiation dose. Measurements were then carried out with the orthopantomograph. Equivalent and effective doses were calculated. The reference protocol with large FOV, high resolution quality images, 95 kVp, 5 mA and acquisition time of 24 s resulted in a DAP value of 1556 mGy cm 2 instead the protocol with reduced kVp from 95 to 80 kVp translated into a value of DAP inferior to 35% (from 1556 to 1013 mGy cm 2 ). Going from a high resolution to a normal resolution, there was a reduction of the acquisition time to 15 s which allowed further dose reduction of approximately 40% (628 mGy cm 2 ); this protocol resulted in a value of effective dose of 35 microSievert (μSv). Moreover, the effect of changing FOV has been evaluated, considering two scans with a reduced FOV (160 × 140  and 120 × 90 mm, respectively). CBCT low-dose protocol with large FOV, normal resolution quality images, 80 kVp, 5 mA and acquisition time of 15 s resulted in a value of effective dose of 35 microSievert (μSv). This protocol allows the study of maxillofacial region with high quality of images and a very low radiation dose and, therefore, could be proposed in selected case where a complete assessment of

  16. Mechanics of bioinspired imaging systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengwei Li; Yu Wang; Jianliang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Imaging systems in nature have attracted a lot of research interest due to their superior optical and imaging characteristics. Recent advancements in materials science, mechanics, and stretchable electronics have led to successful development of bioinspired cameras that resemble the structures and functions of biological light-sensing organs. In this review, we discuss some recent progresses in mechanics of bioinspired imaging systems, including tunable hemispherical eyeball camera and artifi...

  17. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hua; Shi Yikai; Huang Kuidong; Xu Zhe

    2015-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. (authors)

  18. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T., E-mail: dosin@trialphaenergy.com [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  19. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T.

    2016-11-01

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  20. A dual modality phantom for cone beam CT and ultrasound image fusion in prostate implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angela; Beiki-Ardakan, Akbar; Tong, Shidong; Moseley, Douglas; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Jaffray, David; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2008-01-01

    In transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate seed brachytherapy, TRUS provides good delineation of the prostate while x-ray imaging, e.g., C-arm, gives excellent contrast for seed localization. With the recent availability of cone beam CT (CBCT) technology, the combination of the two imaging modalities may provide an ideal system for intraoperative dosimetric feedback during implantation. A dual modality phantom made of acrylic and copper wire was designed to measure the accuracy and precision of image coregistration between a C-arm based CBCT and 3D TRUS. The phantom was scanned with TRUS and CBCT under the same setup condition. Successive parallel transverse ultrasound (US) images were acquired through manual stepping of the US probe across the phantom at an increment of 1 mm over 7.5 cm. The CBCT imaging was done with three reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mm) as well as at three different tilt angles (0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg. ), and the coregistration between CBCT and US images was done using the Variseed system based on four fiducial markers. Fiducial localization error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE), and target registration error (TRE) were calculated for all registered image sets. Results showed that FLE were typically less than 0.4 mm, FRE were less than 0.5 mm, and TRE were typically less than 1 mm within the range of operation for prostate implant (i.e., <6 cm to surface of US probe). An analysis of variance test showed no significant difference in TRE for the CBCT-US fusion among the three slice thicknesses (p=0.37). As a comparison, the experiment was repeated with a US-conventional CT scanner combination. No significant difference in TRE was noted between the US-conventional CT fusion and that for all three CBCT image slice thicknesses (p=0.21). CBCT imaging was also performed at three different C-arm tilt angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., and 30 deg. and reconstructed at a slice thickness of 0.8 mm. There is no significant

  1. Comparison of Multi-Beam and Single-Beam Cytofluorometers for an Automated Screening System in Gynecologic Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Norihito

    1983-09-01

    Clumps of cells often give a false nuclear fluorescence intensity in a measuring system using flow cytofluorometry. In this study, we examined signal selection procedures in multi-beam and single-beam cytofluorometers with the aim of eliminating such false signals. The signal selection in the multi-beam cytofluorometer was found to be far superior to that in a single-beam cytofluorometer, and the problem of false nuclear fluorescence intensity is effectively obviated by using the former type of cytofluarometer.

  2. Micro-beam X-ray fluorescence and absorption imaging techniques at the IAEA Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegrzynek, Dariusz; Markowicz, A.; Bamford, S.; Chinea-Cano, E.; Bogovac, M.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray tube based, micro-beam X-ray fluorescence scanning spectrometer has been equipped with two energy dispersive X-ray detectors. The two-detector configuration allows for simultaneous collection of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and transmitted X-ray beam signals with a spatial resolution in the range of 10-50 μm, depending on the X-ray focussing element in use. The XRF signal is collected with a standard, liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector. The X-ray beam transmitted through the sample is acquired with a thermoelectrically cooled, silicon drift (SD) detector. The data acquisition is carried out in a fully automatic way under control of the SPECTOR-LOCATOR software. The software controls the scanning procedure and X-ray spectra acquisition during the scan. The energy dispersive X-ray spectra collected at every 'pixel' are stored for off-line processing. For selected regions of interest (ROI's), the element maps are constructed and displayed on-line. The spectrometer has been used for mapping elemental distributions and for performing 2D- and 3D-tomograpic imaging of minute objects in X-ray absorption and in X-ray fluorescence mode. A unique feature of the described system is simultaneous utilization of the two detectors, Si(Li) and SD, which adds new options for quantitative analysis and data interpretation. Examples of elemental mapping and 3D tomographic imaging as well as the advanced features of the SPECTOR-LOCATOR measurement control and data acquisition software are presented in this work

  3. A set of dosimetry systems for electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Min; Lin Jingwen; Chen Yundong; Li Huazhi; Xiao Zhenhong; Gao Juncheng

    1999-01-01

    To follow the rapid development of radiation processing with electron beams, it is urgent to set up a set of dosimetric standards to provide Quality Assurance (QA) of electron beam irradiation and unify the values of the quality of the absorbed dose measurements for electron beams. This report introduces a set of dosimetry systems established in Radiometrology Center of China Institute of Atomic Energy (RCCIAE), which have been or will be used as dosimetric standards in the Nuclear Industry System (NIS) in China. For instance, the potassium (silver) dichromate and ceric-cerous sulfate dosimetry systems will be used as standard dosimeters, while alanine-ESR dosimetry system as a transfer dosimeter, and FJL-01 CTA as a routine dosimeter. (author)

  4. Doublet III neutral beam multi-stream command language system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Garcia, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A multi-stream command language system was developed to provide control of the dual source neutral beam injectors on the Doublet III experiment at GA Technologies Inc. The Neutral Beam command language system consists of three parts: compiler, sequencer, and interactive task. The command language, which was derived from the Doublet III tokamak command language, POPS, is compiled, using a recursive descent compiler, into reverse polish notation instructions which then can be executed by the sequencer task. The interactive task accepts operator commands via a keyboard. The interactive task directs the operation of three input streams, creating commands which are then executed by the sequencer. The streams correspond to the two sources within a Doublet III neutral beam, plus an interactive stream. The sequencer multiplexes the execution of instructions from these three streams. The instructions include reads and writes to an operator terminal, arithmetic computations, intrinsic functions such as CAMAC input and output, and logical instructions. The neutral beam command language system was implemented using Modular Computer Systems (ModComp) Pascal and consists of two tasks running on a ModComp Classic IV computer. The two tasks, the interactive and the sequencer, run independently and communicate using shared memory regions. The compiler runs as an overlay to the interactive task when so directed by operator commands. The system is succesfully being used to operate the three neutral beams on Doublet III

  5. Beam position measurement system at the Fermilab main accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1975-01-01

    The beam position system of the Fermilab Main Ring contains one horizontal and one vertical Electrostatic Beam Pickup in each of the 96 cells of the machine. A pair of 75 ohm cables transmits the induced signal from the machine tunnel to the nearest service building. In each of the 24 service buildings, there is a solid-state multiplexer and a beam position detector which processes the A-B signal pairs to produce an intensity-normalized voltage proportional to beam displacement. This voltage is digitized, read into buffer of the Lockheed MAC A, and in turn transferred to the Xerox 530. Horizontal or vertical orbits can be obtained in 50 millisec. Orbits are obtained at injection and at a Main Ring Sample time, if requested, anywhere on the acceleration cycle. Injection orbits can be flattened automatically by a program that sets dipole trim magnets. (auth)

  6. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggs, Stephen G [Port Jefferson, NY; Brennan, J Michael [East Northport, NY; Tuozzolo, Joseph E [Sayville, NY; Zaltsman, Alexander [Commack, NY

    2008-10-07

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  7. Pulsed magnet systems for high energy physics beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1975-01-01

    During the past years pulsed magnet systems have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to transport beam bursts of charged high energy particles of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) facility. The particular features of the switching circuits, the power supplies and the magnets are described. Included are septum, quadrupole, beam shutter and bending magnets with energies ranging from 25 J to 100 kJ. The degree to which magnet current must be repeated and held constant (flattopped) during beam spill varies from +-5 percent for a beam shutter magnet to +-0.005 percent for a bending magnet; the duration of flattop ranges from a few μs to many ms. (U.S.)

  8. Application of virtual instrument in accelerator beam measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guoqing; China Science and Technology Univ., Hefei; Yu Xiaoqi; Zhang Pengfei

    2007-01-01

    Virtual instrument is a novel computer-based technical method of measurement, which has got rapidly development and has been applied in many fields because of a variety of advantages. In this paper we mainly introduce application of virtual instrument in accelerator beam measurement system. Beam measurement system is an important part of accelerator technology and has important effect on accelerator debugging, running and machine research. Adopting new measurement methods and increasing accuracy of measurement directly affect accelerator debugging and running. Now many accelerators have been adopted virtual instrument system. (authors)

  9. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  10. Beam-hardening correction in CT based on basis image and TV model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingliang; Yan Bin; Li Lei; Sun Hongsheng; Zhang Feng

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography, the beam hardening leads to artifacts and reduces the image quality. It analyzes how beam hardening influences on original projection. According, it puts forward a kind of new beam-hardening correction method based on the basis images and TV model. Firstly, according to physical characteristics of the beam hardening an preliminary correction model with adjustable parameters is set up. Secondly, using different parameters, original projections are operated by the correction model. Thirdly, the projections are reconstructed to obtain a series of basis images. Finally, the linear combination of basis images is the final reconstruction image. Here, with total variation for the final reconstruction image as the cost function, the linear combination coefficients for the basis images are determined according to iterative method. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, the experiments are carried out on real phantom and industrial part. The results show that the algorithm significantly inhibits cup and strip artifacts in CT image. (authors)

  11. New method of contour image processing based on the formalism of spiral light beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volostnikov, Vladimir G; Kishkin, S A; Kotova, S P [Samara Branch of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-31

    The possibility of applying the mathematical formalism of spiral light beams to the problems of contour image recognition is theoretically studied. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are evaluated; the results of numerical modelling are presented. (optical image processing)

  12. Cone-beam CT image contrast and attenuation-map linearity improvement (CALI) for brain stereotactic radiosurgery procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Sayed Masoud; Lee, Young; Eriksson, Markus; Nordström, Hâkan; Mainprize, James; Grouza, Vladimir; Huynh, Christopher; Sahgal, Arjun; Song, William Y.; Ruschin, Mark

    2017-03-01

    A Contrast and Attenuation-map (CT-number) Linearity Improvement (CALI) framework is proposed for cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The proposed framework is used together with our high spatial resolution iterative reconstruction algorithm and is tailored for the Leksell Gamma Knife ICON (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The incorporated CBCT system in ICON facilitates frameless SRS planning and treatment delivery. The ICON employs a half-cone geometry to accommodate the existing treatment couch. This geometry increases the amount of artifacts and together with other physical imperfections causes image inhomogeneity and contrast reduction. Our proposed framework includes a preprocessing step, involving a shading and beam-hardening artifact correction, and a post-processing step to correct the dome/capping artifact caused by the spatial variations in x-ray energy generated by bowtie-filter. Our shading correction algorithm relies solely on the acquired projection images (i.e. no prior information required) and utilizes filtered-back-projection (FBP) reconstructed images to generate a segmented bone and soft-tissue map. Ideal projections are estimated from the segmented images and a smoothed version of the difference between the ideal and measured projections is used in correction. The proposed beam-hardening and dome artifact corrections are segmentation free. The CALI was tested on CatPhan, as well as patient images acquired on the ICON system. The resulting clinical brain images show substantial improvements in soft contrast visibility, revealing structures such as ventricles and lesions which were otherwise un-detectable in FBP-reconstructed images. The linearity of the reconstructed attenuation-map was also improved, resulting in more accurate CT#.

  13. Evaluation of imaging reformation for root and pulp canal shapes of permanent teeth using a cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jong Hyun; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To estimate the shape of root and pulp canal using a dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to evaluate the accuracy of imaging reformation. CBCT images were obtained with incisors, premolars, and molars as the destination by using PSR 9000N {sup TM} Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Inc, USA) cone beam CT unit that have different kind of detector and field of view, and compared these with the shape and the size of actual root and root canal. When the measuring value of cone beam computed tomography concerning to each root's bucco-lingual diameter and mesio-distal diameter was compared with the value of the actual root, it reveals an error range -0.49 {approx} +0.63 mm at PSR900N and -0.97 {approx} +1.14 mm at i-CAT (P>0.05). It was possible to identify and measure PSR 9000N {sup T}M Dental CT system to the limit 0.48{+-}0.06 mm (P>0.05) and i-CAT CBCT to the limit 0.86{+-}0.09 mm (P<0.05) on estimating the size and the shape of root canal. Two kinds of CBCT images revealed the useful reproducibility to estimate the shape of root, but there was the difference to estimate the shape of root according to apparatus. The reproducibility of root shape in the image of three-dimensions at PSR 900N is low such as 0.65 mm in a case of minute root canal. CBCT images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation for root and pulp and clinically CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of root and canal. However, these are different qualities of imaging reformation according to CBCT apparatus and limitation of reproducibility for minute root canals.

  14. Mechanics of bioinspired imaging systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging systems in nature have attracted a lot of research interest due to their superior optical and imaging characteristics. Recent advancements in materials science, mechanics, and stretchable electronics have led to successful development of bioinspired cameras that resemble the structures and functions of biological light-sensing organs. In this review, we discuss some recent progresses in mechanics of bioinspired imaging systems, including tunable hemispherical eyeball camera and artificial compound eye camera. The mechanics models and results reviewed in this article can provide efficient tools for design and optimization of such systems, as well as other related optoelectronic systems that combine rigid elements with soft substrates.

  15. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Ren, Yijin

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years. Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines, particularly in the fields of orthodontics, maxillofacial surgery, plastic and reconstructive

  16. Performance comparison of different compact NIR fluorescent imaging systems with goggle display for intraoperative image-guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent imaging system has been widely used for intraoperative image-guided application. In this paper, we present performance comparison from three compact NIR fluorescence imaging system prototypes with goggle display that we developed for intraoperative guidance: threshold detection based two camera system, feature matching based three cameras system and miniature beam-splitter single camera system. Their performance is evaluated according to sensitivity regarding different ICG concentrations, accuracy of image overlay between NIR-visible channels, compactness and practicability in intraoperative use. The comparison results show great potentials of using these NIR fluorescence imaging systems to improve user experience and surgical outcomes in intraoperative use.

  17. Large amplitude forced vibration analysis of cross-beam system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large amplitude forced vibration behaviour of cross-beam system under harmonic excitation is studied, incorporating the effect of geometric non-linearity. The forced vibration analysis is carried out in an indirect way, in which the dynamic system is assumed to satisfy the force equilibrium condition at peak load value, thus ...

  18. Imaging doses in radiation therapy from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Daniel Ellis

    Advances in radiation treatment delivery, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), have made it possible to deliver large doses of radiation with a high degree of conformity. While highly conformal treatments offers the advantage of sparing surrounding normal tissue, this benefit can only be realized if the patient is accurately positioned during each treatment fraction. The need to accurately position the patient has led to the development and use of gantry mounted kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) systems. These systems are used to acquire high resolution volumetric images of the patient which are then digitally registered with the planning CT dataset to confirm alignment of the patient on the treatment table. While kV-CBCT is a very useful tool for aligning the patient prior to treatment, daily use in a high fraction therapy regimen results in a substantial radiation dose. In order to quantify the radiation dose associated with CBCT imaging, an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 50th percentile adult male and a fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimetry system were both constructed as part of this dissertation. These tools were then used to directly measure organ doses incurred during clinical protocols for the head, chest, and pelvis. For completeness, the dose delivered from both the X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) and the On-Board Imager (OBI, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were investigated. While this study provided a direct measure of organ doses for estimating risk to the patient, a practical method for estimating organ doses that could be performed with phantoms and dosimeters currently available at most clinics was also desired. To accomplish this goal, a 100 mm pencil ion chamber was used to measure the "cone beam dose index" (CBDI) inside standard CT dose index (CTDI) acrylic phantoms. A weighted CBDI (CBDIw), similar to the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), was then calculated to

  19. Army medical imaging system: ARMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedband, M.P.; Kramp, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances of stimulable phosphor screens, data cards using optical storage means, and new personal computers with image processing capability have made possible the design of economical filmless medical imaging systems. The addition of communication links means that remote interpretation of images is also possible. The Army Medical Imaging System uses stimulable phosphor screens, digital readout, a small computer, an optical digital data card device, and a DIN/PACS link. Up to 200 images can be stored in the computer hard disk for rapid recall and reading by the radiologist. The computer permits image processing, annotation, insertion of text, and control of the system. Each device contains an image storage RAM and communicates with the computer via the small computer systems interface. Data compression is used to reduce the required storage capacity and transmission times of the 1-mB images. The credit card-size optical data cards replace film and can store 12 or more images. The data cards can be read on an independent viewer. The research is supported by the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory

  20. An electron density measurement using an analyzer based imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewer, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Using a monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source the electron density of a homogeneous target was determined by measuring the refraction that occurs at the air-target interface for a known angle of incidence. The angle of deviation that these X-rays undergo at the transition between materials is micro-radian to submicro-radian in scale. Existing analyzer based imaging systems are designed to measure submicro-radian angle changes and commonly use monochromatic hard X-ray beams generated from synchrotron sources. A preliminary experiment using the analyzer based imaging apparatus at the Canadian Light Source Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline and a half cylinder shaped plastic target will be presented. By measuring the angle of deviation of the photon beam at several discrete angular positions of the target the electron density of the target material was determined.

  1. A novel image-domain-based cone-beam computed tomography enhancement algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Li Tianfang; Yang Yong; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful, E-mail: lix@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in image-guided radiotherapy. However, due to a large cone-beam angle, scatter effects significantly degrade the CBCT image quality and limit its clinical application. The goal of this study is to develop an image enhancement algorithm to reduce the low-frequency CBCT image artifacts, which are also called the bias field. The proposed algorithm is based on the hypothesis that image intensities of different types of materials in CBCT images are approximately globally uniform (in other words, a piecewise property). A maximum a posteriori probability framework was developed to estimate the bias field contribution from a given CBCT image. The performance of the proposed CBCT image enhancement method was tested using phantoms and clinical CBCT images. Compared to the original CBCT images, the corrected images using the proposed method achieved a more uniform intensity distribution within each tissue type and significantly reduced cupping and shading artifacts. In a head and a pelvic case, the proposed method reduced the Hounsfield unit (HU) errors within the region of interest from 300 HU to less than 60 HU. In a chest case, the HU errors were reduced from 460 HU to less than 110 HU. The proposed CBCT image enhancement algorithm demonstrated a promising result by the reduction of the scatter-induced low-frequency image artifacts commonly encountered in kV CBCT imaging.

  2. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Campus,UK (United Kingdom); Connolley, Thomas [Diamond Light Source, I12 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dolbnya, Igor P.; Malandain, Andrew; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source, B16 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Grant, Patrick S.; Liotti, Enzo; Lui, Andrew [Department of Materials, University of Oxford Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm{sup 2} with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm{sup 2}. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. This technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.

  3. A high energy neutral beam system for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.A.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.

    1988-09-01

    High energy neutral beams provide a promising method of heating and driving current in steady-state tokamak fusion reactors. As an example, we have made a conceptual design of a neutral beam system for current drive on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The system, based on electrostatic acceleration of D/sup /minus// ions, can deliver up to 100 MW of 1.6 MeV D 0 neutrals through three ports. Radiation protection is provided by locating sensitive beamline components 35 to 50 m from the reactor. In an application to a 3300 MW power reactor, a system delivering 120 MW of 2-2.4 MeV deuterium beams assisted by 21 MW of lower hybrid wave power drives 25 MA and provides an adequate plasma power gain (Q = 24) for a commercial fusion power plant. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. RAMI Analyses of Heating Neutral Beam and Diagnostic Neutral Beam Systems for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. H.; Lee, S.; Hemsworth, R.; van Houtte, D.; Okayama, K.; Sagot, F.; Schunke, B.; Svensson, L.

    2011-09-01

    A RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, Inspectability) analysis has been performed for the heating (& current drive) neutral beam (HNB) and diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) systems of the ITER device [1-3]. The objective of these analyses is to implement RAMI engineering requirements for design and testing to prepare a reliability-centred plan for commissioning, operation, and maintenance of the system in the framework of technical risk control to support the overall ITER Project. These RAMI requirements will correspond to the RAMI targets for the ITER project and the compensating provisions to reach them as deduced from the necessary actions to decrease the risk level of the function failure modes. The RAMI analyses results have to match with the procurement plan of the systems.

  5. RAMI Analyses of Heating Neutral Beam and Diagnostic Neutral Beam Systems for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, D. H.; Lee, S.; Hemsworth, R.; Houtte, D. van; Okayama, K.; Sagot, F.; Schunke, B.; Svensson, L.

    2011-01-01

    A RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, Inspectability) analysis has been performed for the heating (and current drive) neutral beam (HNB) and diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) systems of the ITER device. The objective of these analyses is to implement RAMI engineering requirements for design and testing to prepare a reliability-centred plan for commissioning, operation, and maintenance of the system in the framework of technical risk control to support the overall ITER Project. These RAMI requirements will correspond to the RAMI targets for the ITER project and the compensating provisions to reach them as deduced from the necessary actions to decrease the risk level of the function failure modes. The RAMI analyses results have to match with the procurement plan of the systems.

  6. SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuinness, C; Descovich, M; Sudhyadhom, A [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The targeting accuracy of the Cyberknife system is measured by end-to-end tests delivering multiple isocentric beams to a point in space. While the targeting accuracy of two representative beams can be determined by a Winston-Lutz-type test, no test is available today to determine the targeting accuracy of each clinical beam. We used a scintillator cone to measure the accuracy of each individual beam. Methods: The XRV-124 from Logos Systems Int’l is a scintillator cone with an imaging system that is able to measure individual beam vectors and a resulting error between planned and measured beam coordinates. We measured the targeting accuracy of isocentric and non-isocentric beams for a number of test cases using the Iris and the fixed collimator. The average difference between plan and measured beam position was 0.8–1.2mm across the collimator sizes and plans considered here. The max error for a single beam was 2.5mm for the isocentric plans, and 1.67mm for the non-isocentric plans. The standard deviation of the differences was 0.5mm or less. Conclusion: The CyberKnife System is specified to have an overall targeting accuracy for static targets of less than 0.95mm. In E2E tests using the XRV124 system we measure average beam accuracy between 0.8 to 1.23mm, with maximum of 2.5mm. We plan to investigate correlations between beam position error and robot position, and to quantify the effect of beam position errors on patient specific plans. Martina Descovich has received research support and speaker honoraria from Accuray.

  7. TFTR neutral beam systems conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    The functions, design requirements, and design descriptions of the injection system are described. Cost summaries are given for each system and subsystem. The costs presented are for: materials procurement; and shipping, assembly, and installation at the Princeton site. (MOW)

  8. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  9. Understanding Beam Alignment in a Coherent Lidar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Roychoudhari, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam alignment in a coherent lidar (or ladar) receiver system plays a critical role in optimizing its performance. Optical alignment in a coherent lidar system dictates the wavefront curvature (phase front) and Poynting vector) matching of the local oscillator beam with the incoming receiver beam on a detector. However, this alignment is often not easy to achieve and is rarely perfect. Furthermore, optical fibers are being increasingly used in coherent lidar system receivers for transporting radiation to achieve architectural elegance. Single mode fibers also require stringent mode matching for efficient light coupling. The detector response characteristics vary with the misalignment of the two pointing vectors. Misalignment can lead to increase in DC current. Also, a lens in front of the detector may exasperate phase front and Poynting vector mismatch. Non-Interaction of Waves, or the NIW property indicates the light beams do not interfere by themselves in the absence of detecting dipoles. In this paper, we will analyze the extent of misalignment on the detector specifications using pointing vectors of mixing beams in light of the NIW property.

  10. Task-based statistical image reconstruction for high-quality cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hao; Webster Stayman, J.; Xu, Jennifer; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Sisniega, Alejandro; Mow, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2017-11-01

    Task-based analysis of medical imaging performance underlies many ongoing efforts in the development of new imaging systems. In statistical image reconstruction, regularization is often formulated in terms to encourage smoothness and/or sharpness (e.g. a linear, quadratic, or Huber penalty) but without explicit formulation of the task. We propose an alternative regularization approach in which a spatially varying penalty is determined that maximizes task-based imaging performance at every location in a 3D image. We apply the method to model-based image reconstruction (MBIR—viz., penalized weighted least-squares, PWLS) in cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the head, focusing on the task of detecting a small, low-contrast intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and we test the performance of the algorithm in the context of a recently developed CBCT prototype for point-of-care imaging of brain injury. Theoretical predictions of local spatial resolution and noise are computed via an optimization by which regularization (specifically, the quadratic penalty strength) is allowed to vary throughout the image to maximize local task-based detectability index ({{d}\\prime} ). Simulation studies and test-bench experiments were performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom. Three PWLS implementations were tested: conventional (constant) penalty; a certainty-based penalty derived to enforce constant point-spread function, PSF; and the task-based penalty derived to maximize local detectability at each location. Conventional (constant) regularization exhibited a fairly strong degree of spatial variation in {{d}\\prime} , and the certainty-based method achieved uniform PSF, but each exhibited a reduction in detectability compared to the task-based method, which improved detectability up to ~15%. The improvement was strongest in areas of high attenuation (skull base), where the conventional and certainty-based methods tended to over-smooth the data. The task-driven reconstruction method presents a

  11. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  12. Multilingual system using Internet imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tadashi; Hata, Yoshitsugu; Iida, Ryouji; Kakugawa, Hirotsugu; Ae, Tadashi; Murakami, Hisae

    2000-12-01

    In these years, multilingual system becomes important, but, most computer environment cannot handle all languages (scripts) in ths world. This paper presents a multilingual imaging system on the Internet. In this system, characters are converted into bitmaps, and therefore, we can display multilingual text on WWW browsers. In order to convert multilingual plain text into bitmap images, we have developed software named ctext2pgm and VFlib. VFlib is a software component to rasterize fonts in various file formats, and ctext2pgm generates bitmap image files form multilingual plain texts. Ctext2pgm is an application program of VFlib, and it supports about 30 languages. We also introduce a language education system for various languages. This is an example of the multilingual system using internet imaging.

  13. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  14. Chromatically Corrected Imaging Systems for Charged-Particle Radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Blind, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    In proton radiography, imaging with systems consisting of quadrupole magnets is an established technique for viewing the material distribution and composition of objects, either statically or during fast events such as explosions. With the most favorable magnet configuration, the -I lens, chromatic aberrations generally dominate the image blur. Image resolution can be improved, and largely decoupled from the input-beam parameters, by using a second-order achromatic bend with some additional higher-order aberration correction. The aberration-correction approach is discussed. For a given resolution, such a bend allows use of much lower-energy imaging particles than a -I lens. Each bend design represents a set of equivalent systems; an 800-MeV proton design and its equivalent 40-MeV electron system are presented. The electron system is useful for imaging small objects. Magnet errors in the achromatic bends must be tightly controlled to preserve image quality, but not beyond feasibility of present technology. Sys...

  15. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-10-01

    With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications.

  16. Comparison of Online 6 Degree-of-Freedom Image Registration of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac X-Ray for Intracranial Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Shi, Wenyin; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Lu, Bo; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam; Liu, Haisong

    2017-06-01

    The study was aimed to compare online 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam computed tomography and BrainLab ExacTrac X-ray imaging systems for intracranial radiosurgery. Phantom and patient studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (version 2.5), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (version 6.1.1). The phantom study was based on a Rando head phantom and was designed to evaluate isocenter location dependence of the image registrations. Ten isocenters at various locations representing clinical treatment sites were selected in the phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken when the phantom was located at each isocenter. The patient study included 34 patients. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken at each patient's treatment position. The 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations were performed on cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac, and residual errors calculated from cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac were compared. In the phantom study, the average residual error differences (absolute values) between cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac image registrations were 0.17 ± 0.11 mm, 0.36 ± 0.20 mm, and 0.25 ± 0.11 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.34° ± 0.08°, 0.13° ± 0.09°, and 0.12° ± 0.10°, respectively. In the patient study, the average residual error differences in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.20 ± 0.16 mm, 0.30 ± 0.18 mm, 0.21 ± 0.18 mm, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.40°± 0.16°, 0.17° ± 0.13°, and 0.20° ± 0.14°, respectively. Overall, the average residual error differences were cone-beam computed tomography image registration in intracranial treatments.

  17. Compact pulsed electron beam system for microwave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. K.; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Banerjee, P.; Prabaharan, T.; Adhikary, B.; Verma, R.; Sharma, A.; Shyam, A.

    2012-11-01

    A compact 180 kV electron beam system is designed for high power microwave generation. The electron beam system is consists of a secondary energy storage device, which can deliver energy to the load at faster rate than usual primary energy storage system such as tesla transformers or marx generator. The short duration, high voltage pulse with fast rise time and good flattop is applied to vacuum diode for high power microwave generation. The compact electron beam system is made up of single turn primary tesla transformer which charges a helical pulse forming line and transfers its energy to vacuum diode through a high voltage pressurized spark gap switch. We have used helical pulse forming line which has higher inductance as compared to coaxial pulse forming line, which in turns increases, the pulse width and reduce the length of the pulse forming line. Water dielectric medium is used because of its high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and efficient energy storage capability. The time dependent breakdown property and high relative permittivity of water makes it an ideal choice for this system. The high voltage flat-top pulse of 90 kV, 260 ns is measured across the matched load. In this article we have reported the design details, simulation and initial experimental results of 180 kV pulsed electron beam system for high power microwave generation.

  18. Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Cooper, Moogega; Adler, John; Jacobson, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a hyperspectral imaging instrument package designed to be carried aboard a helicopter. It was developed to map the depths of Greenland's supraglacial lakes. The instrument is capable of telescoping to twice its original length, allowing it to be retracted with the door closed during takeoff and landing, and manually extended in mid-flight. While extended, the instrument platform provides the attached hyperspectral imager a nadir-centered and unobstructed view of the ground. Before flight, the instrument mount is retracted and securely strapped down to existing anchor points on the floor of the helicopter. When the helicopter reaches the destination lake, the door is opened and the instrument mount is manually extended. Power to the instrument package is turned on, and the data acquisition computer is commanded via a serial cable from an onboard user-operated laptop to begin data collection. After data collection is complete, the instrument package is powered down and the mount retracted, allowing the door to be closed in preparation for landing. The present design for the instrument mount consists of a three-segment telescoping cantilever to allow for a sufficient extended length to see around the landing struts and provide a nadir-centered and unobstructed field of view for the hyperspectral imager. This instrument works on the premise that water preferentially absorbs light with longer wavelengths on the red side of the visible spectrum. This property can be exploited in order to remotely determine the depths of bodies of pure freshwater. An imager flying over such a lake receives light scattered from the surface, the bulk of the water column, and from the lake bottom. The strength of absorption of longer-wavelength light depends on the depth of the water column. Through calibration with in situ measurements of the water depths, a depth-determining algorithm may be developed to determine lake depth from these spectral properties of the

  19. System effects influencing the bending strength of timber beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Källsner, B.

    1998-01-01

    measurements of the strengths of a large number of shorttest pieces cut from the beams such that judgementally each test piece contains only a single defect cluster. The testpiece is spliced to stronger wood beam shafts in both ends. Due to the occurrence of a substantial number of splicefailures in the total...... test series of 197 tests a special maximum likelihood estimation procedure is applied to estimate theparameters. Assuming that the estimated parameters are applicable in the series system model for the full uncutbeams a theoretical bending strength distribution function is obtained in dependence......A stochastic model of hierarchical series system type for the bending strength of spruce beams isdefined from the anticipation that the bending failure takes place at a cross-section with a defect cluster formed by knots or grain irregularities. The parameters of the model are estimated from...

  20. Electronics and Calibration system for the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolò; Fabbri, Franco L; Finkel, Alexey; Orfanelli, Stella; Loos, R; Montanari, Alessandro; Rusack, R; Stickland, David P

    2014-01-01

    In the context of increasing luminosity of LHC, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the cavern of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The readout chain of this detector will make use of many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics will record bunch-by-bunch histograms, which will be published to CMS and the LHC using the newly designed CMS beam instrumentation specific DAQ. A calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate triggered pulses of...

  1. Fibre Monitoring System for the Beam Permit Loops at the LHC and Future Evolution of the Beam Interlock System

    CERN Document Server

    García-Argos, Carlos; Gabourin, Stéphane; Martin, Christophe; Puccio, Bruno; Siemko, Andrzej P.

    The optical fibres that transmit the beam permit loop signals at the CERN accelerator complex are deployed along radiation areas. This may result in increased attenuation of the fibres, which reduces the power margin of the links. In addition, other events may cause the links to not function properly and result in false dumps, reducing the availability of the accelerator chain and affecting physics data taking. In order to evaluate the state of the fibres, an out-of-band fibre monitoring system is proposed, working in parallel to the actual beam permit loops. The future beam interlock system to be deployed during LHC long shutdown 2 will implement online, real-time monitoring of the fibres, a feature the current system lacks. Commercial off-the-shelf components to implement the optical transceivers are proposed whenever possible instead of ad-hoc designs.

  2. Diagnostic medical imaging systems. X-ray radiography and angiography, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, NMR imaging, sonography, integrated image information systems. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morneburg, H.

    1995-01-01

    This third edition is based on major review and updating work. Many recent developments have been included, as for instance novel systems for fluoroscopy and mammography, spiral CT and electron beam CT, nuclear medical tomography ( SPECT and PET), novel techniques for fast NMR imaging, spectral and colour coded duplex sonography, as well as a new chapter on integrated image information systems, including network installations. (orig.) [de

  3. A service for monitoring the quality of intraoperative cone beam CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckel Frank

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, operating rooms (ORs have transformed into integrated operating rooms, where devices are able to communicate, exchange data, or even steer and control each other. However, image data processing is commonly done by dedicated workstations for specific clinical use-cases. In this paper, we propose a concept for a dynamic service component for image data processing on the example of automatic image quality assessment (AQUA of intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images. The service is build using the Open Surgical Communication Protocol (OSCP and the standard for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM. We have validated the proposed concept in an integrated demonstrator OR.

  4. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  5. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Westphalen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher’s exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25 and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34. Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. RESULTS: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58% had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59 for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59. For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2. CONCLUSION: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy.

  6. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology. Abdominal Imaging Section], e-mail: antonio.westphalen@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  7. Development of KOMAC Beam Monitoring System Using EPICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young-Gi; Yun, Sang-Pil; Kim, Han-Sung; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The beam loss signals must be digitized and the sampling has to be synchronized to a reference signal which is an external trigger for beam operation. The digitized data must be accessible by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS)-based control system, which manages the whole accelerator control. In order to satisfy the requirement, an Input /Output Controller (IOC), which runs Linux on a CPU module with PCI express based Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) modules, has been adopted. An associated linux driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed. The IOC meets the requirements and the development and maintenance of the software for the IOC is considerably efficient. The data acquisition system running EPICS will be used in increasing phase of KOrea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) beam power. The beam monitoring system integrates BLM and BPM signals into control system and offers real-time data to operators. The IOC, which is implemented with Linux and PCI driver, has supported data acquisition as a very flexible solution

  8. Application of flat panel digital imaging for improvement of ocular melanoma patient set-up in proton beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daftari, Inder K.; Essert, Timothy; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    In order to reduce the dose to surrounding critical tissues and also minimize the probability of recurrence of the tumor the placement of radiation fields relative to patient anatomy is very essential in proton beam therapy of ocular tumors. To achieve this objective, patient setup and field placement have been verified before treatment by analyzing the portal images obtained with Polaroid film-camera system. The Polaroid films are becoming expensive and obsolete, making new methods of verifying the patient treatment position essential. The objective of this study was to implement an orthogonal flat panel digital imaging (FPDI) system as a tool to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on the UC Davis cyclotron proton beam therapy line and to use the system for patient setup verification. The image quality of the system is sufficient to see an air hole with a diameter of 0.5 mm at a depth of 9 mm, in a 10 cm Lucite phantom. The subject contrast of the FPDI system varied from 16% to 29% by varying the size of the air hole in the phantom from 1 to 5 mm and changing the depth from 9 to 15 mm. The subject contrast for 0.5 mm air hole was 11%. The comparison of the setup variations as measured from Polaroid port films and FPDI was 0.1±0.7 mm in the X-direction, 0.2±0.2 mm in the Y-direction and 0.04±0.1 mm in Z-direction, respectively. The day-to-day positional variations in-patient set-ups were studied for 30 patients using the FPDI system. The patient position set-up on first day of treatment [defined by the X, Y, Z coordinates of the chair and head holder] was registered as the reference image. The comparison of day-to-day patient position with reference image indicated net translation along the three orthogonal axes as 0.3±1.88 mm in right-left direction, -0.3±1.78 in superior-inferior direction and -0.6±2.8 mm in anterior-posterior direction. The image quality of the FPDI system was sufficient to clearly reveal the radio-opaque markers on the digital image. In

  9. Performance of 2D Compressive Sensing on Wide-Beam Through-the-Wall Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Cristofani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing has become an accepted and powerful alternative to conventional data sampling schemes. Hardware simplicity, data, and measurement time reduction and simplified imagery are some of its most attractive strengths. This work aims at exploring the possibilities of using sparse vector recovery theory for actual engineering and defense- and security-oriented applications. Conventional through-the-wall imaging using a synthetic aperture configuration can also take advantage of compressive sensing by reducing data acquisition rates and omitting certain azimuth scanning positions. An ultra-wideband stepped frequency system carrying wide beam antennas performs through-the-wall imaging of a real scene, including a hollow concrete block wall and a corner reflector behind it. Random downsampling rates lower than those announced by Nyquist’s theorem both in the fast-time and azimuth domains are studied, as well as downsampling limitations for accurate imaging. Separate dictionaries are considered and modeled depending on the objects to be reconstructed: walls or point targets. Results show that an easy interpretation of through-the-wall scenes using the -norm and orthogonal matching pursuit algorithms is possible thanks to the simplification of the reconstructed scene, for which only as low as 25% of the conventional SAR data are needed.

  10. Triangular SPECT system for brain and body organ 3-D imaging: Design concept and preliminary imaging result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.; Gottschalk, S.; Schreiner, R.; Walker, R.; Valentino, F.; Covic, J.; Perusek, A.; Pinkstaff, C.; Janzso, J.

    1984-01-01

    The SPECT systems based on 2-D detectors for projection data collection and filtered BPJ image reconstruction have the potential for true 3-D imaging, providing contiguous slice images in any orientation. Anger camera-based SPECT systems have the natural advantage supporting planar imaging clinical procedures. However, current systems suffer from two drawbacks; poor utilization of emitted photons, and inadequate system design for SPECT. The SPECT system consisting of three rectangular cameras with radial translation would offer the cylindrical FOV of 25cm to 40cm diameter allowing close detector access to the object. This system would provide optimized imaging for both brain and body organs in terms of resolution and sensitivity. For brain imaging a tight detector triangle with fan beam collimation, matching detector UFOV to the head, allows full 2π utilization of emitted photons, resulting in >4 times sensitivity increase over the single head system. Minification of intrinsic detector resolution in fan beam collimation further improves system resolution. For body organ imaging the three detectors with parallel hole collimators, rotating in noncircular orbi, provides both improved resolution and three-fold sensitivity increase. Practical challenge lies in ensuring perfect image overlap from three detectors without resolution degradation and artifact generation in order to benefit from the above improvements. An experimental system has been developed to test the above imaging concept and the authors have successfully demonstrated the superior image quality of the overlapped images. Imaging concept analysis is presented with preliminary imaging results

  11. Neutral beam control systems for the Tandem Mirror Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, R.I.

    1979-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) is presently developing the technology and approaches which will be used in larger fusion systems. This paper describes some of the designs which were used in creating the control system for the TMX neutral beams. To create a system of controls that would work near these large, rapid switching current sources required a mixture of different technologies: fiberoptic data transmission, printed circuit and wirewrap techniques, etc

  12. Comparison of image validity between cone beam computed tomography for dental use and multidetector row helical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K; Kawashima, S; Kameoka, S; Akiyama, Y; Honjoya, T; Ejima, K; Sawada, K

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the image validity of a cone beam CT machine for dental use (3DX) and the latest medical CT system, multidetector row helical CT (MDCT). A dried right maxilla of an Asian adult was used as a phantom. It was cut from the zygomatic process towards the midline, parallel to the midline plane, into eight slices of 2 mm thickness. This phantom was imaged with the 3DX and MDCT machines. Images were evaluated by comparing them with one selected bone slice from the phantom. In this comparison, two types of MDCT images were used: one with the window level (WL) and window width (WW) suitable for observing teeth (MDCT tooth image), and the other appropriate for observing bone (MDCT bone image). Three dentists and one radiographer then used our reported subjective five-level scale to evaluate and compare images generated by the two systems in terms of validity. Cancellous bone as well as enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, lamina dura and overall impression were evaluated. Statistically significant differences (Pvalidity. Few significant intra- or interevaluator errors were found. Our subjective evaluation of image validity clarified 3DX as being superior to MDCT. Taken together with the low skin dose we previously reported for 3DX, the results demonstrate 3DX to be beneficial for imaging diagnosis of hard tissues in the maxillofacial region.

  13. Investigation of bulk electron densities for dose calculations on cone-beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.; Parker, J.; Gupta, S.; Hatton, J.; Tang, C.; Capp, A.; Denham, J.W.; Wright, P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: If cone-beam CT images are to be used for dose calculations, then the images must be able to provide accurate electron density information. Twelve patients underwent twice weekly cone-beam CT scans in addition to the planning CT scan. A standardised 5-field treatment plan was applied to 169 of the CBCT images. Doses were calculated using the original electron density values in the CBCT and with bulk electron densities applied. Bone was assigned a density of 288 HU, and all other tissue was assigned to be water equivalent (0 HU). The doses were compared to the dose calculated on the original planning CT image. Using the original HU values in the cone-beam images, the average dose del i vered by the plans from all 12 patients was I. I % lower than the intended 200 cOy delivered on the original CT plans (standard devia tion 0.7%, maximum difference -2.93%). When bulk electron densities were applied to the cone-beam images, the average dose was 0.3% lower than the original CT plans (standard deviation 0.8%, maximum difference -2.22%). Compared to using the original HU values, applying bulk electron densities to the CBCT images improved the dose calculations by almost I %. Some variation due to natural changes in anatomy should be expected. The application of bulk elec tron densities to cone beam CT images has the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations due to inaccurate H U values. Acknowledgements This work was partially funded by Cancer Council NSW Grant Number RG 07-06.

  14. Quantitative low-energy ion beam characterization by beam profiling and imaging via scintillation screens.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Germer, S.; Pietag, F.; Polák, Jaroslav; Arnold, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 113301. ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/21./. Madison, 05.06.2016-09.06.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Current density * Etching * Faraday cups * Ion beam sources * Cameras Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016 http://aip.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1063/1.4964701

  15. Hyperspectral Systems Increase Imaging Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In 1983, NASA started developing hyperspectral systems to image in the ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths. In 2001, the first on-orbit hyperspectral imager, Hyperion, was launched aboard the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft. Based on the hyperspectral imaging sensors used in Earth observation satellites, Stennis Space Center engineers and Institute for Technology Development researchers collaborated on a new design that was smaller and used an improved scanner. Featured in Spinoff 2007, the technology is now exclusively licensed by Themis Vision Systems LLC, of Richmond, Virginia, and is widely used in medical and life sciences, defense and security, forensics, and microscopy.

  16. MR cone-beam CT fusion image overlay for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous biopsies in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Patel, Premal A; Gu, Richard; Rea, Vanessa; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-03-01

    Lesions only visible on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging cannot easily be targeted for image-guided biopsy using ultrasound or X-rays but instead require MR guidance with MR-compatible needles and long procedure times (acquisition of multiple MR sequences). We developed an alternative method for performing these difficult biopsies in a standard interventional suite, by fusing MR with cone-beam CT images. The MR cone-beam CT fusion image is then used as an overlay to guide a biopsy needle to the target area under live fluoroscopic guidance. Advantages of this technique include (i) the ability for it to be performed in a conventional interventional suite, (ii) three-dimensional planning of the needle trajectory using cross-sectional imaging, (iii) real-time fluoroscopic guidance for needle trajectory correction and (iv) targeting within heterogeneous lesions based on MR signal characteristics to maximize the potential biopsy yield.

  17. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  18. Beam position monitor system of J-PARC RCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, N., E-mail: naoki.hayashi@j-parc.jp [Accelerator Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kawase, M.; Hatakeyama, S.; Hiroki, S.; Saeki, R.; Takahashi, H.; Teruyama, Y.; Toyokawa, R. [Accelerator Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Arakawa, D.; Hiramatsu, S.; Lee, S.; Satou, K.; Tejima, M.; Toyama, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2012-06-11

    The J-PARC RCS is a 25 Hz Rapid-Cycling proton Synchrotron and its designed beam power is 1 MW. The beam position monitor (BPM) system at J-PARC RCS is described in this paper. The pre-defined diameter of the BPM detectors is larger than 250 mm, however, the system has to measure the beam position very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to have a large dynamic range. The system should work not only for the high intensity but also for low intensity, such as during beam commissioning, when the intensity is below 1% of the design intensity. There are 54 BPM detectors around the ring and most of them are placed inside steering magnets because of quite limited space. The BPM detector is an electro-static type and it has four electrodes, and a pair of electrodes gives a good linear response with a diagonal cut shape to detect the charge center precisely. The signal processing units, which are equipped with 14-bit 40 MS/s ADC and 600 MHz DSP, have been developed. They are accessed via shared memory space and controlled by EPICS. Such a processing unit is capable of recording the full 25 Hz pulse data for the so-called 'COD mode' (averaged beam position calculation) and it can also store the whole waveform data for further analysis, like turn-by-turn position calculation. The resolution was estimated to be 20{mu}m for 'COD mode' and to be 0.3 mm for the turn-by-turn mode with relatively low intensity of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11}ppp. The position accuracy is estimated to be about 0.5 mm using a newly developed Beam Based Alignment (BBA) method.

  19. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Matthew [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  20. Longitudinal beam instabilities in a double RF system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00229208; Gazis, Evangelos

    Operation with a double RF system is essential for many accelerators in order to increase beam stability, to change the bunch shape or to perform various RF manipulations. This is also the case for the operation of the CERN SPS as the LHC proton injector, where in addition to the main RF system, a fourth harmonic RF system is used in bunch shortening mode in order to increase the synchrotron frequency spread inside the bunch and thus to enhance Landau damping of the collective instabilities. In fact the double RF system operation in the SPS is one of the essential means, together with the controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up to significantly increase the longitudinal instability thresholds (single and multi-bunch) and deliver a good quality beam for the LHC. However, for the HiLumi-LHC (HL-LHC) and LHC injector upgrade (LIU) projects higher beam intensities are required. After all upgrades are in place, the main performance limitations of the LHC injector complex are beam instabilities and high intensity...

  1. Measuring and recording system for electron beam welding parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanova, N.G.; Lifshits, M.L.; Efimov, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    The observation possibility during electron beam welding of circular articles with guaranteed clearance of welding bath leading front in joint gap and flare cloud over the bath by means of television monitor is considered. The composition and operation mode of television measuring system for metric characteristics of flare cloud and altitude of welding bath leading front in the clearance are described

  2. Beam excitation and damping with the transverse feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Rees, J.R.

    1979-08-01

    The questions often come up, ''What is the strength if the beam excitation system? How much damping can the transverse feedback provide?'' The design is now advanced enough to answer these questions; also, laboratory tests of some components have been conducted and we know what can be expected of the hardware. This paper discusses these questions

  3. Large amplitude forced vibration analysis of cross-beam system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    energy method. A. Mitra. *. ,P. Sahoo, K. N. Saha. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, INDIA. *Corresponding Author: e-mail: samik893@gmail.com. Abstract. Large amplitude forced vibration behaviour of cross-beam system under harmonic excitation is studied, incorporating the.

  4. A beam radiation monitoring and protection system for AGS secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    A commercially available radiation monitor using a scintillation detector was modified for charged particle beam monitoring. The device controls access to secondary beams of the AGS and limits beam intensity

  5. ESRF synchrotron injector beam position monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidt, K.; Loyer, F.

    1992-01-01

    The complete lay-out of the BPM system which comprises 75 individual stations is presented from electro-static button signals down to the user level of the computer interface. The design of the electrode button and the block geometry is presented. The timing and the data-acquisition electronics permit precisely timed measurements to be taken simultaneously on all 75 BPM stations at a rate of 1 KHz. The results of this BPM system, are summarised with the performance characteristics of resolution, precision and reproductibility. (author) 4 refs.; 4 figs

  6. Imaging of water in living plant using neutron beam and positron emitting nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of biological activity in intact cells or tissues is essential to understand many life processes. Techniques for these in vivo measurements have not been well developed. We present here a nondestructive method to image water in living plants using a neutron beam as well as positron emitting nuclides. With high specificity to water, neutron beam technique images water movement in seeds or in roots imbedded in soil, as well as in wood and meristems during development. To know real-time water movement, positron emitting nuclides, 18 F or 15 O was produced by a cyclotron. We present how water uptake activity was shown using these these nuclides. (author)

  7. On the impact of neutron beam divergence and scattering on the quality of transmission acquired tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Gonçalves, Marcelo José; Furieri, Rosanne C. A. A.

    2007-10-01

    The impact of the divergence of a thermal neutron beam and the scattered neutrons on the quality of tomographic images acquired by transmission have been evaluated by using a third generation tomographic system incorporating neutron collimators under several different arrangements. The system equipped with a gaseous position sensitive detector has been placed at the main channel outlet of the Argonauta Research Reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN-Brazil) which furnishes a thermal neutron flux of 2.3 × 105 n cm-2 s-1. Experiments have then been conducted using test-objects with well-known inner structure and composition to assess the influence of the collimators arrangement on the quality of the acquired images. Both, beam divergence and scattering - expected to spoil the image quality - have been reduced by using properly positioned collimators between the neutron source and the object, and in the gap between the object and the detector, respectively. The shadow cast by this last collimator on the projections used to reconstruct the tomographic images has been eliminated by a proper software specifically written for this purpose. Improvement of the tomographic images has been observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach to improve their quality by using properly positioned collimators.

  8. High resolution laser beam induced current images under trichromatic laser radiation: approximation to the solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, F J; Alcántara, R; Fernández-Lorenzo, C; Martín-Calleja, J

    2010-03-01

    A laser beam induced current (LBIC) map of a photoactive surface is a very useful tool when it is necessary to study the spatial variability of properties such as photoconverter efficiency or factors connected with the recombination of carriers. Obtaining high spatial resolution LBIC maps involves irradiating the photoactive surface with a photonic beam with Gaussian power distribution and with a low dispersion coefficient. Laser emission fulfils these characteristics, but against it is the fact that it is highly monochromatic and therefore has a spectral distribution different to solar emissions. This work presents an instrumental system and procedure to obtain high spatial resolution LBIC maps in conditions approximating solar irradiation. The methodology developed consists of a trichromatic irradiation system based on three sources of laser excitation with emission in the red, green, and blue zones of the electromagnetic spectrum. The relative irradiation powers are determined by either solar spectrum distribution or Planck's emission formula which provides information approximate to the behavior of the system if it were under solar irradiation. In turn, an algorithm and a procedure have been developed to be able to form images based on the scans performed by the three lasers, providing information about the photoconverter efficiency of photovoltaic devices under the irradiation conditions used. This system has been checked with three photosensitive devices based on three different technologies: a commercial silicon photodiode, a commercial photoresistor, and a dye-sensitized solar cell. These devices make it possible to check how the superficial quantum efficiency has areas dependent upon the excitation wavelength while it has been possible to measure global incident photon-to-current efficiency values approximating those that would be obtained under irradiation conditions with sunlight.

  9. Daily check of the electron beams with a diode system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilette, P. [Hospital Civil de Charleroi (Belgium). Centre for Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    A fast systems to check all the accelerator beams on a daily basis has been developed. A cheap home-made detector, based on non-medical diodes (type 1N5408), has been used since July 1992 to verify all the electron beams every day. The relative energy and Top-cGy correspondence is verified with one single irradiation of less than 1 minute by 6 diodes fixed in a polystyrene phantom. The principle of construction, software implementation and results are presented.

  10. Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

  11. [Development of a cone-beam CT system for radiological technologist education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Ozaki, Kaho; Miyashita, Mariko; Ohno, Tomoyuki; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ohara, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For radiological technologists, it is very important to understand the principle of computed tomography (CT) and CT artifacts derived from mechanical and electrical failure. In this study, a CT system for educating radiological technologists was developed. The system consisted of a cone-beam CT scanner and educational software. The cone-beam CT scanner has a simple structure, using a micro-focus X-ray tube and an indirect-conversion flat panel detector. For the educational software, we developed various educational functions of image reconstruction and reconstruction parameters as well as CT artifacts. In the experiments, the capabilities of the system were evaluated using an acrylic phantom. We verified that the system produced the expected results.

  12. Development of a cone-beam CT system for radiological technologist education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Ohara, Ken; Ozaki, Kaho; Miyashita, Mariko; Ohno, Tomoyuki; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    For radiological technologists, it is very important to understand the principle of computed tomography (CT) and CT artifacts derived from mechanical and electrical failure. In this study, a CT system for educating radiological technologists was developed. The system consisted of a cone-beam CT scanner and educational software. The cone-beam CT scanner has a simple structure, using a micro-focus X-ray tube and an indirect-conversion flat panel detector. For the educational software, we developed various educational functions of image reconstruction and reconstruction parameters as well as CT artifacts. In the experiments, the capabilities of the system were evaluated using an acrylic phantom. We verified that the system produced the expected results. (author)

  13. Artificial intelligence and medical imaging. Expert systems and image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.; Zoellner, G.; Horviller, S.; Jacqmain, T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on the existing systems for automated image analysis and interpretation in medical imaging, especially in radiology. The example of ORFEVRE, the system for the analysis of CAT-scan images of the cervical triplet (c3-c5) by image analysis and subsequent expert-system is given and discussed in detail. Possible extensions are described [fr

  14. Image and surgery-related costs comparing cone beam CT and panoramic imaging before removal of impacted mandibular third molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L. B.; Rose Olsen, Kim; Christensen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to derive the absolute and relative costs of cone beam CT (CBCT) and panoramic imaging before removal of an impacted mandibular third molar. Furthermore, the study aimed to analyse the influence of different cost-setting scenarios...

  15. Applications of FASTBUS to beam diagnostics and experiment data systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machen, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    A five-year effort by the North American NIM Committee, in collaboration with the ESONE Committee of European Laboratories, has resulted in a specification for the FASTBUS modular high-speed data-acquisition system. The system is designed around an emitter-coupled logic (ECL) 32-bit data bus for asynchronous data transmission at 100 ns per transaction. Initial applications of FASTBUS will be in experiment data systems at accelerator facilities worldwide--beam diagnostic data systems on the accelerator side and particle-beam experiment data systems in the experimental area. As the specification (and the resulting hardware and software) matures, real-time machine-control applications will become possible. This paper discusses the near-term use of FASTBUS in accelerator beam-diagnostics instrumentation systems, where an extra increment in system throughput and front-end processing speed can produce a greater understanding of the physical phenomena under study. The arguments and conclusions may be equally well applied to other similar data-handling problems requiring high bandwidth in the data system

  16. Expert system controlled image display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swett, H.A.; Fisher, P.; Mutalik, P.

    1988-01-01

    Conventional medical expert systems deliver advice as text (a diagnosis, list, recommendation, or discussion). This may be quite useful in some areas of medical decision making but has distinct limitations in such a visually oriented discipline as diagnostic imaging, where decisions often depend on pattern recognition and the appreciation of subtle morphologic features. We are developing an expert system that displays groups of images as part of its intelligent output. This system uses a rule-based strategy to select images for display. They may be displayed because they share a common feature, cluster of features, or clinical history. Such a system may be useful as a diagnostic aid or for continuing medical education. It is likely to have particular value in the setting of picture archiving and communication systems

  17. Design of automatic tracking system for electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chengdan; Chinese Academy of Space Technology, Lanzhou; Li Heqi; Li Chunxu; Ying Lei; Luo Yan

    2004-01-01

    The design and experimental process of an automatic tracking system applied to local vacuum electron beam welding are dealt with in this paper. When the annular parts of an exactitude apparatus were welded, the centre of rotation of the electron gun and the centre of the annular weld are usually not superposed because of the machining error, workpiece's setting error and so on. In this teaching process, a little bundle of electron beam is used to scan the weld groove, the amount of the secondary electrons reflected from the workpiece is different when the electron beam scans the both sides and the centre of the weld groove. The difference can indicate the position of the weld and then a computer will record the deviation between the electron beam spot and the centre of the weld groove. The computer will analyze the data and put the data into the storage software. During the welding process, the computer will modify the position of the electron gun based on the deviation to make the electron beam spot centered on the annular weld groove. (authors)

  18. Beam - and drive - controlled amplifier for the ISABELLE accelerating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.; Puglisi, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need of very low output impedance rf systems for heavy particle accelerators has led to the development of very sophisticated amplifier configurations. Among them, the use of a common-anode final amplifier seems most promising. If the output impedance is defined in the Thevenin Theorem sense, then class-A operation seems unavoidable. However, for particle dynamics only the voltage induced by the beam is of real concern and voltage requirements do not necessarily demand a time invariant output impedance. These considerations led to investigation of the conditions that must be met to obtain control over the beam-induced voltage. It was possible to demonstrate that in the common anode case the induced voltage can be largely independent of the bias applied to the final tube, if the beam loading is very strong

  19. X-ray beam design for multi-energy imaging with charge-integrating detector: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Cheol-Ha [Department of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, 47 Jurye-ro, Sasang, Busan 617-716 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Radiological Environment & Health Science, Dongseo University, 47 Jurye-ro, Sasang, Busan 617-716 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Daehong, E-mail: goldcollar011@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Science, Eulji University, 553 Sanseong-daero, Seongnam 461-713, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Multi-energy X-ray imaging systems have been widely used for clinical examinations. In order to enhance the imaging quality of these X-ray systems, a dual-energy system that can obtain specific information has been developed in order to discriminate different materials. Although the dual-energy system shows reliable performance for clinical applications, it is necessary to improve the method in order to minimize radiation dose, reduce projection error, and increase image contrast. The purpose of this study is to develop a triple energy technique that can discriminate three materials for the purpose of enhancing imaging quality and patient safety. The X-ray system tube voltage was varied from 40 to 90 kV, and filters (that can generate three X-ray energies) were installed, consisting of pure elemental materials in foil form (including Al, Cu, I, Ba, Ce, Gd, Er, and W). The X-ray beam was evaluated with respect to mean energy ratio, contrast variation ratio, and exposure efficiency. In order to estimate the performance of the suggested technique, Monte Carlo was conducted, and the results were compared to the photon-counting method. As a result, the density maps of iodine, aluminum, and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) using the X-ray beam were more accurate in comparison to that obtained with the photon-counting method. According to the results, the suggested triple energy technique can improve the accuracy of the determination of thickness of density. Moreover, the X-ray beam could reduce unnecessary patient dose.

  20. Interactive radiographic image retrieval system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Malay Kumar; Chowdhury, Manish; Das, Sudeb

    2017-02-01

    Content based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) systems enable fast diagnosis through quantitative assessment of the visual information and is an active research topic over the past few decades. Most of the state-of-the-art CBMIR systems suffer from various problems: computationally expensive due to the usage of high dimensional feature vectors and complex classifier/clustering schemes. Inability to properly handle the "semantic gap" and the high intra-class versus inter-class variability problem of the medical image database (like radiographic image database). This yields an exigent demand for developing highly effective and computationally efficient retrieval system. We propose a novel interactive two-stage CBMIR system for diverse collection of medical radiographic images. Initially, Pulse Coupled Neural Network based shape features are used to find out the most probable (similar) image classes using a novel "similarity positional score" mechanism. This is followed by retrieval using Non-subsampled Contourlet Transform based texture features considering only the images of the pre-identified classes. Maximal information compression index is used for unsupervised feature selection to achieve better results. To reduce the semantic gap problem, the proposed system uses a novel fuzzy index based relevance feedback mechanism by incorporating subjectivity of human perception in an analytic manner. Extensive experiments were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed CBMIR system on a subset of Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA)-2009 database consisting of 10,902 labeled radiographic images of 57 different modalities. We obtained overall average precision of around 98% after only 2-3 iterations of relevance feedback mechanism. We assessed the results by comparisons with some of the state-of-the-art CBMIR systems for radiographic images. Unlike most of the existing CBMIR systems, in the proposed two-stage hierarchical framework, main importance

  1. SU-F-I-06: Evaluation of Imaging Dose for Modulation Layer Based Dual Energy Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Eunbin; Ahn, SoHyun; Cho, Samju; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Rena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dual energy cone beam CT system is finding a variety of promising applications in diagnostic CT, both in imaging of endogenous materials and exogenous materials across a range of body sites. Dual energy cone beam CT system to suggest in this study acquire image by rotating 360 degree with half of the X-ray window covered using copper modulation layer. In the region that covered by modulation layer absorb the low energy X-ray by modulation layer. Relative high energy X-ray passes through the layer and contributes to image reconstruction. Dose evaluation should be carried out in order to utilize such an imaging acquirement technology for clinical use. Methods: For evaluating imaging dose of modulation layer based dual energy cone beam CT system, Prototype cone beam CT that configured X-ray tube (D054SB, Toshiba, Japan) and detector (PaxScan 2520V, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) is used. A range of 0.5–2.0 mm thickness of modulation layer is implemented in Monte Carlo simulation (MCNPX, ver. 2.6.0, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) with half of X-ray window covered. In-house phantom using in this study that has 3 cylindrical phantoms configured water, Teflon air with PMMA covered for verifying the comparability the various material in human body and is implemented in Monte Carlo simulation. The actual dose with 2.0 mm copper covered half of X-ray window is measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film with 5.0 mm bolus for compared with simulative dose. Results: Dose in phantom reduced 33% by copper modulation layer of 2.0 mm. Scattering dose occurred in modulation layer by Compton scattering effect is 0.04% of overall dose. Conclusion: Modulation layer of that based dual energy cone beam CT has not influence on unnecessary scatter dose. This study was supported by the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission.

  2. The software for the CERN LEP beam orbit measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morpurgo, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Beam Orbit Measurement (BOM) system of LEP consists of 504 pickups, distributed all around the accelerator, that are capable of measuring the positions of the two beams. Their activity has to be synchronized, and the data produced by them have to be collected together, for example to form a 'closed orbit measurement' or a 'trajectory measurement'. On the user side, several clients can access simultaneously the results from this instrument. An automatic acquisition mode, and an 'on request' one, can run in parallel. This results in a very flexible and powerful system. The functionality of the BOM system is fully described, as well as the structure of the software processes which constitute the system, and their interconnections. Problems solved during the implementation are emphasized. (author)

  3. Microprocessor based image processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.I.; Siddiqui, M.N.; Rangoonwala, A.

    1987-01-01

    Rapid developments in the production of integrated circuits and introduction of sophisticated 8,16 and now 32 bit microprocessor based computers, have set new trends in computer applications. Nowadays the users by investing much less money can make optimal use of smaller systems by getting them custom-tailored according to their requirements. During the past decade there have been great advancements in the field of computer Graphics and consequently, 'Image Processing' has emerged as a separate independent field. Image Processing is being used in a number of disciplines. In the Medical Sciences, it is used to construct pseudo color images from computer aided tomography (CAT) or positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Art, advertising and publishing people use pseudo colours in pursuit of more effective graphics. Structural engineers use Image Processing to examine weld X-rays to search for imperfections. Photographers use Image Processing for various enhancements which are difficult to achieve in a conventional dark room. (author)

  4. Noise power properties of a cone-beam CT system for breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L C; Huang, Shih-Ying; Packard, Nathan J; Boone, John M

    2008-12-01

    The noise power properties of a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for breast cancer detection were investigated. Uniform polyethylene cylinders of various diameters were scanned under different system acquisition conditions. Noise power spectra were calculated from difference data generated by subtraction between two identical scans. Multidimensional noise power spectra (NPS) were used as the metric to evaluate the noise properties of the breast CT (bCT) under different system acquisition and reconstruction conditions. A comprehensive investigation of the noise properties was performed in regard to system acquisition parameters including kVp, mA, number of cone-beam projection images used, cone angle, and object size. The influence on reconstruction parameters including interpolation method, reconstruction filter, field of view, matrix size, and slice thickness were also studied. Under certain conditions, the zero-dimensional NPS (image variance) was used as a quantitative index to compare the influence from different scan parameters, especially the radiation dose. If the total scan dose is changed by linearly changing the total number of projection images while the dose per frame is kept constant, the noise power has a linear relationship with the reciprocal of the total dose. If the total scan dose is changed by linearly changing the dose per frame while the total number of projection images is kept constant, the noise power has a quadratic relationship with the reciprocal of the total dose. With the same amount of total dose, using fewer projection images results in lower image noise power in the CT image. Quantitative results from this noise power analysis provide guidance for the bCT system operation, optimization, and data reconstruction.

  5. Moisture imaging of a camphor tree by neutron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences; Karakama, Isamu; Sakura, Tsuguo; Matsubayashi, Masashi

    1998-05-01

    Moisture distribution of a camphor tree was presented. A 23 year old camphor tree was downed at university forest and a wood disk, about 1 cm in width, was lumbered out from the breast height of the tree. The wood disk as well as a newly developing branch of the tree were irradiated with thermal neutrons at an atomic reactor installed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The total flux of thermal neutron was 3.0 x 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}. Water specific images of the disk and a branch were presented with high resolution, which was estimated to be about 16 {mu}m. In the case of wood disk, moisture decreasing manner while drying was also shown through neutron image. Neutron images showed that the moisture decreasing rate in sapwood was similar to that of heartwood. (author)

  6. Image Intensifier-Based CT Volume Imager For Angiography: System Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ruola; Kruger, Robert A.; Hu, Hui

    1989-05-01

    A prototype volume CT system for use in angiography has been modified and tested using three different phantoms. This system consists of a fixed x-ray tube, a conventional image intensifier coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, a computer-controlled turntable on which phantoms were placed. In order to explore the imaging performance of the system for reconstructing a three dimension (3D) vascular structure, two sets of projection images of a vascular phantom, acquired over 250 projection angles with two different sizes of image intensifier were digitized and used for a direct 3D cone beam reconstruction. The spatial resolution limits of the system were measured from the 3D reconstructed images of a specially-designed resolution phantom. The direct 3D reconstructions of a Humanoid chest phantom were obtained using this system to show the perspective of the system for a general medical application with 3D imaging. The quality of the reconstructed images indicates that the system can be used for achieving a direct 3D reconstruction of a vascular structure as well as a general 3D object. The measured spatial resolution of the system is nearly half of the nominal resolution of the image intensifier and is reduced around the edge of the image intensifier, primarily because of the pincushion distortion.

  7. Online full two-dimensional imaging of pulsed muon beams at J-PARC MUSE using a gated image intensifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, T.U., E-mail: ito.takashi15@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Toyoda, A. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Higemoto, W. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tajima, M.; Matsuda, Y. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Shimomura, K. [Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    A new muon beam profile monitor (MBPM) was developed to diagnose pulsed muon beams at J-PARC MUSE, mainly composed of a scintillation screen, a gated image intensifier (II), and a cooled CCD camera. The MBPM was designed to be compact so that it could be inserted into the bore of the μSR spectrometer in the D1 area and used concurrently. The spatial resolution of the MBPM was evaluated to be better than 1.4 mm, depending on the II gain. Such high-resolution muon beam profiles were obtained online for a positive muon beam with a kinetic energy of approximately 4 MeV. The contribution from the decay positrons to beam profiles was significantly reduced owing to the II gating. The linearity of the MBPM was evaluated on the basis of the number of decay positrons monitored by the μSR spectrometer. A linear response within a deviation of ±5% was confirmed over more than two orders of magnitude. In addition, a 3D imaging capability, used in vacuum, and immunity against moderate magnetic fields were demonstrated.

  8. Utility of cone-beam CT imaging in prostatic artery embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Sandeep; Rholl, Kenneth S; Sterling, Keith M; van Breda, Arletta; Papadouris, Dimitrios; Cooper, James M; van Breda, Arina

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the utility of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) in patients undergoing prostatic artery (PA) embolization (PAE) for benign prostatic hyperplasia. From January 2012 to January 2013, 15 patients (age range, 59-81 y; mean, 68 y) with moderate- or severe-grade lower urinary tract symptoms, in whom medical management had failed were enrolled in a prospective United States trial to evaluate PAE. During pelvic angiography, 15 cone-beam CT acquisitions were performed in 11 patients, and digital subtraction angiography was performed in all patients. Cone-beam CT images were reviewed to assess for sites of potential nontarget embolization that impacted therapy, a pattern of enhancement on cone-beam CT suggesting additional PAs, confirmation of prostatic parenchymal perfusion before embolization, and contralateral prostatic parenchymal enhancement. Cone-beam CT was successful in 14 of 15 acquisitions, and PAE was successful in 14 of 15 patients (92%). Cone-beam CT provided information that impacted treatment in five of 11 patients (46%) by allowing for identification of sites of potential nontarget embolization. Duplicated prostatic arterial supply and contralateral perfusion were each identified in 21% of patients (three of 11). Prostatic perfusion was confirmed before embolization in 50% of acquisitions (seven of 14). Cone-beam CT is a useful technique that can potentially mitigate the risk of nontarget embolization. During treatment, it can allow for the interventionalist to identify duplicated prostatic arterial supply or contralateral perfusion, which may be useful when evaluating a treatment failure. © SIR, 2013.

  9. Novel imaging and quality assurance techniques for ion beam therapy a Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, I; Jäkel, O; Mairani, A; Parodi, K

    2010-01-01

    Ion beams exhibit a finite and well defined range in matter together with an “inverted” depth-dose profile, the so-called Bragg peak. These favourable physical properties may enable superior tumour-dose conformality for high precision radiation therapy. On the other hand, they introduce the issue of sensitivity to range uncertainties in ion beam therapy. Although these uncertainties are typically taken into account when planning the treatment, correct delivery of the intended ion beam range has to be assured to prevent undesired underdosage of the tumour or overdosage of critical structures outside the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to define dedicated Quality Assurance procedures to enable in-vivo range verification before or during therapeutic irradiation. For these purposes, Monte Carlo transport codes are very useful tools to support the development of novel imaging modalities for ion beam therapy. In the present work, we present calculations performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and pr...

  10. Electron beam extraction system with a ring radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auslender, V.L.; Kuksanov, N.K.; Polyakov, V.A.; Salimov, R.A.; Chertok, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    Description and results of testings of two electron beam extraction systems for shaping of a circular irradiation field are given. One of the systems contains three 20 cm long outlet windows arranged at 120 deg angle with respect to each other. Tests at the ILU-6 accelerator have shown that the given system provides 150 mm zone irradiation from three sides. Beam utilization factor when irradiating three 40 mm dia tubes amounted to 35% which provides capacity of 2.5 txMrad/h at 20 kW beam power. The other extraction system includes two C-form magnets producing nonuniform and opposing magnetic fields. This system tests at the EhLV-2 accelerator have shown that at 0.8-1.5 MeV electron energy it is possible to irradiate of 60 and 100 mm dia objects, accordingly. The system may be used together with both constant-action and pulse-action accelerators having extraction with linear scanning [ru

  11. Beam position feedback system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and X-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the eddy current induced in the relatively thick (1/2 inch) vacuum chamber by the AC corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the X-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will also be presented

  12. An XCT image database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Masaru; Minato, Kotaro; Koide, Harutoshi; Hirakawa, Akina; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Harumi; Torizuka, Kanji; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Kuwahara, Michiyoshi.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, an expansion of X-ray CT (XCT) examination history database to XCT image database is discussed. The XCT examination history database has been constructed and used for daily examination and investigation in our hospital. This database consists of alpha-numeric information (locations, diagnosis and so on) of more than 15,000 cases, and for some of them, we add tree structured image data which has a flexibility for various types of image data. This database system is written by MUMPS database manipulation language. (author)

  13. EDITORIAL: Imaging systems and techniques Imaging systems and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George; Nikita, Konstantina; Pastorino, Matteo; Karras, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on providing the state-of-the-art approaches and solutions to some of the most challenging imaging areas, such as the design, development, evaluation and applications of imaging systems, measuring techniques, image processing algorithms and instrumentation, with an ultimate aim of enhancing the measurement accuracy and image quality. This special issue explores the principles, engineering developments and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, and encourages broad discussion of imaging methodologies, shaping the future and identifying emerging trends. The multi-faceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment and technological evolution. There is an urgent need to address new problems, which tend to be either static but complex, or dynamic, e.g. rapidly evolving with time, with many unknowns, and to propose innovative solutions. For instance, the battles against cancer and terror, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, management of natural resources and environmental monitoring are some of the areas that need to be addressed. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios and demanding design parameters, e.g. speed, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specificity, contrast, spatial resolution, scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environments, necessitate the development of a multi-functional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, and operation on diverse detection and imaging principles. Efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level present another important research area. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, and using high-resolution, high-selectivity nano-imaging methods, quantum dots, nanoparticles, biomarkers, nanostructures, nanosensors, micro-array imaging chips

  14. The AMS-02 RICH Imager Prototype - In-Beam Tests with 20 GeV/c per Nucleon Ions -

    CERN Document Server

    Buenerd, M.; Aguilar Benitez, M.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Baret, B.; Belmont, E.; Berdugo, J.; Boudoul, G.; Borges, J.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Delgado, C.; Diaz, C.; Derome, L.; Eraud, L.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Giovacchini, F.; Goncalves, P.; Lanciotti, E.; Laurenti, G.; Malinine, A.; Mana, C.; Marin, J.; Martinez, G.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Palomares, C.; Pimenta, M.; Protasov, K.; Sanchez, E.; Seo, E-S.; Sevilla, I.; Torrento, A.; Vargas-Trevino, M.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of the AMS Cherenkov imager (RICH) has been tested at CERN by means of a low intensity 20 GeV/c per nucleon ion beam obtained by fragmentation of a primary beam of Pb ions. Data have been collected with a single beam setting, over the range of nuclear charges 2beam conditions and using different radiators. The charge Z and velocity beta resolutions have been measured.

  15. DC proton beam measurements in a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Schafstall, P.; Schneider, J.D.; Sherman, J.; Zaugg, T.; Taylor, T.

    1994-01-01

    High current, CW proton accelerators are being considered for a number of applications including disposition of nuclear wastes, reduction of fissionable nuclear material inventories, safe production of critical nuclear materials, and energy production. All these applications require the development of high current, reliable, hydrogen ion injectors. In 1986, a program using CW RFQ technology was undertaken at CRL in collaboration with LANL and was continued there until 1993. During this time, an accelerator was built which produced 600 keV, 75 mA and 1,250 keV, 55 mA CW proton beams. The present program at Los Alamos using this accelerator is aimed at continuing the CRL work to demonstrate long-term reliability. In the present work, the authors are seeking to determine the optimal match to and the current limit of the 1,250-keV RFQ. This paper discusses the characterization of the 50 keV beams at the exit of the single-solenoid LEBT and presents both the experimental measurements and the beam simulations done to model this system

  16. Interference-aware random beam selection for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Mohamed M.

    2012-09-01

    Spectrum sharing systems have been introduced to alleviate the problem of spectrum scarcity by allowing secondary unlicensed networks to share the spectrum with primary licensed networks under acceptable interference levels to the primary users. In this paper, we develop interference-aware random beam selection schemes that provide enhanced throughput for the secondary link under the condition that the interference observed at the primary link is within a predetermined acceptable value. For a secondary transmitter equipped with multiple antennas, our schemes select a random beam, among a set of power- optimized orthogonal random beams, that maximizes the capacity of the secondary link while satisfying the interference constraint at the primary receiver for different levels of feedback information describing the interference level at the primary receiver. For the proposed schemes, we develop a statistical analysis for the signal-to-noise and interference ratio (SINR) statistics as well as the capacity of the secondary link. Finally, we present numerical results that study the effect of system parameters including number of beams and the maximum transmission power on the capacity of the secondary link attained using the proposed schemes. © 2012 IEEE.

  17. 40 kA dumping system for the ISR beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnuriger, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The kinetic energy of the proton beam of each ISR is W = I x E x T/sub rev/. With the maximum value of current achieved so far in the ISR I approximately equal to 30 A, a proton energy E = 26 GeV, and a revolution time T/sub rev/ = 3.15 μs, the result is a maximum kinetic energy of W = 2.45 MJ. Such an energy, if suddenly lost and instantaneously dissipated in any part of the ISR, would cause a major breakdown. It was therefore necessary to build a fast and reliable system which could dump the beam whenever safety monitors indicated a hardware fault or a beam loss. The beam in each ISR is dumped by means of four fast pulsed magnets deflecting the particles vertically onto an absorber block situated in the same long straight section. In 1970, when the ISR was first put into operation, each of the four magnets in each ring was energized independently by its own 3 Ω pulse generator. By means of a special spark-gap developed for that purpose, and by switching together the four 3 Ω pulse-forming networks, it was possible to improve significantly the reliability of the system. The 0.75 OMEGA, 40 kA pulse generator now energizing the four fast pulsed magnets is described, with special attention given to the principles and technological solutions which were adopted in order to achieve the necessary reliability of the system for each type of operation, particularly during long colliding beam experiments. (auth)

  18. Beam profile monitor system for the bevalac transfer line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.

    1985-01-01

    Incorporated in the current Bevalac transfer line upgrade project is a proposal for a new electronic beam monitoring system. It will be designed to amplify, convert, and transmit the signals of twelve 16 by 16 multi-wire grids to a central computer located in the Bevatron control room. Each station will contain interface amplifiers and a local microprocessor to convert wire grid currents into digitized values which will then be transmitted via a serial data channel to the main computer. The system will have a large dynamic range (1 nano to 1 milli-ampere of beam current), be designed for distributed operation, and will be easily expandable. This paper describes the basic electronic hardware and software components of the proposed system

  19. Note: An advanced in situ diagnostic system for characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundesmann, C; Tartz, M; Scholze, F; Leiter, H J; Scortecci, F; Gnizdor, R Y; Neumann, H

    2010-04-01

    We present an advanced diagnostic system for in situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources. The system uses a high-precision five-axis positioning system with a modular setup and the following diagnostic tools: a telemicroscopy head for optical imaging, a triangular laser head for surface profile scanning, a pyrometer for temperature scanning, a Faraday probe for current density mapping, and an energy-selective mass spectrometer for beam characterization (energy and mass distribution, composition). The capabilities of our diagnostic system are demonstrated with a Hall effect thruster SPT-100D EM1.

  20. Fundamental efficiency of limited cone-beam X-ray CT (3DX Multi image micro CT) for practical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji; Iwai, Kazuo; Shinoda, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2000-06-01

    The limited cone-beam CT known as Ortho-CT has been used in clinical examination since 1997. On the basis of this experience, we developed a new style of limited cone-beam CT for practical use, called ''3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX). The purpose of this study was to introduce this new style of limited cone-beam X-CT by comparing it to the prototype (Ortho-CT). 3DX was compared with Ortho-CT regarding the fundamental efficiency. The skin doses of 3DX and Ortho-CT were measured using TLD on a Rando phantom. The resolutions of both systems were evaluated with MTF (modulation transfer function). The subjective image quality was evaluated on the following anatomical landmarks: the inner ear, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maxillary first molar, mandibular first molar. Five dental radiologists and two otolaryngologists evaluated the quality of 3DX images comparing then with that of Ortho-CT images for the same observation point. The five-point scale ranged from one point (inferior) to five (superior). The skin doses were 1.07 mSv with 3DX and 1.19 mSv with Ortho-CT. The skin dose of ''3DX'' was almost the same as that of Ortho-CT. The resolutions of Ortho-CT were 0.6 line pair/mm (horizontal) and 0.9 line pair/mm (vertical) on the MTF (0.5). The resolution of 3DX was 1.1 line pair/mm (horizontal) and 1.3 line pair/mm (vertical). The subjective image quality of 3DX was better than that of Ortho-CT at every observation point. The minimum score was 3.46, and maximum score was 4.17. There were significant differences with every observation point (p<0.05). On the basis of the clinical experience of Ortho-CT, a new style of limited cone-beam X-CT called ''3DX'' was developed by us for practical use. The skin dose is almost the same as in the prototype system. The images show very high resolution compared to those of the prototype system. We think that this system is very useful for diagnosis of hard tissue for

  1. Optimization of beam filtering, kV-mA regulation curve, and image intensifier entrance exposure rate to reduce radiation exposure in angiographic fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhausen, J.; Schoenfelder, D.; Stoeblen, F.

    1999-01-01

    Aim of study: Evaluation of radiation exposure and image quality during fluoroscopy using a new vascular X-ray system. Material and methods: The measurements were made on an Integris V 3000 X-ray system with MRC tube and SpectraBeam technology (Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg). Entrance dose rates were measured with phantoms for the three fluoroscopy levels (1-3) which differed with regard to beam filtering and image intensiver entrance exposure rate. We evaluated 132 diagnostic and interventional angiographic studies. The angiographic investigators were asked to start with level 1 and to change to the next fluoroscopy level only in the case of insufficient image quality. Results: Entrance dose rate is reduced by approx. 74% at fluoroscopy level 1 and by approx. 46% at level 2 relative to level 3 which is comparable to angiographic X-ray systems without MRC tube and SpectraBeam technology. Because level 1 ensured a sufficient image quality in 92% of the diagnostic and 60% of the interventional angiographic procedures a change to higher fluoroscopy levels was not necessary. Conclusion: Reduction of the intensifier exposure rate and the optimization of beam filtering enabled us to reduce the radiation exposure considerably. The procedure was well accepted by the angiographic investigators due to the diagnostically sufficient image quality of the fluoroscopy level 1. (orig.) [de

  2. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hueso-Gonzalez, F.; Biegun, A. K.; Dendooven, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Golnik, C.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Petzoldt, J.; Roemer, K. E.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range

  3. Reliability of three-dimensional measurements of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Hui; Aarab, Ghizlane; Parsa, Azin; de Lange, Jan; van der Stelt, Paul F.; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the localization of anatomic landmarks of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images; and (2) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the three-dimensional measurements of the upper airway

  4. Reliability of three-dimensional measurements of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.; Aarab, G.; Parsa, A.; de Lange, J.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was (1) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the localization of anatomic landmarks of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images; and (2) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the three-dimensional measurements of the

  5. A Laue-Bragg monolithic beam splitter for efficient X-ray 2-beam imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oberta, Peter; Mokso, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 703, MAR (2013), s. 59-63 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : X-ray imaging * Laue-Bragg diffraction * monolithic crystal * dueal energy option Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2013 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0168900212013794

  6. A novel track imaging system as a range counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Matsufuji, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kanayama, S. [Chiba University (Japan); Ishida, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kohno, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Koba, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Murakami, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    An image-intensified, camera-based track imaging system has been developed to measure the tracks of ions in a scintillator block. To study the performance of the detector unit in the system, two types of scintillators, a dosimetrically tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator EJ-240 and a CsI(Tl) scintillator, were separately irradiated with carbon ion ({sup 12}C) beams of therapeutic energy from HIMAC at NIRS. The images of individual ion tracks in the scintillators were acquired by the newly developed track imaging system. The ranges reconstructed from the images are reported here. The range resolution of the measurements is 1.8 mm for 290 MeV/u carbon ions, which is considered a significant improvement on the energy resolution of the conventional ΔE/E method. The detector is compact and easy to handle, and it can fit inside treatment rooms for in-situ studies, as well as satisfy clinical quality assurance purposes.

  7. Dependability analysis of a safety critical system the LHC beam dumping system at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Filippini, R

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the dependability study of the Beam Dumping System of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the high energy particle accelerator to be commissioned at CERN in summer 2007. There are two identical, independent LHC Beam Dumping Systems (LBDS), one per LHC beam, each consisting of a series of magnets that extract the particle beam from the LHC ring into the extraction line leading to the absorbing block. The consequences of a failure within the LBDS can be very severe. This risk is reduced by applying redundancy to the design of the most critical components and on-line surveillance that, in case of a detected failure, issues a safe operation abort, called false beam dump. The system has been studied applying Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) and reliability prediction. The system failure processes have been represented with a state transition diagram, governed by a Markov regenerative stochastic process, and analysed for different operational scenarios for one year of operati...

  8. Dose-homogeneity Driven Beam Delivery System Performance Requirements for MedAustron

    CERN Document Server

    Palm, M; Moser, F; Benedikt, M

    2011-01-01

    MedAustron [1], the Austrian hadron therapy center is currently under construction. Irradiation will be performed using active scanning with proton and carbon ion pencil beams. Major beam delivery system contributors to dose heterogeneities are evaluated: beam position, beam size and spot weight errors. Their individual and combined effect on the dose distribution is quantified, using semianalytical models of lateral beam spread in the nozzle and target and depth-dose curves for protons and carbon ions. Deduced requirements on critical parts of the beam delivery system are presented. Preventive and active methods to suppress the impact of beam delivery inaccuracies are proposed.

  9. Electron beam cyclotron instability of a beam-plasma system in a magnetic beach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.

    1988-09-01

    We study the development of the electron cyclotron instability of a beam-plasma system in a magnetic beach. Beaches of positive as well as of negative B-field gradient are considered. The frequency spectrum shows either one or two cyclotron peaks depending on the B-field inhomogeneity. The central frequencies of these peaks, as opposed to their amplitudes, are independent of both the axial and radial positions of the measuring probe. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the analysis of the instability frequency spectrum theoretically constructed from the space-time evolution, in the WKB approximation, of unstable electron cyclotron waves.

  10. Intellectual system for images restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardare, Igor

    2005-02-01

    Intelligence systems on basis of artificial neural networks and associative memory allow to solve effectively problems of recognition and restoration of images. However, within analytical technologies there are no dominating approaches of deciding of intellectual problems. Choice of the best technology depends on nature of problem, features of objects, volume of represented information about the object, number of classes of objects, etc. It is required to determine opportunities, preconditions and field of application of neural networks and associative memory for decision of problem of restoration of images and to use their supplementary benefits for further development of intelligence systems.

  11. Army Medical Imaging System - ARMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-08

    Melvin P. Siedband Frank C. Grenzow Craig A. Heilman James R. Gray Huilian Zhang A ... NTtS CFA?•I " U ; J C l A t j. University of Wisconsin _. I e...Medical Imaging System - ARMIS Contract # 6.AUTHOR(S) Melvin P. Siedband James R. Gray DAMDI7-88C-8058 Frank C. Grenzow Huilian Zhang 63807A Craig A...its use is inconsistent to the people who must manage it. The consistency of the Macin- tosh operating system permits easier staff training as imaging

  12. Assessment of flatness and symmetry of megavoltage x-ray beam with an electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, G; Bezak, E

    2002-01-01

    The input/output characteristics of the Wellhofer BIS 710 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) have been investigated to establish its efficacy for periodic quality assurance (QA) applications. Calibration curves have been determined for the energy fluence incident on the detector versus the pixel values. The effect of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera sampling time and beam parameters (such as beam field size, dose rate, photon energy) on the calibration have been investigated for a region of interest (ROI) around the central beam axis. The results demonstrate that the pixel output is a linear function of the incident exposure, as expected for a video-based electronic portal imaging system. The field size effects of the BIS 710 are similar to that of an ion chamber for smaller field sizes up to 10 x 10 cm sup 2. However, for larger field sizes the pixel value increases more rapidly. Furthermore, the system is slightly sensitive to dose rate and is also energy dependent. The BIS 710 has been used in t...

  13. The Groningen image processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.J.; Ekers, R.D.; Terlouw, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive, integrated software and hardware computer system for the reduction and analysis of astronomical images. A short historical introduction is presented before some examples of the astonomical data currently handled by the system are shown. A description is given of the present hardware and software structure. The system is illustrated by describing its appearance to the user, to the applications programmer, and to the system manager. Some quantitative information on the size and cost of the system is given, and its good and bad features are discussed

  14. Particle beam digital phase control system for COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnase, A.

    1994-02-01

    Particle accelerators require that the orbit of the charged particles in the vacuum chamber is controlled to fulfil narrow limits. This is done by magnetic deflection systems and exactly adjusted rf-acceleration. Up to now the necessary control-functions were realised with analogue parts. This work describes a digital phase control system that works in real time and is used with the proton accelerator COSY. The physical design of the accelerator sets the accuracy-specifications of the revolution frequency (<1 Hz in the whole range from 400 kHz to 1.6 MHz), the phase-difference (<0.01 ), the signal-to-noise-ratio (<-60 dBc) and the update rate (<1 μs) of the parameters. In a typical operation the beam is first bunched and synchronised to the reference oscillator. After that the beam influences the rf-system with the help of charge detectors and now the rf-systems will be synchronised with the bunched beam. This control-loop is modelled and simulated with PSPICE. (orig.)

  15. WE-G-18A-05: Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction with Deformed Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Prior image can be incorporated into image reconstruction process to improve the quality of on-treatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) from sparseview or low-dose projections. However, the deformation between the prior image and on-treatment CBCT are not considered in current prior image based reconstructions (e.g., prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS)). The purpose of this work is to develop a deformed-prior-imagebased- reconstruction strategy (DPIR) to address the mismatch problem between the prior image and target image. Methods: The deformed prior image is obtained by a projection based registration approach. Specifically, the deformation vector fields (DVF) used to deform the prior image is estimated through matching the forward projection of the prior image and the measured on-treatment projection. The deformed prior image is then used as the prior image in the standard PICCS algorithm. Simulation studies on the XCAT phantom was conducted to evaluate the performance of the projection based registration procedure and the proposed DPIR strategy. Results: The deformed prior image matches the geometry of on-treatment CBCT closer as compared to the original prior image. Using the deformed prior image, the quality of the image reconstructed by DPIR from few-view projection data is greatly improved as compared to the standard PICCS algorithm. The relative image reconstruction error is reduced to 11.13% in the proposed DPIR from 17.57% in the original PICCS. Conclusion: The proposed DPIR approach can solve the mismatch problem between the prior image and target image, which overcomes the limitation of the original PICCS algorithm for CBCT reconstruction from sparse-view or low-dose projections

  16. Musashi dynamic image processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Yutaka; Mochiki, Koh-ichi; Taguchi, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In order to produce transmitted neutron dynamic images using neutron radiography, a real time system called Musashi dynamic image processing system (MDIPS) was developed to collect, process, display and record image data. The block diagram of the MDIPS is shown. The system consists of a highly sensitive, high resolution TV camera driven by a custom-made scanner, a TV camera deflection controller for optimal scanning, which adjusts to the luminous intensity and the moving speed of an object, a real-time corrector to perform the real time correction of dark current, shading distortion and field intensity fluctuation, a real time filter for increasing the image signal to noise ratio, a video recording unit and a pseudocolor monitor to realize recording in commercially available products and monitoring by means of the CRTs in standard TV scanning, respectively. The TV camera and the TV camera deflection controller utilized for producing still images can be applied to this case. The block diagram of the real-time corrector is shown. Its performance is explained. Linear filters and ranked order filters were developed. (K.I.)

  17. Beam vacuum system of Brookhaven's muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseuth, H.C.; Snydstrup, L.; Mapes, M.

    1995-01-01

    A storage ring with a circumference of 45 m is being built at Brookhaven to measure the g-2 value of the muons to an accuracy of 0.35 ppm.. The beam vacuum system of the storage ring will operate at 10 -7 Torr and has to be completely non-magnetic. It consists of twelve sector chambers. The chambers are constructed of aluminum and are approximately 3.5 m in length with a rectangular cross-section of 16.5 cm high by 45 cm at the widest point. The design features, fabrication techniques and cleaning methods for these chambers are described. The beam vacuum system will be pumped by forty eight non-magnetic distributed ion pumps with a total pumping speed of over 2000 ell/sec. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure distribution in the muon storage region are presented

  18. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of the ultracold plasma formed in a supersonic molecular beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Grant, Edward

    2015-06-01

    Double-resonant excitation of nitric oxide in a seeded supersonic molecular beam forms a state-selected Rydberg gas that evolves to form an ultracold plasma. This plasma travels with the propagation of the molecular beam in z over a variable distance as great as 600 mm to strike an imaging detector, which records the charge distribution in the dimensions, x and y. The ω1 + ω2 laser crossed molecular beam excitation geometry convolutes the axial Gaussian distribution of NO in the molecular beam with the Gaussian intensity distribution of the perpendicularly aligned laser beam to create an ellipsoidal volume of Rydberg gas. Detected images describe the evolution of this initial density as a function of selected Rydberg gas initial principal quantum number, n0, ω1 laser pulse energy (linearly related to Rydberg gas density, ρ0) and flight time. Low-density Rydberg gases of lower principal quantum number produce uniformly expanding, ellipsoidal charge-density distributions. Increase either of n0 or ρ0 breaks the ellipsoidal symmetry of plasma expansion. The volume bifurcates to form repelling plasma volumes. The velocity of separation depends on n0 and ρ0 in a way that scales uniformly with ρe, the density of electrons formed in the core of the Rydberg gas by prompt Penning ionization. Conditions under which this electron gas drives expansion in the long axis dimension of the ellipsoid favours the formation of counter-propagating shock waves.

  20. Pattern data handling system for an electron beam exposure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrian, D.W.; Ward, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    A beam is blanked over a rectangular area by storing beam blanking data in a bit map memory having data words of n bits. An address counter is loaded with the x-coordinate of the location of the rectangle and inhibited (by word counter) from counting after advancing through a number of addresses corresponding to the length of the rectangle. Mask bits whose position determines the y-coordinate of the location of the rectangle and whose number determines the width of the rectangle are loaded into a mask latch having n bit locations each with an output coupled to write enable inputs of the memory corresponding to the n bits of the data words in the memory. As the address counter advances through the number of addresses corresponding to the length of the rectangle, data describing the rectangle is stored in the memory without altering masked parts of previously stored blanking data. (author)

  1. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs

  2. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs.

  3. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, P; Ford, N L; Atwal, P; Duzenli, C; Thakur, Y

    2014-01-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom. (paper)

  4. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  5. Polychromatic map-making from imaging telescopes with asymmetric beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Solomon; Bunn, Emory

    2018-01-01

    Data from an imaging telescope with an asymmetric antenna pattern that varies significantly with wavelength can be used to reconstruct images in multiple wavelength bands from a single set of scans. This is potentially particularly valuable for an instrument such as QUBIC, because the QUBIC antenna pattern has multiple peaks with wavelength-dependent positions. We quantify the ability of such an instrument to reconstruct polychromatic maps both analytically and numerically. When the telescope has full-sky coverage, it is convenient to transform to the spherical harmonic basis. Hence we analyze statistical properties of the signal reconstruction as a function of the coefficients of the antenna pattern. When the telescope observes only part of the sky, no such transformation can be made—hence more computation is required in this case. We compare monochromatic and polychromatic map-making to determine the number of wavelength bands that can be accurately reconstructed in a QUBIC-like instrument as a function of angular scale. This formalism can be applied to other instruments whose antenna patterns have features that vary strongly with wavelength.

  6. Neutral beam interlock system on TFTR using infrared pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Kugel, H.W.; Kozub, T.A.; Lowrance, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Young, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Although the region of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel wall which is susceptible to damage by neutral beam strike is armored with a mosaic of TiC-clad POCO graphite tiles, at power deposition levels above 2.5 kW/cm 2 the armor surface temperature exceeds 1200 0 C within 250 ms, and itself becomes susceptible to damage. In order to protect the wall armor, a neutral beam interlock system based on infrared pyrometry measurement of the armor surface temperature was installed on TFTR. For each beamline, a three-fiber-optic telescope views three areas of --30 cm diameter centered on the armor hot spots for the three ion sources. Each signal is fiber-optic coupled to a remote 900-nm pyrometer which feeds analog signals to the neutral beam interrupt circuits. The pyrometer interlock system is designed to interrupt each of the 12 ion sources independently within 10 ms of the temperature exceeding a threshold which can be set in the range of 500--2300 0 C. A description of the pyrometer interlock system and its performance will be presented

  7. Non-thermal fusion in a beam plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, F.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of producing fusion power with low neutron emission has been debated in the past in the framework of the magnetic confinement fusion research. Proposals are still being renewed to use advanced fuels in various plasma systems. Since today's toroidal devices cannot support plasma conditions suitable for a large fusion production with such fuels, new concepts and configurations have been studied, where the plasma components are not in a thermal equilibrium. Here, a system of a neutral beam injected into a confined plasma is considered where fusion is produced only between the beam and plasma ions. The collisional slowing down of the beam into the plasma is described by a fluid model. General considerations in this model allow conditions to be found for the fusion-produced power to breakeven against the power needed to sustain the system itself. These conditions are only necessary since the nuclear power is maximized in the present analysis by using favourable assumptions. Nevertheless, the results for different advanced fuels indicate again the very high difficulty of getting a net power produced by the fusion of such fuels, unless the plasma target temperature reaches very high and unrealistic values

  8. The RTSS Image Generation System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvermann, K.; Graeber, S.; Mager, J.W.L.J.; Smith, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Main market demands for the visual system of a simulator are photorealism and low latency time. RTSS, a general purpose image generation module developed within the European ESPRIT project HAMLET, can meet these demands through the use of High Performance Computing technology. This technology

  9. Imaging Systems in TLE Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Thomas Højgaard; Neubert, Torsten; Laursen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    documented using the right equipment in the right way. This chapter provides an introduction to the concepts of low light imagers, and how they can be successfully applied in TLE research. As examples, we describe the 2003 and 2004 Spritewatch systems, which integrate low-light cameras with a digital...

  10. Influence of Acquisition Mode of Cone-beam Computed Tomography on Accuracy of Image Registration for Image-guided Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Takuya; Hara, Takanori; Shimozato, Tomohiro; Shiraki, Katsuhiko; Ohono, Kousei; Maejima, Ryousyuu

    2017-01-01

    Half scan can acquire images at the 200° rotation in image-guided radiation treatment using cone-beam CT and is useful to evaluate the influence of the half-scan-imaging start angle and imaging direction on image registration accuracy. The half-scan-imaging start angle is changed from 180° to 340° in the clockwise direction and from 180° to 20° in the counter clockwise direction to calculate the registration error. As a result, registration errors between -0.37 mm and 0.27 mm in the left and right directions occur because of the difference in the imaging start angle and approximately 0.3° in the gantry rotation direction because of the difference in the imaging direction. Because half scan does not have data for 360° rotation, depending on the subject structure, inconsistency of opposing data can lower reconstruction accuracy and cause a verification error. In addition, in image acquisition during rotation, the slower the shutter speed is, the more the actual gantry angle and angle information of the image are apart, which is considered the cause of rotation errors. Although these errors are very minute, it is thought that there is no influence on the treatment effect, but these errors are considered an evaluation item indispensable for ensuring the accuracy of high-precision radiation treatment. In addition, these errors need to be considered for ensuring the quality of high-precision radiation treatment.

  11. Foreign Object Detection by Sub-Terahertz Quasi-Bessel Beam Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyang Sook Chun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Food quality monitoring, particularly foreign object detection, has recently become a critical issue for the food industry. In contrast to X-ray imaging, terahertz imaging can provide a safe and ionizing-radiation-free nondestructive inspection method for foreign object sensing. In this work, a quasi-Bessel beam (QBB known to be nondiffracting was generated by a conical dielectric lens to detect foreign objects in food samples. Using numerical evaluation via the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method, the beam profiles of a QBB were evaluated and compared with the results obtained via analytical calculation and experimental characterization (knife edge method, point scanning method. The FDTD method enables a more precise estimation of the beam profile. Foreign objects in food samples, namely crickets, were then detected with the QBB, which had a deep focus and a high spatial resolution at 210 GHz. Transmitted images using a Gaussian beam obtained with a conventional lens were compared in the sub-terahertz frequency experimentally with those using a QBB generated using an axicon.

  12. Implementation of a Direct Link between the LHC Beam Interlock System and the LHC Beam Dumping System Re-Triggering Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gabourin, S; Denz, R; Magnin, N; Uythoven, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M; Vatansever, V; Bartholdt, M; Bertsche, B; Zeiler, P

    2014-01-01

    To avoid damage of accelerator equipment due to impacting beam, the controlled removal of the LHC beams from the collider rings towards the dump blocks must be guaranteed at all times. When a beam dump is demanded, the Beam Interlock System communicates this request to the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System of the LHC Beam Dumping System. Both systems were built according to high reliability standards. To further reduce the risk of incapability to dump the beams in case of correlated failures in the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System, a new direct link from the Beam Interlock System to the re-triggering lines of the LHC Beam Dumping System will be implemented for the start-up with beam in 2015. The link represents a diverse redundancy to the current implementation, which should neither significantly increase the risk for so-called asynchronous beam dumps nor compromise machine availability. This paper describes the implementation choices of this link. Furthermore the results of a rel...

  13. Image reconstruction of dynamic infrared single-pixel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qi; Jiang, Yilin; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Limin

    2018-03-01

    Single-pixel imaging technique has recently received much attention. Most of the current single-pixel imaging is aimed at relatively static targets or the imaging system is fixed, which is limited by the number of measurements received through the single detector. In this paper, we proposed a novel dynamic compressive imaging method to solve the imaging problem, where exists imaging system motion behavior, for the infrared (IR) rosette scanning system. The relationship between adjacent target images and scene is analyzed under different system movement scenarios. These relationships are used to build dynamic compressive imaging models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the reconstruction quality of IR image and enhance the contrast between the target and the background in the presence of system movement.

  14. A Real-Time S-Parameter Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, P. S.; Cheung, C. K.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2005-05-01

    Obtaining a lateral S-parameter image scan from positrons implanted into semiconductor devices can be a helpful research tool both for localizing device structures and in diagnozing defect patterns that could help interpret function. S-parameter images can be obtained by electromagnetically rastering a variable energy positron beam of small spot size across the sample. Here we describe a general hardware and software architecture of relatively low cost that has recently been developed in our laboratory which allows the whole sub-surface S-parameter image of a sample or device to be obtained in real time. This system has the advantage over more conventional sequential scanning techniques of allowing the operator to terminate data collection once the quality of the image is deemed sufficient. As an example of the usefulness of this type of imaging architecture, S-parameter images of a representative sample are presented at two different positron implantation energies.

  15. A real time S-parameter imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.S.; Cheung, C.K.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

    2005-01-01

    Obtaining a lateral S-parameter image scan from positrons implanted into semiconductor devices can be a helpful research tool both for localizing device structures and in diagnosing defect patterns that could help interpret function. S-parameter images can be obtained by electromagnetically rastering a variable energy positron beam of small spot size across the sample. Here we describe a general hardware and software architecture of relatively low cost that has recently been developed in our laboratory which allows the whole sub-surface S-parameter image of a sample or device to be obtained in real time. This system has the advantage over more conventional sequential scanning techniques of allowing the operator to terminate data collection once the quality of the image is deemed sufficient. As an example of the usefulness of this type of imaging architecture, S-parameter images of a representative sample are presented at two different position implantation energies. (author)

  16. LCD and CRT display of storage phosphor plate and limited cone beam computed tomography images for the evaluation of root canal fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksi, B Güniz; Soğur, Elif; Gröndahl, Hans-Göran

    2009-03-01

    The aim was to compare quality of liquid crystal display (LCD) and high resolution cathode ray tube (CRT) screens for the evaluation of length and homogeneity of root canal fillings in storage phosphor plate (SPP) and limited cone beam computed tomography (LCBCT) images. Endodontic treatment was performed to 17 extracted permanent lower incisor teeth. Images of each tooth positioned in a dried mandible were obtained with Digora SPP and Accu-I-Tomo LCBCT systems. Six observers scored the quality of all images on CRT and LCD screens. Results were compared using McNemar's and Cochran's Q tests (p LCD displays (p > 0.05). Agreement among observers' scores was higher with CRT display. Within the limits of this ex vivo study, differences between LCD and CRT monitors for the evaluation of root canal fillings are clinically insignificant independent on whether conventional radiographs, captured by means of image plates, or cone beam images are being displayed.

  17. Two-Pipe Chilled Beam System for Both Cooling and Heating of Office Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Alireza; Gordnorouzi, Rouzbeh; Hultmark, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Simulations were performed to compare a conventional 4-pipe chilled beam system and a 2-pipe chilled beam system. The objective was to establish requirements, possibilities and limitations for a well-functioning 2-pipe chilled beam system for both cooling and heating of office buildings. The buil...

  18. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Characterization of Fan Beam Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging Methods for Differentiation of Normal and Neoplastic Breast Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R; Albanese, K; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study intends to characterize the spectral and spatial resolution limits of various fan beam geometries for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast structures via coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging techniques. In previous studies, pencil beam raster scanning methods using coherent scatter computed tomography and selected volume tomography have yielded excellent results for tumor discrimination. However, these methods don’t readily conform to clinical constraints; primarily prolonged scan times and excessive dose to the patient. Here, we refine a fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system to characterize the tradeoffs between dose, scan time and image quality for breast tumor discrimination. Methods: An X-ray tube (125kVp, 400mAs) illuminated the sample with collimated fan beams of varying widths (3mm to 25mm). Scatter data was collected via two linear-array energy-sensitive detectors oriented parallel and perpendicular to the beam plane. An iterative reconstruction algorithm yields images of the sample’s spatial distribution and respective spectral data for each location. To model in-vivo tumor analysis, surgically resected breast tumor samples were used in conjunction with lard, which has a form factor comparable to adipose (fat). Results: Quantitative analysis with current setup geometry indicated optimal performance for beams up to 10mm wide, with wider beams producing poorer spatial resolution. Scan time for a fixed volume was reduced by a factor of 6 when scanned with a 10mm fan beam compared to a 1.5mm pencil beam. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the utility of fan beam coherent scatter spectral imaging for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast tissues has successfully reduced dose and scan times whilst sufficiently preserving spectral and spatial resolution. Future work to alter the coded aperture and detector geometries could potentially allow the use of even wider fans, thereby making coded

  19. Concept of a novel fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM for fan-beam tomography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortesi, M; Zboray, R; Adams, R; Prasser, H-M; Dangendorf, V

    2012-01-01

    The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5 MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, coolant dynamics, and liquid metal flow).

  20. Concept of a novel fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM for fan-beam tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, M.; Zboray, R.; Adams, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2012-02-01

    The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5 MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, coolant dynamics, and liquid metal flow).