WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam flue gas

  1. Electron beam flue gas treatment process. Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkonen, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The basis of the process for electron beam flue gas treatment are presented in the report. In tabular form the history of the research is reviewed. Main dependences of SO 2 and NO x removal efficiencies on different physico-chemical parameters are discussed. Trends concerning industrial process implementation are presented in the paper,finally. (author). 74 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  2. The Application of Electron Beam Machine for Flue Gas Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko

    2006-01-01

    The emission of environmental pollutant such as SO 2 and NO x into atmosphere from heavy industrial activities in particular from fossil fuel burning in electricity production has been recognized one of main source of environmental pollution. These environmental pollutants sometimes travel more than thousand kilometers and make a trouble in other places, even in other countries, therefore the problem of the air pollution became world-wide problem. Now many countries are introducing more strict emission control regulations to solve the problem. Electron beam treatment of flue gas is now regarded as a promising pollution control method with some advantages; simultaneous reduction of SO 2 and NO x with high removal efficiency, being a dry process, yields a by-product with can be used as agriculture fertilizer, and so on. In this paper will be discussed concerning electron beam machine and its application for flue gas treatment produced from coal burning in the electric power station. (author)

  3. Flue gas cleaning by electron beam technology in 21st

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guang; Luo Jingyu; Zhang Ming

    2005-01-01

    China is paying great attention to the pollution caused by flue gases including sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, fine particles, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) for the environmental protection and sustainable development of China economy for 21st century. Among several promising processes, applicable to industrial scale, the electron beam (EB) scrubbing process can simultaneously remove SO 2 , NOx, PM-10 (particulate matter 10 μm or less in diameter), VOC and CO 2 from the flue gas is a new high technology combined with radiation chemistry and electron accelerator technique. The EB flue gas purification process consists of the producing ionization in the EB irradiated gases followed by the formation of free radicals and active species which ultimately forming foggy sulfur acid and nitrate acid. These acids react further with added ammonia to form ammonium sulfate and nitrates as by-products, which can be fertilizer usable in agriculture. The next stage for this technology is its optimization for the reduction of electricity energy consumption and an effective collection of by-products. Lastly the investment cost for EB method is shown to be the most economic compared with other competing methods. (S. Ohno)

  4. Chemical kinetics of flue gas cleaning by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maetzing, H.

    1989-02-01

    By electron beam treatment of flue gases, NO x and SO 2 are converted to nitric and sulfuric acids simultaneously. Upon ammonia addition, the corresponding salts are collected in solid state and can be sold as fertilizer. Both homogeneous gas phase reactions and physico-chemical aerosol dynamics are involved in product formation. These processes have been analyzed by model calculations. In part 1, the present report summarizes the model results and gives an account of the theoretical understanding of the EBDS process and its performance characteristics. Part 2 of this report gives a complete listing of the reactions used in the AGATE code. (orig.) [de

  5. Current status of electron beam treatment of flue gas in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2006-01-01

    Fossil resource especially coal will remain the main energy resource in China over the next 3 ∼4 decades. Pollution of flue gas from fossil power station is one problem being desiderated to solve since 1990's. Electron beam treatment of flue gas as an advanced technique has been developed and used by some institutes and industries in China. The current status of flue gas treatment using electron beam and the development of electron accelerator in China are reviewed. (author)

  6. Industrial plant for electron beam flue gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Iller, E.; Tyminnski, B.; Zimek, Z; Ostapczuk, A.; Licki, J.

    2001-01-01

    The electron beam flue gas treatment technology was invented many years ago. Research on the process has been carried out in Japan, USA, Germany and Poland. However, the recent fidings, based on the experiments performed at pilot plant at Electric Power Station Kaweczyn, led to developments which made process mature just at the dawn of the XXI century. The process is being implemented in the full industrial scale at Electric Power Station Pomorzany (Dolna Odra EPS Group). Other developments are reported in Japan and after Nagoya's pilot plant experiments, an industrial plant has been built in China and another one is constructed in Japan. There are remarkable differences in technological and design solutions applied in all these installations. Developments achieved at EPS Kaweczyn pilot plant and INCT laboratory unit were the basis for the project realized at EPS Pomorzan

  7. Progress on flue gas desulfurization and denitration with electron beam irradiation in CAEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Min; Wang Baojian; Yang Ruizhuang; Huang Wenfeng; He Xiaohai; Mao Benjiang

    2005-01-01

    The first pilot plant with electron beam irradiation for desulfurization and denitration of flue gas in China and the experimental results based on the pilot plant are briefly introduced in this paper. The FGD (flue gas desulfurization) demonstration installation designed by CAEP (China Academy of Engineering Physics) in Beijing Jingfeng Thermal Powe Co., Ltd. is recommended. (author)

  8. Japan’s experience of flue gas treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The electron beam flue gas treatment technology was invented in Japan in 1970's. The paper presents the outlook of the Japanese activities on the development and present state of EBFGT technology. (author)

  9. Pilot plant experience in electron-beam treatment of iron-ore sintering flue gas and its application to coal boiler flue gas cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Shui, V. H.

    The peresent development status of the electron-beam flue gas treatment process, which is a dry process capable of removing SOx and NOx simultaneously, is described. The most advanced demonstration of this process was accomplished with a pilot plant in Japan where the maximum gas flow rate of 10,000 Nm 3/h of an iron-ore sintering machine flue gas was successfully treated. The byproduct produced in this process is collected as a dry powder which is a mixture of ammonia sulfate and ammonium nitrate and is salable as a fertilizer or a fertilizer component. A preliminary economic projection showed that this process costs less than the lime scrubber which removes SOx but does not remove NOx. Tests using simulated coal combustion gases suggest that this process will be applicable to coal-fired boiler flue gas treatment as well. However, test on actual coal-fired flue gases are still required for commercial application decisions. A process development unit program consisting of the design, construction and testing of actual coal-fired power station flue gases is underway in the U.S.A. The design and engineering of the test plant is far advanced and the construction phase will be launched in the very near future.

  10. Electron beam flue gas treatment. Research cooperation among JAERI, IAEA and INCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The research co-operation is conducted among Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Poland (INCT) on Electron Beam Flue Gas Treatment from January 1993 to March 1997. The first phase of the cooperation was carried out for 3 years from January 1993 to March 1995. This cooperation was performed through information exchange meetings (Coordination Meetings), held in Takasaki and Warsaw, and experiments and discussions by exchange scientists. Many useful results were obtained on electron beam treatment of flue gas from coal-combustion heat generation plant in Kaweczyn within the frame work of the research co-operation. This report includes the main results of the tripartite research cooperation. (author)

  11. Numerical simulation of flue gas purification from NOx, SO2 by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgunov, V.V.; Shkilko, A.M.; Fainchtein, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The paper is devoted to numerical simulation of radiation-chemical processes in gas phase, which are take place during electron beam (EB) treatments of flue gases. A mathematical model of EB processes in gas phase was created. Also, a computer code which numerically simulates radiation-chemical processes during EB treatment of flue gases was created. The needed data such as chemical species, radiation-chemical yields and rate constants of the chemical reactions were collected and putted into database. The computer code allows do following: 1. The following technological parameters: irradiation dose, temperature, initial composition of the flue gases, time of irradiation (time which flue gases spend in an irradiation zone), one- or two-stage irradiation can be defined by the user in the code shell; 2. In accordance with the initial composition of flue gases selects chemical species from database of the chemical species (total amount of species in database is 522) which took part in simulation taking into account species that are formed due to irradiation; 3. In accordance with the selected chemical species selects chemical and radiation-chemical reactions from the database of reactions (total amount of chemical and radiation-chemical reaction is 2275) which are took part in the simulation; 4. Creates a stiff system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) which describes chemical and radiation-chemical reactions; 5. Solves the received system of ODEs by backward differentiation formula (Gear's method); 6. Creates plots of dependencies: concentrations of chemical species versus time of irradiation under different parameters of modeled EB-processes. The received results. For the following technological parameters: irradiation dose is 8.0 kGy; two stage irradiation; initial temperature is 353 deg K; time of the irradiation - 4 s; initial composition of the flue gases - typical for power plant, following removal efficiencies were

  12. Control and monitoring systems for electron beam flue gas treatment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Licki, J.; Mazurekc, J.; Nelskic, L.; Sobolewskic, L.

    2011-01-01

    The reliable and accurate measurements of gas parameters in essential points of industrial plant are necessary for its proper operation and control. Natural flue gases there are only at the inlet. At other points of plant gas parameters are strongly modified by process control system. The principal role of process monitoring system is to provide the Computer System for Monitoring and Control with continuous recording of process parameters. The main goal of control system is to obtain the optimal SO 2 and NO x removal efficiencies by control of amount of spray water at the spray cooler, amount of NH 3 injection to flue gas and adjustment of electron beam current. The structure of the process control system is based on algorithms describing functional dependence of SO 2 and NO x removal efficiencies. The best available techniques should be applied for measurements of flue gases parameters at essential points of installation and for digital control system to assist plant operators in the analysis and optimization of plant operation, including integrated emission control. (author)

  13. Simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.; Jordan, S.; Maetzing, H.; Paur, H.R.; Schikarski, W.; Wiens, H.

    1987-05-01

    The simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification by the irradiation with 300 keV electrons in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of ammonia yields removal efficiencies of more than 90%. NO X -removal efficiencies depend on the absorbed dose, NO X -concentration and NH 3 -stoichiometry. SO 2 -removal proceeds by thermal and radiation induced mechanisms. The efficiency of the SO 2 -removal process is highest for low temperatures and high NH 3 -stoichiometries. By recycling of scrubbed gas into the reaction chamber (multiple irradiation) the efficiency of the process is increased by 50%. The product aerosol has mass median diameters of 2 and NO x removals in the absence of NH 3 are predicted with reasonable accuracy by the computer model. In the presence of NH 3 experimental data show higher SO 2 removal efficiencies than calculated. This is probably due to additional heterogeneous reactions on particles, which are not covered by the computer model. With 119 figs., 86 refs [de

  14. The analysis of technical and economical aspects of electron beam flue gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko

    2008-01-01

    Environmental problems caused by the increased world energy demands have become a serious problem in many countries. The emission of SO 2 and NO x from fossil fuel burning for electricity generation and industrial plants is one of the major sources of environmental pollution. These pollutants are named as acid gases causing acid rain and also indirect greenhouse gases contributing greenhouse effect. These toxic components sometimes travel more than thousand kilometers and make a trouble in other places, in some cases, even in other countries. Therefore, the problem of the air pollution became world-wide problem. Today many countries are introducing more strict emission control regulations to solve environmental problem. Electron beam flue gas treatment technology is one of the most advanced technologies among new generation processes for air pollution control. This electron beam process is dry scrubbing process and simultaneously removes SO 2 and NO x and useful by-product for agriculture fertilizer. In this study, the technical and economical aspects of electron beam flue gas treatment process are discussed. Economically, the technology is competitive with the conventional ones. (author)

  15. Heterogeneous reactions and aerosol formation in flue gas cleaning by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.; Jordan, S.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Maetzing, H.; Paur, H.R.; Schikarski, W.

    1990-08-01

    The electron beam dry scrubbing process is a simultaneous method for the removal of SO 2 and NO x from flue gas. By electron irradiation radicals (OH, O 2 H, O) are formed from the main flue gas components which oxidize NO x and SO 2 into the acids HNO 3 and H 2 SO 4 . These are then neutralized by the injection of NH 3 . A submicron aerosol consisting of ammonium salts is formed which is filtered from the offgas. The main pathways of the gas phase chemistry and product formation have been elucidated by experimental and theoretical studies. Back reactions which occur in the gas and the particle phase limit the energy efficiency of the process. By recirculation of irradiated gas into the reaction vessel (multiple irradiation) a significant improvement of removal yields was obtained. This enhancement of the energy efficiency requires the removal of products between the irradiation steps. Studies show that the material balance is complete. Deficits in the N and S balance of the process are due to the additional formation of molecular nitrogen and the deposition of ammonium sulfate in the ducts. Aerosol formation participates only with 30% in the material balance. The remaining 70% of the product are formed by surface reactions in the filter cake (40%) and in the ducts (30%). (orig.) With 38 figs., 29 tabs [de

  16. Investigations on electron beam flue gas treatment held in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Iller, E.; Zimek, Z.; Licki, J.

    1992-01-01

    Two different research installations have been built. The first one, laboratory unit has a flow capacity of approx. 400 Nm 3 /h of flue gas from two gas fired boilers. The composition of gas can be adjusted. An irradiator, accelerator ILU-6, is used with electron beam energy in the range 600-1000 keV. The unit is mostly used for aerosol formation and filtration research. This laboratory installation is being adapted for electron beam/microwave combined gas molecule excitation. The second unit, a pilot with a plant of flow rate up to 20 000 Nm 3 /h has been constructed in EPS Kaweczyn. Pit coal is used as a fuel in a boiler from which flue gas is purified. Two accelerators, ELW-3, of beam power 40-50 kW and electrons energy 700 keV are applied. The arrangement of accelerators in series allows cascade, step by step gas mixture irradiation. The installation is equipped in a spray cooler, ammonia dosage system and bag filter. The irradiation/reaction part of the plant was put in operation in April 1991. Separately, laboratory research on grain bed aerosol filtration is performed to study the possibility of such filtration unit as a prefilter application. Agriculture tests of the byproduct have been performed. Two types of the byproduct with and without additive were tested. Comparative vegetation tests have shown that application of the pure product gives similar results as application of market fertilizer - ammonia sulfate. The elemental analysis have shown that content of the heavy metals do not exceed acceptable value. For both systems dosimetric measurements were performed. The electron penetration depth and dose distribution profiles were established. The results of preliminary tests both laboratory and pilot plant units have proved high efficiency of SO 2 and NO X removal. (J.P.N.)

  17. Demonstration test of electron beam flue gas treatment pilot plant of a coal fired thermal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Kazuaki; Izutsu, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shigeharu; Namba, Hideki; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Hashimoto, Shoji; Tanaka, Tadashi; Ogura, Yoshimi.

    1995-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chubu Electric Power Company and Ebara Corporation jointly constructed a pilot plant for electron beam flue gas treatment (dry process) capable of treating 12,000 m 3 /h (NTP) of flue gas from a coal fired boiler, at Shin-Nagoya Thermal Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Company. Various tests carried out at the plant over a period extending one year verified the followings. By appropriately controlling parameters such as electron beam dosage, flue gas temperature, and ammonia stoichiometric amount, highly efficient simultaneous SO 2 and NOx removal from flue gas was achieved under all gas conditions, equal to or more efficient than that by the highest level conventional treatment. The operation of the pilot plant was stable and trouble-free over a long term, and the operation and the process was easy to operate and control. By-products (ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate) produced by the flue gas treatment were proven to have superior quality, equivalent to that of market-available nitrogen fertilizers. These by-products had been registered as by-product nitrogen fertilizers. (author)

  18. Application of Module System for Processing a Large Capacity of Coal Steam Power Plant Flue gas by Electron Beam Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukijatmo; Munawir Z, M.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual design of SOx dan NOx flue gas treatment base on 25% of 400 M We capacity and 90% efficiency reduction of SOx, the electron beam machine will be utilized to performed the environment quality standard of air pollution. The technical specification of electron beam machine, processing system and chamber dimension should conformed to the regulation. The discussion is focused on the selection of electron beam machine type and the dimension of radiation vessel for perfect reaction and exact time processing. The design calculation is indicated that we need two electron beam machines of 500 mA, 800 kV installed in parallel and 3 up to 3.4 metres diameter, the speed of flue gas in the vessel around 16.4 up to 18.14 metre per second, 80% treatment of 0,7% sulphur content coal is conform to regulation on emission of flue gas environment, and only 50% of flue gas needed to be treated by 4 modular. (author)

  19. Pilot-scale test for electron beam purification of flue gas from coal-combustion boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Hideki; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Hashimoto, Shoji; Tanaka, Tadashi; Ogura, Yoshimi; Doi, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Shinji; Izutsu, Masahiro

    1995-09-01

    A pilot-scale test for electron beam treatment of flue gas (12,000m3N/hr) from coal-fired boiler was conducted by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chubu Electric Power Company and Ebara Corporation, in the site of Shin-Nagoya Thermal Power Plant in Nagoya, Japan. During 14 months operation, it was proved that the method is possible to remove SO2 and NOX simultaneously in wide concentration range of SO2 (250-2,000ppm) and NOX (140-240ppm) with higher efficiency than the conventional methods, with appropriate operation conditions (dose, temperature etc.). The pilot plant was easily operated with well controllability and durability, and was operated for long period of time without serious problems. The byproduct, ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate, produced by the treatment was proved to be a nitrogenous fertilizer with excellent quality.

  20. Industrial applications of electron beam flue gas treatment - From laboratory to the practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.

    2007-01-01

    The electron beam technology for flue gas treatment (EBFGT) has been developed in Japan in the early 1980s. Later on, this process was investigated in pilot scale in the USA, Germany, Japan, Poland, Bulgaria and China. The new engineering and process solutions have been developed during the past two decades. Finally industrial plants have been constructed in Poland and China. The high efficiency of SO x and NO x removal was achieved (up to 95% for SO x and up to 70% for NO x ) and by-product is a high quality fertilizer. Since the power of accelerators applied in industrial installation is over 1 MW and requested operational availability of the plant is equal to 8500 h in year, it is a new challenge for radiation processing applications

  1. Computation and Database Development for Flue Gas Treatment on Electron Beam Machine (EBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tono Wibowo; Slamet Santosa

    2007-01-01

    A computation and database development for parameter calculations of SO 2 and NO x flue-gas treatment have been done. This computation and database development will make easier for researchers in calculations of flue gas parameters for various specifications and recur in such a way that saves time and apparatus. Analysis and calculation design of flue gas treatment using EBM right now is performing in Microsoft Excel program and calculator, therefore with a computation and database it is expected that can be developed for further parameter calculations of flue gas treatment and having user friendly characteristic. Computation for parameter calculations of flue gas treatment is developed on Borland Delphi version 7.0 with arithmetic and graphic components are in active and for database function is used dBase and Paradox through Borland Database Engine (BDE). Developed calculations include removal efficiency, dose and time of irradiation and the power of MBE. For the purpose of further calculations and bigger application, database functions have been prepared for SQL-Links. From the operation test, program can be run as expected. (author)

  2. Flue gas cleaning chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutberlet, H. [VEBA Kraftwerke Ruhr AG, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The introduction of modern flue gas cleaning technology into fossil-fueled power stations has repeatedly confronted the power station chemists with new and interesting problems over the last 15 - 20 years. Both flue gas desulphurization by lime washing and catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides are based on simple basic chemical reactions. Owing to the use of readily available starting materials, the production of safe, useful end products and, last but not least, the possibility of implementing all this on an industrial scale by means of efficient process engineering, limestone desulphurization and catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides dominate the world market and, little by little, are becoming still more widespread. The origin and thus the quality of fuels and starting materials, the firing method, the mode of operation and engineering peculiarities in each plant interact in a complex manner. Simple cause/effect relationships are frequently incapable of explaining phenomena; thinking in complex interrelationships is needed. (EG)

  3. A review on electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT) as a multicomponent air pollution control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basfar, A.A.; Fageeha, O.I.; Kunnummal, N.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Pawelec, A.; Zimek, Z.; Licki, J.; Warych, J.

    2010-01-01

    Implemented on an industrial scale in two thermal power plants in China and at the Electropower Station (EPS) Pomorzany in Poland. The plants in China have been designed mainly for desulfurization while the plant in Poland for a simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO x from flue gases. The successful operation of these plants has demonstrated the advantages of using this technology for removing SO 2 and NO x from flue gas under varying conditions. At present, the plant in Poland is the only operational installation at an international level. Recent tests performed at an EBFGT industrial pilot plant in Bulgaria have demonstrated feasibility of application of this technology for treatment of high sulfur and high humidity lignite fired boilers. Further laboratory tests have been performed for model flue gases similar to those emitted from a copper smelter and flue gases originated from different types of high sulfur heavy fuel oils. In all cases, dry-scrubbing process with ammonia addition has been tested. The removal efficiency of pollutants is as high as 95% for SO 2 and 70-80% for NO x . The by-product of this process is a high quality fertilizer component. Additional laboratory studies have shown that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during combustion of fossil fuels, can be degraded as well. Therefore, EBFGT can be considered as a multicomponent air pollution control technology which can be applied to flue gases treatment from coal, lignite and heavy fuel oil-fired boilers. Other thermal processes like metallurgy and municipal waste incinerators are potential candidates for EBFGT technology application. (authors)

  4. Flue Gas Cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    and sulfuric acid in the atmosphere causing precipitation of acid rain resulting in death of forests and destruction of buildings and monuments in addition to human health problems. The most common state-of-the-art methods applied today industrially for cleaning of flue gases will be addressed, including wet......-time. But the problems may also be attacked by new materials like supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) gas absorbers where the pollutants may be selectively absorbed, desorbed and finally converted to useful mineral acids of commercial grade – really a green waste-to-value approach that we persue instead...

  5. Overview of flue gas treatment in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, W.A.P.; Duarte, C.L.; Omi, N.M.; Poli, D.C.R.; Lima, W.

    2011-01-01

    The coal mines in Brazil are primarily located in southern part areas. The total coal reserves are approximately 32.8 billions tons, 89% of which are located in Rio Grande do Sul state. The Brazilian agriculture potentiality is very high, mainly due to the availability of flat land and the existence of industrial capacity to supply the main fertilizers needs. Electron beam flue gas treatment process ensures simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO X from flue gases by single process, requiring no additional wastewater treatment system and can produce useful nitrogen fertilizer consisting of ammonium sulfate (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and ammonium nitrate NH 4 NO 3 as by-products. During the TC Project BRA/8/021 - Pilot Plant for Electron Beam Purification of Flue Gas supported by IAEA (1995-1996), a laboratory facility for electron beam flue gas treatment was set at IPEN. In 1997, an official request from Brazilian Government, Ministry of Science & Technology (MCT) and IPEN was made for the Japan Consulting Institute (JCI) to prepare feasibility studies of air pollution control by electron beam flue gas treatment in three power generation companies. These companies are responsible for the power generation, the transmission and the supply of electricity to Brazil: Jorge Lacerda – Eletrosul Centrais Eletricas do Sul do Brasil S.A., Presidente Medici – Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica (CEEE) and Piratininga – AES Eletropaulo Thermal Power Plants. (author)

  6. NOx and PAHs removal from industrial flue gas by using electron beam technology in the alcohol addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.X.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Bulka, S.; Zimek, Z.; Licki, J.; Kubica, K.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The preliminary test of NO x and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal from flue gas were investigated in the alcohol addition by using electron beam irradiation in EPS Kaweczyn. Experimental conditions were as follows: flue gas flow rate 5000 nM 3 /hr; humidity 4-5%; inlet concentrations of SO 2 and NO x , which were emitted from power station, were 192 ppm and 106 ppm, respectively; ammonia addition is 2.75 m 3 /hr; alcohol addition is 600 l/hr. It was found that NO x removal efficiency in the presence of alcohol was increased by 10% than without alcohol addition when the absorbed dose was below 6 kGy. The NO x removal efficiency was decreased when the absorbed dose was higher than 10 kGy. In order to understand PAHs' behavior under EB irradiation, inlet PAHs (emitted from coal combustion process) sample and outlet PAHs (after irradiation) sample were collected by using a condensed bottle connected with XAD-2 adsorbent and active carbon adsorbent and were analyzed by a GC-MS. It is found that: at the 8 kGy adsorbed dose, concentrations of PAHs with small aromatic rings (≤3, except Acenaphthylene) are reduced and concentrations of PAHs with large aromatic rings (≤4) are increased. A possible mechanism is proposed

  7. Flue gas conditioning today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southam, B.J.; Coe, E.L. Jr. [Wahlco Engineering International Ltd., Santa Ana, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Many relatively small electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s) exist which collect fly ash at remarkably high efficiencies and have been tested consistently at correspondingly high migration velocities. But the majority of the world`s coal supplies produce ashes which are collected at much lower migration velocities for a given efficiency and therefore require correspondingly large specific collection areas to achieve acceptable results. Early trials of flue gas conditioning (FGC) showed benefits in maximizing ESP performance and minimizing expense which justified continued experimentation. Trials of several dozen ways of doing it wrong eventually developed a set of reliable rules for doing it right. One result is that the use of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) for adjustment of the resistivity of fly ash from low sulfur coal has been widely applied and has become an automatically accepted part of the option of burning low sulfur coal for compliance with the Clean Air Act of l990 in the U.S.A. Currently, over 100,000 MW of generating capacity is using FGC, and it is estimated that approximately 45,800 MW will utilize coal-switching with FGC for Clean Air Act emission compliance. Guarantees that this equipment will be available to operate at least 98 percent of the time it is called upon are routinely fulfilled.

  8. Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder,; Edgar, B [Bethel Park, PA

    2009-02-24

    The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

  9. Water recovery from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijboer, R.; Van Deelen-Bremer, M.H.; de Vos, F.; Zeijseink, A.G.L. [KEMA Nederland B.V. (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    In the power generation process a large amount of water is needed, for steam generation, flue gas cleaning etc. On the other hand a large amount of water is emitted to the atmosphere via the stack. For example a 400 MW coal fired power plant with a flue gas desulfurisation plant emits about 1,500,000 m{sup 3} per hour with a water concentration of about 11%. The emitted water has a rather good quality compared to surface water and needs less effort to be treated for use as make-up water. As the available amount of water in the flue gas from the earlier mentioned power plant is about 150 tons per hour, recovering 20% of this amount covers the make-up water needs of this 400 MW power plant. Direct condensation of the flue gas needs large cooling power and the condensed water is acidic and corrosive and needs cleanup treatment before it can be used in the water/steam cycle. KEMA developed a technology based on gas separation membranes which makes it possible to recover water from flue gas. The process is covered by a wide patent. The principle of the membrane is comparable to the material that is used in fabric like SympaTex{reg_sign} and GORE-TEX{reg_sign}. The GORE-TEX material is permeable to water vapor but rejects liquid water. The driving force is the water vapor pressure close to the human skin which is the higher than the water vapor pressure open the outside of the clothing. The selectivity of the GORE-TEX material however is not good enough to be used at the temperature of flue gas. The University of Twente (Netherlands) developed a membrane material based on modified PEEK which is highly selective of water vapor at flue gas temperatures. Based on the fact that flat membranes have an uneconomical surface to volume ratio, the choice has been made to use hollow fibre membranes. 6 figs.

  10. The calculation of water fogging system for process conditioning the flue gas processor by electron beam machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanda; Utaya; Suryanto; Kristiyanti

    2008-01-01

    In the course of gas processing flue gas needed water fogging technique to get condition moisture the desired that is from 7% becoming 12% with temperature processed at about 65°C. In this calculation will condition flue gas SO 2 and NO x with debit 20.000 Nm 3 /hour at temperature 135°C. The result to reach the condition have to be sprayed by item of aqueous vapour have diameter 1 mm, so that yielded a speed item of aqueous vapour 776,82 cm/seconds, sum up secretory aqueous vapour from nozzle 0,137.10 -6 kgm/m 2 second, wide of surface nozzle 2,93 mm 2 , diameter and high of vessel 1,13 m and 7,26 m, evaporation time item of aqueous vapour 3,8 seconds and pressure difference in spray cooler vessel equal to 0,3864 bar. (author)

  11. An electron beam flue gas treatment plant for a coal fired thermal power station. EBA demonstration plant in Chengdu thermal power station (China EBA Project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Shi, Jingke

    1999-01-01

    Ebara's electron beam flue gas treatment plant was installed and is being demonstrated in Chengdu Thermal Power Station, Sichuan, China. The demonstration is proving that this plant is fully capable of meeting the target removal of sulfur dioxides from flue gas (flow rate : 300-thousand m 3 /h). Recovered by-products, namely ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate, from the treatment were actually tested as fertilizers, the result of which was favorable. The sale and distribution of these by-products are already underway. In May 1995, this plant was presented the certificate of authorization by China's State Power Corporation. It is noted that this was the first time a sulfur dioxide removal plant was certified as such in China. (author)

  12. A new approach in e-beam treatment of flue gases and other gas-phase processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukulin, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    A principally new approach avoiding the conventional ammonia (or limestone) technology for the e-beam treatment of flue gases in coal-fired electric power stations, boilers and ore smelting industries is suggested. The approach includes two stages. At the first stage the flue gases undergo hard ultra-violet irradiation (with an appropriate spectral distribution) in permanent electric field which leads to a partial separation of NO and SO 2 from the rest of flue gases. At the second stage this partially separated mixture of No and SO 2 undergoes a combined impact of a fast gaseous jet consisting of a molecular mixture N 2 +H 2 together with longitudinal collinear electron beam with maximal electron energy around 300-400 KeV only. This low energy electron irradiation leads in case of such a geometry to a simultaneous reduction of NO and SO 2 oxides to the clear air components (i.e. N 2 +H 2 O) and elementary sulphur respectively instead of a large mass of ammonium nitrates and sulphates in the traditional Ebara approach, Besides, the suggested two-stage process may lead to a very significant reduction in the energy consumption (of the accelerated electrons) and a sharp decrease in the gamma-radiational background. Due to its characteristic features, the process has a much higher potential for commercialisation and wide spreading

  13. Removal of SO2 and NO/sub x/ from flue gas by means of a spray dryer/electron beam combination: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Feldman, P.L.; Ray, A.B.; Morgan, J.R.; Hildreth, G.A.

    1982-04-01

    This study examines the feasibility of adding an electron beam between the spray dryer and the fabric filter of dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The beam promises effective removal of nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), even at higher coal-sulfur levels than usually economic for dry scrubbers. The beam excites gas molecules, promoting reactions that convert SO 2 and NO/sub x/ to acids that then react with calcium compounds and are removed by the filter. Concerns examined here are feasibility and waste disposal. The cost findings are promising for both manufacture and operation. The system uses commercially available components. The relatively low temperatures and high humidity downstream of the spray dryer favor economic beam operation. The beam removes SO 2 , so the dryer can be run for economy, not high removal. The beam's incidental heating effect reduces reheat cost. Safe landfilling of the nitrate-rich waste appears practical, with leachate carrying no more nitrate than natural rain and dustfall. We expect natural pozzolanic reactions between alumina-silica compounds in the fly ash and lime compounds from the spray dryer to form an impermeable concrete-like material within 10 days after landfilling. Dry scrubber with electron beam appears competitive with commercial FGD systems, and we recommend a pilot scale operation

  14. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  15. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Vann Bush, P. [Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The overall goal of this research project has been to formulate a model describing effects of flue gas conditioning on particulate properties. By flue gas conditioning we mean any process by which solids, gases, or liquids are added to the combustor and/or the exhaust stream to the extent that flue gas and particulate properties may be altered. Our modeling efforts, which are included in our Final Report, are based on an understanding of how ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Flue gas conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of forces acting on the fly ash particles, and can take place through many different methods. Modification of particulate properties can alter ash resistivity or ash cohesivity and result in improved or degraded control device performance. Changes to the flue gas, addition or particulate matter such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sorbents, or the addition of reactive gases or liquids can modify these properties. If we can better understand how conditioning agents react with fly ash particles, application of appropriate conditioning agents or processes may result in significantly improved fine particle collection at low capital and operating costs.

  16. Technical aspects of flue gas irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.; Galloway, R.A.; Stichelbaut, F.; Abs, M.

    2011-01-01

    Removal of SO 2 and NO x from flue gases in fossil-fueled power plants by irradiation with accelerated electrons was first investigated in Japan more than 30 years ago. This process has since been extensively evaluated in several pilot facilities in Japan, the USA, Germany, Poland, Bulgaria and China. Recently, it has advanced to the demonstration plant stage in Poland, Japan and China. Except for the initial research facility in Japan, which had a 5.5 MeV microwave linear accelerator, these facilities have used relatively low-energy dc accelerators rated from 0.3 MeV to 0.8 MeV. An attractive feature of such accelerators is their high electrical efficiency, which can exceed 90%. However, the electron beam power dissipated in the two titanium beam windows, the first on the accelerator and the second on the flue gas duct, and in the air space between the windows must also be taken into account. These beam power losses have been calculated as 54% at 0.50 MeV and 28% at 0.75 MeV, but they decrease further to 17% at 1.0 MeV, 9.3% at 1.5 MeV, 6.7% at 2.0 MeV, 5.2% at 2.5 MeV and 4.6% at 3.0 MeV. The use of accelerators providing electron energies higher than 0.75 MeV could facilitate the generation and delivery of the high beam current and beam power requirements for large electric power plants, which are about 1% to 2% of the electrical power output of the plant. Most of the pilot and demonstration facilities have used ammonia gas to neutralize the acid vapors produced during the irradiation process. The resulting by-products are ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate, which have value as agricultural fertilizers. On the other hand, two pilot facilities, one in the USA and the other in Japan, have shown that slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) is a possible alternative to ammonia. The resulting by-products in this case are calcium sulfate and calcium nitrate, which can be used as soil amendments or to make gypsum board (drywall) for interior construction in homes and

  17. Architectural design of flue gas continuous emission monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Jiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Yong; Yao, Xifan

    2008-10-01

    The paper presents the architectural design of flue gas continuous emission monitoring system, which uses computer, acquisition card and serial port communication card as hardware in the flue gas continuous emission monitoring system. In the CEMS, continuous emission monitoring system, it monitors dust in the flue gas, SO2, NOX, and some parameter on the flue gas emission, which includes mass flow, pressure, and temperature. For the software in the monitoring system, the research designs monitoring program in VC++, and realizes flue gas monitor with the architecture.

  18. System and method for treatment of a flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiry, Irina Pavlovna; Wood, Benjamin Rue; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Perry, Robert James; McDermott, John Brian

    2017-09-19

    A method for treatment of a flue gas involves feeding the flue gas and a lean solvent to an absorber. The method further involves reacting the flue gas with the lean solvent within the absorber to generate a clean flue gas and a rich solvent. The method also involves feeding the clean flue gas from the absorber and water from a source, to a wash tower to separate a stripped portion of the lean solvent from the clean flue gas to generate a washed clean flue gas and a mixture of the water and the stripped portion of the lean solvent. The method further involves treating at least a portion of the mixture of the water and the stripped portion of the lean solvent via a separation system to separate the water from the stripped portion of the lean solvent.

  19. Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  20. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  1. A Flue Gas Tube for Thermoelectric Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a flue gas tube (FGT) (1) for generation of thermoelectric power having thermoelectric elements (8) that are integrated in the tube. The FTG may be used in combined heat and power (CHP) system (13) to produce directly electricity from waste heat from, e.g. a biomass boiler....... The CHP system may also be operated in a heating or cooling mode, thus being able to heat or cool water by feeding electricity to the system....

  2. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Cao, Yan; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of flue gas contents on the mercury speciation transformation process. Mercury emission control methods, such as existing APCDs (air pollution control devices) at power stations, sorbent injection, additives in coal combustion and photo-catalytic methods are introduced in detail. Lab-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale experimental studies of sorbent injection conducted by the authors are presented systematically, helping researchers and engineers to understand how this approach reduces the mercury emissions in flue gas and to apply the methods in mercury emission control at coal-fired power stations.

  3. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of

  4. Process for catalytic flue gas denoxing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldhuis, A.; Goudriaan, F.; Groeneveld, M.; Samson, R.

    1991-01-01

    With the increasing concern for the environment, stringency of legislation and industry's awareness of its own environmental responsibility, the demand for the reduction of emission levels of nitrogen oxides is becoming increasingly urgent. This paper reports that Shell has developed a low temperature catalytic deNOx system for deep removal of nitrogen oxides, which includes a low-pressure-drop reactor. This process is able to achieve over 90% removal of nitrogen oxides and therefore can be expected to meet legislation requirements for the coming years. The development of a low-temperature catalyst makes it possible to operate at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C, compared to 300-400 degrees C for the conventional honeycomb and plate-type catalysts. This allows an add-on construction, which is most often a more economical solution than the retrofits in the hot section required with conventional deNOx catalysts. The Lateral Flow Reactor (LFR), which is used for dust-free flue gas applications, and the Parallel Passage Reactor (PPR) for dust-containing flue gas applications, have been developed to work with pressure drops below 10 mbar

  5. Flue gas treatment with membrane gas absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    Dutch researchers from the TN0 Institute have developed a technique to carry out gas-liquid contacting operations using hollow fibre membranes in combination with an absorption liquid. The method known as membrane gas absorption, aims to combine the advantages of membrane technology (compactness,

  6. Flue gas desulfurization by rotating beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, N.; Keyvani, M.; Coskundeniz, A.

    1992-01-01

    The operating and mass transfer characteristics of rotating foam metal beds were studied to determine the potential for flue gas desulfurization. This is a final technical report on the work supported by DOE [number sign]FG22-87-PC79924. The report is divided into two sections, Part 1 deals primarily with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, and Part 2 covers the mass transfer characteristics of S0[sub 2] absorption in water-lime slurries. Rotating foam metal beds are in essence packed towers operated in high gravitational fields. The foam metal bed is in the form of a cylindrical donut, or torus, and is rotated to produced the high centrifugal forces. The liquid phase enters the bed at the inner surface of the torus and is pulled by the field through the bed. Gas flows countercurrent to the liquid. The bed packing can have a very large specific surface areas and not flood. Possible benefits include much smaller height of a transfer unit resulting in smaller equipment and supporting structures, reduced solvent inventory, faster response with improved process control, reduced pressure drop, and shorter startup and shut-down times. This work is concerned broadly with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, the objectives being to (1) determine the pressure drop through the rotating bed; (2) determine the power required to operate the beds, (3) investigate the residence time distribution of the liquid phase in the beds; and (4) determine the mass transfer coefficients of S0[sub 2] absorption. Three packings of differing specific surface areas were studied, with areas ranging from 656 to 2952 m[sub 2]/m[sub 3]. Liquid flow rates to 36 kg/s*m[sub 2], gas flow rate to 2.2 kg/s*m[sub 2], and gravitational fields to 300 g were covered in this study.

  7. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  8. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Bush, P.V.

    1992-04-27

    This project is divided into four tasks. The Management Plan was developed in task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. This phase of the project is now complete. During the past quarter, initial preparations of laboratory equipment for laboratory testing have been made. A plan for initial laboratory tests has been submitted to the Project Manager for review. Laboratory testing will commence once these laboratory plans have been formally approved. The results of the work performed under task 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under task 4.

  9. Laboratory scale electron beam system for treatment of flue gases from diesel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Aiasah Hashim; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan; Khomsaton Abu Bakar; Ayub Muhammad

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory scale test rig to treat simulated flue gas using electron beam technology was installed at the Alurtron EB-Irradiation Center, MINT. The experiment test rig was proposed as a result of feasibility studies conducted jointly by IAEA, MINT and TNB Research in 1997. The test rig system consists of several components, among other, diesel generator sets, pipe ducts, spray cooler, ammonia dosage system, irradiation vessel, bag filter and gas analyzers. The installation was completed and commissioned in October 2001. results from the commissioning test runs and subsequent experimental work showed that the efficiency of flue gas treatment is high. It was proven that electron beam technology might be applied in the treatment of air pollutants. This paper describes the design and work function of the individual major components as well as the full system function. Results from the initial experimental works are also presented. (Author)

  10. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.; Dahlin, R.S.

    1996-03-20

    The US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated this project as part of a program to study the control of fine particles from coal combustion. Our project focus was flue gas conditioning. Various conditioning processes have lowered operating costs and increased collection efficiency at utility particulate control devices. By improving fine particle collection, flue gas conditioning also helps to control the emission of toxic metals, which are concentrated in the fine particle fraction. By combining a review of pertinent literature, laboratory characterization of a variety of fine powders and ashes, pilot-scale studies of conditioning mechanisms, and field experiences, Southern Research Institute has been able to describe many of the key processes that account for the effects that conditioning can have on fine-particle collection. The overall goal of this research project was to explain the mechanisms by which various flue gas conditioning processes alter the performance of particulate control devices. Conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of the forces acting on the fly ash particles. Resistivity, chemistry, cohesivity, size distribution, and particle morphology are among the basic properties of fly ash that significantly influence fine particle collection. Modifications of particulate properties can result in improved or degraded control device performance. These modifications can be caused by (1) changes to the process design or operation that affect properties of the flue gas, (2) addition of particulate matter such as flue-gas desulfurization sorbents to the process effluent stream, (3) injection of reactive gases or liquids into the flue gas. We recommend that humidification be seriously considered as a flue gas conditioning option. 80 refs., 69 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  12. Enhancement of mercury control in flue-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, Hann S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper summarizes research at Argonne National Laboratory which is focused on techniques to enhance the capture of elemental mercury and integrate its control into existing flue-gas cleanup (FGC) systems. Both laboratory and field tests have shown that very little elemental mercury is captured in a wet scrubber system due to the low solubility of that species. To enhance the ability of wet scrubbers to capture mercury, Argonne has studied improved mass transfer through both mechanical and chemical means, as well as the conversion of elemental mercury into a more soluble species that can be easily absorbed. Current research is investigating the roles of several halogen species either alone or in combination with typical flue-gas components such as sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in the oxidation of mercury to form compounds that are easily scrubbed from the flue gas.

  13. BUILDING MATERIALS MADE FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael W. Grutzeck; Maria DiCola; Paul Brenner

    2006-03-30

    Flue gas desulphurization (FGD) materials are produced in abundant quantities by coal burning utilities. Due to environmental restrains, flue gases must be ''cleaned'' prior to release to the atmosphere. They are two general methods to ''scrub'' flue gas: wet and dry. The choice of scrubbing material is often defined by the type of coal being burned, i.e. its composition. Scrubbing is traditionally carried out using a slurry of calcium containing material (slaked lime or calcium carbonate) that is made to contact exiting flue gas as either a spay injected into the gas or in a bubble tower. The calcium combined with the SO{sub 2} in the gas to form insoluble precipitates. Some plants have been using dry injection of these same materials or their own Class C fly ash to scrub. In either case the end product contains primarily hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}O) with smaller amounts of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). These materials have little commercial use. Experiments were carried out that were meant to explore the feasibility of using blends of hannebachite and fly ash mixed with concentrated sodium hydroxide to make masonry products. The results suggest that some of these mixtures could be used in place of conventional Portland cement based products such as retaining wall bricks and pavers.

  14. Membranes for Flue Gas Treatment - Transport behavior of water and gas in hydrophilic polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potreck, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Fossil fuel fired power plants produce electricity and in addition to that large volume flows of flue gas, which mainly contain N2, O2, and CO2, but also large quantities of water vapor. To prevent condensation of the water vapor present in this flue gas stream, water needs to be removed before

  15. Absorption of Flue-Gas Components by Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolding, Helene; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Mossin, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    for absorption of NOX, CO2 and SO2 are demonstrated and the possible mechanism of absorption described on the molecular level. Special focus regards the interaction of the ILs with water vapor, which is an important feature in envisaged application of flue gas cleaning in power plants, waste incineration plants...

  16. Workshop on sulfur chemistry in flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.E. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The Flue Gas Desulfurization Workshop was held at Morgantown, West Virginia, June 7-8, 1979. The presentations dealt with the chemistry of sulfur and calcium compounds in scrubbers. DOE and EPRI programs in this area are described. Ten papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  17. Mechanical, Hygric and Thermal Properties of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tesárek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference measurements of basic mechanical, thermal and hygric parameters of hardened flue gas desulfurization gypsum are carried out. Moisture diffusivity, water vapor diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined with the primary aim of comparison with data obtained for various types of modified gypsum in the future. 

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full-scale exper...... and mass transport phenomena in wet FGD plants....

  19. Flue gas condensation cleaning technology; Reningsteknik vid roekgaskondensering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westermark, M. [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-08-01

    Flue gas condensation has become established as an economical and environmentally attractive method for heat recovery and flue gas cleaning. Effective capture is wanted for dust and flue gas components. This also leads to more advanced treatment of the condensate. Important aspects for present plants are removal of heavy metals, sulfur oxides and ammonia. Future areas are condensation in biofuel driers, small-scale oil- and natural gas boilers and boilers using Salix. High concentrations of heavy metals are reported in refuse boilers, where sulphide precipitation and filtration are used to minimize outlet concentrations in the condensate. For simple dust cleaning (multicyclones) filtration of condensate is normally demanded. The pH value should be increased (to {approx} 7,5-9) for precipitation of heavy metals; zinc and cadmium being the most relevant from environmental point of view. Salix contains considerably higher amounts of cadmium, and may need sulphide precipitation. Addition of sodium hydroxide to the condensate film gives 90-95% absorption of sulfur dioxide. The pH value 6-6,5 is optimal for good removal of sulfur compounds and ammonias, and minimizes carbon dioxide absorption. For avoiding corrosion on concrete pipes the outlet condensate has to be neutralized. Ammonia is formed during combustion of fuels containing nitrogen and can be found in flue gases from e.g. biofuels. For SNCR extra ammonia is added. The main part ({approx} 60-95%) of the ammonia in flue gas is absorbed as ammonia ions in the condensate. Normal ammonium concentration in condensate is about 30-50 g/m{sup 3} without SNCR and 50-150 g/m{sup 3} with SNCR. Removal of ammonia from condensates can become necessary and methods are under development for stripping of ammonia with air or steam. 27 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs, 14 appendices

  20. Carbon dioxide capture strategies from flue gas using microalgae: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniya M; Mechery, Jerry; Paulose, Sylas V

    2016-09-01

    Global warming and pollution are the twin crises experienced globally. Biological offset of these crises are gaining importance because of its zero waste production and the ability of the organisms to thrive under extreme or polluted condition. In this context, this review highlights the recent developments in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas using microalgae and finding the best microalgal remediation strategy through contrast and comparison of different strategies. Different flue gas microalgal remediation strategies discussed are as follows: (i) Flue gas to CO2 gas segregation using adsorbents for microalgal mitigation, (ii) CO2 separation from flue gas using absorbents and later regeneration for microalgal mitigation, (iii) Flue gas to liquid conversion for direct microalgal mitigation, and (iv) direct flue gas mitigation using microalgae. This work also studies the economic feasibility of microalgal production. The study discloses that the direct convening of flue gas with high carbon dioxide content, into microalgal system is cost-effective.

  1. Flue Gas Cleaning With Alternative Processes and Reaction Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Huang, Jun; Riisager, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Alternative methods to the traditional industrial NOX and SOXflue gas cleaning processes working at lower temperatures and/orleading to useful products are desired. In this work we presentour latest results regarding the use of molten ionic media inelectrocatalytic membrane separation, ionic liquid...... reversibleabsorption and supported ionic liquid deNOX catalysis. Furtherdevelopment of the methods will hopefully make them suitable forinstallation in different positions in the flue gas duct ascompared to the industrial methods available today....

  2. Incineration and flue gas cleaning in China - a Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Mi; Jiang, Xuguan; Li, Xiaodong; Lu, Shengyong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2010-01-01

    Waste incineration is rapidly developing in China. Different technologies are proposed for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Hazardous Waste (HW), and Medical Waste (MW). The required technologies are either imported, or developed locally. Some data are cited to illustrate these rapid developments. Incinerator flue gas arises at rather limited scale (10,000-100,000 Nm 3 /h), compared to power generation, yet the number of pollutants to be counted with is huge: dust and grit, acid gases, NO x , selected heavy metals, aerosols and nanoparticles, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and dioxins. Major options in flue gas cleaning can be derived from Best Available Technologies (BAT), as were developed in the European Union. Hence, E.U. practice is analyzed in some detail, by considering the present situation in selected E.U. countries (Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium). A comparison is made with China. Also, the situation in Japan is examined. Based on this wide experience, a number of technical suggestions regarding incineration, flue gas cleaning, and emission control are formulated. Also, the possibility of co incineration is considered. Starting from the particular experience of Zhejiang University (as a designer of Fluid Bed and Rotary Kiln plant, with large experience in Fluid Bed processes, coal firing, gasification and pyrolysis, and actively monitoring thermal units throughout China) some specific Case Studies are examined, e.g., a fluidized bed incinerator and its gas cleaning system (MSWI and HWI from ITPE). Some attention is paid to the potential threats in China from uncontrolled combustion sources. As a conclusion, some recommendations are formulated regarding flue gas cleaning in Developing Nations at large and in China in particular. (author)

  3. Development of a 'wet' variant of electron beam gas treatment technology adapted to economic and technological conditions of developing countries to remove NOx, SO2 and particulates from flue gas and produce fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainchtein, O.L.; Piotrovskiy, V.V.; Savenkov, A.S.; Smirnov, I.K.; Salimov, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Institute Energostal with its co-authors has carried out real gas tests of the EB flue gas treatment technology at a 1000 m 3 /h experimental installation at Lipetsk Metallurgical Plant (Lipetsk, Russia), including agricultural tests to utilize the by-product. On the basis of the results obtained, a ''wet'' variant of the EB technology has been developed. A conceptual, basic and working design was engineered for a 100,000 m 3 /h EB demonstration unit at Slavyanskaya Power Plant (Donbass, Ukraine). In a ''wet'' variant of the technology, the following problems are believed to be harmoniously solved: reduction of power consumption for irradiation due to heterogenous reactions based on the so-called droplet mechanism, efficiency and reliability of collecting ammonia salts by wet dust catchers, wet granulation of the by-product using traditional equipment. A ''wet'' variant of the EB technology has a low capital cost and requires less floor area. Therefore, despite all its disadvantages typical for any wet method of gas purification, the ''wet'' EB technology can find its application in developing countries with low levels of economy. In many countries of this type, in particular, in the countries of the former Soviet Union, wet methods of gas treatment and fertilizer granulation are still widely used. As a matter of fact, it is a conventionally ''wet'' method (hence the inverted commas), since no waste water is discharged into the environment

  4. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

  5. Assessment of corrosion in the flue gas cleaning system using on-line monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vendelbo Nielsen, Lars; Berggreen Petersen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Amager unit 1 is a 350 MW multifuel suspension-fired plant commissioned in 2009 to fire biomass (straw and wood pellets). Increasing corrosion problems in the flue gas cleaning system were observed in the gas-gas preheater (GAFO), the booster fan and flue gas ducts. Chlorine containing corrosion ...

  6. Flue gas injection into gas hydrate reservoirs for methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinhai; Okwananke, Anthony; Tohidi, Bahman; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Maerle, Kirill; Istomin, Vladimir; Bukhanov, Boris; Cheremisin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Flue gas was injected for both methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. • Kinetics of methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration was investigated. • Methane-rich gas mixtures can be produced inside methane hydrate stability zones. • Up to 70 mol% of carbon dioxide in the flue gas was sequestered as hydrates. - Abstract: Flue gas injection into methane hydrate-bearing sediments was experimentally investigated to explore the potential both for methane recovery from gas hydrate reservoirs and for direct capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide from flue gas as carbon dioxide hydrate. A simulated flue gas from coal-fired power plants composed of 14.6 mol% carbon dioxide and 85.4 mol% nitrogen was injected into a silica sand pack containing different saturations of methane hydrate. The experiments were conducted at typical gas hydrate reservoir conditions from 273.3 to 284.2 K and from 4.2 to 13.8 MPa. Results of the experiments show that injection of the flue gas leads to significant dissociation of the methane hydrate by shifting the methane hydrate stability zone, resulting in around 50 mol% methane in the vapour phase at the experimental conditions. Further depressurisation of the system to pressures well above the methane hydrate dissociation pressure generated methane-rich gas mixtures with up to 80 mol% methane. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide hydrate and carbon dioxide-mixed hydrates were formed while the methane hydrate was dissociating. Up to 70% of the carbon dioxide in the flue gas was converted into hydrates and retained in the silica sand pack.

  7. Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, Henry W.; Granite, Evan J.; Freeman, Mark C.; Hargis, Richard A.; O'Dowd, William J.

    2003-02-18

    A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

  8. Optimize Flue Gas Settings to Promote Microalgae Growth in Photobioreactors via Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lian; Chen, Amelia B; Yu, Yi; Kucera, Leah; Tang, Yinjie

    2013-01-01

    Flue gas from power plants can promote algal cultivation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions1. Microalgae not only capture solar energy more efficiently than plants3, but also synthesize advanced biofuels2-4. Generally, atmospheric CO2 is not a sufficient source for supporting maximal algal growth5. On the other hand, the high concentrations of CO2 in industrial exhaust gases have adverse effects on algal physiology. Consequently, both cultivation conditions (such as nutrients and light) and the control of the flue gas flow into the photo-bioreactors are important to develop an efficient “flue gas to algae” system. Researchers have proposed different photobioreactor configurations4,6 and cultivation strategies7,8 with flue gas. Here, we present a protocol that demonstrates how to use models to predict the microalgal growth in response to flue gas settings. We perform both experimental illustration and model simulations to determine the favorable conditions for algal growth with flue gas. We develop a Monod-based model coupled with mass transfer and light intensity equations to simulate the microalgal growth in a homogenous photo-bioreactor. The model simulation compares algal growth and flue gas consumptions under different flue-gas settings. The model illustrates: 1) how algal growth is influenced by different volumetric mass transfer coefficients of CO2; 2) how we can find optimal CO2 concentration for algal growth via the dynamic optimization approach (DOA); 3) how we can design a rectangular on-off flue gas pulse to promote algal biomass growth and to reduce the usage of flue gas. On the experimental side, we present a protocol for growing Chlorella under the flue gas (generated by natural gas combustion). The experimental results qualitatively validate the model predictions that the high frequency flue gas pulses can significantly improve algal cultivation. PMID:24121788

  9. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or

  10. Thermal oxidation vitrification flue gas elimination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kephart, W.; Angelo, F.; Clemens, M.

    1995-01-01

    With minor modifications to a Best Demonstrated Available Technology hazardous waste incinerator, it is possible to obtain combustion without potentially toxic emissions by using technology currently employed in similar applications throughout industry. Further, these same modifications will reduce waste handling over an extended operating envelope while minimizing energy consumption. Three by-products are produced: industrial grade carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a final waste form that will exceed Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures requirements and satisfy nuclear waste product consistency tests. The proposed system utilizes oxygen rather than air as an oxidant to reduce the quantities of total emissions, improve the efficiency of the oxidation reactions, and minimize the generation of toxic NO x emissions. Not only will less potentially hazardous constituents be generated; all toxic substances can be contained and the primary emission, carbon dioxide -- the leading ''greenhouse gas'' contributing to global warming -- will be converted to an industrial by-product needed to enhance the extraction of energy feedstocks from maturing wells. Clearly, the proposed configuration conforms to the provisions for Most Achievable Control Technology as defined and mandated for the private sector by the Clear Air Act Amendments of 1990 to be implemented in 1997 and still lacking definition

  11. Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JoAnn S. Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Andrew Fry; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this project is to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involves both experimental and modeling efforts. The team is comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective is to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters to be studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. This report summarizes Year 2 results for the experimental and modeling tasks. Experiments in the mercury reactor are underway and interesting results suggested that a more comprehensive look at catalyzed surface reactions was needed. Therefore, much of the work has focused on the heterogeneous reactions. In addition, various chemical kinetic models have been explored in an attempt to explain some discrepancies between this modeling effort and others.

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  13. Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JoAnn Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this project was to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involved both experimental and modeling efforts. The team was comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective was to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. The results suggested that homogeneous mercury oxidation is below 10% which is not consistent with previous data of others and work which was completed early in this research program. Previous data showed oxidation above 10% and up to 100%. However, the previous data are suspect due to apparent oxidation occurring within the sampling system where hypochlorite ion forms in the KCl impinger, which in turn oxidized mercury. Initial tests with entrained iron oxide particles injected into a flame reactor suggest that iron present on fly ash particle surfaces can promote heterogeneous oxidation of mercury in the presence of HCl under entrained flow conditions. Using the data generated above, with homogeneous reactions accounting for less than 10% of the oxidation, comparisons were made to pilot- and full-scale data. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions, as with the case of iron oxide, and adsorption on solid carbon must be taking place in the full-scale system. Modeling of mercury oxidation using parameters from the literature was conducted to further study the contribution of homogeneous pathways to Hg oxidation in coal combustion systems. Calculations from the literature used rate parameters developed in different studies, in some cases using transition state theory with a range of approaches and basis sets, and in other cases

  14. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  15. Installation of laboratory scale flue gas treatment system at ALURTRON, MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti A'iasah Hashim; Khairul Zaman Dahlan; Zulkafli Ghazali; Khomsaton Abu Bakar, Ayub Muhamad

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory scale test rig to treat simulated flue gas using electron beam technology was installed at the Alurtron EB-irradiation center, MINT. The experiment test rig was proposed as a result of a feasibility studies conducted jointly by IAEA, MINT and TNB Research in 1997. The test rig system consisted of several components, among other, diesel generator, gas analyzers and spray cooler. The installation was completed and commissioned in October 2001. Results from the commissioning test runs and subsequent experimental work showed that the efficiency of the gas treatment is high. It was proven that electron beam technology might be applied in the treatment of air pollutants. This paper describes the design and work function of the individual major components as well as the full system function. Results from the initial experimental works are also presented. (Author)

  16. Distribution of heavy metals from flue gas in algal bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napan, Katerine

    Flue gas from coal-fired power plants is a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Microalgae can use this enriched form of CO2 as carbon source and in turn the biomass can be used to produce food, feed, fertilizer and biofuels. However, along with CO2, coal-based flue gas will inevitably introduce heavy metals, which have a high affinity to bind algal cells, could be toxic to the organisms and if transferred to the products could limit their uses. This study seeks to address the distribution and impact of heavy metals present in flue gas on microalgae production systems. To comprehend its effects, algae Scenedesmus obliquus was grown in batch reactors in a multimetal system. Ten heavy metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Pb, As, Se, Cr, Hg, Ni and Cd) were selected and were evaluated at four concentrations (1X, 2X, 5X and 10X). Results show that most heavy metals accumulated mainly in biomass and were found in very low concentrations in media. Hg was shown to be lost from the culture, with low amounts present in the biomass. An upper limit for As uptake was observed, suggesting its likelihood to build-up in the system during medium recycle. The As limited bioaccumulation was overcome by addition of sulfur to the algal medium. Heavy metal at 2X, 5X and 10X inhibited both growth and lipid production, while at the reference concentration both biomass and lipids yields were increased. Heavy metal concentrations in the medium and biomass were time dependent, and at the end of the cultivation most heavy metals in the supernatant solution complied with the recommendations for irrigation water, while biomass was below limits for cattle and poultry feed, fertilizer, plastic and paper. This research shows that bioremediation of CO2 and heavy metals in combination with energy production can be integrated, which is an environmentally friendly form of biotechnology.

  17. Increasing draft capability for retrofit flue gas desulfurization systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, R.D.; Basel, B.E.; Mosier, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    The retrofit installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems results in significantly higher draft losses for existing generating stations. Consequently, the means for increasing draft capability must be included in many FGD retrofit projects. Consideration is given to several alternatives for increasing draft capability. Alternatives are developed for new induced draft (ID) fans to replace the existing ID fans and for new booster fans to supplement the existing ID fans. Both centrifugal and axial fans are evaluated, as are different means of fan volume control. Each alternative is evaluated on the basis of technical merit and economics. Presented are the development of fan alternatives and results of the technical and economic evaluations

  18. CO2 , NOx and SOx removal from flue gas via microalgae cultivation: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-06-01

    Flue gas refers to the gas emitting from the combustion processes, and it contains CO2 , NOx , SOx and other potentially hazardous compounds. Due to the increasing concerns of CO2 emissions and environmental pollution, the cleaning process of flue gas has attracted much attention. Using microalgae to clean up flue gas via photosynthesis is considered a promising CO2 mitigation process for flue gas. However, the impurities in the flue gas may inhibit microalgal growth, leading to a lower microalgae-based CO2 fixation rate. The inhibition effects of SOx that contribute to the low pH could be alleviated by maintaining a stable pH level, while NOx can be utilized as a nitrogen source to promote microalgae growth when it dissolves and is oxidized in the culture medium. The yielded microalgal biomass from fixing flue gas CO2 and utilizing NOx and SOx as nutrients would become suitable feedstock to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals. In addition to the removal of SOx , NOx and CO2 , using microalgae to remove heavy metals from flue gas is also quite attractive. In conclusion, the use of microalgae for simultaneous removal of CO2 , SOx and NOx from flue gas is an environmentally benign process and represents an ideal platform for CO2 reutilization. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Separation of Flue Gas Components by SILP (Supported Ionic Liquid-Phase) Absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, P.; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Mossin, Susanne L.

    2013-01-01

    . The results show that CO2, NO and SO2 can be reversible and selective absorbed using different ILs and that Supported Ionic Liquid-Phase (SILP) absorbers are promising materials for industrial flue gas cleaning. Absorption/desorption dynamics can be tuned by temperature, pressure and gas concentration. © 2012......Reversible absorption of the flue gas components CO2, NO, NO2 and SO2 has been tested for different ionic liquids (ILs) at different temperatures and flue gas compositions where porous, high surface area carriers have been applied as supports for the ionic liquids to obtain Supported Ionic Liquid......-Phase (SILP) absorber materials. The use of solid SILP absorbers with selected ILs were found to significantly improve the absorption capacity and sorption dynamics at low flue gas concentration, thus making the applicability of ILs viable in technical, continuous flow processes for flue gas cleaning...

  20. Materials in flue gas condensation plants; Materialval vid roekgaskondensering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Barbara; Nordling Magnus

    2003-02-01

    This project is the first part of a larger project. In the part reported here, materials for flue gas condensers have been investigated by contact with plant owners and suppliers and by a literature review of reported failures. If it is decided to continue with another part of the project, a number of materials will be long term tested on site. The project is complementary to an earlier project, which investigated the operating experiences from flue gas condensers in biomass fired cogeneration plants. In the project materials (steel and polymeric) suitable for long term testing in existing plants are discussed. It is proposed that testing in the second part of the project is made with material coupons in one plant fired with only biomass and one plant where biomass is co fired with other fuels. In the biomass fired plant a number of steel materials should be tested. In the co fired plant, with its harsher operating conditions, the same steel materials plus a number of polymeric materials should be tested. Materials suitable for testing are summarised in the report.

  1. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  2. Potential Flue Gas Impurities in Carbon Dioxide Streams Separated from Coal-fired Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    For geological sequestration of CO2 separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This s...

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

    2001-01-01

    Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

  4. Flue-gas-influenced heavy metal bioaccumulation by the indigenous microalgae Desmodesmus communis LUCC 002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisami, Swaminathan; Lee, Keesoo; Balakrishnan, Baskar; Nam, Paul Ki-souk

    2015-01-01

    Desmodesmus communis LUCC 002 was cultivated using flue gas originating from a coal-fired power plant as a carbon dioxide (CO2) source. The flue gas contains various heavy metals. For investigating the fate of flue-gas-introduced metals on the cultivation system, bioaccumulation was measured in the microalgal biomass and milieu. The accumulated biomass was found to contain eight heavy metals: arsenic, chromium, barium, lead, selenium, silver, cadmium, and mercury. High heavy metal accumulations were also found in the control group of algae grown without the addition of flue gas at the same location. Further testing revealed that some of the heavy metals originated from well water used in the cultivation. The flue-gas-influenced bioaccumulation pattern of different heavy metals was observed. The responses of individual heavy metals and the influence of well water microbial flora on the algal growth were investigated, this study showed that hormesis was developed by the D. communis LUCC 002.

  5. Membranes for Flue Gas Treatment - Transport behavior of water and gas in hydrophilic polymer membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Potreck, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Fossil fuel fired power plants produce electricity and in addition to that large volume flows of flue gas, which mainly contain N2, O2, and CO2, but also large quantities of water vapor. To prevent condensation of the water vapor present in this flue gas stream, water needs to be removed before emission to the atmosphere. Commercial dehydration processes such as the use of a condenser or a desiccant system have several disadvantages and membrane technology is an attractive, energy efficient a...

  6. A hybrid plasma-chemical system for high-NOx flue gas treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Zwolińska, Ewa; Licki, Janusz; Sun, Yongxia; Zimek, Zbigniew; Bułka, Sylwester

    2018-03-01

    The reduction of high concentrations of NOx and SO2 from simulated flue gas has been studied. Our aim was to optimise energy consumption for NOx and SO2 removal from off-gases from a diesel generator using heavy fuel oil. A hybrid process: electron beam (EB) plasma and wet scrubber has been applied. A much higher efficiency of NOx and SO2 removal was achieved in comparison to dry, ammonia free, electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT). A recorded removal from a concentration of 1500 ppm NOx reached 49% at a low dose of 6.5 kGy, while only 2% NOx was removed at the same dose if EB only was applied. For SO2, removal efficiency at a dose of 6.5 kGy increased from 15% (EB only) to 84% when sea water was used as a wet scrubber agent for 700 ppm SO2. The results of this study indicate that EB combined with wet scrubber is a very promising technology to be applied for removal of high concentrations of NOx and SO2 emitted from diesel engines operated e.g. on cargo ships, which are the main sources of SO2 and NOx pollution along their navigation routes.

  7. Electron beam application in gas waste treatment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Haifeng

    2003-01-01

    In the most recent decade, electron beam waste treatment technology attracted serious attention from environment policymaker and industrial leaders in power industry in China. Starting in middle of 1980's, Chinese research institute began experiment of electron beam treatment on flue gas. By the end of 2000, two 10,000 cubic meters per hour small scale electron beam gas purifying station were established in Sichuang province and Beijing. Several electron beam gas purifying demonstration projects are under construction. With robust economy and strong energy demand, needless to say, in near future, electron beam gas purifying technology will have a bright prospect in China. (author)

  8. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that

  9. Current Techniques of Growing Algae Using Flue Gas from Exhaust Gas Industry: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanhua; Chen, Feng; Kuang, Yali; He, Huan; Qin, An

    2016-03-01

    The soaring increase of flue gas emission had caused global warming, environmental pollution as well as climate change. Widespread concern on reduction of flue gas released from industrial plants had considered the microalgae as excellent biological materials for recycling the carbon dioxide directly emitted from exhaust industries. Microalgae also have the potential to be the valuable feedback for renewable energy production due to their high growth rate and abilities to sequester inorganic carbon through photosynthetic process. In this review article, we will illustrate important relative mechanisms in the metabolic processes of biofixation by microalgae and their recent experimental researches and advances of sequestration of carbon dioxide by microalgae on actual industrial and stimulate flue gases, novel photobioreactor cultivation systems as well as the perspectives and limitations of microalgal cultivation in further development.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-01-01

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C

  12. Transport and transformation of mercury during wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous metal smelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhilou; Wang, Dongli; Peng, Bing; Chai, Liyuan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Shu; Yang, Bentao; Xiang, Kaisong; Liu, Cao

    2017-10-01

    Reducing mercury emission is hot topic for international society. The first step for controlling mercury in fuel gas is to investigate mercury distribution and during the flue gas treatment process. The mercury transport and transformation in wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous smelting industry was studied in the paper with critical important parameters, such as the solution temperature, Hg 0 concentration, SO 2 concentration, and Hg 2+ concentration at the laboratory scale. The mass ratio of the mercury distribution in the solution, flue gas, sludge, and acid fog from the simulated flue gas containing Hg 2+ and Hg 0 was 49.12~65.54, 18.34~35.42, 11.89~14.47, and 1.74~3.54%, respectively. The primary mercury species in the flue gas and acid fog were gaseous Hg 0 and dissolved Hg 2+ . The mercury species in the cleaning solution were dissolved Hg 2+ and colloidal mercury, which accounted for 56.56 and 7.34% of the total mercury, respectively. Various mercury compounds, including Hg 2 Cl 2 , HgS, HgCl 2 , HgSO 4 , and HgO, existed in the sludge. These results for mercury distribution and speciation are highly useful in understanding mercury transport and transformation during the wet flue gas cleaning process. This research is conducive for controlling mercury emissions from nonferrous smelting flue gas and by-products.

  13. New particle formation in the fresh flue-gas plume from a coal-fired power plant: effect of flue-gas cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mylläri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric emissions, including particle number and size distribution, from a 726 MWth coal-fired power plant were studied experimentally from a power plant stack and flue-gas plume dispersing in the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted under two different flue-gas cleaning conditions. The results were utilized in a plume dispersion and dilution model taking into account particle formation precursor (H2SO4 resulted from the oxidation of emitted SO2 and assessment related to nucleation rates. The experiments showed that the primary emissions of particles and SO2 were effectively reduced by flue-gas desulfurization and fabric filters, especially the emissions of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Primary pollutant concentrations reached background levels in 200–300 s. However, the atmospheric measurements indicated that new particles larger than 2.5 nm are formed in the flue-gas plume, even in the very early phases of atmospheric ageing. The effective number emission of nucleated particles were several orders of magnitude higher than the primary particle emission. Modelling studies indicate that regardless of continuing dilution of the flue gas, nucleation precursor (H2SO4 from SO2 oxidation concentrations remain relatively constant. In addition, results indicate that flue-gas nucleation is more efficient than predicted by atmospheric aerosol modelling. In particular, the observation of the new particle formation with rather low flue-gas SO2 concentrations changes the current understanding of the air quality effects of coal combustion. The results can be used to evaluate optimal ways to achieve better air quality, particularly in polluted areas like India and China.

  14. The production of carbon dioxide from flue gas by membrane gas absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    The use of membrane gas absorption for carbon dioxide production from flue gases is discussed with special reference to the combined supply of heat and carbon dioxide to greenhouses. Novel absorption liquids are introduced which show an improved performance in terms of system stability and mass

  15. Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Trachtenberg

    2007-05-31

    These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer

  16. Flue gas moisture capacity calculation at the outlet of the condensation heat recovery unit

    OpenAIRE

    Galashov Nikolay; Tsibulskiy Svyatoslav; Mel’nikov Denis; Kiselev Alexandr; Gabdullina Al’bina

    2017-01-01

    As a result, study equation has been obtained which determine the flue gas moisture capacity at the outlet of the condensation heat recovery unit with an error of less than 1%. It possible to at the temperature of the flue gas below the dew point and the known air-fuel ratio efficient. The equation can be used to calculate plants operating on products of gas combustion without Use of tables and programs for calculating the water-vapor saturation pressure.

  17. Thermodynamic properties calculation of the flue gas based on its composition estimation for coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Liang; Yuan, Jingqi

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of the working fluid and the flue gas play an important role in the thermodynamic calculation for the boiler design and the operational optimization in power plants. In this study, a generic approach to online calculate the thermodynamic properties of the flue gas is proposed based on its composition estimation. It covers the full operation scope of the flue gas, including the two-phase state when the temperature becomes lower than the dew point. The composition of the flue gas is online estimated based on the routinely offline assays of the coal samples and the online measured oxygen mole fraction in the flue gas. The relative error of the proposed approach is found less than 1% when the standard data set of the dry and humid air and the typical flue gas is used for validation. Also, the sensitivity analysis of the individual component and the influence of the measurement error of the oxygen mole fraction on the thermodynamic properties of the flue gas are presented. - Highlights: • Flue gas thermodynamic properties in coal-fired power plants are online calculated. • Flue gas composition is online estimated using the measured oxygen mole fraction. • The proposed approach covers full operation scope, including two-phase flue gas. • Component sensitivity to the thermodynamic properties of flue gas is presented.

  18. Detailed modelling of a flue-gas desulfurisation plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, A.; Fueyo, N.; Tomas, A. [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a CFD model for a flue-gas desulfurisation plant, and its application to an operating plant. The FGD plant is of the wet-scrubber type, with co-current and counter-current sections. The sorbent used is limestone, and, after cleaning the flue gases, the limestone slurry is collected in an oxidation tank for the production of gypsum. The model uses an Eulerian-Eulerian treatment of the multiphase flow in the absorber and the tank. The essential mass-transfer mechanisms (such as SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} absorption and CO{sub 2} desorption) are accounted for, as are also the main chemical kinetics leading to the formation of gypsum. Given the different nature of the flow in the absorber and tank, two separate simulations are conducted for each of these domains, and the solutions are iteratively coupled through boundary conditions during the calculations. The model is applied to the FGD plant of the Teruel powerstation located in Andorra (Teruel, Spain). The powerstation is fired with a high-sulfur coal (up to 4.5 percent), and the FGD system has been designed for a desulfurisation capacity of 1.4 million N m{sup 3}/hr for a desulfurisation efficiency in excess of 90 percent. Validation of the model is conducted by comparison with available plant data for two design coals and two desulfurisation efficiencies. The model accuracy is reasonable, given the complexity of the aero/hydrodynamical and thermo-chemical phenomena involved.

  19. Simultaneous removal of mercury, PCDD/F, and fine particles from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korell, Jens; Paur, Hanns-R; Seifert, Helmut; Andersson, Sven

    2009-11-01

    A multifunctional scrubber (MFS) has been developed to reduce the complexity of flue gas cleaning plants. The MFS integrates an oxidizing scrubber equipped with a dioxin-absorbing tower packing material and a space charge electrostatic precipitator. All these processes have been previously developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In the described multifunctional scrubber, mercury, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and submicrometer particles are removed simultaneously. A MFS pilot plant with a flue gas volume flow of 250 m(3)/h has been installed in a slipstream of a waste incineration pilot plant. Pilot scale testing was performed to measure mercury, particles, and PCDD/F in the raw and clean gas. After optimization of the process these three flue gas components were separated from the flue gas in the range 87-97%.

  20. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1997-08-31

    A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO{sub 2} capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO(sub 2) as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO(sub 2) stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO(sub 2) capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and transport

  3. Control systems for condensing flue-gas coolers related to natural-gas-fired heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krighaar, M.; Paulsen, O.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study is made of the enthalpy-efficiency for a water-cooled heat exchanger added to a natural gas-fired boiler. Under varying conditions of both water flow and temperature and flue-gas flow and temperature, both in condensing and non-condensing mode, the efficiency seems to be constant. The result is very useful for comparison between two different working conditions. The efficiency is used to calculate the savings achieved for a district heating plant by using a heat exchanger. The energy economic calculations are also helpful for estimating the most appropriate size of heat exchanger. The annual savings are calculated by means of data regarding heat production, flue gas temperature and water return temperature. The savings achieved by using different connection principles such as bypass, reheating and controlled water temperature are also calculated. (author)

  4. Method for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas, device for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Livengood, Charles David

    1997-12-01

    A method for the simultaneous removal of oxides and heavy metals from a fluid is provided comprising combining the fluid with compounds containing alkali and sulfur to create a mixture; spray drying the mixture to create a vapor phase and a solid phase; and isolating the vapor phase from the solid phase. A device is also provided comprising a means for spray-drying flue gas with alkali-sulfide containing liquor at a temperature sufficient to cause the flue gas to react with the compounds so as to create a gaseous fraction and a solid fraction and a means for directing the gaseous fraction to a fabric filter.

  5. Flue gas desulfurization by rotating beds. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, N.; Keyvani, M.; Coskundeniz, A.

    1992-12-01

    The operating and mass transfer characteristics of rotating foam metal beds were studied to determine the potential for flue gas desulfurization. This is a final technical report on the work supported by DOE {number_sign}FG22-87-PC79924. The report is divided into two sections, Part 1 deals primarily with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, and Part 2 covers the mass transfer characteristics of S0{sub 2} absorption in water-lime slurries. Rotating foam metal beds are in essence packed towers operated in high gravitational fields. The foam metal bed is in the form of a cylindrical donut, or torus, and is rotated to produced the high centrifugal forces. The liquid phase enters the bed at the inner surface of the torus and is pulled by the field through the bed. Gas flows countercurrent to the liquid. The bed packing can have a very large specific surface areas and not flood. Possible benefits include much smaller height of a transfer unit resulting in smaller equipment and supporting structures, reduced solvent inventory, faster response with improved process control, reduced pressure drop, and shorter startup and shut-down times. This work is concerned broadly with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, the objectives being to (1) determine the pressure drop through the rotating bed; (2) determine the power required to operate the beds, (3) investigate the residence time distribution of the liquid phase in the beds; and (4) determine the mass transfer coefficients of S0{sub 2} absorption. Three packings of differing specific surface areas were studied, with areas ranging from 656 to 2952 m{sub 2}/m{sub 3}. Liquid flow rates to 36 kg/s*m{sub 2}, gas flow rate to 2.2 kg/s*m{sub 2}, and gravitational fields to 300 g were covered in this study.

  6. Microbial communities associated with wet flue gas desulfurization systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Brown

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Flue gas desulfurization (FGD systems are employed to remove SOx gasses that are produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation, and consequently limit acid rain associated with these activities. Wet FGDs represent a physicochemically extreme environment due to the high operating temperatures and total dissolved solids of fluids in the interior of the FGD units. Despite the potential importance of microbial activities in the performance and operation of FGD systems, the microbial communities associated with them have not been evaluated. Microbial communities associated with distinct process points of FGD systems at several coal fired electricity generation facilities were evaluated using culture-dependent and –independent approaches. Due to the high solute concentrations and temperatures in the FGD absorber units, culturable halothermophilic/tolerant bacteria were more abundant in samples collected from within the absorber units than in samples collected from the makeup waters that are used to replenish fluids inside the absorber units. Evaluation of bacterial 16S rRNA genes recovered from scale deposits on the walls of absorber units revealed that the microbial communities associated with these deposits are primarily composed of thermophilic bacterial lineages. These findings suggest that unique microbial communities develop in FGD systems in response to physicochemical characteristics of the different process points within the systems. The activities of the thermophilic microbial communities that develop within scale deposits could play a role in the corrosion of steel structures in FGD systems.

  7. Chemical treatment of wastewater from flue gas desulphurisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiecznik, Iwona; Szczepaniak, Włodzimierz

    2017-11-01

    The article presents results of laboratory tests of removing boron and arsenium from non-ideal solutions using double-layered magnesium/aluminium hydroxides (Mg/Al Double-Layered Hydroxide - DLH) produced with nitrate-chloride method. In research, wastewater from an installation for flue gas desulfurization was examined. Double-layered hydroxides are perfect absorbents for anionic compounds. The research proved high effectiveness of preparation with reference to arsenium, as well as confirmed the effect of presence of sulfatic and arsenate ions on the effectiveness of boron removal. On the basis of research on absorption kinetics a theoretical dose of DLH/NO3-Cl/M preparation was calculated and compared with a dose that ensures emimination of boron below the limit standarized by the national regulations. Application of double-layered magnesium/aluminium hydroxides for boron elimination from industrial wastewater requires significantly higher doses of preparation than those calculated in model investigations. It is due to the priority of removal of multivalent ions, such as sulfatic, arsenate or phosphate ions, by DLH/NO3-Cl/M.

  8. Producing ammonium sulfate from flue gas desulfurization by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bruinius, J.A.; Benig, V.; Chou, S.-F.J.; Carty, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Emission control technologies using flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have been widely adopted by utilities burning high-sulfur fuels. However, these technologies require additional equipment, greater operating expenses, and increased costs for landfill disposal of the solid by-products produced. The financial burdens would be reduced if successful high-volume commercial applications of the FGD solid by-products were developed. In this study, the technical feasibility of producing ammonium sulfate from FGD residues by allowing it to react with ammonium carbonate in an aqueous solution was preliminarily assessed. Reaction temperatures of 60, 70, and 80??C and residence times of 4 and 6 hours were tested to determine the optimal conversion condition and final product evaluations. High yields (up to 83%) of ammonium sulfate with up to 99% purity were achieved under relatively mild conditions. The optimal conversion condition was observed at 60??C and a 4-hour residence time. The results of this study indicate the technical feasibility of producing ammonium sulfate fertilizer from an FGD by-product. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Inc.

  9. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  10. Microbial communities associated with wet flue gas desulfurization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bryan P.; Brown, Shannon R.; Senko, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed to remove SOx gasses that are produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation, and consequently limit acid rain associated with these activities. Wet FGDs represent a physicochemically extreme environment due to the high operating temperatures and total dissolved solids (TDS) of fluids in the interior of the FGD units. Despite the potential importance of microbial activities in the performance and operation of FGD systems, the microbial communities associated with them have not been evaluated. Microbial communities associated with distinct process points of FGD systems at several coal-fired electricity generation facilities were evaluated using culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Due to the high solute concentrations and temperatures in the FGD absorber units, culturable halothermophilic/tolerant bacteria were more abundant in samples collected from within the absorber units than in samples collected from the makeup waters that are used to replenish fluids inside the absorber units. Evaluation of bacterial 16S rRNA genes recovered from scale deposits on the walls of absorber units revealed that the microbial communities associated with these deposits are primarily composed of thermophilic bacterial lineages. These findings suggest that unique microbial communities develop in FGD systems in response to physicochemical characteristics of the different process points within the systems. The activities of the thermophilic microbial communities that develop within scale deposits could play a role in the corrosion of steel structures in FGD systems. PMID:23226147

  11. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-08-31

    The AFGD process as demonstrated by Pure Air at the Bailly Station offers a reliable and cost-effective means of achieving a high degree of SO{sub 2} emissions reduction when burning high-sulfur coals. Many innovative features have been successfully incorporated in this process, and it is ready for widespread commercial use. The system uses a single-loop cocurrent scrubbing process with in-situ oxidation to produce wallboard-grade gypsum instead of wet sludge. A novel wastewater evaporation system minimizes effluents. The advanced scrubbing process uses a common absorber to serve multiple boilers, thereby saving on capital through economies of scale. Major results of the project are: (1) SO{sub 2} removal of over 94 percent was achieved over the three-year demonstration period, with a system availability exceeding 99.5 percent; (2) a large, single absorber handled the combined flue gas of boilers generating 528 MWe of power, and no spares were required; (3) direct injection of pulverized limestone into the absorber was successful; (4) Wastewater evaporation eliminated the need for liquid waste disposal; and (5) the gypsum by-product was used directly for wallboard manufacture, eliminating the need to dispose of waste sludge.

  12. Complete utilisation of flue gases from natural gas combustion for reducing fuel purchase costs and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, A.; Gedrovics, M.; Ekmanis, J.; Zeltins, N.

    2004-01-01

    The article shows the possibilities to reduce the consumption of natural gas, thus cutting the expenditure for the purchase of natural gas and minimising the emissions. By analysing on e component of the heat balance of a boiler - the losses of heat with outgoing flue gases - the impact of lower-temperature flue gases without / with the water vapor condensations is shown upon the increase in the value of the efficiency of the boiler. Technical possibilities are shown how to reduce the temperature of flue gases by installation of heat exchangers and condensing boilers. It is emphasised that the products of natural gas combustion do not contain sulphurous compounds and ash, making thi kind of fuel appropriate for condensation of the water vapour present in flue gases. (authors)

  13. Photocatalytic process of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas by TiO2-polyacrylonitrile nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chunyan; Ran, Xu; Hu, Jianglei; Shao, Changlu

    2013-10-15

    TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully fabricated on electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via the coupling of electrospinning and hydrothermal pathway. A straightforward photocatalysis oxidation process has been developed for simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas using the TiO2-PAN photocatalyst. Also, the influences of some important operating parameters, such as titanium loading content of catalyst, flue gas humidity, flue gas flow, and inlet flue gas temperature on removal efficiencies of SO2 and NO were investigated. The results demonstrated that removal efficiencies of 99.3% for SO2 and 71.2% for NO were attained under the following optimal experiment conditions: titanium loading content, 6.78 At %; gas flow rate, 200 mL/min; flue gas humidity, 5%; inlet flue gas temperature, 40 °C. Furthermore, the presumed reaction mechanism of SO2 and NO removal using TiO2-PAN photocatalyst under UV light was proposed.

  14. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO(sub 2) as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO(sub 2) stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry

  15. CO₂ Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toy, Lora [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gupta, Raghubir [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation's energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO₂, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO₂ capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO₂ from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO₂ purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO₂-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft²) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO₂, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: - Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO₂ over N₂ and CO

  16. Electron beam process for SO2 removal from flue gases with high SO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licki, J.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Zimek, Z.; Tyminski, B.; Bulka, S.

    2002-01-01

    Flue gases with high SO 2 concentration are emitted from different industrial processes, e.g. combustion of coal with high sulfur content, copper smelting and sintering plant. The application of the electron beam process for SO 2 removal from such flue gases was investigated. A parametric study was carried out to determine the removal efficiency as a function of temperature and humidity of irradiated gases, dose and ammonia stoichiometry. At the dose 11.5 kGy 95% SO 2 removal efficiency was obtained when the temperature and humidity of irradiated flue gases and ammonia stoichiometry were properly adjusted. The synergistic effect of high SO 2 concentration on NO x removal was observed. The collected by-product was the mixture of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and NH 4 NO 3 . The content of heavy metals in the by-product was many times lower than the values acceptable for commercial fertilizer

  17. Techno-economic analysis and optimization of the heat recovery of utility boiler flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Gang; Huang, Shengwei; Yang, Yongping; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Four typical flue gas heat recovery schemes are quantitatively analyzed. • The analysis considers thermodynamic, heat transfer and hydrodynamics factors. • Techno-economic analysis and optimization design are carried out. • High-stage steam substitute scheme obtains better energy-saving effect. • Large heat transfer area and high flue gas resistances weaken overall performance. - Abstract: Coal-fired power plants in China consume nearly half of available coals, and the resulting CO 2 emissions cover over 40% of total national emissions. Therefore, reducing the energy expenditure of coal-fired power plants is of great significance to China’s energy security and greenhouse gas reduction programs. For coal-fired power plants, the temperature of a boiler’s exhaust gas reaches 120–150 °C or even higher. The thermal energy of boiler’s exhaust accounts for approximately 3–8% of the total energy of fuel input. Given these factors, we conducted a techno-economic analysis and optimization design of the heat recovery system using boiler exhaust gas. This research is conformed to the principles of thermodynamic, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. Based on the data from an existing 1000 MW typical power generation unit in China, four typical flue gas heat recovery schemes are quantitatively analyzed from the thermodynamics perspective. The impacts of flue gas heat recovery on net work output and standard coal consumption rate of various schemes are performed. Furthermore, the transfer area of heat recovery exchanger and the draft fan work increment due to the flue gas pressure drop are analyzed. Finally, a techno-economic analysis of the heat recovery schemes is conducted, and some recommendations on optimization design parameters are proposed, with full consideration of various factors such as the decrease on fuel cost due to energy conservation as well as the investment cost of heat recovery retrofitting. The results revealed that, high

  18. Utilization of on-line corrosion monitoring in the flue gas cleaning system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Nielsen, Lars V.; Petersen, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    The power plant unit 1 at Amager, Denmark is a 350 MWth multifuel suspension-fired plant commissioned in 2009 which uses biomass. Increasing corrosion problems in the flue gas cleaning system have been observed since 2011 in both the gas-gas preheater and the booster fan and booster fan duct. A r...

  19. GRANULATION AND BRIQUETTING OF SOLID PRODUCTS FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan J. Hycnar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most flue gas desulfurization products can be characterized by significant solubility in water and dusting in dry state. These characteristics can cause a considerable pollution of air, water, and soil. Among many approaches to utilization of this waste, the process of agglomeration using granulation or briquetting has proved very effective. Using desulfurization products a new material of aggregate characteristics has been acquired, and this material is resistant to water and wind erosion as well as to the conditions of transportation and storage. The paper presents the results of industrial trials granulation and briquetting of calcium desulphurization products. The granulation of a mixture of phosphogypsum used with fly ash (in the share 1:5. The resulting granules characterized by a compressive strength of 41.6 MPa, the damping resistance of 70% and 14.2% abrasion. The granulate was used for the production of cement mix. The produced concrete mortar have a longer setting and hardening time, as compared to the traditional ash and gypsum mortar, and have a higher or comparable flexural and compressive strength during hardening. Briquetting trials made of a product called synthetic gypsum or rea-gypsum both in pure form and with the addition of 5% and 10% of the limestone dust. Briquettes have a high initial strength and resistance to abrasion. The values ​​of these parameters increased after 72 hours of seasoning. It was found that higher hardiness of briquettes with rea-gypsum was obtained with the impact of atmospheric conditions and higher resistance to elution of water-soluble components in comparison to ash briquettes.

  20. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minish Shah; Nich Degenstein; Monica Zanfir; Rahul Solunke; Ravi Kumar; Jennifer Bugayong; Ken Burgers

    2012-06-30

    The objectives of this project were to carry out an experimental program to enable development and design of near zero emissions (NZE) CO{sub 2} processing unit (CPU) for oxy-combustion plants burning high and low sulfur coals and to perform commercial viability assessment. The NZE CPU was proposed to produce high purity CO{sub 2} from the oxycombustion flue gas, to achieve > 95% CO{sub 2} capture rate and to achieve near zero atmospheric emissions of criteria pollutants. Two SOx/NOx removal technologies were proposed depending on the SOx levels in the flue gas. The activated carbon process was proposed for power plants burning low sulfur coal and the sulfuric acid process was proposed for power plants burning high sulfur coal. For plants burning high sulfur coal, the sulfuric acid process would convert SOx and NOx in to commercial grade sulfuric and nitric acid by-products, thus reducing operating costs associated with SOx/NOx removal. For plants burning low sulfur coal, investment in separate FGD and SCR equipment for producing high purity CO{sub 2} would not be needed. To achieve high CO{sub 2} capture rates, a hybrid process that combines cold box and VPSA (vacuum pressure swing adsorption) was proposed. In the proposed hybrid process, up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in the cold box vent stream would be recovered by CO{sub 2} VPSA and then it would be recycled and mixed with the flue gas stream upstream of the compressor. The overall recovery from the process will be > 95%. The activated carbon process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx, thus exceeding the performance targets of >99% and >95%, respectively. The process was also found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. Sulfuric acid process did not meet the performance expectations. Although it could achieve high SOx (>99%) and NOx (>90%) removal efficiencies, it could not produce by

  1. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hermida, M. I.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.; Morales-Flórez, V.; Esquivias, L.

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N2, CO2, and O2, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO2 adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO2 adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO2 concentrations and low temperatures, the CO2 adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.

  2. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Hermida, M. I. [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Departamento de Física Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Romero-Enrique, J. M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Área de Física Teórica, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Morales-Flórez, V.; Esquivias, L. [Departamento de Física Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC/US), Av. Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-08-21

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO{sub 2} adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO{sub 2} adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO{sub 2} concentrations and low temperatures, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.

  3. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  4. Modeling and parametric analysis of hollow fiber membrane system for carbon capture from multicomponent flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2011-08-12

    The modeling and optimal design/operation of gas membranes for postcombustion carbon capture (PCC) is presented. A systematic methodology is presented for analysis of membrane systems considering multicomponent flue gas with CO 2 as target component. Simplifying assumptions is avoided by namely multicomponent flue gas represented by CO 2/N 2 binary mixture or considering the co/countercurrent flow pattern of hollow-fiber membrane system as mixed flow. Optimal regions of flue gas pressures and membrane area were found within which a technoeconomical process system design could be carried out. High selectivity was found to not necessarily have notable impact on PCC membrane performance, rather, a medium selectivity combined with medium or high permeance could be more advantageous. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  5. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment.

  6. Technical and economic feasibility study of flue gas injection in an Iranian oil field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2015-09-01

    The main aim of this research is to investigate various gas injection methods (N2, CO2, produced reservoir gas, and flue gas in one of the northern Persian gulf oil fields by a numerical simulation method. Moreover, for each scenario of gas injection technical and economical considerations are took into account. Finally, an economic analysis is implemented to compare the net present value (NPV of the different gas injection scenarios in the aforementioned oil field.

  7. Flue gas moisture capacity calculation at the outlet of the condensation heat recovery unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galashov Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result, study equation has been obtained which determine the flue gas moisture capacity at the outlet of the condensation heat recovery unit with an error of less than 1%. It possible to at the temperature of the flue gas below the dew point and the known air-fuel ratio efficient. The equation can be used to calculate plants operating on products of gas combustion without Use of tables and programs for calculating the water-vapor saturation pressure.

  8. Review of technologies for mercury removal from flue gas from cement production processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a pollutant of concern and mercury emissions from cement plants are under environmental regulation. After coal-fired power plants, mercury emissions from cement and mineral production are the second largest anthropogenic sources. Compared to fuels, cement raw materials are the major...... sources of mercury in the cement kiln flue gas. Cement plants are quite different from power plants and waste incinerators regarding the flue gas composition, temperature, residence time, and material circulation. Cement kiln systems have some inherent ability to retain mercury in the solid materials due...... kilns.Among the mercury control technologies, sorbent injection upstream of a particulate control device has shown the most promise. Due to material recirculation, and high moisture level in the cement kiln flue gas the application of sorbent injection to cement plants will be more challenging...

  9. Proof-of concept testing of the advanced NOXSO flue gas cleanup process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The NOXSO Process uses a regenerable sorbent that removes SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} simultaneously from flue gas. The sorbent is a stabilized {gamma}-alumina bed impregnated with sodium carbonate. The process was successfully tested at three different scales, equivalent to 0.017, 0.06 and 0.75 MW of flue gas generated from a coal-fired power plant. The Proof-of-Concept (POC) Test is the last test prior to a full-scale demonstration. A slip stream of flue gas equivalent to a 5 MW coal-fired power plant was used for the POC test. This paper summarizes the NOXSO POC plant and its test results.

  10. Impact of Flue Gas Compounds on Microalgae and Mechanisms for Carbon Assimilation and Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuppaladadiyam, Arun K; Yao, Joseph G; Florin, Nicholas; George, Anthe; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Labeeuw, Leen; Jiang, Yuelu; Davis, Ryan W; Abbas, Ali; Ralph, Peter; Fennell, Paul S; Zhao, Ming

    2018-01-23

    To shift the world to a more sustainable future, it is necessary to phase out the use of fossil fuels and focus on the development of low-carbon alternatives. However, this transition has been slow, so there is still a large dependence on fossil-derived power, and therefore, carbon dioxide is released continuously. Owing to the potential for assimilating and utilizing carbon dioxide to generate carbon-neutral products, such as biodiesel, the application of microalgae technology to capture CO 2 from flue gases has gained significant attention over the past decade. Microalgae offer a more sustainable source of biomass, which can be converted into energy, over conventional fuel crops because they grow more quickly and do not adversely affect the food supply. This review focuses on the technical feasibility of combined carbon fixation and microalgae cultivation for carbon reuse. A range of different carbon metabolisms and the impact of flue gas compounds on microalgae are appraised. Fixation of flue gas carbon dioxide is dependent on the selected microalgae strain and on flue gas compounds/concentrations. Additionally, current pilot-scale demonstrations of microalgae technology for carbon dioxide capture are assessed and its future prospects are discussed. Practical implementation of this technology at an industrial scale still requires significant research, which necessitates multidisciplinary research and development to demonstrate its viability for carbon dioxide capture from flue gases at the commercial level. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, five cycle thermogravimetric tests were conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) with sodium bicarbonate Grade 3 (SBC{number_sign}3) which showed that carbonation activity declined slightly over 5 cycles following severe calcination conditions of 200 C in pure CO{sub 2}. Three different sets of calcination conditions were tested. Initial carbonation activity (as measured by extent of reaction in the first 25 minutes) was greatest subsequent to calcination at 120 C in He, slightly less subsequent to calcination in 80% CO{sub 2}/20% H{sub 2}O, and lowest subsequent to calcination in pure CO{sub 2} at 200 C. Differences in the extent of reaction after 150 minutes of carbonation, subsequent to calcination under the same conditions followed the same trend but were less significant. The differences between fractional carbonation under the three calcination conditions declined with increasing cycles. A preliminary fixed bed reactor test was also conducted at LSU. Following calcination, the sorbent removed approximately 19% of the CO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. CO{sub 2} evolved during subsequent calcination was consistent with an extent of carbonation of approximately 49%. Following successful testing of SBC{number_sign}3 sorbent at RTI reported in the last quarter, a two cycle fluidized bed reactor test was conducted with trona as the sorbent precursor, which was calcined to sodium carbonate. In the first

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO(sub 2) as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO(sub 2) stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, five cycle thermogravimetric tests were conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) with sodium bicarbonate Grade 3 (SBC(number s ign)3) which showed that carbonation activity declined slightly over 5 cycles following severe calcination conditions of 200 C in pure CO(sub 2). Three different sets of calcination conditions were tested. Initial carbonation activity (as measured by extent of reaction in the first 25 minutes) was greatest subsequent to calcination at 120 C in He, slightly less subsequent to calcination in 80% CO(sub 2)/20% H(sub 2)O, and lowest subsequent to calcination in pure CO(sub 2) at 200 C. Differences in the extent of reaction after 150 minutes of carbonation, subsequent to calcination under the same conditions followed the same trend but were less significant. The differences between fractional carbonation under the three calcination conditions declined with increasing cycles. A preliminary fixed bed reactor test was also conducted at LSU. Following calcination, the sorbent removed approximately 19% of the CO(sub 2) in the simulated flue gas. CO(sub 2) evolved during subsequent calcination was consistent with an extent of carbonation of approximately 49%. Following successful testing of SBC(number s ign)3 sorbent at RTI reported in the last quarter, a two cycle fluidized bed reactor test was conducted with trona as the sorbent precursor, which was calcined to sodium carbonate. In the first carbonation cycle, CO

  13. Application of Pt/CdS for the Photocatalytic Flue Gas Desulfurization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulan Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A photocatalytic flue gas desulfurization technology was designed to control emissions of SO2 from the combustion of fossil fuels. With the photocatalytic technology, we cannot only achieve the purpose of solving the problem of SO2 emissions but also realize the desire of hydrogen production from water. CdS loaded with Pt were selected as the model photocatalyst for the photocatalytic flue gas desulfurization. The factors influencing the rate of hydrogen production and ammonia sulfite solution oxidation were detected.

  14. Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Electroless Ni-P Coating in Flue Gas Condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hejie Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of Ni-P coating deposited on 3003 aluminum alloy in flue gas condensate was investigated by electrochemical approaches. The results indicated that nitrite acted as a corrosion inhibitor. The inhibiting effect of nitrite was reduced in solutions containing sulfate or nitrate. Chloride and sulfate accelerated the corrosion of Ni-P coatings greatly. This can provide important information for the researchers to develop special Ni-P coatings with high corrosion resistance in the flue gas condensate.

  15. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO 2 from simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Mohamed, Mona H.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2015-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas is considered to be a feasible approach to mitigate the effects of anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we report that an isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) of general formula [M(linker)(2)(pillar)], linker = pyrazine, pillar = hexaflourosilicate and M = Zn, Cu, Ni and Co exhibits highly selective removal of CO2 fromdry and wet simulated flue gas. Two members of the family, M = Ni and Co, SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-3-Co, respectively, are reported for the first time and compared with the previously reported Zn and Cu analogs.

  16. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO 2 from simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Mohamed, Mona H.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2015-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas is considered to be a feasible approach to mitigate the effects of anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we report that an isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) of general formula [M(linker)2(pillar)], linker = pyrazine, pillar = hexaflourosilicate and M = Zn, Cu, Ni and Co exhibits highly selective removal of CO2 from dry and wet simulated flue gas. Two members of the family, M = Ni and Co, SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-3-Co, respectively, are reported for the first time and compared with the previously reported Zn and Cu analogs.

  17. Phosphate stabilization of flue gas ashes from waste incineration; Fosfatstabilisering av roekgasaska fraan avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullberg, S. [Geodesign AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    1995-05-01

    This study deals with the immobilization of heavy metals and other elements in flue gas ashes from household waste incineration by the addition of phosphates to the ash. It also describes the FUDD-technique (FUnction-adapted Design and Deposition) for deposition of the stabilized ash. In this work, phosphates obtained from phosphoric acid have been added to ash in proportions of 2.8% and 3.7% by weight of ash. Phosphates have also been injected into the flue gases, in this case with proportions of 4.7% and 16.3%. The samples have been studied both in the field and in the laboratory in regard to compaction properties, permeability, chemical solid phase content, HCl in the flue gases, leaching of metals via batch tests, availability tests and column tests. In batch tests, the stabilized samples show an immobilization of most metals except cadmium. Lead has been reduced by 97.0-99.9%. Cadmium has been mobilized by a factor of 2-30 in this experiment. The best results are obtained with addition of phosphates to the flue gases. In the availability tests, with addition of phosphates to flue gases, all environmentally destructive metals except arsenic and nickel have been immobilized to varying degree. The reduction is greatest for lead, aluminium, copper, mercury and zinc. With the addition of phosphates to ash, aluminium, copper and lead have been immobilized. In opposite, arsenic, cobalt and nickel were mobilized. The addition of 4-5% phosphates in the flue gas reactor produced only a marginal effect on the HCl concentration in the flue gases. The use of phosphates increases the HF concentration by about 3 mg/Nm{sup 3}. The cost for phosphate stabilization have been estimated at SEK 110-220 per ton of ash including costs for stabilization equipment. 18 refs, 15 figs, 13 tabs

  18. Prospects of electron beam treatment of flue gases in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalfin, Estelita G.

    2005-01-01

    Coal-fired and oil-based power plants operated in Philippines are totally 11 and 58 units respectively. The government recognizes the threat of air pollution, because more than one third of the electricity generation is fueled by coal. The Philippines Congress therefore enacted Republic Act 8749 (Clean Air Act of 1999) under which sulfur and nitrogen oxides concentration at the point of emission from stationary sources shall be strictly regulated. Under the UNDP/IAEA regional project on industrial application of radiation, the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in cooperation with the National Power Corporation hosted two national executive management seminars on electron beam treatment of flue gases in 1990 and 1994. The Philippine Smelting and Refining Corporation (PASAR) has interest in this technology of reducing 90% SO 2 removal efficiency with EB power of 380 kW. PNRI promotes, through training courses and seminars, the applications of nuclear technology and radiation including EB treatment of flue gases. (S. Ohno)

  19. Dose distribution effect on optimal geometry for industrial flue gas treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Dobrowolski, A.; Tyminski, B.

    1998-01-01

    Dose distribution in a flue gas irradiation vessel is not uniform due to the absorption of electron energy in the gas phase. This phenomenon influences the overall NO x removal efficiency. The remarkable increase in the NO x removal efficiency can be achieved by a multistage gas irradiation system and location of accelerators which enables improvement of dose distribution uniformity in the process vessel. These problems are analysed in this report. (author)

  20. Results using flue gas desulfurization gypsum in soilless substrates for greenhouse crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent availability of Flue Gas Desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has led to interested in its possible use in horticulture greenhouse production. Three studies were conducted to determine the effects of increasing rates of FGDG on six greenhouse crops. In the first study, substrates (6:1 pine bark:san...

  1. High Temperature Flue Gas Desulfurization In Moving Beds With Regenerable Copper Based Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz, P.A.; Ho, K.K.; Abbasian, J.; Lau, F.S.

    2002-09-20

    The objective of this study was to develop new and improved regenerable copper based sorbent for high temperature flue gas desulfurization in a moving bed application. The targeted areas of sorbent improvement included higher effective capacity, strength and long-term durability for improved process control and economic utilization of the sorbent.

  2. Investigation of Parameters Affecting Gypsum Dewatering Properties in a Wet Flue Gas Desulphurization Pilot Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun; Kiil, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) plants with forced oxidation, installed at coal and oil fired power plants for removal of SO2(g), must produce gypsum of high quality. However, quality issues such as an excessive moisture content, due to poor gypsum dewatering properties, may occur from time...

  3. Buffered flue gas scrubbing system using adipic acid by-product stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, J.H. Jr.; Danly, D.E.

    1983-12-27

    A by-product stream from the production of adipic acid from cyclohexane, containing glutaric acid, succinic acid and adipic acid, is employed as a buffer in lime or limestone flue gas scrubbing for the removal of sulfur dioxide from combustion gases.

  4. Production of activated char from Illinois coal for flue gas cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Kruse, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Activated chars were produced from Illinois coal and tested in several flue gas cleanup applications. High-activity chars that showed excellent potential for both SO2 and NOx removal were prepared from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal. The SO2 (120 ??C) and NOx (25 ??C) removal performance of one char compared favorably with that of a commercial activated carbon (Calgon Centaur). The NOx removal performance of the same char at 120 ??C exceeded that of the Centaur carbon by more than 1 order of magnitude. Novel char preparation methods were developed including oxidation/thermal desorption and hydrogen treatments, which increased and preserved, respectively, the active sites for SO2 and NOx adsorption. The results of combined SO2/NOx removal tests, however, suggest that SO2 and NOx compete for similar adsorption sites and SO2 seems to be more strongly adsorbed than NO. A low-activity, low-cost char was also developed for cleanup of incinerator flue gas. A three-step method involving coal preoxidation, pyrolysis, and CO2 activation was used to produce the char from Illinois coal. Five hundred pounds of the char was tested on a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial incinerator in Germany. The char was effective in removing >97% of the dioxins and furans present in the flue gas; mercury levels were below detectable limits.

  5. The Coupling Effect Research of Ash Deposition and Condensation in Low Temperature Flue Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ash deposition is a key factor that deteriorates the heat transfer performance and leads to higher energy consumption of low pressure economizer working in low temperature flue gas. In order to study the ash deposition of heat exchange tubes in low temperature flue gas, two experiments are carried out with different types of heat exchange tubes in different flue gas environments. In this paper, Nusselt Number Nu and fouling factor ε are calculated to describe the heat transfer characteristics so as to study the ash deposition condition. The scanning electron microscope (SEM is used for the analysis of ash samples obtained from the outer wall of heat exchange tubes. The dynamic process of ash deposition is studied under different temperatures of outer wall. The results showed that ash deposition of heat exchanger will achieve a stable state in constant flue gas environment. According to the condition of condensation of acid vapor and water vapor, the process of ash deposition can be distinguished as mere ash deposition, acid-ash coupling deposition, and acid-water-ash coupling deposition.

  6. ASSESSING AS, HG AND SE SPECIATION AND TRANSPORT IN FLUE GAS DESULPHURIZATION MATERIAL AND DRYWALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The risk associated with the reuse of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) material in drywall manufacture is largely determined by the distribution or mineralogical fractionation of mercury(Hg), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). During coal combustion, FGD material is enriched in volat...

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of multi-layer ceramics for electrochemical flue gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Cristine Grings; Ippolito, Davide; Bentzen, Janet Jonna

    2013-01-01

    Multi-layered ceramics for electrochemical flue gas purification were fabricated by tape casting and lamination or by multi-layer tape casting. The sintered bodies were studied by scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was shown that the samples made by multi...

  8. Possibilities of Mercury Removal in the Dry Flue Gas Cleaning Lines of Solid Waste Incineration Units

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 166, JAN 15 (2016), s. 499-511 ISSN 0301-4797 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE02000236 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : waste incineration * mercury removal * flue gas Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.010, year: 2016

  9. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  10. The role of outlet temperature of flue gas in organic Rankine cycle considering low temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shuang Ying; Li, Chun; Xiao, Lan; Li, You Rong; Liu, Chao [Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-12-15

    This paper gives a special focus on the role of outlet temperature of flue gas (T{sub go}) in organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system for low temperature flue gas waste heat recovery. The variations of performance indicators: net work (W{sub net}), exergy efficiency (η{sub ex}) and levelized energy cost (LEC) versus T{sub go} are discussed. Considering the corrosion of low temperature flue gas, the necessity and reasonability of limiting T{sub go} at its minimum allowed discharge temperature (355.15 K) are analyzed. Results show that there exist optimal T{sub go} (T{sub go,opt}) for W{sub net} and LEC, while T{sub go,opt} for η{sub ex} does not appear under the investigated range of T{sub go}. Moreover, the T{sub go,opt} for W{sub net} is always lower than 355.15 K, the T{sub go,opt} for LEC, despite being greater than the one for W{sub net}, is just slightly higher than 355.15 K when the inlet temperature of flue gas varies from 408.15 K to 463.15 K. For the waste heat recovery of low temperature flue gas, it is reasonable to fix T{sub go} at 355.15K if W{sub net} or LEC is selected as primary performance indicator under the pinch point temperature difference of evaporator (ΔT{sub e}) below 20K.

  11. Characterization of flue gas, fly ash, aerosol and deposit compositions as a function of waste composition and grate operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Zeuthen, Frederik Jacob; Frandsen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    metals, was then mixed with the reference fuel in the individual test runs. The dedicated waste fractions comprised NaCl (road salt), batteries, automotive shredder waste, CCA (Copper-Chromate-Arsenate)-impregnated wood, PVC plastics, and (leather) shoes. Test runs with varying operational parameters, e.......g. minimum or maximum oxygen content, were carried out as well. The flue gas main composition (O2, CO2, CO, NO, SO2) was measured on-line during the test runs, and fly ash and aerosols was sampled from the flue gas duct, upstream of the flue gas cleaning system. Deposits were collected on a cooled probe...

  12. Reaction behavior of SO2 in the sintering process with flue gas recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xu-Ling; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Yun-Song

    2016-07-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the reaction behavior of SO2 in the sinter zone, combustion zone, drying-preheating zone, and over-wet zone during flue gas recirculation (FGR) technique. The results showed that SO2 retention in the sinter zone was associated with free-CaO in the form of CaSO3/CaSO4, and the SO2 adsorption reached a maximum under 900ºC. SO2 in the flue gas came almost from the combustion zone. One reaction behavior was the oxidation of sulfur in the sintering mix when the temperature was between 800 and 1000ºC; the other behavior was the decomposition of sulfite/sulfate when the temperature was over 1000ºC. However, the SO2 adsorption in the sintering bed mainly occurred in the drying-preheating zone, adsorbed by CaCO3, Ca(OH)2, and CaO. When the SO2 adsorption reaction in the drying-preheating zone reached equilibrium, the excess SO2 gas continued to migrate to the over-wet zone and was then absorbed by Ca(OH)2 and H2O. The emission rising point of SO2 moved forward in combustion zone, and the concentration of SO2 emissions significantly increased in the case of flue gas recirculation (FGR) technique. Aiming for the reuse of the sensible heat and a reduction in exhaust gas emission, the FGR technique is proposed in the iron ore sintering process. When using the FGR technique, SO2 emission in exhaust gas gets changed. In practice, the application of the FGR technique in a sinter plant should be cooperative with the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technique. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the FGR technique on SO2 emissions because it will directly influence the demand and design of the FGD system.

  13. Conditions for lowering the flue gas temperature; Foerutsaettning foer saenkning av roekgastemperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus

    2012-02-15

    In heat and power production, the efficiency of the power plant increases the larger share of heat from the flue gas that is converted to power. However, this also implies that the temperature of the heat exchanging surfaces is lowered. If the temperature is lowered to a temperature below the dew point of the flue gas, this would result in condensation of the gas, which in turn elevates the risk of serious corrosion attack on the surfaces where condensation occurs. Thus, it is important to determine the dew point temperature. One way of determining the dew point temperature is to use data on composition of the fuel together with operation parameters of the plant, thus calculating the dew point temperature. However, this calculation of the dew point is not so reliable, especially if hygroscopic salts are present. Therefore, for safety reasons, the temperature of the flue gas is kept well above the dew point temperature. This results in lowered over-all efficiency of the plant. It could also be expected that for a certain plant, some construction materials under certain operation conditions would have corrosion characteristics that may allow condensation on the surface without severe and unpredictable corrosion attack. However, by only using operation parameters and fuel composition, it is even harder to predict the composition of the condensate at different operation temperatures than to calculate the dew point temperature. If the dew point temperature was known with a greater certainty, the temperature of the flue gas could be kept lower, just above the estimated value of the dew point, without any increased risk for condensation. If, in addition, also the resulting composition of the condensate at different temperatures below the dew point is known, it can be predicted if the construction materials of the flue gas channel were compatible with the formed condensate. If they are compatible, the flue gas temperature can be further lowered from the dew point

  14. Techno-economic assessment of membrane gas absorption for the production of carbon dioxide from flue gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane gas absorption for carbon dioxide production from flue gases is discussed with special reference to the economics of the supply of carbon dioxide to greenhouses in the Netherlands. Novel absorption liquids have been introduced which show as excellent performance in terms of system stability

  15. MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker; Ramin Daniels; Bilgen Friat; Zhenjie He; Haiqing Lin; Adrian Serbanescu

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris™) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris™ membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plant energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris™ CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTR’s commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Service’s Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.

  16. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  17. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  18. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

  19. Possibility study of gasifier with axial circulating flue gas for reducing Tar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poowadin, T.; Polsongkram, M.; Khantikomol, P.

    2018-01-01

    This present research article aims to study the possibility of gasification by axial core flue gas circulating kiln and find the efficiency of syngas production. An axial core flue gas circulating tube was installed in the center of the updraft gasifier in purposing of tar reducing. In the present study, the eucalyptus wood chip 4, 8, and 10 kg with the moisture content 16% were examined. Several type-K thermocouples were employed to measure the temperatures at preheat, combustion, reduction, pyrolysis, drying, and gas outlet zone. The results showed that the temperatures in the combustion and the reduction zone of the kiln with the axial core flue gas recirculating were lower than the kiln without the core owing to installing the core would reduce the combustion zone area in biomass burning. Obviously, the temperature in the pyrolysis and drying zone were nearly the same as both with and without the core. In consideration of syngas components, it was found that CO production from the gasifier with the core was higher than the gasifier without the core about 25%. Other gases, however, were almost same. The syngas production efficiency obtained from the gasifier with the core decreased with increasing the mass of biomass. It showed that the highest efficiency was 30% at 4 kg supplying biomass. In comparison, the efficiencies of both the kilns with and without the core were not different. For liquid product, the amount of liquid decreased about 47.23% comparing with the gasifier without the core.

  20. Copper slag as a catalyst for mercury oxidation in coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Zhang, Weilin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Zequn; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2018-04-01

    Copper slag is a byproduct of the pyrometallurgical smelting of copper concentrate. It was used in this study to catalyze elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) oxidation in simulated coal combustion flue gas. The copper slag exhibited excellent catalytic performance in Hg 0 oxidation at temperatures between 200 °C and 300 °C. At the most optimal temperature of 250 °C, a Hg 0 oxidation efficiency of 93.8% was achieved under simulated coal combustion flue gas with both a high Hg 0 concentration and a high gas hourly space velocity of 128,000 h -1 . Hydrogen chloride (HCl) was the flue gas component responsible for Hg 0 oxidation over the copper slag. The transition metal oxides, including iron oxides and copper oxide in the copper slag, exhibited significant catalytic activities in the surface-mediated oxidation of Hg 0 in the presence of HCl. It is proposed that the Hg 0 oxidation over the copper slag followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism whereby reactive chlorine species that originated from HCl reacted with the physically adsorbed Hg 0 to form oxidized mercury. This study demonstrated the possibility of reusing copper slag as a catalyst for Hg 0 oxidation and revealed the mechanisms involved in the process and the key factors in the performance. This knowledge has fundamental importance in simultaneously reducing industrial waste and controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of carbonation under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas on the leachability of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Xiong, Zhuo; Tian, Chong; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high cost of pure CO 2 , carbonation of MSWI fly ash has not been fully developed. It is essential to select a kind of reaction gas with rich CO 2 instead of pure CO 2 . The CO 2 uptake and leaching toxicity of heavy metals in three typical types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated with simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas under different reaction temperatures, which was compared with both pure CO 2 and simulated air combustion flue gas. The CO 2 uptake under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas were similar to that of pure CO 2 . The leaching concentration of heavy metals in all MSWI fly ash samples, especially in ash from Changzhou, China (CZ), decreased after carbonation. Specifically, the leached Pb concentration of the CZ MSWI fly ash decreased 92% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, 95% under pure CO 2 atmosphere and 84% under the air combustion flue gas. After carbonation, the leaching concentration of Pb was below the Chinese legal limit. The leaching concentration of Zn from CZ sample decreased 69% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, which of Cu, As, Cr and Hg decreased 25%, 33%, 11% and 21%, respectively. In the other two samples of Xuzhou, China (XZ) and Wuhan, China (WH), the leaching characteristics of heavy metals were similar to the CZ sample. The speciation of heavy metals was largely changed from the exchangeable to carbonated fraction because of the carbonation reaction under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas. After carbonation reaction, most of heavy metals bound in carbonates became more stable and leached less. Therefore, oxy-fuel combustion flue gas could be a low-cost source for carbonation of MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

  3. Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, K. L.

    2001-06-22

    Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

  4. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO 2 from simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Mohamed, Mona H.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2015-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas or air is considered as feasible way to reduce the anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we reported the impact of metal substitution on tuning the physicochemical properties in isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) based on pyrazine as organic linker, hexaflouro silicate as anionic pillar and Zn, Cu, Ni and Co as metal centres. Two new isostructural square grid networks namely SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-Co are fully characterized and compared with the parent Zn(II) and Cu(II). Interestingly the new Ni(II) and Co (II) analogues higher loading capacity for CO2 at 0.15 bar and higher CO2/N2 selectivity at condition relevant to flue gas separation. Our data show that a small change in the structure could lead to dramatic enhancement in the physicochemical properties of MOMs.

  6. A new flowsheeting tool for flue gas treating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elk, E. P.; Arendsen, A. R. J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    A new flowsheeting tool, specifically designed for steady-state simulation of acid gas treating processes, has been developed. The models implemented in the new tool combine all issues relevant for the design, optimization and analysis of acid gas treating processes, including post-combustion and

  7. Highly integrated CO2 capture and conversion: Direct synthesis of cyclic carbonates from industrial flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Barthel, Alexander

    2016-02-08

    Robust and selective catalytic systems based on early transition metal halides (Y, Sc, Zr) and organic nucleophiles were found able to quantitatively capture CO2 from diluted streams via formation of hemicarbonate species and to convert it to cyclic organic carbonates under ambient conditions. This observation was exploited in the direct and selective chemical fixation of flue gas CO2 collected from an industrial exhaust, affording high degrees of CO2 capture and conversion.

  8. The use of flue gas for the growth of microalgal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, K.G.; Kadam, K.L.; Heacox, D.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Capture and utilization of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by microalgae is a promising technology to help reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Microalgae are of particular interest because of their rapid growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions. Laboratory work is directed toward investigating the effects of simulated flue gas on microalgae, while engineering studies have focused on the economics of the technology. One strain of a green algae, Monoraphidium minutum, has shown excellent tolerance and growth when exposed to simulated flue gas which meets the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (1990 CAAA). Biomass concentrations of {similar_to}2g/L have been measured in batch culture. Several other microalgae have also shown tolerance to simulated flue gas; however, the growth of these strains is not equivalent to that observed for M. minutum. Coupling the production of biodiesel or other microalgae-derived commodity chemicals with the use of flue gas carbon dioxide is potentially a zero-cost method of reducing the amount of carbon dioxide contributed to the atmosphere by fossil fuel-fired power plants. We have identified two major biological performance parameters which can provide sufficient improvement in this technology to render it cost-competitive with other existing CO{sub x} mitigation technologies. These are algal growth rate and lipid content. An updated economic analysis shows that growth rate is the more important of the two, and should be the focus of near term research activities. The long term goal of achieving zero cost will require other, non-biological, improvements in the process.

  9. Characterization and Regeneration of Pt-Catalysts Deactivated in Municipal Waste Flue Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Kustov, Arkadii; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Severe deactivation was observed for industrially aged catalysts used in waste incineration plants and tested in lab-scale. Possible compounds that cause deactivation of these Pt-based CO oxidation catalysts have been studied. Kinetic observations of industrial and model catalysts showed...... that siloxanes were the most severe catalyst poisons, although acidic sulfur compounds also caused deactivation. Furthermore, a method for on-site regeneration without shutdown of the catalytic flue gas cleaning system has been developed, i.e. an addition of H-2/N-2 gas to the off-gas can completely restore...... the activity of the deactivated catalysts. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Characterization and regeneration of Pt-catalysts deactivated in municipal waste flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Soeren Birk; Kustov, Arkady; Due-Hansen, Johannes; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Siret, Bernard; Tabaries, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Severe deactivation was observed for industrially aged catalysts used in waste incineration plants and tested in lab-scale. Possible compounds that cause deactivation of these Pt-based CO oxidation catalysts have been studied. Kinetic observations of industrial and model catalysts showed that siloxanes were the most severe catalyst poisons, although acidic sulfur compounds also caused deactivation. Furthermore, a method for on-site regeneration without shutdown of the catalytic flue gas cleaning system has been developed, i.e. an addition of H 2 /N 2 gas to the off-gas can completely restore the activity of the deactivated catalysts. (author)

  11. Corrosion in the Flue Gas Cleaning System of a Biomass-Fired Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Olesen, R. E.; Gensmann, P.

    2017-01-01

    bolts were under stress and this together with the presenceof accumulated chlorine between the sealing strips andbolts resulted in stress corrosion cracking and rupture. Inaddition, Zn-K-Cl deposits were agglomerated in the ductafter the DeNOx unit. Zn was also a constituent of corrosionproducts......After only a few years operation, corrosiondamage was observed in the flue gas cleaning system of abiomass power plant. The corrosion was on the lower partof the gas/gas heat exchanger fabricated from A242weathering steel, where UNS S31600 bolts were used toattach sealing strips to the rotor. Thick...

  12. Investigation of sewage sludge gasification with use of flue gas as a gasifying agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Izabella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigation of low-temperature sewage sludge gasification with use of flue gas as a gasifying agent. Tests were conducted in a laboratory stand, equipped with a gasification reactor designed and constructed specifically for this purpose. During presented tests, gas mixture with a composition of typical flue gases was used as a gasifying agent. The measuring system ensures online measurements of syngas composition: CO, CO2, H2, CH4. As a result of gasification process a syngas with combustible components has been obtained. The aim of the research was to determine the usability of sewage sludge for indirect cofiring in power boilers with the use of flue gas from the boiler as a gasifying agent and recirculating the syngas to the boiler’s combustion chamber. Results of presented investigation will be used as a knowledge base for industrial-scale sewage sludge gasification process. Furthermore, toxicity of solid products of the process has been determined by the use of Microtox bioassay. Before tests, solid post-gasification residues have been ground to two particle size fractions and extracted into Milli-Q water. The response of test organisms (bioluminescent Aliivibrio fischeri bacteria in reference to a control sample (bacteria exposed to 2% NaCl solution was measured after 5 and 15 minutes of exposure. The obtained toxicity results proved that thermal treatment of sewage sludge by their gasification reduces their toxicity relative to water organisms.

  13. Effect of flue gas desulfurization residue on plant establishment and soil and leachate quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punshon, T.; Adriano, D.C.; Weber, J.T. [University of Georgia, Savannah, GA (USA). Savannah River Ecology Lab.

    2001-06-01

    Effects on soil quality and crop establishment after incorporation of flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) into soil as an amendment was assessed in a mesocosm study. Mesocosm units received applications equivalent to 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10% FGD residue. Germination, biomass production, and elemental composition of corn, radish and cotton were determined. The quality of leachates and soil were also determined periodically. Flue gas desulfurization residue did not affect germination and all application rates stimulated aboveground biomass. Plants grown in FGD-amended soil contained significantly elevated tissue concentrations of As, B, Se, and Mo. The FGD residue elevated surface soil pH from 5.5 to 8.1. Leachate pH was unaffected by FGD, but salinity rose sharply with increasing application rates of FGD. Leachates contained higher concentrations of B, with small increases in Se and As. Flue gas desulfurization residue application caused an increase in total B, As, Mo, Se and extractable Ca in the soil, but decreased Mn and Zn. Using FGD residues could have beneficial effects on crop establishment without detrimental effects on soil or leachate quality, at an optimum rate of approximately 2.5%. This material could alleviate surface acidity, and B and Mo deficiencies in plants. 27 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Analysis of CO2 Separation from Flue Gas, Pipeline Transportation, and Sequestration in Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-09-01

    This report was written to satisfy a milestone of the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration task of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration project. The report begins to assess the costs associated with separating the CO2 from flue gas and then injecting it into an unminable coal seam. The technical challenges and costs associated with CO2 separation from flue gas and transportation of the separated CO2 from the point source to an appropriate sequestration target was analyzed. The report includes the selection of a specific coal-fired power plant for the application of CO2 separation technology. An appropriate CO2 separation technology was identified from existing commercial technologies. The report also includes a process design for the chosen technology tailored to the selected power plant that used to obtain accurate costs of separating the CO2 from the flue gas. In addition, an analysis of the costs for compression and transportation of the CO2 from the point-source to an appropriate coal bed sequestration site was included in the report.

  15. The centralized control of elemental mercury emission from the flue gas by a magnetic rengenerable Fe-Ti-Mn spinel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yong; Xiong, Shangchao; Dang, Hao; Xiao, Xin; Yang, Shijian; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-12-15

    A magnetic Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was developed to adsorb gaseous Hg(0) in our previous study. However, it is currently extremely restricted in the control of Hg(0) emission from the flue gas for at least three reasons: sorbent recovery, sorbent regeneration and the interference of the chemical composition in the flue gas. Therefore, the effect of SO2 and H2O on the adsorption of gaseous Hg(0) on the Fe-Ti-Mn spinel and the regeneration of spent Fe-Ti-Mn spinel were investigated in this study. Meanwhile, the procedure of the centralized control of Hg(0) emission from the flue gas by the magnetic Fe-Ti-Mn spinel has been analyzed for industrial application. The spent Fe-Ti-Mn spinel can be regenerated by water washing followed by the thermal treatment at 450 °C with no obvious decrease of its ability for Hg(0) capture. Meanwhile, gaseous Hg(0) in the flue gas can be remarkably concentrated during the regeneration, facilitating its safe disposal. Initial pilot test demonstrated that gaseous Hg(0) in the real flue gas can be concentrated at least 100 times by the Fe-Ti-Mn spinel. Therefore, Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was a novel magnetic regenerable sorbent, which can be used for the centralized control of Hg(0) emission from the flue gas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth response of Spirulina platensis PCC9108 to elevated CO2 levels and flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedmahdi Hoseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Because their ability to capture CO2, photosynthetical microorganisms have some advantages to CO2 mitigation from high CO2 streams such as flue gases and they can use CO2 as carbon source. Recently, experts have made efforts to exploit microorganisms intended for recovering CO2 from power plants. Materials and methods: To achieve this purpose, we studied the growth response of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis PCC9108 under different concentrations of carbon dioxide (ranging from 0.036% to 10% and flue gas in a bench-scale system. Preparation of different concentrations of CO2 and injection into Erlenmeyer flasks was performed by a system including air compressor, CO2 capsule, pressure gauge and flow meter. Results: The main goal of studying this paper is a survey of organism's potential to grow by generated CO2 from flue gas of power plant. It already had the potential and highest biomass production recorded at 8% CO2 (v/v. Also we proved that S.platensis PCC9108 can be grown under flue gas, although biomass production decreased fairly. Total lipid content of algae interestingly enhanced with elevated CO2 levels from ambient air to 4% and 6% which ranged from 14.5 to 15.8 and 16 dry weight (wt. % respectively. In contrast, total protein content illustrated no difference between all treatment and its value was about 46 wt.%. Discussion and conclusion: The results of present study suggested that understudied S.platensis PCC9108 is appropriate for mitigating CO2 because of its carbon fixation ability. Also due to its high protein content, this cyanobacterium is a good candidate to produce SCP (single cell protein.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling- film column) were determined. The correlations are valid at gas phase Reynolds numbers from 7500 to 18,300 and liquid phase Reynolds numbers from 4000 to 12,000, conditions of industrial relevance. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase...... of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO2, slurry pH-profiles, sol-ids contents of the slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. Simulations were found to match...... experimental data for the two Danish limestone types (Faxe Bryozo and a chalk, Mikrovit) investigated. Gas phase mass transport was found to be the dominating rate determining step, though the liquid phase mass transport resistance could not be neglected. Simulations and experimental data both showed the same...

  18. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Final report, February 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Tagg, T.; Riggs, T.; Ventura, S.; Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumick, D.

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this work by SRI International was to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. High efficiency, hollow fiber contactors (HFCs) were proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system would be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process would generate only marketable by-products, if any (no waste streams are anticipated). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, the approach was to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency, hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. The authors also introduced new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. The process and progress in its development are described.

  19. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  20. Experimental Investigation and Modelling of a Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation Pilot Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    A detailed model for a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant, based on the packed tower concept, has been developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO2, oxidation of HSO3-, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Population balance...... equations, governing the description of particle size distributions of limestone in the plant, were derived. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO2, slurry pH-profiles, solids content of the slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual...... wet FGD plants....

  1. Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2010-08-17

    Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

  2. Utilization of SO/sub 2/ gas of boiler flue gas in the epsilon-caprolactam (EC) manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, M.; Yoshida, Y.

    1979-09-01

    Sulfur dioxide in boiler exhaust gas from high-sulfur, heavy oil combustion is used at the Sakai caprolactam plant of Ube Industries Ltd. At this plant, 20,000 tons/yr out of a total 90,000 tons/yr of EC is prepared by the reaction of cyclohexanone with hydroxylamine, which is in turn prepared by the Raschig synthesis, which involves reduction by sulfur dioxide of aqueous ammonium nitrite prepared by absorption of N/sub 2/O/sub 3/ into aqueous ammonium bisulfite. For SO/sub 2/ absorption, the flue gas is cooled to about 60/sup 0/C by isothermal cooling with the absorption solution. The SO/sub 2/ absorption reaction occurs in liquid phase at pH 5-5.8 in the absence of free ammonia, since otherwise, an aerosol would form. After further absorption of SO/sub 2/ from flue gas in a second absorber of the same type (which uses a different concentration of absorption liquid), the SO/sub 2/ in the flue gas is diminished to 40-60 ppm from its original 1300 ppm concentration. The chemistry and performance of the SO/sub 2/ absorption procedure, including the composition of the crude ammonium bisulfite solution during the absorption reactions, and of the Raschig process are discussed.

  3. Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

    2012-03-31

    This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris? membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no

  4. Flue Gas Desulfurization by Mechanically and Thermally Activated Sodium Bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walawska Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of study on structural parameters (particle size, surface area, pore volume and the sorption ability of mechanically and thermally activated sodium bicarbonate. The sorption ability of the modified sorbent was evaluated by: partial and overall SO2 removal efficiency, conversion rate, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR. Sodium bicarbonate was mechanically activated by various grinding techniques, using three types of mills: fluid bed opposed jet mill, fine impact mill and electromagnetic mill, differing in grinding technology. Grounded sorbent was thermally activated, what caused a significant development of surface area. During the studies of SO2 sorption, a model gas with a temperature of 300°C, of composition: sulfur dioxide at a concentration of 6292 mg/mn3, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen as a carrier gas, was used. The best development of surface area and the highest SO2 removal efficiency was obtained for the sorbent treated by electromagnetic grinding, with simultaneous high conversion rate.

  5. Use of adipic acid to enhance flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostroff, N.; Laslo, D.

    1984-01-01

    From a chemical point of view, FGD is an acid-base neutralization reaction where the overall rate is balanced by the dissolution of (limestone) alkali, and the absorption of sulfur dioxide. The former occurs at a solid/liquid interface, and the latter occurs at a liquid/gas interface. The rate of each of these processes is determined by local conditions, notably, pH. The introduction of a buffering agent lowers the pH at the solid-liquid interface, thereby increasing the rate of limestone dissolution, and simultaneously, raises the pH at the liquid/gas interface, thereby increasing the rate of absorption. Studies performed during the past several years have established that adipic acid is the best available choice for application because of its unique combination of physical and chemical properties, and its price and availability. This paper discusses the theory of adipic acid enhancement and the mathematics used to describe these phenomena trace its history from the laboratory through full scale trials.

  6. Ecological aspects of coal combustion - utilization of CO2 from flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markoš Jozef

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Slovakia belongs to the group of twenty worst polluters throughout the world, releasing 10 - 12 tons of carbon dioxide per capita, whereas the worldwide average value is about 5 tons. It is known that the big electric and thermal power stations produce only 25 % of the overall production of carbon dioxide in Slovakia, whereas the biggest producer of carbon dioxide is the industry by 31%. The aim of the present contribution is to show possibilities of the further chemical conversion of the separated carbon dioxide from flue gas as a chemical raw material. We focused our attention to the feasibility of the conversion of carbon dioxide into carbon oxide or synthesis gas and its further conversion into methanol. The production of synthesis gas from carbon dioxide, coke (coal and natural gas was assumed. On the basis of our studies we can claim that the fulfilment of the national target of the Slovak Republic set up for 2005, i.e., the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by 20 % against 1988 by the chemical transformation of carbon dioxide from the electric power stations flue gas is not realistic. In our opinion a profound reduction of carbon dioxide emission can be reached by lower demands for energy produced by burning fossil fuels or by the substitution of these fuels by alternative energy sources.

  7. Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

    2005-05-31

    A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

  8. Flue gas CO{sub 2} capture by a green liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Trachtenberg; Lihong Bao; Stefanie L. Goldman; David A. Smith; Xiaoqiu Wu [Carbozyme, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We have designed, developed, modeled and tested several different membrane-based, facilitated transport carbonate / bicarbonate reactors (conjoint absorber-strippers) for the post-combustion extraction of CO{sub 2} from both air and flue gas. We have assessed separately the reactive chemistry, the reactor design and the process engineering. Facilitation is achieved by means of the most efficient CO{sub 2} conversion catalyst, the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Experimental data mirror model predictions very closely. CO{sub 2} permeance value for 10% feed stream (balanced dry air) is 3.35E-8 mole/m{sup 2} s Pa, and the selectivity vs. N{sub 2} and vs. O{sub 2} were 250 and 150. The only moving elements in this design are the feed gas and the sweep gas streams. Gas separation is driven by partial pressure difference alone. As a consequence, this design is extremely energy efficient. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Electro-membrane processes for flue gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, T. F.

    1997-12-31

    Various techniques for NO removal in Membrane Contactor were considered. However the NO absorption in a liquid adsorbent with chemical enhancement and its ease for regeneration, was selected as the most practicable choice. Various different compounds for chemical enhancement were studied and Fe(II)-chelate enhanced adsorbent was selected for further studies. The technical feasibility of Fe(II)-chelate enhanced adsorbent for obtaining greater than 80% NO removal have been successfully established. Even though the membrane area required for greater than 80% NO removal has been found to be about 500 m{sup 2}/MW{sub c} (compared to 50 - 150 m{sup 2}/MW{sub c}, for 95% SO{sub 2} removal, depending on the membrane characteristics), suitable Membrane Contactor design has been proposed for carrying out the process at an acceptable gas side pressure drop. The electro-membrane processes for the regeneration of adsorbents have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical studies have concerned the study of basic functions of both the bipolar membranes and charge laden (anion/cation) membranes. Suitable experimental techniques have been devised for studying of these basic parameters (e.g. charge transport number, salt diffusion through membranes, current-voltage characteristics of bipolar membranes and electrical resistance of charge laden membranes). These parameters have further been utilized in the mechanistic model of combined membranes in an ED cell (electrodialysis). Based on these fundamental studies and analysis of process requirements, suitable configuration of ED cell has been developed and verified by experimental studies. The effect of both the stack design parameters (e.g. number of cells, membrane type and spacer design) and the operational parameters (e.g. temperature, electrolyte concentration, liquid velocity and current density) have been studied for optimization of energy consumption for regeneration of loaded adsorbents. As a result

  10. EB technology for the purification of flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides in flue gas from coal-combustion boilers in power plants, dioxins in flue gas from municipal waste incineration facilities and toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in off-gas from painting or cleaning factories are among air pollutants for which emission is regulated by a law in Japan. Electron beam is the effective and easy controllable radiation source for treatment of these flue gases. This report describes outline of the results so far obtained at JAERI on electron beam treatment of flue gas. The removal performance higher than 90% at 10 kGy for flue gas containing 800 ppm SOx and 225 ppm NOx were achieved and being applied to real-scale power plants in Poland and China with expectation of cost reduction of 20% compared to conventional plants. Decomposition of dioxins in flue gas from solid waste incinerators is another project. Using an accelerator of 300 keV and 40 mA for treatment of real incineration gas at 200degC, we obtain 90% decomposition of dioxins at 15 kGy irradiation. Expansion of these flue gas purification technologies combined with low-energy electron accelerators is expected. (S. Ohno)

  11. Study of flue gas condensing for biofuel fired heat and power plants; Studie av roekgaskondensering foer biobraensleeldade kraftvaermeanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axby, Fredrik; Gustafsson, J.O.; Nystroem, Johan; Johansson, Kent

    2000-11-01

    This report considers questions regarding flue gas condensing plants connected to bio-fuelled heat and power plants. The report consists of two parts, one where nine existing plants are described regarding technical issues and regarding the experience from the different plants. Part two is a theoretical study where heat balance calculations are made to show the technical and economical performance in different plant configurations and operating conditions. Initially the different parts in the flue gas condensing plant are described. Tube, plate and scrubber condensers are described briefly. The different types of humidifiers are also described, rotor, cross-stream plate heat exchanger and scrubber. Nine flue gas-condensing plants have been visited. The plants where chosen considering it should be bio-fuel fired plant primarily heat and power plants. Furthermore we tried to get a good dissemination considering plant configuration, supplier, geographical position, operating situation and plant size. The description of the different plants focuses on the flue gas condenser and the belonging components. The fuel, flue gas and condensate composition is described as well as which materials are used in the different parts of the plant. The experience from operating the plants and the reasons of why they decided to chose the actual condenser supplier are reported.

  12. Operational improvement to the flue gas cleaning system in radioactive waste incineration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Bowen; Li Xiaohai; Wang Peiyi

    2012-01-01

    After years of operation, some problems, such as corrosion and waste water treatment, have been found in the first domestic whole-scale radioactive waste incineration facility. According to the origin of the problems, the flue gas cleaning system has been optimized and improved in terms of technical process, material and structure. It improves the operational stability, extends the equipment life-time, and also reduces the amount of secondary waste. In addition, as major sources of problems, waste management, operational experiences and information exchange deserve more attention. (authors)

  13. A breakthrough in flue gas cleanup, CO2 mitigation and H2S removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Wolf; Wasas, James; Stenger, Raymond; Howell, Evan

    2010-09-15

    SWAPSOL Corp. is developing commercial processes around a newly discovered reaction that reduces H2S below detectable levels while reacting with CO2 to form water, sulfur and carsuls, a carbon-sulfur polymer. The Stenger-Wasas Process (SWAP) stands to simplify sulfur removal technology as it consumes CO2 in an exothermic reaction. The SWAP has applications in landfill, sour, flue and Claus tail gas cleanup and may replace Claus technology. Destruction of waste hydrocarbons provides a source of H2S. The primary reactions and variants have been independently verified and the chemical kinetics determined by a third party laboratory.

  14. Sodic Soil Properties and Sunflower Growth as Affected by Byproducts of Flue Gas Desulfurization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO(4), which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1)) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3) ha(-1)). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total disso...

  15. Study of flue-gas temperature difference in supercritical once-through boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yanchang; Li, Bing; Song, Ang

    2018-02-01

    The 600 MW coal-fired once-through Boilers with opposed firing at a power plant are found to experience marked temperature variation and even overtemperature on the wall of the heating surface as a result of flue-gas temperature (FGT) variation in the boiler. In this study, operational adjustments were made to the pulverizing, combustion, and secondary air box systems in these boilers, in order to solve problems in internal combustion. The adjustments were found to reduce FGT difference and optimize the boiler’ combustion conditions. The results of this study can provide a reference for optimization of coal-fired boiler of the same type in similar conditions.

  16. Adipic acid-enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization system commercial demonstration. [Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Colley, J.D.; Mobley, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A full-scale demonstration carried out at Springfield, Mo City Utilities Southwest Power Plant in 1980-1981 on adipic acid enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization system is reported. The major process findings during the demonstration are discussed. It is found that adipic acid is a viable means for improving SO/sub 2/ removal in scrubbers which are limited from a dissolved alkalinity standpoint. Dibasic acid (a mixture of glutaric, adipic, and succinic acids) is a technically viable alternative to adipic acid. 6 refs.

  17. Recovery of flue gas energy in heat integrated IGCC power plants using the contact economizer system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madzivhandila, V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Asia Pacific Confederation of APCChE 2010 Chemical Engineering Congress October 5-8, 2010, Taipei � �� Recovery of flue gas energy in heat integrated IGCC power plants using the contact economizer system Vhutshilo Madzivhandilaa, Thokozani... temperature and the thermal efficiency of the plant. The 13th Asia Pacific Confederation of APCChE 2010 Chemical Engineering Congress October 5-8, 2010, Taipei � �� 1. Introduction The IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) is one...

  18. Design of a low-cost, compact SRF accelerator for flue gas and wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to a proposal that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). PAMS Proposal ID: 222439. The proposed project consists of the design of a novel superconducting continuous-wave accelerator capable of providing a beam current of ~1 A at an energy of 1-2 MeV for the treatment of flue gases and wastewater streams. The novel approach consists on studying the feasibility of using a single-cell Nb cavity coated with a thin Nb3Sn layer of the inner surface and conductively cooled by to 4.2 K by cryocoolers inside a compact cryomodule. The proposed study will include beam transport simulations, thermal and mechanical engineering analysis of the cryomodule and a cost analysis for both the fabrications costs and the operational and maintenance costs of such accelerator. The outcome of the project will be a report summarizing the analysis and results from the design study.

  19. Vanadium As a Potential Membrane Material for Carbon Capture: Effects of Minor Flue Gas Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengyao; Liguori, Simona; Lee, Kyoungjin; Van Campen, Douglas G; Toney, Michael F; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2017-10-03

    Vanadium and its surface oxides were studied as a potential nitrogen-selective membrane material for indirect carbon capture from coal or natural gas power plants. The effects of minor flue gas components (SO 2 , NO, NO 2 , H 2 O, and O 2 ) on vanadium at 500-600 °C were investigated by thermochemical exposure in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that SO 2 , NO, and NO 2 are unlikely to have adsorbed on the surface vanadium oxides at 600 °C after exposure for up to 10 h, although NO and NO 2 may have exhibited oxidizing effects (e.g., exposure to 250 ppmv NO/N 2 resulted in an 2.4 times increase in surface V 2 O 5 compared to exposure to just N 2 ). We hypothesize that decomposition of surface vanadium oxides and diffusion of surface oxygen into the metal bulk are both important mechanisms affecting the composition and morphology of the vanadium membrane. The results and hypothesis suggest that the carbon capture performance of the vanadium membrane can potentially be strengthened by material and process improvements such as alloying, operating temperature reduction, and flue gas treatment.

  20. Hg⁰ removal from flue gas by ionic liquid/H₂O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guangwen; Bai, Bofeng; Zhang, Qiang; Cai, Ming

    2014-09-15

    1-Alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids ([Cnmim] Cl, n=4, 6, 8) were prepared. The ionic liquid was then mixed with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to form an absorbent. The Hg(0) removal performance of the absorbent was investigated in a gas/liquid scrubber using simulated flue gas. It was found that the ionic liquid/H2O2 mixture was an excellent absorbent and could be used to remove Hg(0) from flue gas. When the mass ratio of H2O2 to ionic liquid was 0.5, the absorbent showed high Hg(0) removal efficiency (up to 98%). The Hg(0) removal efficiency usually increased with the absorption temperature, while decreased with the increase of alkyl chain length in ionic liquid molecule. The Hg(0) removal mechanism involved with Hg(0) oxidation by H2O2 and Hg(2+) transfer from aqueous phase to ionic liquid phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mathematical modelling of flue gas tempered flames produced from pulverised coal fired with oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breussin, A.; Weber, R.; Kamp, W.L. van de

    1997-10-01

    The combustion of pulverised coal in conventional utility boilers contributes significantly to global CO{sub 2} emissions. Because atmospheric air is used as the combustion medium, the exhaust gases of conventional pulverised coal fired utility boilers contain approximately 15 % CO{sub 2}. This relatively low concentration makes separating and recovering CO{sub 2} a very energy-intensive process. This process can be simplified if N{sub 2} is eliminated from the comburent before combustion by firing the pulverised coal with pure oxygen. However, this concept will result in very high flames temperatures. Flue gas recirculation can be used to moderate the flame temperature, whilst generating a flue gas with a CO{sub 2} concentration of 95 %. In this presentation, both experimental and modelling work will be described. The former deals with identifying the issues related to the combustion of pulverised coal in simulated turbine exhaust gas, particularly with respect to stability, burnout and pollutant emissions. The second part of this presentation describes mathematical modelling of type 2 as well as type 1 swirling pulverised coal flames. Future work will concentrate on high CO{sub 2} levels environments. (orig.)

  2. Investigation on an ammonia supply system for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiankun; Yuan, Han; Zhao, Jian; Mei, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Low-speed marine diesel flue gas denitrification is in great demand in the ship transport industry. This research proposes an ammonia supply system which can be used for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel. In this proposed ammonia supply system, ammonium bicarbonate is selected as the ammonia carrier to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide by thermal decomposition. The diesel engine exhaust heat is used as the heating source for ammonium bicarbonate decomposition and ammonia gas desorption. As the ammonium bicarbonate decomposition is critical to the proper operation of this system, effects have been observed to reveal the performance of the thermal decomposition chamber in this paper. A visualization experiment for determination of the single-tube heat transfer coefficient and simulation of flow and heat transfer in two structures is conducted; the decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate is simulated by ASPEN PLUS. The results show that the single-tube heat transfer coefficient is 1052 W m2 °C-1; the thermal decomposition chamber fork-type structure gets a higher heat transfer compared with the row-type. With regard to the simulation of ammonium bicarbonate thermal decomposition, the ammonia production is significantly affected by the reaction temperature and the mass flow rate of the ammonium bicarbonate input.

  3. Furnace draft dynamics analysis after a flue gas desulphurization system incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazo, J.F.L. [Tecnatom, S.A. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Due to environmental regulations some utilities are modifying coal-fired power groups by installing a flue gas desulfurisation system (FGDS) in order to remove SO{sub 2} from a gas stream. These studies have been ordered by 'Endesa Generacion' for the following power plant groups: C.T. Teruel Grs. 1-3, C.T. Litoral Gr. 2, C.T. Compostilla Gr. 3, C.T. Alucdia Grs. 1-2, C.T. Compostilla Grs. 4-5 (on-going); and C.T. Los Barrios (on-going). The pictures that appear in this abstract correspond to Compostilla Gr.4 and Los Barrios projects. In both cases FGDS installation implies a new booster fan and heat exchanger keeping former Induced Draft Fans (IDFs). The main goal for these projects is to analyze the new flue-gas dynamic, in order to: detect risk situations to equipment, particularly to boiler integrity, test control system strategies and interlocks, select parameters to valves and control system to minimize pressure transients, and test operation strategies. 14 figs.

  4. Evaluation of flue-gas desulfurization gypsum in poultry litter as a substrate component for greenhouse horticultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the growth response and consumer preference of three plant species to substrate blends containing flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG). Substrate blends used in this study were derived from a previous experiment that evaluated the use of FGD Gas a bedding material...

  5. An energetic analysis of CO2 capture on a gas turbine combining flue gas recirculation and membrane separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaissaoui, Bouchra; Cabot, Gilles; Cabot, Marie-Sophie; Willson, David; Favre, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Post-combustion Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently intensively investigated as a key issue for the mitigation of greenhouse gases emissions. A very large number of studies is dedicated to coal power plants. In this paper, the possibility to achieve carbon capture on a gas turbine, based on a combination of flue gas recycle and membrane separation is reported. Membrane processes are effectively known to offer attractive performances in terms of energy efficiency, as soon as concentrated and/or pressure mixtures have to be treated. Two different flow schemes have been simulated and compared: flue gas recycle with air combustion and flue gas recycle with an oxygen enriched feed mixture. The energy requirement of the different processes, expressed in GJ (thermal basis) per ton of recovered CO 2 , and the size of the membrane capture process (expressed in m 2 of membrane area) have been systematically estimated for different membrane separation performances. It is shown that an overall energy requirement down to 2.6 GJ per ton can possibly be achieved when optimal operating conditions, based on oxygen enriched air (OEA) combustion together with a highly selective membrane (CO 2 /N 2 selectivity of 200) are combined. Additional possibilities in order to minimise the energy penalty of the process are discussed. -- Highlights: ► A carbon capture process for gas turbine has been investigated for the first time, with membrane separation unit. ► Air combustion systematically induces CO 2 capture specific energy requirement far above alternative capture processes. ► Remarkably, a very low energy requirement can be achieved (down to 2.6 GJ/ton) with Oxygen Enriched Air combustion. ► Target membrane selectivities and optimal oxygen content for combustion have been identified.

  6. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    elemental mercury shows that when HCl is present with either SO2 or NOx the mercury measurement after the converter is unstable and lower than the elemental mercury inlet level. The conclusion is that red brass chips cannot fully reduce oxidized mercury to elemental mercury when simulated cement kiln gas...... is applied. A sodium sulfite-based converter material was prepared by dry impregnation of sodium sulfite and calcium sulfate powders on zeolite pellets using water glass as binder. The sulfite converter works well at 500°C with less than 10ppmv HCl in the simulated cement kiln flue gas. The 95% response time...... of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer system...

  7. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report No. 11, October 1994--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N. [and others

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. For example, we will extract the SO{sub 2} from the aqueous scrubbing liquor into an oligomer of dimethylaniline to avoid the problem of organic liquid losses in the regeneration of the organic liquid.

  8. Flue gas carbon capture using hollow fiber membrane diffuser-separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariono, D.; Chandranegara, A. S.; Widodo, S.; Khoiruddin; Wenten, I. G.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, CO2 removal from flue gas using membrane diffuser-separator was investigated. Hollow fiber polypropylene membrane was used as the diffuser while pure water was used as the absorbent. Separation performance of the membrane diffuser-separator as a function of CO2 concentration (6-28%-vol.) and flow rate (gas: 0.8-1.55 L.min-1 and liquid: 0.2-0.7 L.min-1) was investigated and optimized. It was found that CO2 removal was significantly affected by CO2 concentration in the feed gas. On the other hand, CO2 flux was more influenced by flow rates of liquid and gas rather than concentration. The optimized CO2 removal (64%) and flux (1 x 10-4 mol.m-2.s-1) were obtained at the highest gas flow rate (1.55 L.min-1), the lowest liquid flow rate (0.2 L.min-1), and 6.2%-vol. of CO2 concentration. Outlet gas of the membrane diffuser system tends to carry some water vapor, which is affected by gas and liquid flow rate. Meanwhile, in the steady-state operation of the separator, the gas bubbles generated by the membrane diffuser take a long time to be completely degassed from the liquid phase, thus a portion of gas stream was exiting separator through liquid outlet.

  9. Ion swarm data for electrical discharge modeling in air and flue gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.; Benhenni, M.; Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first step of this work is the determination of the elastic and inelastic ion-molecule collision cross sections for the main ions (N 2 + , O 2 + , CO 2 + , H 2 O + and O - ) usually present either in the air or flue gas discharges. The obtained cross section sets, given for ion kinetic energies not exceeding 100 eV, correspond to the interactions of each ion with its parent molecule (symmetric case) or nonparent molecule (asymmetric case). Then by using these different cross section sets, it is possible to obtain the ion swarm data for the different gas mixtures involving N 2 , CO 2 , H 2 O and O 2 molecules whatever their relative proportions. These ion swarm data are obtained from an optimized Monte Carlo method well adapted for the ion transport in gas mixtures. This also allows us to clearly show that the classical linear approximations usually applied for the ion swarm data in mixtures such as Blanc's law are far to be valid. Then, the ion swarm data are given in three cases of gas mixtures: a dry air (80% N 2 , 20% O 2 ), a ternary gas mixture (82% N 2 , 12% CO 2 , 6% O 2 ) and a typical flue gas (76% N 2 , 12% CO 2 , 6% O 2 , 6% H 2 O). From these reliable ion swarm data, electrical discharge modeling for a wire to plane electrode configuration has been carried out in these three mixtures at the atmospheric pressure for different applied voltages. Under the same discharge conditions, large discrepancies in the streamer formation and propagation have been observed in these three mixture cases. They are due to the deviations existing not only between the different effective electron-molecule ionization rates but also between the ion transport properties mainly because of the presence of a highly polar molecule such as H 2 O. This emphasizes the necessity to properly consider the ion transport in the discharge modeling

  10. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs

  11. Study Analysis of Flue Gas Utilization as Alternative Power Generation in Cement Plant Using Organic Rankine Cycle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Ranggonang Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Cement plant produce large amount of heat source in cement making process, due to inefficiency of system there still waste heat available in form of flue gas that can be utilize. Flue gas  in cement plant can be utilized as alternative power generation. With the 200-300oC temperature output range of flue gas from suspension preheater and air quenching cooler (AQC in cement plant, organic rankine cycle (ORC can be suitable option for alternative power generation. ORC is development of rankine cycle, the different is the working fluid in ORC using refrigerant. In cement plant that produce 8466 TPD kiln production, used flue gas from suspension preheater to dry raw material and produce 163888 m3/h flue gas from AQC that still not utilized. Flue gas with 235oC temperature from AQC can utilized for power generation purpose using ORC system. Waste heat recovery calculation carried out to know the potential recovery. Operating condition of the ORC system will determine power produced that can be generated and ORC components calculated and selected according to the operating condition of the system. Using R141b as working fluid with 8 bar pressure and 110oC temperature inlet to turbine, power produced by turbine is 666 kW. For the components, evaporator and condenser use shell and tube heat exchanger, with evaporator heat transfer area is 676.49 m2 while condenser has 510 m2 of heat transfer area. And for working fluid pump it needs 16.235 Kw power to pump R141b back to evaporator.

  12. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  13. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  14. Torrefaction of cedarwood in a pilot scale rotary kiln and the influence of industrial flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yanyang; Liu, Rujie; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping; Shao, Jingai; Draper, Christopher; Zhang, Shihong; Chen, Hanping

    2015-02-01

    Torrefaction of cedarwood was performed in a pilot-scale rotary kiln at various temperatures (200, 230, 260 and 290°C). The torrefaction properties, the influence on the grindability and hydroscopicity of the torrefied biomass were investigated in detail as well as the combustion performance. It turned out that, compared with raw biomass, the grindability and the hydrophobicity of the torrefied biomass were significantly improved, and the increasing torrefaction temperature resulted in a decrease in grinding energy consumption and an increase in the proportion of smaller-sized particles. The use of industrial flue gas had a significant influence on the behavior of cedarwood during torrefaction and the properties of the resultant solid products. To optimize the energy density and energy yield, the temperature of torrefaction using flue gas should be controlled within 260°C. Additionally, the combustion of torrefied samples was mainly the combustion of chars, with similar combustion characteristics to lignite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. In situ laser measurement of oxygen concentration and flue gas temperature utilizing chemical reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanen, J; Sorvajärvi, T; Toivonen, J

    2017-12-01

    Combustion research requires detailed localized information on the dynamic combustion conditions to improve the accuracy of the simulations and, hence, improve the performance of the combustion processes. We have applied chemical reaction kinetics of potassium to measure the local temperature and O 2 concentration in flue gas. An excess of free atomic potassium is created in the measurement volume by a photofragmenting precursor molecule such as potassium chloride or KOH which are widely released from solid fuels. The decay of the induced potassium concentration is followed with an absorption measurement using a narrow-linewidth diode laser. The temperature and O 2 concentration are solved from the decay curve features using equations obtained from calibration measurements in a temperature range of 800°C-1000°C and in O 2 concentrations of 0.1%-21%. The local flue gas temperature and O 2 concentration were recorded in real time during devolatilization, char burning, and ash cooking phases of combustion in a single-particle reactor with a 5 Hz repetition rate. The method can be further extended to other target species and applications where the chemical dynamics can be disturbed with photofragmentation.

  16. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA. This topical report covers Subphase 2a which is the design phase of pilot demonstration subsystems. Materials of construction have been selected and proven in both lab scale and prototype testing to be acceptable for the reagent conditions of interest. The target application for the reactive carbonate material has been selected based upon small-scale feasibility studies and the design of a continuous fiber board production line has been completed. The electrochemical cell architecture and components have been selected based upon both lab scale and prototype testing. The appropriate quality control and diagnostic techniques have been developed and tested along with the required instrumentation and controls. Finally the demonstrate site infrastructure, NEPA categorical exclusion, and permitting is all ready for the construction and installation of the new units and upgrades.

  17. Investigation of heavy metal partitioning influenced by flue gas moisture and chlorine content during waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghai; Meng, Aihong; Jia, Jinyan; Zhang, Yanguo

    2010-01-01

    The impact of moisture on the partitioning of the heavy metals including Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in municipal solid waste (MSW) was studied in a laboratory tubular furnace. A thermodynamic investigation using CHEMKIN software was performed to compare the experimental results. Simulated waste, representative of typical MSW with and without chlorine compounds, was burned at the background temperature of 700 and 950 degrees C, respectively. In the absence of chlorine, the moisture content has no evident effect on the volatility of Pb, Zn and Cu at either 700 or 950 degrees C, however, as flue gas moisture increasing the Cd distribution in the bottom ash increased at 700 degrees C and reduced at 950 degrees C, respectively. In the presence of chlorine, the flue gas moisture reduced the volatility of Pb, Zn and Cu due to the transformation of the more volatile metal chlorides into less volatile metal oxides, and the reduction became significant as chlorine content increase. For Cd, the chlorine promotes its volatility through the formation of more volatile CdCl2. As a result, the increased moisture content increases the Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd concentrations in the bottom ash, which limits the utilization of the bottom ash as a construction material. Therefore, in order to accumulate heavy metals into the fly ash, MSW should be dried before incineration.

  18. Mercury Speciation in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Experimental Studies and Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radisav Vidic; Joseph Flora; Eric Borguet

    2008-12-31

    The overall goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding of the catalytic reactions that are promoted by solid surfaces present in coal combustion systems and develop a mathematical model that described key phenomena responsible for the fate of mercury in coal-combustion systems. This objective was achieved by carefully combining laboratory studies under realistic process conditions using simulated flue gas with mathematical modeling efforts. Laboratory-scale studies were performed to understand the fundamental aspects of chemical reactions between flue gas constituents and solid surfaces present in the fly ash and their impact on mercury speciation. Process models were developed to account for heterogeneous reactions because of the presence of fly ash as well as the deliberate addition of particles to promote Hg oxidation and adsorption. Quantum modeling was used to obtain estimates of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions. Based on the initial findings of this study, additional work was performed to ascertain the potential of using inexpensive inorganic sorbents to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants without adverse impact on the salability fly ash, which is one of the major drawbacks of current control technologies based on activated carbon.

  19. Theoretical prediction the removal of mercury from flue gas by MOFs

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2016-07-19

    Removal of mercury from flue gas has been considered as one of the hot topics in both the scientific and industrial world. Adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg) and oxidized mercury species (HgCl, HgO, and HgS) on a novel metal organic framework (MOF) material, named Mg/DOBDC, with unsaturated metal centers was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Hg stably physi-sorbed on the unsaturated metal center (magnesium ion) of Mg/DOBDC with a binding energy (BE) of −27.5 kJ/mol. A direct interaction between Hg and magnesium ion was revealed by the partial density of state (PDOS) analysis. HgCl multi-interacts with two neighboring magnesium ions simultaneously by its Cl endings and thus resulted in strong adsorption strength (−89.0 kJ/mol). The adsorption energies of HgO and HgS on the Mg/DOBDC were as high as −117.0 kJ/mol and −169.7 kJ/mol, respectively, indicating a strong chemisorption. Theoretical calculations in this study reveal that Mg/DOBDC has the potential to serve as an efficient material for removal of mercury from flue gas.

  20. Simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg0 from flue gas by ferrate (VI) solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yi; Han, Yinghui; Guo, Tianxiang; Ma, Tianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneously removing SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 from flue gas was examined by ferrate (VI) solution at a bubbling reactor. The removal efficiencies of 100% for SO 2 , 64.8% for NO and 81.4% for Hg 0 were achieved respectively, under the optimum experimental conditions, in which concentration of ferrate (VI) solution was 0.25 mmol/L, solution pH was 8.0, flue gas flow rate was 1 L/min and reaction temperature was 320 K. Based on the discussions of the ferrate (VI) solution characteristics, the comparisons of the standard electrode potential (E 0 ) of ferrate (VI) solution with E 0 values of reactant, and the analysis of the reaction products, a mechanism of simultaneous removal was proposed. In the process of simultaneous removal, FeO 4 2− and HFeO 4 − as the dominant species of ferrate (VI), could rapidly oxidize SO 2 , NO, and Hg 0 into SO 4 2− , NO 3 − and Hg 2+ . - Highlights: • Prepared ferrate (VI) absorbent has excellent property of removing SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 . • 100% of SO 2 , 63.8% of NO and 83.6% of Hg 0 were simultaneously removed. • The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 was proposed

  1. Condensing of steam in flue gas using a heat pump system in relation to a wood chip fired boiler. Roeggaskondensering med varmepumpe paa flisfyrede kedelanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, B.; Evald, A.; Vogel, G.; Bisgaard, C.

    1989-10-15

    The aim of this report is to describe existing methods for condensing steam water in flue gas in relation to combustion of forest biomas, and to describe the implementation of a plant for condensing of water in flue gas on an existing installation for combustion of wood chips. Condensing of water in flue gas, is specially interesting, because of the high content of water in forest biomas. The actual installation for the condensing of water is special, because it include a heat pump system. In this system the inlet air is humidified and heated in a heat exchanger by the flue gas. This system makes it possible to condense approximately all the water in the flue gas. It is shown, that an installation for condensing of steam water in flue gas is an advantage from an economic point of view; the pay back period for the investment will be about three years. Measurements on the installation has shown that the implementation of a plant for condensing the water in the flue gas reduces the pollution from the flue gas of approximately 85% for the emission of particles and approximately 25% for the emission of Co{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. (author).

  2. Flue gas recovery system for natural gas combined heat and power plant with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiling; Fu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoyin; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jingyi; Zhang, Shigang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A flue gas recovery system with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps is proposed. • The system can improve network transmission and distribution capacity. • The system is advantageous in energy saving, emission reduction and economic benefits. - Abstract: District heating systems use distributed heat pump peak-shaving technology to adjust heat in secondary networks of substations. This technology simultaneously adjusts the heat of the secondary network and reduces the return-water temperature of the primary network by using the heat pump principle. When optimized, low temperature return-water is able to recycle more waste heat, thereby further improving the heating efficiency of the system. This paper introduces a flue gas recovery system for a natural gas combined heat and power plant with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps. A pilot system comprising a set of two 9F gas-steam combined cycle-back pressure heating units was used to analyse the system configuration and key parameters. The proposed system improved the network transmission and distribution capacity, increased heating capacity, and reduced heating energy consumption without compromising heating safety issues. As such, the proposed system is advantageous in terms of energy saving, emission reduction, and economic benefits.

  3. Electron beams for power plant flue gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Among the processes in which fuel is used for energy generation coal burning plays leading role. On the other hand combustion of fossil fuels is the biggest source of air pollution. When burning fossil fuel pollutants such as particulate, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and others are emitted. Air pollution caused by these pollutants not only acts directly on environment but by contamination of water and soil leads to their degradation. The advanced technology for simultaneous SO 2 , NO x and VOC removal is discussed in the paper. The technology is based on electron accelerators applications. Many new solutions have been introduced in the new pilot plants which have been operated at coal fired power stations. 98% SO 2 and up to 90% NO x removals were obtained at very moderate energy consumption (for de SO x ). Additional agricultural tests have proven full applicability of byproduct in pure form or as a blending stock for NPK fertilizers. Two full scale industrial plants are being built in China (640 kW accelerators) and Poland (1.2 MW accelerators). These will be the biggest radiation processing units using accelerator technology all over the world

  4. CO2 Capture by Injection of Flue Gas or CO2-N2 Mixtures into Hydrate Reservoirs: Dependence of CO2 Capture Efficiency on Gas Hydrate Reservoir Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpouryouzband, Aliakbar; Yang, Jinhai; Tohidi, Bahman; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Istomin, Vladimir; Bukhanov, Boris; Cheremisin, Alexey

    2018-04-03

    Injection of flue gas or CO 2 -N 2 mixtures into gas hydrate reservoirs has been considered as a promising option for geological storage of CO 2 . However, the thermodynamic process in which the CO 2 present in flue gas or a CO 2 -N 2 mixture is captured as hydrate has not been well understood. In this work, a series of experiments were conducted to investigate the dependence of CO 2 capture efficiency on reservoir conditions. The CO 2 capture efficiency was investigated at different injection pressures from 2.6 to 23.8 MPa and hydrate reservoir temperatures from 273.2 to 283.2 K in the presence of two different saturations of methane hydrate. The results showed that more than 60% of the CO 2 in the flue gas was captured and stored as CO 2 hydrate or CO 2 -mixed hydrates, while methane-rich gas was produced. The efficiency of CO 2 capture depends on the reservoir conditions including temperature, pressure, and hydrate saturation. For a certain reservoir temperature, there is an optimum reservoir pressure at which the maximum amount of CO 2 can be captured from the injected flue gas or CO 2 -N 2 mixtures. This finding suggests that it is essential to control the injection pressure to enhance CO 2 capture efficiency by flue gas or CO 2 -N 2 mixtures injection.

  5. Amino acid salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture from flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    solutions is their ability to form solid precipitates upon the absorption of CO2. The occurrence of crystallization offers the possibility of increasing the CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. However, precipitation can also have negative effect on the CO2 capture process. The chemical nature of the solid...... formed is a decisive factor in determining the effect of precipitation on the process. For the purpose of studying the CO2 loading capacity of amino acid salt solutions, we developed an experimental set-up based on a dynamic analytical mode, with analysis of the effluent gas. Using this set-up, the CO2......New solvents based on the salts of amino acids have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions, for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. But only few studies on amino acids as CO2 capturing agents have been performed so far. One of the interesting features of amino acid salt...

  6. Photocatalytic Reduction of CO2 from Simulated Flue Gas with Colored Anatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yebin Guan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic reduction with sunlight is an economical and promising advanced approach for reducing the excessive emissions of CO2 from the combustion of fossil fuels. Aimed at practical applications, a type of inexpensive colored anatase material was used to evaluate CO2 photoreduction performance on a platform with a continuous flow of gas mixtures (10 vol % CO2, 90% N2, which resembles realistic flue gas conditions. The results showed an enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with standard P25 and significant improvement over pristine anatase. Based on a series of characterization techniques, we propose that the oxygen vacancies and surface hydroxyl groups on colored anatase can reduce the bandgap and assist the binding of CO2 molecules. Our results showed that photoreduction of CO2 is feasible under practical conditions, and the efficiency could be improved through modification of catalysts.

  7. CO2 Capture by Cold Membrane Operation with Actual Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaubey, Trapti [American Air Liquide Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Kulkarni, Sudhir [American Air Liquide Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Hasse, David [American Air Liquide Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Augustine, Alex [American Air Liquide Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-07-28

    The main objective of the project was to develop a post-combustion CO2 capture process based on the hybrid cold temperature membrane operation. The CO2 in the flue gas from coal fired power plant is pre-concentrated to >60% CO2 in the first stage membrane operation followed by further liquefaction of permeate stream to achieve >99% CO2 purity. The aim of the project was based on DOE program goal of 90% CO2 capture with >95% CO2 purity from Pulverized Coal (PC) fired power plants with $40/tonne of carbon capture cost by 2025. The project moves the technology from TRL 4 to TRL 5. The project involved optimization of Air Liquide commercial 12” PI-1 bundle to improve the bundle productivity by >30% compared to the previous baseline (DE-FE0004278) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and bundle testing with synthetic flue gas at 0.1 MWe bench scale skid located at Delaware Research and Technology Center (DRTC). In parallel, the next generation polyimide based novel PI-2 membrane was developed with 10 times CO2 permeance compared to the commercial PI-1 membrane. The novel PI-2 membrane was scaled from mini-permeator to 1” permeator and 1” bundle for testing. Bundle development was conducted with a Development Spin Unit (DSU) installed at MEDAL. Air Liquide’s cold membrane technology was demonstrated with real coal fired flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) with a 0.3 MWe field-test unit (FTU). The FTU was designed to incorporate testing of two PI-1 commercial membrane bundles (12” or 6” diameter) in parallel or series. A slip stream was sent to the next generation PI-2 membrane for testing with real flue gas. The system exceeded performance targets with stable PI-1 membrane operation for over 500 hours of single bundle, steady state testing. The 12” PI-1 bundle exceeded the productivity target by achieving ~600 Nm3/hr, where the target was set at ~455

  8. Simulation studies of the influence of HCl absorption on the performance of a wet flue gas desulphurisation pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Nygaard, Helle; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2002-01-01

    The mathematical model of Kiil et al, (Ind. Eng, Chem. Res. 37 (1998) 2792) for a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant was extended to include the simultaneous absorption of HCl. In contrast to earlier models for wet FGD plants, the inclusion of population balance equations for the lim......The mathematical model of Kiil et al, (Ind. Eng, Chem. Res. 37 (1998) 2792) for a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant was extended to include the simultaneous absorption of HCl. In contrast to earlier models for wet FGD plants, the inclusion of population balance equations...... for the limestone particles enabled a quantitative description of the influence of HCl absorption on essential process parameters such as the degree of desulphurisation and the residual limestone level of the gypsum produced. Simulations showed that the presence of 100 ppmv HCl in the flue gas reduced the degree...... gas concentration of SO2 on the degree of desulphurisation and the residual limestone level was found to be almost the same irrespective of HCl was present (100 ppmv) in the flue gas or not. The results presented are of importance in the analysis of the performance of wet FGD plants installed at power...

  9. Experimental study on the separation of CO2 from flue gas using hollow fiber membrane contactors without wetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Shui-ping; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa; Wang, Shu-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2007-01-01

    Experiments on CO 2 removal from flue gas using polypropylene (PP) hollow fiber membrane contactors were conducted in this study. Absorbents including aqueous potassium glycinate (PG) solution, aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were used to absorb CO 2 in the experiments. Based on the wetting experimental results, aqueous PG solution can offer a higher surface tension than water, aqueous MEA and MDEA solutions. Aqueous PG solution has a lower potential of membrane wetting after a continuously steady operation for 40 h to maintain CO 2 removal efficiency of about 90%. Under moderate operating conditions, effects of the temperature, flow rate, and concentration of absorbents, and the flow rate of flue gas as well as the volumetric concentration of carbon dioxide in the flue gas on the mass transfer rate of CO 2 were studied on a pilot-scale test facility. Unlike conventional absorbents, the mass transfer decreases with an increasing liquid temperature when using aqueous PG solution. Results show that CO 2 removal efficiency was above 90% and the mass transfer rate was above 2.0 mol/(m 2 h) using the PG aqueous solution. It indicates that the hollow fiber membrane contactor has a great potential in the area of CO 2 separation from flue gas when absorbent's concentration and liquid-gas pressure difference are designed elaborately. (author)

  10. Measurement of slurry droplets in coal-fired flue gas after WFGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Cheng; Zhao, Hua-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Xin; Zheng, Cheng-Hang; Gao, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    China owns the world's largest capacity of coal-fired power units. By the end of 2012, the capacity of installed national thermal power has been 819.68 million kilowatts. The latest standard requires that newly built power plants emit SO2 in no more than 100 mg/m(3) and the emission of old ones be lower than 200 mg/m(3) while in some key areas the emission should be controlled under 50 mg/m(3). So by the end of 2012, 90% of the active coal-fired units have been equipped with flue gas desulfurization devices. Among the desulfurization methods adopted, limestone-gypsum wet flue gas desulphurization accounts for 92%, causing the problem of fine droplets in the exhaust gas after defogger, which may even form "gypsum rain." At present, sampling methods are widely used at home and abroad, such as magnesium ion tracer method, modified magnesium ion tracer method and chemical analysis. In addition, some scholars use aerodynamic methods, such as ELPI, to measure the diameter distribution and concentration. The methods mentioned above all have their own demerits, such as the inability to on-line, continuous measurements and the need of prolonged measuring time. Thus, in this paper some potential optical on-line methods are presented, such as Fraunhofer diffraction pattern analysis and wavelength-multiplexed laser extinction. Also brought up are their measuring scope and merits. These methods have already been utilized to measure small liquid droplets and their demonstrations and evaluations are as well stated. Finally, a 3D imaging method based on digital holographic microscope is proposed for in-line measurement of size and concentration of slurry droplets. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by preliminary experimental investigation.

  11. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  12. Hydroquinone and quinone-grafted porous carbons for highly selective CO2 capture from flue gases and natural gas upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Krishna, R.; Yang, J.; Deng, S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were

  13. ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth E. Baldrey

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO(sub 3) and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was underway at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. This represents the first long-term full-scale testing of this class of products. Modifications to the flue gas conditioning system at Jim Bridger, including development of alternate injection lances, was also undertaken to improve chemical spray distribution and to avoid spray deposition to duct interior surfaces. Also in this quarter, a firm commitment was received for another long-term test of the cohesivity additives. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative

  14. Utilization of flue gas for cultivation of microalgae (Chlorella sp.) in an outdoor open thin-layer photobioreactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doucha, Jiří; Straka, F.; Lívanský, Karel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2005), s. 403-412 ISSN 0921-8971 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV104/97/S055; GA ČR GA104/02/0410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : microalgae * flue gas * carbon dioxide Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.992, year: 2005

  15. Mercury emission and plant uptake of trace elements during early stage of soil amendment using flue gas desulfurization materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale field study was carried out to investigate the distribution of Hg and other selected elements in the three potential mitigation pathways, i.e., emission to ambient air, uptake by surface vegetation (i.e., grass), and rainfall infiltration, after flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material ...

  16. Recovery of flue gas energy in heat-integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants using the contact economizer system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madzivhandila, VA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available (flue gas) stream of a heat-integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) design of the Elcogas plant adopted from previous studies. The underlying support for this idea was the direct relationship between efficiency of the IGCC and the boiler feedwater...

  17. Research progress of SO2 removal from flue gas by functionalized ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinle SHI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized ionic liquids are receiving increasing attention in the field of flue gas desulfurization due to its unique physical and chemical properties. Research progress on the field of SO2 removal by ionic liquids (ILs including guanidinium-based, amines-based and ether-based ILs is summarized. Industrial application of polymerization ILs and loaded ILs to desulfurization is reviewed. Relevant suggestions on industrial application of ionic liquids based on fundamental research are put forward. The first thing is to develop functional ionic liquid for desulfurization,and thus investigate and propose its desulfurization mechanism and model; the second is to carry out the research work on immobilized ionic liquid, and explore its recycling properties, thus prolonging its service life.

  18. Crystallisation of Gypsum and Prevention of Foaming in Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun

    faces. Excessive foaming within wet FGD-plants has been associated with a range of operational problems as well as an increased degree of SO2 absorption. Foaming agents include surfactants, macromolecules (such as polymers or proteins), and finely dispersed solids. The foaming ability of particles......, electrolytes and buffers, present in a wet FGD-plant, has been investigated by laboratory scale Bikerman experiments. Adipic acid, as well as a combination of small particles and an electrolyte, have been demonstrated to generate weak transient foams. Pilot plant experiments showed an increased absorption......The aim of this project is to investigate two operational problems, which have been experienced during wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) operation, i.e. poor gypsum dewatering properties and foaming. The results of this work can be used for the optimization of wet FGD-plants in terms...

  19. Optimized CO2-flue gas separation model for a coal fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arachchige, Udara S.P.R. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Mohsin, Muhammad [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Melaaen, Morten C. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Tel-Tek, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The detailed description of the CO2 removal process using mono-ethylamine (MEA) as a solvent for coal-fired power plant is present in this paper. The rate based Electrolyte NRTL activity coefficient model was used in the Aspen Plus. The complete removal process with re-circulating solvent back to the absorber was implemented with the sequential modular method in Aspen Plus. The most significant cost related to CO2 capture is the energy requirement for re-generating solvent, i.e. re-boiler duty. Parameters’ effects on re-boiler duty were studied, resulting decreased re-boiler duty with the packing height and absorber packing diameter, absorber pressure, solvent temperature, stripper packing height and diameter. On the other hand, with the flue gas temperature, re-boiler duty is increased. The temperature profiles and CO2 loading profiles were used to check the model behavior.

  20. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas using Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    amine and the pH dropped between 2 and 3 units during the absorption process. In both types of solutions the temperature increased as a result of the CO2 absorption, which is expected due to the exothermic nature of the absorption reaction. The increase in temperature for the potassium glycinate......The reversible absorption of CO2 into a chemical solvent is currently the leading CO2 capture technology. Available solvents are almost exclusively based on aqueous alkanolamine solutions, which entail both economic and environmental complications, making the commercialization of the technology...... difficult. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions. A number of advantages make amino acid salt solutions attractive solvents for CO2 capture from flue gas. In the present study CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions of 0.5 M potassium glycinate and 0.5 M...

  1. Fabrication of highly porous LSM/CGO cell stacks for electrochemical flue gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Bræstrup, Frantz Radzik; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2013-01-01

    In this study porous cell stacks for electrochemical flue gas purification were fabricated using tape casting and lamination followed by sintering. Two different mixtures of pore formers were used; either a mixture of two types of graphite or a mixture of graphite with polymethyl methacrylate micro-particles....... It was shown that the porous cell stacks fabricated with polymethyl methacrylate had a higher porosity but a similar back pressure compared to the porous cell stacks fabricated with only graphite as a pore former. This was due to a high back pressure of the electrolyte layer. The porous cell stacks fabricated...... with polymethyl methacrylate as a pore former seem to be well suited for i.e. caption of soot particles. Furthermore, the back pressure of the electrode layer was significantly reduced when using polymethyl methacrylate pore formers. However, a better interconnectivity of the pores formed by the polymethyl...

  2. Catalytic pleat filter bags for combined particulate separation and nitrogen oxides removal from flue gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Ok; Choi, Ho Kyung

    2010-01-01

    The development of a high temperature catalytically active pleated filter bag with hybrid filter equipment for the combined removal of particles and nitrogen oxides from flue gas streams is presented. A special catalyst load in stainless steel mesh cartridge with a high temperature pleated filter bag followed by optimized catalytic activation was developed to reach the required nitrogen oxides levels and to maintain the higher collection efficiencies. The catalytic properties of the developed high temperature filter bags with hybrid filter equipment were studied and demonstrated in a pilot scale test rig and a demonstration plant using commercial scale of high temperature catalytic pleated filter bags. The performance of the catalytic pleated filter bags were tested under different operating conditions, such as filtration velocity and operating temperature. Moreover, the cleaning efficiency and residual pressure drop of the catalyst loaded cartridges in pleated filter bags were tested. As result of theses studies, the optimum operating conditions for the catalytic pleated filter bags are determined. (author)

  3. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  4. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  5. Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Richardson; Katherine Dombrowski; Douglas Orr

    2006-12-31

    This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operation at the different host sites. Full-scale sorbent injection for mercury control was evaluated at three sites: Georgia Power's Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of the Southern Company] and Reliant Energy's Shawville Unit 3. Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 has an existing small-SCA cold-side ESP followed by a Chiyoda CT-121 wet scrubber. Yates Unit 2 is also equipped with a small-SCA ESP and a dual flue gas conditioning system. Unit 2 has no SO2 control system. Shawville Unit 3 is equipped with two small-SCA cold-side ESPs operated in series. All ESP systems tested in this program had SCAs less than 250 ft2/1000 acfm. Short-term parametric tests were conducted on Yates

  6. Mixotrophic cultivation of oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 mediated by actual coal-fired flue gas for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Kyubock; Cho, Sunja; Hyun, Ju-Soo; Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Young-Chul; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jin-Suk; Oh, You-Kwan

    2014-10-01

    Flue gases mainly consist of CO2 that can be utilized to facilitate microalgal culture for bioenergy production. In the present study, to evaluate the feasibility of the utilization of flue gas from a coal-burning power plant, an indigenous and high-CO2-tolerant oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1, was cultivated under mixotrophic conditions, and the results were evaluated. When the culture was mediated by flue gas, highest biomass (0.8 g cells/L·d) and FAME (fatty acid methyl esters) productivity (121 mg/L·d) were achieved in the mixotrophic mode with 5 g/L glucose, 5 mM nitrate, and a flow rate of 0.2 vvm. By contrast, the photoautotrophic cultivation resulted in a lower biomass (0.45 g cells/L·d) and a lower FAME productivity (60.2 mg/L·d). In general, the fatty acid profiles of Chlorella sp. KR-1 revealed meaningful contents (>40 % of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids) under the mixotrophic condition, which enables the obtainment of a better quality of biodiesel than is possible under the autotrophic condition. Conclusively then, it was established that a microalgal culture mediated by flue gas can be improved by adoption of mixotrophic cultivation systems.

  7. Evaluation of Synthetic Gypsum Recovered via Wet Flue-Gas Desulfurization from Electric Power Plants for Use in Foundries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Biernacki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates possible use of waste gypsum (synthetic, recovered via flue-gas desulfurization from coal-fired electric powerplants, in foundries. Energy sector, which in Eastern Europe is mostly composed from coal-fired electric power plants, is one of the largestproducers of sulfur dioxide (SO2.In order to protect the environment and reduce the amount of pollution flue-gas desulfurization (FGD is used to remove SO2 fromexhaust flue gases of fossil-fuel power plants. As a result of this process gypsum waste is produced that can be used in practicalapplications.Strength and permeability tests have been made and also in-depth analysis of energy consumption of production process to investigateways of preparing the synthetic gypsum for casting moulds application. This paper also assesses the chemical composition, strength andpermeability of moulds made with synthetic gypsum, in comparison with moulds made with traditional GoldStar XL gypsum and withceramic molds. Moreover examination of structure of synthetic gypsum, the investigations on derivatograph and calculations of energyconsumption during production process of synthetic gypsum in wet flue-gas desulfurization were made.After analysis of gathered data it’s possible to conclude that synthetic gypsum can be used as a material for casting mould. There is nosignificant decrease in key properties, and on the other hand there is many additional benefits including low energy consumption,decreased cost, and decreased environmental impact.

  8. Decarb/Desal: Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas with Simultaneous Fresh Water Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W

    2009-10-21

    If fossil fuels continue to be a major part of the world's energy supply, effective means must be developed to deal with the carbon emissions. Geologic sequestration of supercritical CO{sub 2} is expected to play a major role in mitigating this problem. Separating carbon dioxide from other gases is the most costly aspect of schemes for geologic sequestration. That cost is driven by the complexity and energy intensity of current chemical-stripping methods for separating carbon dioxide. Our experience in water treatment technology indicated that an entirely new approach could be developed, taking advantage of water's propensity to separate gases that ionize in water (like CO{sub 2}) from those that do not (like N{sub 2}). Even though water-based systems might not have the extreme selectivity of chemicals like substituted amines used in industrial systems today, they have the potential to tolerate NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates while also producing clean drinking water as a valuable byproduct. Lower capital cost, broader range of applicability, environmental friendliness, and revenue from a second product stream give this approach the potential to significantly expand the worldwide application of carbon separation for geologic sequestration. Here we report results for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas by two methods that simultaneously separate carbon dioxide and fresh water: ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water, and thermal distillation. The ion pumping method dramatically increases dissolved carbonate ion in solution and hence the overlying vapor pressure of CO{sub 2} gas, allowing its removal as a pure gas. We have used two common water treatment methods to drive the ion pumping approach, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis to produce pure CO{sub 2}. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas, because the slightly basic water used as the extraction medium

  9. Method of flash evaporation and condensation – heat pump for deep cooling of coal-fired power plant flue gas: Latent heat and water recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuzhong; Yan, Min; Zhang, Liqiang; Chen, Guifang; Cui, Lin; Song, Zhanlong; Chang, Jingcai; Ma, Chunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A method is developed for deep cooling of flue gas in coal-fired boilers. • The method can recover both latent heat and water from flue gas. • The method utilizes FGD scrubber as a deep cooling exchanger. • The method adopts the direct heat exchange mode to avoid the corrosion problem. - Abstract: Flue gas waste heat recovery and utilization is an efficient means to improve the energy efficiency of coal-fired power plants. At present, the surface corrosion and fouling problems of heat exchanger hinder the development of flue gas deep cooling. In this study, a novel flue gas deep cooling method that can reduce flue gas temperature below the dew point of vapor to recover latent heat and obtain clean water simultaneously is proposed to achieve improved energy efficiency. The heat transfer mode of this method is the direct contact mode, which takes the scrubber, e.g. the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber, as the deep cooling exchanger. The flash evaporation and condensation (FEC) device and heat pump (HP) are utilized to provide low-temperature medium, such as FGD slurry or water, for washing and deep cooling flue gas, to collect recovered water, and to absorb recovered waste heat. This method is called as the FEC–HP method. This paper elaborated on two optional models of the proposed method. The mechanism for recovering heat and water was also analyzed using the customized flue gas humidity chart, and the method to quantitate recovered heat and water, as well as the results of the case of a 300 MW coal-fired generator set were provided. Net present value calculations showed that this method is profitable in the scenario of burning high-water-content coals. Several potential advantages of this method and suggestions for practical application were also discussed.

  10. Optimization of CO2 Absorption Characteristic under the Influence of SO2 in Flue Gas by Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyi Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hollow fiber membrane contactor is a new, highly efficient, and the most promising technology for CO2 absorption in flue gas. There is still SO2 that exists in the flue gas after desulfurization tower of power plant. This paper studied the influence of SO2 on CO2 absorption characteristic in flue gas by hollow fiber membrane contactor with absorbent of EDA, EDA + MEA (0.6 : 0.4, and EDA + MEA + PZ (0.4 : 0.4 : 0.2. The influences of SO2 concentration, cycle absorption and desorption characteristic of absorbent, absorbent concentration, and liquid-gas flow rate ratio are studied to analyze the influence of SO2 on CO2 absorption characteristic. The appropriate absorbent composition ratio and appropriate parameter range that can inhibit the influence of SO2 are proposed by studying the hybrid sorbent with activating agent, appropriate absorbent concentration, and ratio of liquid-gas flow rate. Among the three kinds of absorbents, EDA + MEA + PZ (0.4 : 0.4 : 0.2 had the best tolerance ability to SO2 and the highest efficiency. With comprehensive consideration of CO2 removal efficiency and operating cost, under the condition of 1000 ppm SO2, the appropriate concentration and liquid-gas flow rate ratio of EDA, EDA + MEA, and EDA + MEA + PZ are proposed.

  11. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  12. Savings on natural gas consumption by doubling thermal efficiencies of balanced-flue space heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juanico, Luis E. [Conicet, and Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Gonzalez, Alejandro D. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales, Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medio Ambiente (Inibioma-Conicet), 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas is a relatively clean fossil fuel for space heating. However, when it is not used efficiently high consumption can become an environmental problem. In Argentina, individual balanced-flue space heaters are the most extensively used in temperate and cold regions. This furnace is a simple device with a burner set into a metal chamber, separated from the indoor ambient by an enclosing cabinet, and both inlet and outgas chimneys are connected to the outdoor ambient. In previous studies, we measured the performance of these commercial devices, and found very low thermal efficiency (in the range of 39-63% depending on the chimney configuration). The extensive use of these devices is possible due to the availability of unlimited amount of subsidised natural gas to households and businesses. In the present work, we developed a prototype with simple and low cost modifications made on commercial models, and measured the improvements on the thermal efficiency. Findings showed better infrared radiation, enhanced indoor air convection, and passive chimney flow regulation leading to thermal efficiency in the range of 75-85%. These values represent an improvement of 100% when compared to marketed models, and hence, the specific cost of the heater per unit of useful heating power delivered was actually reduced. Considering the large market presence of these furnaces in both residential and business sectors in Argentina, the potential benefits related to gas consumption and environmental emissions are very significant. (author)

  13. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification - Power Plant Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

    2011-03-01

    A technical feasibility assessment was performed for retrofitting oxy-fuel technology to an existing power plant burning low sulfur PRB fuel and high sulfur bituminous fuel. The focus of this study was on the boiler/power generation island of a subcritical steam cycle power plant. The power plant performance in air and oxy-firing modes was estimated and modifications required for oxy-firing capabilities were identified. A 460 MWe (gross) reference subcritical PC power plant was modeled. The reference air-fired plant has a boiler efficiency (PRB/Bituminous) of 86.7%/89.3% and a plant net efficiency of 35.8/36.7%. Net efficiency for oxy-fuel firing including ASU/CPU duty is 25.6%/26.6% (PRB/Bituminous). The oxy-fuel flue gas recirculation flow to the boiler is 68%/72% (PRB/bituminous) of the flue gas (average O{sub 2} in feed gas is 27.4%/26.4%v (PRB/bituminous)). Maximum increase in tube wall temperature is less than 10ºF for oxy-fuel firing. For oxy-fuel firing, ammonia injected to the SCR was shut-off and the FGD is applied to remove SOx from the recycled primary gas stream and a portion of the SOx from the secondary stream for the high sulfur bituminous coal. Based on CFD simulations it was determined that at the furnace outlet compared to air-firing, SO{sub 3}/SO{sub 2} mole ratio is about the same, NOx ppmv level is about the same for PRB-firing and 2.5 times for bituminous-firing due to shutting off the OFA, and CO mole fraction is approximately double. A conceptual level cost estimate was performed for the incremental equipment and installation cost of the oxyfuel retrofit in the boiler island and steam system. The cost of the retrofit is estimated to be approximately 81 M$ for PRB low sulfur fuel and 84 M$ for bituminous high sulfur fuel.

  14. Separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas by mixed matrix membranes using dual phase microporous polymeric constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizkardes, Ali K; Kusuma, Victor A; Dahe, Ganpat; Roth, Elliot A; Hill, Lawrence J; Marti, Anne; Macala, Megan; Venna, Surendar R; Hopkinson, David

    2016-09-27

    This study presents the fabrication of a new mixed matrix membrane using two microporous polymers: a polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1 and a benzimidazole linked polymer, BILP-101, and their CO 2 separation properties from post-combustion flue gas. 17, 30 and 40 wt% loadings of BILP-101 into PIM-1 were tested, resulting in mechanically stable films showing very good interfacial interaction due to the inherent H-bonding capability of the constituent materials. Gas transport studies showed that BILP-101/PIM-1 membranes exhibit high CO 2 permeability (7200 Barrer) and selectivity over N 2 (15). The selected hybrid membrane was further tested for CO 2 separation using actual flue gas from a coal-fired power plant.

  15. Handbook - Status assessment of polymeric materials in flue gas cleaning systems; Handbok - Statusbedoemning av polymera material i roekgassystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemhild, Stefanie

    2011-01-15

    In today's flue gas cleaning systems with advanced energy recovery systems and improved flue gas cleaning, the use of polymeric materials has continuously increased in applications where the flue gas environment is to corrosive to be handled with metallic materials. Typical polymeric materials used are fibre reinforced plastics (FRP), glassflake-filled linings, polypropylene (PP) and fluoropolymers. Demands on increased profitability and efficiency at incineration plants involve that also polymeric materials have to face more demanding environments with increased temperature, temperature changes, changes in fuel composition and therewith fluegas composition and longer service intervals. The knowledge on how polymeric materials perform in general and how these service conditions influence them, is, however, poor and continuous status assessment is therefore necessary. The overall aim of this project has been to assess simple techniques for status assessment of polymeric materials in flue gas cleaning equipment and to perform an inventory of present experience and knowledge on the use of polymeric materials. The project consisted of an inventory of present experience, analysis of material from shut-down plants and plants still in service, field testing in a plant adding sulphur during combustion and the assessment of different non-destructive testing (NDT) methods by laboratory experiments. The results of the project are summarised in the form of a handbook which in the first place addresses plant owners and maintenance staff at incineration plants and within the pulp and paper industry. In the introductory chapter typical polymeric materials (FRP, flake linings, PP and fluoropolymers) used in flue gas cleaning equipment are described as well as the occurring corrosion mechanisms. The inventory of process equipment is divided into sections about scrubbers, flue gas ducts, stacks, internals and other equipment such as storage tanks. Typical damages are

  16. A plug flow model for chemical reactions and aerosol nucleation and growth in an alkali-containing flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, K. A.; Livbjerg, Hans

    2000-01-01

    multicomponent growth models are treated. The local gas phase composition is determined from a gas phase chemical equilibrium calculation combined with finite reaction rate kinetics for slower reactions. The model is useful in the analysis of boiler operation with respect to the formation of particles, HCl, SO2......The paper presents a numerical model for the simulation of gas to particle conversion and the chemical changes during cooling of a flue gas from the combustion of fuels rich in volatile alkali species. For the homogeneous nucleation of alkali species the model uses the classical theory modified...

  17. Comparison of alternative flue gas dry treatment technologies in waste-to-energy processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pozzo, Alessandro; Antonioni, Giacomo; Guglielmi, Daniele; Stramigioli, Carlo; Cozzani, Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Acid gases such as HCl and SO2 are harmful both for human health and ecosystem integrity, hence their removal is a key step of the flue gas treatment of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. Methods based on the injection of dry sorbents are among the Best Available Techniques for acid gas removal. In particular, systems based on double reaction and filtration stages represent nowadays an effective technology for emission control. The aim of the present study is the simulation of a reference two-stage (2S) dry treatment system performance and its comparison to three benchmarking alternatives based on single stage sodium bicarbonate injection. A modelling procedure was applied in order to identify the optimal operating configuration of the 2S system for different reference waste compositions, and to determine the total annual cost of operation. Taking into account both operating and capital costs, the 2S system appears the most cost-effective solution for medium to high chlorine content wastes. A Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess the robustness of the results. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States); Gilliam, Ryan [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States); Seeker, Randy [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This final report details all development, analysis, design and testing of the project. Also included in the final report are an updated Techno-Economic Analysis and CO2 Lifecycle Analysis. The subsystems included in the pilot demonstration plant are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant was proven to be capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing it into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The final report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. The report also discusses the results of the fully integrated operation of the facility. Fiber cement boards have been produced in this facility exclusively using reactive calcium carbonate from captured CO2 from flue gas. These boards meet all US and China appropriate acceptance standards. Use demonstrations for these boards are now underway.

  19. Experimental investigation of the degradation rate of adipic acid in wet flue gas desulphurisation plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian N. Buchardt; Jan Erik Johnsson; Soeren Kiil [Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-03-15

    The aim of this work is to study the degradation rate of adipic acid in wet FGD plants using forced oxidation. The investigation is experimentally demanding because the degradation rate must be studied under realistic conditions present in pilot plants or industrial plants only. This is the first systematic investigation including both chemical and biological degradation. The influence on the degradation rate of adipic acid was studied: The concentration of adipic acid (0-2100 mg/l), trace-metals, Cl{sup -} (0-50 g/l), pH (4.7 and 5.4), and temperature (32, 42 and 50{sup o}C). Furthermore, the degradation rate of adipic acid was examined in two types of limestone/gypsum slurry: one based on limestone, distilled water and flue gas from natural gas combustion, the other on slurry liquid taken from the wet FGD plant of a full-scale power plant (coal combustion) with limestone subsequently added. The first order rate constant, using slurry based on natural gas combustion, was estimated to 0.60{+-}0.10 day{sup -1} which is more than twice the value of the rate constant estimated from experiments based on slurry from the full-scale wet FGD plant (0.25{+-}0.10 day{sup -1}). Both types of slurry were examined for biological activity. In the slurry based on natural gas combustion no biological activity was found. Independent laboratory tests showed that biological activity contributed to the degradation rate of adipic acid in the slurry liquid from the full-scale wet FGD plant, though the effect could not be quantified. Analysis of the slurries for selected trace metals showed significantly higher concentrations in the slurry from the full-scale plant. It was found that increasing concentrations of trace metals and chloride inhibits the chemical degradation of adipic acid. 19 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Fractionation of mercury stable isotopes during coal combustion and seawater flue gas desulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shuyuan; Yuan, Dongxing; Lin, Haiying; Sun, Lumin; Lin, Shanshan

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, fractionation of mercury isotopes during coal combustion and seawater flue gas desulfurization (SFGD) in a coal-fired power plant using a SFGD system was investigated. Fourteen samples were collected from the power plant. The samples were pretreated with a combustion-trapping method and were analyzed with a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). Compared with the raw coal, the bottom ash was enriched with lighter mercury isotopes with δ 202 Hg values ranging from −0.45 to −0.03‰. The fly ash was enriched with lighter mercury isotopes with δ 202 Hg values ranging from −1.49 to −0.73‰ for Chinese coal and from −1.47 to −0.62‰ for Indonesian coal. The δ 202 Hg of fresh seawater and desulfurized seawater was found to be −1.32 and −0.32‰ respectively. These δ 202 Hg values indicated that the desulfurized seawater was enriched with heavier mercury isotopes. Based upon the calculated results obtained from the mass balance equation, it was suggested that the stack emissions were enriched with lighter mercury isotopes. Mass independent fractionation was observed in most of the samples with a Δ 199 Hg/Δ 201 Hg ratio of approximately 0.96. The results help in improving the understanding of mercury isotope fractionation during coal combustion and SFGD, and are also useful in tracing the mercury emissions from coal fired power plants. - Highlights: • Spread of 1.5‰ was observed in δ 202 Hg values of raw coals and coal related samples. • The δ 202 Hg values were more negative in fly ash than those in the raw coal. • The flue gas had a significant Hg fractionation after desulfurization. • The stack emissions were enriched with lighter isotopes compared with the raw coal.

  1. Catalyst for the removal of hazardous effluents in flue gas. Final report. Katalysator til fjerning av skadelige forurensninger i roekgass. Sluttrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrdal, R.; Oftedal, T.A.

    1987-11-03

    The report deals with a project on the testing and development of a suitable catalyst for the removal of hazardous pollutants and the decrease of NO/sub x/ in the flue gas from the combustion of charcoal. 2 drawings.

  2. JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Patton

    2006-12-31

    The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

  3. Potassium Tethered Carbons with Unparalleled Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Zhongzheng; Luo, Xiaona; Zhang, Lina; Shen, Qun; Li, Shenggang; Zhang, Haijiao; Sun, Nannan; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2018-01-31

    Carbons are considered less favorable for postcombustion CO 2 capture because of their low affinity toward CO 2 , and nitrogen doping was widely studied to enhance CO 2 adsorption, but the results are still unsatisfactory. Herein, we report a simple, scalable, and controllable strategy of tethering potassium to a carbon matrix, which can enhance carbon-CO 2 interaction effectively, and a remarkable working capacity of ca. 4.5 wt % under flue gas conditions was achieved, which is among the highest for carbon-based materials. More interestingly, a high CO 2 /N 2 selectivity of 404 was obtained. Density functional theory calculations evidenced that the introduced potassium carboxylate moieties are responsible for such excellent performances. We also show the effectiveness of this strategy to be universal, and thus, cheaper precursors can be used, holding great promise for low-cost carbon capture from flue gas.

  4. Re-use of stabilised flue gas ashes from solid waste incineration in cement-treated base layers for pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Zuansi; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2003-01-01

    Fly ash from coal-burning power plants has been used extensively as a pozzolan and fine filter in concrete for many years. Laboratory experiments were performed investigating the effect of substituting the coal-based fly ash with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes (FGA) from waste incineration...... weeks. Cylinders (diameter 100 mm, length 150 mm) were drilled from these cubes for tank leaching experiments. Duplicate specimens were subject to compression strength testing and to tank leaching experiments. The compressive strength of the CTB fulfilled the Danish requirements for CTB, i.e. strength...... more than 5 MPa after 7 days. The tank leaching tests revealed that leaching of heavy metals was not significantly affected by the use of chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. Assuming that diffusion controls the leaching process it was calculated that less than 1% of the metals...

  5. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project. Technical progress report No. 15, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate that, by combining state-of-the-art technology, highly efficient plant operation and maintenance capabilities and by-product gypsum sales, significant reductions of SO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at approximately one-half the life cycle cost of a conventional Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Further, this emission reduction is achieved without generating solid waste and while minimizing liquid wastewater effluent. Basically, this project entails the design, construction and operation of a nominal 600 MWe AFGD facility to remove SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station.

  6. Re-use of stabilised flue gas ashes from solid waste incineration in cement-treated base layers for pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Zuansi; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2003-01-01

    Fly ash from coal-burning power plants has been used extensively as a pozzolan and fine filter in concrete for many years. Laboratory experiments were performed investigating the effect of substituting the coal-based fly ash with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes (FGA) from waste incineration...... would teach during a 100-year period from a 0.5 m thick concrete stab exposed to water on one side. Leaching of the common ions Ca, Cl, Na and SO4 was increased 3-20 times from the specimens with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. However, the quantities leached were still...... modest. These experiments suggest that FGA from waste incineration after Ferrox-treatment could be re-used in CTB without compromising the strength and teaching from the base layer....

  7. Method and apparatus for conditioning flue gas with a mist of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, W.I.; Gaunt, R.H.; Lynch, J.G.

    1978-01-24

    In order to reduce the electrical resistance of entrained fine particles of fly ash resulting from the burning of low sulfur coal and to enhance the efficiency of their collection by an electrical precipitator means, there is a conditioning of the particles carried in the flue gas stream by having a very fine mist of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ condensed and adsorbed on the particles themselves. Sulfuric acid is mixed with air in an acoustic nozzle to form a mist having a mean particle size of less than 10 microns which is injected uniformly into the flue gas stream at a zone ahead of the precipitator unit so that the acid can condense on the particles. The acid is preferably transported through the apparatus at ambient temperature and then heated just prior to injection to a temperature less than its vaporization temperature.

  8. Biological carbon fixation: A study of Isochrysis sp. growth under actual coal-fired power plant's flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya, Liyana; Chik, Muhammad Nazry; Pang, Mohd Asyraf Mohd Azmir

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary study on the growth of marine microalgae Isochrysis sp. was carried out using actual flue gas from a coal-fired power station. The species was cultured using a 2×10-L customized bubble column photobioreactor skid under specified culture conditions. With an initial culture density of 0.459 Abs (optical density at 560 nm wavelength), the species was found able to survive – observed by increases in optical densities, number of cells and weights – in the presence of actual coal-fired flue gas containing on average 4.08 % O 2 , 200.21 mg/m 3 SO 2 , 212.29 mg/m 3 NO x , 4.73 % CO 2 and 50.72 mg/m 3 CO. Results thus add value to the potential and capability of microalgae, especially for Isochrysis sp., to be the biological carbon fixer in neutralizing carbon emissions from power plants.

  9. Regeneration of Pt-catalysts deactivated in municipal waste flue gas with H2/N2 and the effect of regeneration step on the SCR catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Kustov, Arkadii

    Municipal waste flue gas was previously found to deactivate the Pt-based CO oxidation catalyst severely. In the specific case studied, siloxanes were found to cause the deactivation. An on-site method for complete regeneration of the catalyst activity was found without shutdown of the flue gas st......, i.e. the reaction 4NO + 4NH3 + O2 ->4N2 + 6H2O....

  10. Reduction of NO2 in flue gas by CO and propylene over CuO-CeO2/SiO2 in the presence of O-2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Mo-Hong; Li, M.; Shan, Yu-Hua; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of NO2 with CO and/or propylene in the presence of NO and excess oxygen, a model mixture for flue gas, was studied over a series of CuO-CeO2/SiO2 catalysts between 120-260 °C. The effect of HCl, an impurity in flue gas, on the activity of the catalysts was evaluated. It was found

  11. Performance testing of cross flow heat exchanger operating in the atmosphere of flue gas particulate with vapor condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntaphan, A.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance testing of a cross flow heat exchanger operating under the atmosphere of flue gas particulate from combustion was carried out in this work. This heat exchanger exchanges heat between flue gas from the fuel oil combustion and cold water. The heat exchanger is composed of a spiral finned tube bank having 3 rows and 8 tubes per row with a staggered arrangement. The fin spacings considered are 2.85 and 6.10 mm. The theories of thermodynamics and heat transfer are used for analyzing the performance of this system.In this experiment, the flue gas temperature of 200ºC from combustion having 0.35 kg/s mass flow rate flows along outside surface of the heat exchanger and transfers heat to the 25ºC cooling water having 0.15 kg/s mass flow rate flowing in the tube side. Each experiment uses 750 hr for testing. During the testing, part of flue gas condenses on the heat transfer surface.From the experiment, it was found that the heat transfer rate of both heat exchangers tended to decrease with time while the airside pressure drop increased. These results come from the fouling on the heat transfer surface. Moreover, it is found that the heat exchanger having 2.85 mm fin spacing has an approximately 4 times higher fouling resistance than that of the 6.10 mm fin spacing.In this work a model for calculating the fouling resistance is also developed as a the function of time. The model is developed from that of Kern and Seaton and the mean deviation of the model is 0.789.

  12. Impact of Heavy Metal Contamination From Coal Flue Gas on Microalgae Biofuel and Biogas Production Through Multiple Conversation Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Derek E.

    2016-01-01

    Large scale biofuel production from microalgae is expected to be integrated with point source CO2 sources, such as coal fired power plants. Flue gas (CO2) integration represents a required nutrient source for accelerated growth while concurrently providing an environmental service. Heavy metals inherent in coal will ultimately be introduced into the culture system. The introduced heavy metals have the potential to bind to microalgae cells, impact growth due to toxicity, and negatively impact ...

  13. Design of CO2 absorption plant for recovery of CO2 from flue gases of gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mofarahi, Masoud; Khojasteh, Yaser; Khaledi, Hiwa; Farahnak, Arsalan

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing human-induced emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) threatens to change the earth's climate. A major factor in global warming is CO 2 emission from thermal power plants, which burn fossil fuels. One possible way of decreasing CO 2 emissions is to apply CO 2 removal, which involves recovering of CO 2 from energy conversion processes. This study is focused on recovery of CO 2 from gas turbine exhaust of Sarkhun gas refinery power station. The purpose of this study is to recover the CO 2 with minimum energy requirement. Many of CO 2 recovery processes from flue gases have been studied. Among all CO 2 recovery processes which were studied, absorption process was selected as the optimum one, due to low CO 2 concentration in flue gas. The design parameters considered in this regard, are: selection of suitable solvent, solvent concentration, solvent circulation rate, reboiler and condenser duty and number of stages in absorber and stripper columns. In the design of this unit, amine solvent such as, diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and monoethanolamine (MEA) were considered and the effect of main parameters on the absorption and stripping columns is presented. Some results with simultaneous changing of the design variables have been obtained. The results show that DGA is the best solvent with minimum energy requirement for recovery of CO 2 from flue gases at atmospheric pressure. (author)

  14. Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolinsky, F.T.; Ross, J.; Dennis, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO 2 will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO 2 is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. Pilot-scale multistage membrane process for the separation of CO2 from LNG-fired flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Seung Hak

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a multistage pilot-scale membrane plant was constructed and operated for the separation of CO2 from Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)-fired boiler flue gas of 1000 Nm3/day. The target purity and recovery of CO2 were 99 vol.% and 90%, respectively. For this purpose, asymmetric polyethersulfone (PES) hollow fibers membranes has been developed in our previous work and has evaluated the effects of operating pressure and feed concentration of CO2 on separation performance. The operating and permeation data obtained were also analyzed in relation with the numerical simulation data using countercurrent flow model. Based on these results, in this study, four-staged membrane process including dehumidification process has been designed, installed, and operated to demonstrate the feasibility of multistage membrane systems for removing CO2 from flue gases. The operation results using this plant were compared to the numerical simulation results on multistage membrane process. The experimental results matched well with the numerical simulation data. The concentration and the recovery of CO2 in the permeate stream of final stage were ranged from 95-99 vol.% and 70-95%, respectively, depending on the operating conditions. This study demonstrated the applicability of the membrane-based pilot plant for CO2 recovery from flue gas. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcium and organic matter removal by carbonation process with waste incineration flue gas towards improvement of leachate biotreatment performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Xuedong; Wu, Liang; Li, Qingtao; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren

    2017-09-01

    Municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) flue gas was employed as the carbon source for in-situ calcium removal from MSWI leachate. Calcium removal efficiency was 95-97% with pH of 10.0-11.0 over 100min of flue gas aeration, with both bound Ca and free Ca being removed effectively. The fluorescence intensity of tryptophan, protein-like and humic acid-like compounds increased after carbonation process. The decrease of bound Ca with the increase of precipitate indicated that calcium was mainly converted to calcium carbonate precipitate. It suggested that the interaction between dissolved organic matter and Ca 2+ was weakened. Moreover, 10-16% of chemical oxygen demand removal and the decrease of ultraviolet absorption at 254nm indicated that some organics, especially aromatic compound decreased via adsorption onto the surface of calcium carbonate. The results indicate that introduce of waste incineration flue gas could be a feasible way for calcium removal from leachate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomass gasification chars for mercury capture from a simulated flue gas of coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Cuesta, A; Diaz-Somoano, M; Lopez-Anton, M A; Cieplik, M; Fierro, J L G; Martínez-Tarazona, M R

    2012-05-15

    The combustion of coal can result in trace elements, such as mercury, being released from power stations with potentially harmful effects for both human health and the environment. Research is ongoing to develop cost-effective and efficient control technologies for mercury removal from coal-fired power plants, the largest source of anthropogenic mercury emissions. A number of activated carbon sorbents have been demonstrated to be effective for mercury retention in coal combustion power plants. However, more economic alternatives need to be developed. Raw biomass gasification chars could serve as low-cost sorbents for capturing mercury since they are sub-products generated during a thermal conversion process. The aim of this study was to evaluate different biomass gasification chars as mercury sorbents in a simulated coal combustion flue gas. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercial activated carbon. Chars from a mixture of paper and plastic waste showed the highest retention capacity. It was found that not only a high carbon content and a well developed microporosity but also a high chlorine content and a high aluminium content improved the mercury retention capacity of biomass gasification chars. No relationship could be inferred between the surface oxygen functional groups and mercury retention in the char samples evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of carbonate rocks for flue gas desulfurization: Reactive dissolution of limestone particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasio, Cataldo De; Mäkilä, Ermei; Westerlund, Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks, such as limestone, are widely utilized in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes because of their ability to form sulfur compounds. The most common system adopted for FGD is the wet scrubbing process, in which the dissolution rate of sedimentary rocks represents one of the most important factors. Evaluation of the dissolution and the reactivity of solid particles involved is therefore a key factor for FGD process design and plant operation. The rate of dissolution affects the cost of makeup and waste disposal. For this reason a method to test different qualities of raw materials can give us a better understanding of the desulfurization process and reasonable economical effects. In the present work the dissolution of carbonate rocks was investigated by utilizing hydrochloric acid and the mass transport phenomena involved in batch stirred tank reactors (BSTRs) were modeled. By evaluating the ratio of convective to diffusive mass transport and the ratio of momentum and mass diffusivity, it was possible to relate the quality of raw materials in terms of a defined Time Of Exposure (TOE). The model involved takes into account the variation of the particle size distribution derived from the allocation of the scattered light energy using the Fraunhofer diffraction theory. Improvements from previous studies were done .

  19. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO(4), which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1)) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3) ha(-1)). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total dissolved salts (TDS) in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1) and water was supplied at 1200 m(3)·ha(-1). Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage.

  20. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    Full Text Available The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD is CaSO(4, which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1 and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3 ha(-1. The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP, pH and total dissolved salts (TDS in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1 and water was supplied at 1200 m(3·ha(-1. Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage.

  1. FGD [flue gas desulfurization] gypsum in the United Germany: Trends of demand and supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, V.

    1991-01-01

    1990 was the first year in which all flue gas desulfurization (FGD) units in West Germany suplied the gypsum industry in Germany and some other European countries with FGD-gypsum. The effect on the gypsum market was not as significant as anticipated, mainly due to wrong estimates based on the most conservative conditions assumed by the power stations in their applications for permission. These estimates generally assumed high sulfur coal at full load throughout the year, whereas most West German boilers fire low sulfur coal and run only at peak times, resulting in much less FGD gypsum on the market than the German gypsum industry had been prepared to use. The unification of Germany has changed the situation of the gypsum industry dramatically. Reserves of natural gypsum in the middle of Germany are now much more accessible, and a great number of lignite-fired power stations must be fitted with FGD equipment as soon as possible. At the same time, the market for gypsum building products will improve dramatically due to the poor condition of many buildings in east Germany, which will require rehabilitation. These circumstances imply a bright future for both natural and FGD-based gypsum in Germany. 8 refs., 5 figs

  2. Regenerable sorbents for mercury capture in simulated coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Jorge; López-Antón, M Antonia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; García, Roberto; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2013-09-15

    This work demonstrates that regenerable sorbents containing nano-particles of gold dispersed on an activated carbon are efficient and long-life materials for capturing mercury species from coal combustion flue gases. These sorbents can be used in such a way that the high investment entailed in their preparation will be compensated for by the recovery of all valuable materials. The characteristics of the support and dispersion of gold in the carbon surface influence the efficiency and lifetime of the sorbents. The main factor that determines the retention of mercury and the regeneration of the sorbent is the presence of reactive gases that enhance mercury retention capacity. The capture of mercury is a consequence of two mechanisms: (i) the retention of elemental mercury by amalgamation with gold and (ii) the retention of oxidized mercury on the activated carbon support. These sorbents were specifically designed for retaining the mercury remaining in gas phase after the desulfurization units in coal power plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. UV-Enhanced NaClO Oxidation of Nitric Oxide from Simulated Flue Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-long Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wet de-NOx technique based on an UV-enhanced NaClO oxidation process was investigated for simulated flue gas of a diesel engine using a bench-scale reaction chamber. The effects of UV irradiation time, initial pH value, and available chlorine concentration of NaClO solution were studied, respectively. The results showed that when the UV irradiation time was 17.5 min and the initial pH value of NaClO solution was 6, NO removal efficiency of UV/NaClO solution was increased by 19.6% compared with that of NaClO solution. Meanwhile, when the available chlorine concentration of NaClO solution decreased from 0.1 wt% to 0.05 wt%, the enhancement in NO removal efficiency of UV/NaClO solution increased from 19.6% to 24%, compared with that of NaClO solution. The reaction pathways of NaClO solution photolysis and NO removal by UV/NaClO process were preliminarily discussed. The results suggested that HOCl might be the most active species that released many UV-induced photooxidants through photolysis reactions, which played an important role in NO removal process.

  4. LIFAC flue gas desulfurization process an alternative SO{sub 2} control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, J.G. [Tampella Power Corp., Atlanta, GA (United States); Vilala, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the results from two recently completed LIFAC flue gas desulfurization plants - 300 MW Shand lignite powered station owned by Saskatchewan Power Corporation and 60 MW Whitewater Valley high sulfur coal fired station owned by Richmond Powerand Light. LIFACis a dry FGD process in which limestone is injected into the upper regions of the boiler furnace and an activation reactor is used to humidify the unreacted limestone to achieve additional sulfur capture. The performance in both plants indicates that 70 to 80% sulfur is removed at a Ca/S ratio of 2. Cost performance data from these plants has shown that LI FAC both on construction cost and $/ton SO{sub 2} removed basis is very cost competitive compared to other SO{sub 2} control technologies. The Richmond plant has been realized under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program. The Shand plant is the first commercial installation in North America. The paper also discusses highlights of operating and maintenance experience, availability and handling of the solid waste product.

  5. Dynamic simulation model of a coal thermoelectric plant with a flue gas desulphurisation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio Caselles-Moncho; Liliana Ferrandiz-Serrano; Eduardo Peris-Mora [Universitat de Valencia, Burjassot (Spain). Departament de Matematica Aplicada

    2006-12-15

    In this paper a Dynamic Simulation Model has been used to present the likely responses of the electricity industries' latest perturbations such as: changes in environmental regulations, international fuel market evolution, restriction on fuel supply and increase on fuel prices, liberalisation of the European electricity market, and the results of applying energy policies and official tools such as taxes and emission allowances. The case study refers to the Teruel Power Plant, built after the 1970s oil crisis to ensure Spain's electricity supply, burning domestically produced coal in order to ensure local mining activity. The Teruel Power Plant has made relevant investments in order to meet emission limits, such as a flue gas desulphurisation plant. The economic viability of the power stations has to be analysed after environmental costs have been internalised. A system is defined that studies the coal-firing electric power plant selling energy to the free electricity market, whenever the generation cost is competitive. A Dynamic Simulation Model would appear to be an accurate tool to optimise power station management within different frameworks. 82 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs., 2 apps.

  6. Dynamic simulation model of a coal thermoelectric plant with a flue gas desulphurisation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caselles-Moncho, Antonio [Departament de Matematica Aplicada, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)]. E-mail: Antonio.Caselles@uv.es; Ferrandiz-Serrano, Liliana [Departamento de Ingenieria de la Construccion, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Peris-Mora, Eduardo [Departamento de Ingenieria de la Construccion, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    In this paper a Dynamic Simulation Model has been used to present the likely responses of the electricity industries' latest perturbations such as: changes in environmental regulations, international fuel market evolution, restriction on fuel supply and increase on fuel prices, liberalisation of the European Electricity Market, and the results of applying energy policies and official tools such as taxes and emission allowances. The case under study refers to the Teruel Power Plant, built after the 1970s oil crisis to ensure national electricity supply; burning domestically produced coal in order to ensure local mining activity. The Teruel Power Plant has made relevant investments in order to meet emission limits, such as a Flue Gas Desulphurisation Plant. The economic viability of the power stations has to be analysed after environmental costs have been internalised. A system is defined that studies the coal-firing Electric Power Plant selling energy to the free electricity market, whenever the generation cost is competitive. A Dynamic Simulation Model would appear to be an accurate tool to optimise power station management within different frameworks.

  7. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, January 1992--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Bush, P.V.

    1992-04-27

    This project is divided into four tasks. The Management Plan was developed in task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. This phase of the project is now complete. During the past quarter, initial preparations of laboratory equipment for laboratory testing have been made. A plan for initial laboratory tests has been submitted to the Project Manager for review. Laboratory testing will commence once these laboratory plans have been formally approved. The results of the work performed under task 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under task 4.

  8. Dual Alkali Solvent System for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, H Paul; Liao, Chang-Yu; Zhao, Xinglei; Hsiung, Tung-Li; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2017-08-01

    A novel two-aqueous-phase CO 2 capture system, namely the dual alkali solvent (DAS) system, has been developed. Unlike traditional solvent-based CO 2 capture systems in which the same solvent is used for both CO 2 absorption and stripping, the solvent of the DAS system consists of two aqueous phases. The upper phase, which contains an organic alkali 1-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine (HEP), is used for CO 2 absorption. The lower phase, which consists of a mixture of K 2 CO 3 /KHCO 3 aqueous solution and KHCO 3 precipitate, is used for CO 2 stripping. Only a certain kind of amine (such as HEP) is able to ensure the phase separation, satisfactory absorption efficiency, effective CO 2 transfer from the upper phase to the lower phase, and regeneration of the upper phase. In the meantime, due to the presence of K 2 CO 3 /KHCO 3 in the lower phase, HEP in the upper phase is capable of being regenerated from its sulfite/sulfate heat stable salt, which enables the simultaneous absorption of CO 2 and SO 2 /SO 3 from the flue gas. Preliminary experiments and simulations indicate that the implementation of the DAS system can lead to 24.0% stripping energy savings compared to the Econamine process, without significantly lowering the CO 2 absorption efficiency (∼90%).

  9. Dynamic simulation model of a coal thermoelectric plant with a flue gas desulphurisation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caselles-Moncho, Antonio; Ferrandiz-Serrano, Liliana; Peris-Mora, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a Dynamic Simulation Model has been used to present the likely responses of the electricity industries' latest perturbations such as: changes in environmental regulations, international fuel market evolution, restriction on fuel supply and increase on fuel prices, liberalisation of the European Electricity Market, and the results of applying energy policies and official tools such as taxes and emission allowances. The case under study refers to the Teruel Power Plant, built after the 1970s oil crisis to ensure national electricity supply; burning domestically produced coal in order to ensure local mining activity. The Teruel Power Plant has made relevant investments in order to meet emission limits, such as a Flue Gas Desulphurisation Plant. The economic viability of the power stations has to be analysed after environmental costs have been internalised. A system is defined that studies the coal-firing Electric Power Plant selling energy to the free electricity market, whenever the generation cost is competitive. A Dynamic Simulation Model would appear to be an accurate tool to optimise power station management within different frameworks

  10. Flue gas emissions from gas-fired cogeneration units <25 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.; Wit, J. de

    1997-01-01

    A total of 900 MW e gas driven combined heat and power (CHP) has now been established in Denmark based on gas engines and gas turbine units less than 25 MW e each. Of the 900 MW e approx. 750 MW e are based on gas engines. Biogas is used as fuel for some 32 MW e of these. Emission limits for NO x and CO are 650 mg/nm 3 (ref. 5% O 2 and electrical efficiency 30% LCV). There is at present no limit for unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) for gas engines or gas turbines. The average emission of unburned hydrocarbons for the Danish gas engine driven CHP units is equal to approx. 3,5% of the fuel used. It is the target of this report to provide the basis for evaluating the planned UHC limit and possible adjustments of the present limit for NO x emission. The average NO x emission from gas turbines slightly exceeds the NO x emission from gas engines. This is due to a number of older gas turbines. Modern gas turbines can achieve significantly lower NO x emission compared to engines. The NO x emission from biogas driven engines is significantly higher than that of natural gas driven units. This is mainly due to NO x -unfavourable engine settings and the use of older units, as there are no legislation concerning NO x emission for the majority of these biogas driven units. The emission of CO and UHC is lower from gas turbines than from gas engines. The NO x emission can be reduced by SCR Catalyst systems. In Denmark 3 gas engine installations use this commercially available technology. Oxidation catalyst for UHC reduction at modern gas engine installations has proven relatively unsuccesful in Denmark until now. Only limited reductions are achieved and many catalysts are toxificated in less than 100 hours of operation. However, long-term field testing of promising UHC reducing catalysts is now being made. UHC reduction by incineration is at the prototype stage. No such plant has yet been set up in Denmark. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Device for selective fly ash elimination and sorptive means for volatile components of flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastrup, N.E.

    1980-09-17

    Fly ash and volatile components are eliminated from flue gases by means of a sorbent placed in a spray-dryer connected between two series-parallel filter sections. As sorbent there is used CaO solution.

  12. Wettability determination by contact angle measurements: hvbB coal-water system with injection of synthetic flue gas and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojai Kaveh, Narjes; Rudolph, E Susanne J; Wolf, Karl-Heinz A A; Ashrafizadeh, Seyed Nezameddin

    2011-12-01

    Geological sequestration of pure carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in coal is one of the methods to sequester CO(2). In addition, injection of CO(2) or flue gas into coal enhances coal bed methane production (ECBM). The success of this combined process depends strongly on the wetting behavior of the coal, which is function of coal rank, ash content, heterogeneity of the coal surface, pressure, temperature and composition of the gas. The wetting behavior can be evaluated from the contact angle of a gas bubble, CO(2) or flue gas, on a coal surface. In this study, contact angles of a synthetic flue gas, i.e. a 80/20 (mol%) N(2)/CO(2) mixture, and pure CO(2) on a Warndt Luisenthal (WL) coal have been determined using a modified pendant drop cell in a pressure range from atmospheric to 16 MPa and a constant temperature of 318 K. It was found that the contact angles of flue gas on WL coal were generally smaller than those of CO(2). The contact angle of CO(2) changes from water-wet to gas-wet by increasing pressure above 8.5 MPa while the one for the flue gas changes from water-wet to intermediate-wet by increasing pressure above 10 MPa. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Next Generation Pressurized Oxy-Coal Combustion: High Efficiency and No Flue Gas Recirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David

    2013-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has developed a pressurized oxy-coal fired molten bed boiler (MBB) concept, in which coal and oxygen are fired directly into a bed of molten coal slag through burners located on the bottom of the boiler and fired upward. Circulation of heat by the molten slag eliminates the need for a flue gas recirculation loop and provides excellent heat transfer to steam tubes in the boiler walls. Advantages of the MBB technology over other boilers include higher efficiency (from eliminating flue gas recirculation), a smaller and less expensive boiler, modular design leading to direct scalability, decreased fines carryover and handling costs, smaller exhaust duct size, and smaller emissions control equipment sizes. The objective of this project was to conduct techno-economic analyses and an engineering design of the MBB project and to support this work with thermodynamic analyses and oxy-coal burner testing. Techno-economic analyses of GTI’s pressurized oxy-coal fired MBB technology found that the overall plant with compressed CO2 has an efficiency of 31.6%. This is a significant increase over calculated 29.2% efficiency of first generation oxy-coal plants. Cost of electricity (COE) for the pressurized MBB supercritical steam power plant with CO2 capture and compression was calculated to be 134% of the COE for an air-coal supercritical steam power plant with no CO2 capture. This compares positively with a calculated COE for first generation oxy-coal supercritical steam power plants with CO2 capture and compression of 164%. The COE for the MBB power plant is found to meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) target of 135%, before any plant optimization. The MBB power plant was also determined to be simpler than other oxy-coal power plants with a 17% lower capital cost. No other known combustion technology can produce higher efficiencies or lower COE when CO2 capture and compression are included. A thermodynamic enthalpy and exergy analysis

  14. Facile synthesis of triazine-triphenylamine-based microporous covalent polymer adsorbent for flue gas CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2017-07-17

    The sustainable capture and sequestration of CO2 from flue gas emission is an important and unavoidable challenge to control greenhouse gas release and climate change. In this report, we describe a triazine-triphenylamine-based microporous covalent organic polymer under mild synthetic conditions. 13C and 15N solid-state NMR and FTIR analyses confirm the linkage of the triazine and triphenylamine components in the porous polymer skeleton. The material is composed of spherical particles 1.0 to 2.0 μm in size and possesses a high surface area (1104 m2/g). The material exhibits superb chemical robustness under acidic and basic conditions and high thermal stability. Single-component gas adsorption exhibits an enhanced CO2 uptake of 3.12 mmol/g coupled with high sorption selectivity for CO2/N2 of 64 at 273 K and 1 bar, whereas the binary gas mixture breakthrough study using a model flue gas composition at 298 K shows a high CO2/N2 selectivity of 58. The enhanced performance is attributed to the high Lewis basicity of the framework, as it favors the interaction with CO2.

  15. Advanced and clean gasification of solid wastes by downstream hot flue gas cleaning with high temperature filters and catalytic beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Univ. Complutense of Madrid (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    Thermochemical gasification of solid wastes has two main advantages over their incineration: a lesser flow rate of exit /stack gas is produced, smaller gas cleaning devices are thus required, and no formation of dioxins/furans, because of the reducing gas atmosphere. Nevertheless, at least two other problems remain to be solved: the destruction or elimination of the halogenated tars produced, and the removal of the heavy metals from the flue gas. Two small pilot plants are being used at University of Madrid to study and solve these problems. They are based on a bubbling fluidized bed gasifier and on a riser type gasifier. They have a continuous feeding of waste (1-4 kg/h) and downstream vessels for high temperature gas cleaning with filters and catalysts. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Summary of INCO corrosion tests in power plant flue gas scrubbing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxie, E.C.; Tuffnell, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion tests in a number of flue-gas desulfurization units have shown that carbon steel, low alloy steels, and Type 304L stainless steel are inadequate in the wet portions of the scrubbers. Type 316L stainless steel is sometimes subject to localized corrosive attack in scrubber environments with certain combinations of pH and chloride content. A corollary is that corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel might be controlled by control of scrubbing media pH and chloride content. Although an attempt was made to correlate the pitting and crevice corrosion obtained on the Type 316 stainless steel test samples with chloride and pH measurements, relatively wide scatter in the data indicated only a modest correlation. This is attributed to variations in local conditions, especially beneath deposits, that differ from the liquor samples obtained for analysis, to processing upsets, to temperature differences, and to some extent to inaccuracies in measurement of pH and chloride levels. The data do show, however, that molybdenum as an alloying element in stainless steels and high nickel alloys was very beneficial in conferring resistance to localized attack in scrubber environments. High nickel alloys containing appreciable amounts of molybdenum such as Hastelloy alloy C-276 and Inconel alloy 625 can be used for critical components. Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steels has generally not been a problem in FGD scrubbers, apparently because operating temperatures are comparatively low. An exception is reheater tubing where some failures have occurred because of elevated temperatures in conjunction with condensate that forms during shut-down periods or carryover of chloride laden mist from the scrubber. This problem can be overcome by proper alloy selection or maintaining dry conditions

  17. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  18. Mercury removal from MSW incineration flue gas by mineral-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumayor, M; Svoboda, K; Švehla, J; Pohořelý, M; Šyc, M

    2018-03-01

    Three samples of commercially available mineral-based sorbents (zeolite, bentonite and diatomaceous earth) were selected and evaluated for Hg capture under conditions of simulated dry flue gas atmosphere typical in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI). The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fixed-bed device at temperatures between 120 and 200 °C. Two samples of activated carbons (AC) (raw-AC and sulphur impregnated AC) were tested under the same conditions. The mineral-based sorbents were chemically promoted by sulphur, FeCl 3 and CaBr 2 , achieving an improvement in the overall reduction percentage of Hg 0 out (g) up to 85%, which was comparable to that obtained using a commercial activated carbon for Hg capture (sulphur impregnated AC). The study demonstrates that sorbents with a matrix relatively richer in TiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 , as bentonite, favour Hg heterogeneous oxidation. The best Hg capture capacity was achieved with a zeolite sorbent sample characterized by high specific surface (132 m 2 /g) and impregnated with elemental sulphur. The final form of mercury retained in this sorbent was HgS with proved long-term stability in disposal and landfilling. The higher the temperature, the lower the efficiency of Hg capture being the optimum temperature for Hg-capture in the range of 120-150 °C. This study provides a basis for the development of new efficient non-carbon sorbents for mercury removal in the air pollution control lines of MSWI facilities considering the non-hazardous final form of mercury and its long-term landfilling/sequestration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create several types of by-products. This project focused primarily on by-product materials obtained from what are commonly called ''dry scrubbers'' which produce a dry, solid material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Prior to this project, dry FGD by-products were generally treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing; The major objective of this project was to develop beneficial uses, via recycling, capable of providing economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD by-product. It is equally important, however, that the environmental impacts be carefully assessed so that the new uses developed are not only technically feasible but socially acceptable. Specific objectives developed for this project were derived over an 18-month period during extensive discussions with personnel from industry, regulatory agencies and research institutions. These were stated as follows: Objective 1: To characterize the material generated by dry FGD processes. Objective 2: To demonstrate the utilization of dry FGD by-product as a soil amendment on agricultural lands and on abandoned and active surface coal mines in Ohio. Objective 3: To demonstrate the use of dry FGD by-product as an engineering material for soil stabilization. Objective 4: To determine the quantities of dry FGD by-product that can be utilized in each of these applications. Objective 5. To determine the environmental and economic impacts of utilizing the material. Objective 6. To calibrate environmental, engineering, and economic models that can be used to determine the applicability and costs of utilizing these processes at other sites.

  20. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2

  1. Technoeconomic Optimization of Waste Heat Driven Forward Osmosis for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingerich, Daniel B [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bartholomew, Timothy V [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-06-26

    With the Environmental Protection Agency’s recent Effluent Limitation Guidelines for Steam Electric Generators, power plants are having to install and operate new wastewater technologies. Many plants are evaluating desalination technologies as possible compliance options. However, the desalination technologies under review that can reduce wastewater volume or treat to a zero-liquid discharges standard have a significant energy penalty to the plant. Waste heat, available from the exhaust gas or cooling water from coal-fired power plants, offers an opportunity to drive wastewater treatment using thermal desalination technologies. One such technology is forward osmosis (FO). Forward osmosis utilizes an osmotic pressure gradient to passively pull water from a saline or wastewater stream across a semi-permeable membrane and into a more concentrated draw solution. This diluted draw solution is then fed into a distillation column, where the addition of low temperature waste heat can drive the separation to produce a reconcentrated draw solution and treated water for internal plant reuse. The use of low-temperature waste heat decouples water treatment from electricity production and eliminates the link between reducing water pollution and increasing air emissions from auxiliary electricity generation. In order to evaluate the feasibility of waste heat driven FO, we first build a model of an FO system for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatment at coal-fired power plants. This model includes the FO membrane module, the distillation column for draw solution recovery, and waste heat recovery from the exhaust gas. We then add a costing model to account for capital and operating costs of the forward osmosis system. We use this techno-economic model to optimize waste heat driven FO for the treatment of FGD wastewater. We apply this model to three case studies: the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) 550 MW model coal fired power plant without carbon

  2. Integrating Waste Heat from CO2 Removal and Coal-Fired Flue Gas to Increase Plant Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvin, Nick [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States); Kowalczyk, Joseph [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In project DE-FE0007525, Southern Company Services demonstrated heat integration methods for the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide produced from pulverized coal combustion. A waste heat recovery technology (termed High Efficiency System) from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America was integrated into an existing 25-MW amine-based CO2 capture process (Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process®1) at Southern Company’s Plant Barry to evaluate improvements in the energy performance of the pulverized coal plant and CO2 capture process. The heat integration system consists of two primary pieces of equipment: (1) the CO2 Cooler which uses product CO2 gas from the capture process to heat boiler condensate, and (2) the Flue Gas Cooler which uses air heater outlet flue gas to further heat boiler condensate. Both pieces of equipment were included in the pilot system. The pilot CO2 Cooler used waste heat from the 25-MW CO2 capture plant (but not always from product CO2 gas, as intended). The pilot Flue Gas Cooler used heat from a slipstream of flue gas taken from downstream of Plant Barry’s air heater. The pilot also included a 0.25-MW electrostatic precipitator. The 25-MW High Efficiency System operated for approximately six weeks over a four month time period in conjunction with the 25-MW CO2 capture facility at Plant Barry. Results from the program were used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of full-scale implementation of this technology. The test program quantified energy efficiency improvements to a host power plant that could be realized due to the High Efficiency System. Through the execution of this project, the team verified the integrated operation of the High Efficiency System and Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process®. The ancillary benefits of the High Efficiency System were also quantified, including reduced water consumption

  3. Evaluating the potential of CNT-supported Co catalyst used for gas pollution removal in the incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chi-Yuan; Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Chuang, Kui-Hao; Kuo, Jia-Hong

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated the use of Cu/Al(2)O(3), Co/Al(2)O(3), Fe/Al(2)O(3), and Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). These CNTs were used as support for Co catalyst preparation and Co/CNT catalysts were applied to a catalytic reaction to remove BTEX, PAHs, SO(2), NO, and CO simultaneously in a pilot-scale incineration system. The analyzed results of EDS and XRD showed low metal content and good dispersion characteristics of the Al(2)O(3)-supported catalysts by excess-solution impregnation. FESEM analyzed results showed that the CNTs that were synthesized from Co, Fe, and Ni catalysts had a diameter of 20nm, whereas those synthesized from Cu/Al(2)O(3) had a diameter of 50nm. Pilot-scale test results demonstrated that the Co/CNT catalyst effectively removed air pollutants in the catalytic reaction and that there was no obvious deactivation by Pb, water vapor, and coke deposited in the process. The thermal stabilization at 250 degrees C and hydrophobicity properties of CNTs enhanced the application of CNT catalysts in flue gas.

  4. Study on the Removal of SO2 from Simulated Flue Gas Using Dry Calcium-Spray with DBD Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Chengwu; Wu Chundu; Chen Zhigang; Ou Hongxiang; Shao Xuejun

    2008-01-01

    In this study, lime-hydrate (Ca(OH) 2 ) desulfurizer was treated by plasma with strong ionization discharge of a dielectric barrier. The removal of SO 2 from simulated flue gas was investigated. The principles of SO 2 removal are discussed. Several factors affecting the efficiency of SO 2 removal were studied. They included the ratio of calcium to sulfur (Ca/S), desulfurizer granularity, residence time of the flue gas, voltage applied to the discharge electrode in the plasma generator, and energy consumption. Experimental results indicate that the increase in Ca/S ratio, the applied voltage and discharge power, the residence time, and the reduction in the desulfurizer granularity all can raise the SO 2 removal efficiency. The SO 2 removal efficiency was up to 91.3% under the following conditions, namely a primary concentration of SO2 of 2262 x 10 -6 (v/v) in the emission gas, 21%(v/v) of oxygen, 1.8% (v/v) of water, a Ca/S ratio of 1.48, a residence time of 2.8 s, a 3.4 kV voltage and a 10 kHz frequency power applied to the discharge electrodes in the plasma generator, and a flow rate of 100 m 3 /h for emission gas.

  5. Thermo Dynamics and Economics Evaluations: Substitution of the Extraction Steam with the Wasted Heat of Flue Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lifen; Qiu, Lixia; Li, Jinping; Li, Dongxiong

    2018-01-01

    A new heat supplying system is proposed that utilizes the exhausted gas of the boiler to substitute the extraction steam from the turbine as the driving force for the adsorption heat pump regarding the recovery of the condensation heat of power plant. However, our system is not subject to the low efficiency of wasted heat utilization due to the low temperature of flue gas, which hence possesses higher performance in COP factors in the utilization of heat than that of the conventional techniques of using flues gas, so the amount of extracted gas from turbine can be reduced and the power generate rate be enhanced. Subsequently, detailed evaluation of the performance of this system in the point of views of thermodynamics and economics are presented in this work. For the instance of a 330 MW heat supply unit, 5 sample cities are chosen to demonstrate and confirm our economic analysis. It is revealed that when the heating coefficient of the heat pump is 1.8, the investment payback periods for these 5 cities are within the range of 2.4 to 4.8 years, which are far below the service year of the heat pump, demonstrating remarkable economic benefits for our system.

  6. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

  7. Electrospun cerium-based TiO2 nanofibers for photocatalytic oxidation of elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lulu; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying

    2017-10-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation is an attractive method for Hg-rich flue gas treatment. In the present study, a novel cerium-based TiO 2 nanofibers was prepared and selected as the catalyst to remove mercury in flue gas. Accordingly, physical/chemical properties of those nanofibers were clarified. The effects of some important parameters, such as calcination temperature, cerium dopant content and different illumination conditions on the removal of Hg 0 using the photocatalysis process were investigated. In addition, the removal mechanism of Hg 0 over cerium-based TiO 2 nanofibers focused on UV irradiation was proposed. The results show that catalyst which was calcined at 400 °C exhibited better performance. The addition of 0.3 wt% Ce into TiO 2 led to the highest removal efficiency at 91% under UV irradiation. As-prepared samples showed promising stability for long-term use in the test. However, the photoluminescence intensity of nanofibers incorporating ceria was significantly lower than TiO 2 , which was attributed to better photoelectron-hole separation. Although UV and O 2 are essential factors, the enhancement of Hg 0 removal is more obviously related to the participation of catalyst. The coexistence of Ce 3+ and Ce 4+ , which leads to the efficient oxidation of Hg 0 , was detected on samples. Hg 2+ is the final product in the reaction of Hg 0 removal. As a consequence, the emissions of Hg 0 from flue gas can be significantly suppressed. These indicate that combining photocatalysis technology with cerium-based TiO 2 nanofibers is a promising strategy for reducing Hg 0 efficiently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Flue Gas Purification during Hot Gas Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thulfaut, C.; Renz, U.

    2002-09-19

    The aim of the actual investigations is to integrate the catalytic reduction of carbon monoxide and particularly nitric oxides into the hot gas filtration process with ceramic filter elements of fluidized bed combustors which mainly represent an important N2O-source. According to Klein (Klein 1994) worldwide approx. 260 coal-fired power plants with fluidized bed combustors in the power range > 50 MWel existed in 1994, to which approx. 1% of the global coal dissipation corresponds. These emitted dinitrogen oxide with 70 kt/a, however, 20% of the entire N2O amounts from stationary firing plants. After Kleins calculations an increase of coal-fired fluidized bed combustors only by 10% triples the N2O emission.

  9. Decomposition of organochlorine compounds in flue gas from municipal solid waste incinerators using natural and activated acid clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Hee; Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature particle control (HTPC) using a ceramic filter is a dust collection method without inefficient cooling and reheating of flue gas treatment; thus, its use is expected to improve the energy recovery efficiency of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However there are concerns regarding de novo synthesis and a decrease in the adsorptive removal efficiency of dioxins (DXNs) at approximately 300 degrees C. In this study, the effect of natural and activated acid clays on the decomposition of monochlorobenzene (MCB), one of the organochlorine compounds in MSW flue gas, was investigated. From the results of MCB removal tests at 30-300 degrees C, the clays were classified as adsorption, decomposition, and low removal types. More than half of the clays (four kinds of natural acid clays and two kinds of activated acid clays) were of the decomposition type. In addition, the presence of Cl atoms detached from MCB was confirmed by washing the clay used in the MCB removal test at 300 degrees C. Activated acid clay was expected to have high dechlorination performance because of its proton-rich-composition, but only two clays were classed as decomposition type. Conversely, all the natural acid clays used in this work were of the decomposition type, which contained relatively higher di- and trivalent metal oxides such as Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and CaO. These metal oxides might contribute to the catalytic dechlorination of MCB at 300 degrees C. Therefore, natural and activated acid clays can be used as alternatives for activated carbon at 300 degrees C to remove organochloride compounds such as DXNs. Their utilization is expected to mitigate the latent risks related to the adoption of HTPC, and also to contribute to the improvement of energy recovery efficiency of MSWI. Implications: The effect of natural and activated acid clays on MCB decomposition was investigated to evaluate their suitability as materials for the removal of organochlorine compounds, such as

  10. Effects of foaming and antifoaming agents on the performance of a wet flue gas desulfurization pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Siqiang; Hansen, Brian Brun; Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Foaming is a common phenomenon in industrial processes, including wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants. A systemic investigation of the influence of two foaming agents, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and egg white albumin (protein), and two commercial antifoams on a wet FGD pilot plant...... transferring small particles to the foam layer present on top of the slurry in the holding tank. The addition of 0.03 g antifoams/(L slurry) to SDS foam eliminated the foam, but the desulfurization degree remained low. Potential mechanisms for the observed behavior are analyzed. (c) 2014 American Institute...

  11. Adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous fgd (flue gas desulfurization) systems. Final report Oct 78-Apr 79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meserole, F.B.; Lewis, D.L.; Nichols, A.W.; Rochelle, G.

    1979-09-01

    The report gives results of a field and laboratory study of the adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. (Adding adipic acid to limestone-based, SO2 wet scrubbers increases SO2 removal and limestone utilization. However, as much as 80% of the adipic acid added to some systems is lost, supposedly through degradation.) The degradation is associated with the oxidation of sulfite, possibly through a free radical mechanism. At least one mechanism is an oxidative decarboxylation yielding valeric acid, butyric acid, glutaric acid, and CO2. The quantities of products measured during laboratory testing only account for approximately 30% of the adipic acid degraded.

  12. Hydroquinone and Quinone-Grafted Porous Carbons for Highly Selective CO2 Capture from Flue Gases and Natural Gas Upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Krishna, Rajamani; Yang, Jiangfeng; Deng, Shuguang

    2015-08-04

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption isotherms were measured and correlated with the Langmuir model. An ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) selectivity for the CO2/N2 separation of 26.5 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the hydroquinone-grafted carbon, which is 58.7% higher than that of the pristine porous carbon, and a CO2/CH4 selectivity value of 4.6 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the quinone-grafted carbon (OAC-2), which represents a 28.4% improvement over the pristine porous carbon. The highest CO2 adsorption capacity on the oxygen-doped carbon adsorbents is 3.46 mmol g(-1) at 298 K and 1 atm. In addition, transient breakthrough simulations for CO2/CH4/N2 mixture separation were conducted to demonstrate the good separation performance of the oxygen-doped carbons in fixed bed adsorbers. Combining excellent adsorption separation properties and low heats of adsorption, the oxygen-doped carbons developed in this work appear to be very promising for flue gas treatment and natural gas upgrading.

  13. Degradation mechanisms of organic rubber and glass flake/vinyl ester linings in flue gas desulphurization plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R. [Allianz-Centre for Technology GmbH, Ismaning (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    In recent years, there have been reports in numerous publications about damage to rubber and glass flake coatings in flue gas desulphurization plants. The pattern of damage has been described and attempts have frequently been made to determine and explain the cause of the damage. Oxidation/hydrolytic changes were generally observed as the damage mechanisms. In addition, blistering occurs in both the chloroprene coatings in the absorbers and in the glass flake coatings in clean gas ducts. This blistering may be considered as the end of the useful life and leads to cost-intensive and time-intensive repair and restoration measures. The present state of knowledge suggests that the blistering is mainly due to osmotic processes preceded by permeation processes and with permeation processes superimposed on them. Among other things, the reports describe the permeation behaviour of water and other flue gas constituents; the blistering in chloroprene rubber coatings and glass flake coatings is explained by means of the knowledge gained. (au) 16 refs.

  14. Alkali deactivation of high-dust SCR catalysts used for NOx reduction exposed to flue gas from 100MW-scale biofuel and peat fired boilers. Influence of flue gas composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, AAsa; Andersson, Christer; Myringer, AAse; Eskilsson, David; Jaeraas, Sven G.

    2007-01-01

    Deactivation of vanadium-titanium deNO x SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalysts in high-dust position have been investigated in three 100MW-scale boilers during biofuel and peat combustion. The deactivation of the catalyst samples has been correlated to the corresponding flue gas composition in the boilers. To investigate the effect on catalyst deactivation a sulphate-containing additive was sprayed into one of the furnaces. Increased alkali content on the SCR catalyst samples decreased the catalytic deNO x activity. The study has shown a linear correlation between exposure time in the boilers and alkali concentration (mainly potassium) on the samples. The results imply that mainly alkali in ultra fine particles (<100nm) in the flue gas increased the alkali accumulation on the catalyst samples. Low correlation was found between particles larger than 100nm and the catalyst deactivation. It was not possible to decrease the deactivation of the catalyst samples by the sulphate-containing additive. Although the additive had an effect in sulphating potassium chloride to potassium sulphate, it did not decrease the amount of potassium in ultra fine particles or the deactivation of the catalyst samples. (author)

  15. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH TRANSITION METAL CONTENT AND FLUE GAS HCL/SO2 RATIO ON MERCURY SPECIATION IN WASTE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents results of research on the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2):HCI ratio on heterogeneous Hg0 oxidation. The addition of SO2 to moist flue gas at high SO2:HCI ratios (4:1 to 10:1) caused a decrease in oxidation of Hg0 relative to flur gas without SO2. This is attrib...

  16. Performance evaluation of a green process for microalgal CO2 sequestration in closed photobioreactor using flue gas generated in-situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Geetanjali; Karemore, Ankush; Dash, Sukanta Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, carbon-dioxide capture from in situ generated flue gas was carried out using Chlorella sp. in bubble column photobioreactors to develop a cost effective process for concomitant carbon sequestration and biomass production. Firstly, a comparative analysis of CO2 sequestration with varying concentrations of CO2 in air-CO2 and air-flue gas mixtures was performed. Chlorella sp. was found to be tolerant to 5% CO2 concentration. Subsequently, inhibitory effect of pure flue gas was minimized using various strategies like use of high initial cell density and photobioreactors in series. The final biofixation efficiency was improved by 54% using the adopted strategies. Further, sequestered microalgal biomass was analyzed for various biochemical constituents for their use in food, feed or biofuel applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Cycle Air Parameters and Flue Gas Path Aerodynamics on Efficiency of Gas Turbine and Steam Gas Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Grinchouk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an influence of gas-air path aerodynamic resistance for a gas-turbine plant, barometric pressure, air moisture and outside air temperature on parameters, efficiency and characteristics of electric power plants with gas-turbine and combined-cycle sets. Calculations and analysis have been executed for Alstom GT13E2 gas-turbine which is included in composition of Steam Gas Plant-230 at the Minsk Thermal Power Plant No.3.

  18. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regenerable cobalt oxide loaded magnetosphere catalyst from fly ash for mercury removal in coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianping; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2014-12-16

    To remove Hg(0) in coal combustion flue gas and eliminate secondary mercury pollution of the spent catalyst, a new regenerable magnetic catalyst based on cobalt oxide loaded magnetospheres from fly ash (Co-MF) was developed. The catalyst, with an optimal loading of 5.8% cobalt species, attained approximately 95% Hg(0) removal efficiency at 150 °C under simulated flue gas atmosphere. O2 could enhance the Hg(0) removal activity of magnetospheres catalyst via the Mars-Maessen mechanism. SO2 displayed an inhibitive effect on Hg(0) removal capacity. NO with lower concentration could promote the Hg(0) removal efficiency. However, when increasing the NO concentration to 300 ppm, a slightly inhibitive effect of NO was observed. In the presence of 10 ppm of HCl, greater than 95.5% Hg(0) removal efficiency was attained, which was attributed to the formation of active chlorine species on the surface. H2O presented a seriously inhibitive effect on Hg(0) removal efficiency. Repeated oxidation-regeneration cycles demonstrated that the spent Co-MF catalyst could be regenerated effectively via thermally treated at 400 °C for 2 h.

  20. Removal of elemental mercury from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate in a bubble column reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangxian; Wang, Qian

    2014-10-21

    In this article, a novel technique on removal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate ((NH4)(2)S(2)O(8)) has been developed for the first time. Some experiments were carried out in a bubble column reactor to evaluate the effects of process parameters on Hg(0) removal. The mechanism and kinetics of Hg(0) removal are also studied. The results show that the parameters, (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration, activation temperature and solution pH, have significant impacts on Hg(0) removal. The parameters, Hg(0), SO2 and NO concentration, only have small effects on Hg(0) removal. Hg(0) is removed by oxidations of (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8), sulfate and hydroxyl free radicals. When (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is more than 0.1 mol/L and solution pH is lower than 9.71, Hg(0) removal by thermally activated (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) meets a pseudo-first-order fast reaction with respect to Hg(0). However, when (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is less than 0.1 mol/L or solution pH is higher than 9.71, the removal process meets a moderate speed reaction with respect to Hg(0). The above results indicate that this technique is a feasible method for emission control of Hg(0) from flue gas.

  1. Experiences of membrane technique in flue gas condensate treatment applications; Utvaerdering av erfarenheter av membranteknik foer rening av roekgaskondensat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Barbara; Ekdahl, Emma; Hellman, Mats

    2009-07-01

    Investing in a flue gas condensate treatment plant often turns out to be very profitable. The profitability comes from savings in energy and water consumption when treated waste water is recirculated, and also from savings in the NO{sub x} fee as condensate treatment allows for higher ammonia injection rates in the SNCR (NO{sub x} reduction) system. The membrane based technologies for flue gas treatment, which were investigated in this report, have proven to be successful and are operating well. However, they require that the project management is committed and acquaint themselves with the technology to avoid problems during commissioning and operation. In this project, experience with membrane based flue gas condensate treatment at ten different plants was investigated and evaluated. The ten plants are either biomass fired plants or co-combustion plants using a mixture of biomass and industrial waste. Membrane based flue gas condensate treatment is used by circa ten Swedish plants (Ultra Filtration membranes and/or Reverse Osmosis membranes, and at some plants also membranes for ammonia and carbon dioxide removal). All plants are biomass fired plants or co-combustion plants using a mixture of biomass and industrial waste. In Sweden, no plant firing municipal waste has yet been equipped with membrane based flue gas condensate treatment. These plants usually use precipitation and filtration technologies instead. Also the purpose of the condensation step is primarily to operate as a wet flue gas cleaning step. The heat recovery is of subordinate importance. Typical for these plants is also that they use condensation in several steps. The condensates from the different steps are often treated separately, as they may be of very different qualities. The RO unit is the main equipment in a membrane based water treatment plant. Pre-treatment and post-treatment of the RO water is adjusted to the incoming condensate quality, and to the requirements on the effluent. The

  2. Long-time experience in catalytic flue gas cleaning and catalytic NO{sub x} reduction in biofueled boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, M. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    NO emissions are reduced by primary or secondary methods. Primary methods are based on NO reduction in the combustion zone and secondary methods on flue gas cleaning. The most effective NO reduction method is selective catalytic reduction (SCR). It is based on NO reduction by ammonia on the surface of a catalyst. Reaction products are water and nitrogen. A titanium-dioxide-based catalyst is very durable and selective in coal-fired power plants. It is not poisoned by sulphur dioxide and side reactions with ammonia and sulphur dioxide hardly occur. The long time experience and suitability of a titanium-dioxide-based catalyst for NO reduction in biofuel-fired power plants was studied. The biofuels were: peat, wood and bark. It was noticed that deactivation varied very much due to the type of fuel and content of alkalinities in fuel ash. The deactivation in peat firing was moderate, close to the deactivation noticed in coal firing. Wood firing generally had a greater deactivation effect than peat firing. Fuel and fly ash were analyzed to get more information on the flue gas properties. The accumulation of alkali and alkaline earth metals and sulphates was examined together with changes in the physical composition of the catalysts. In the cases where the deactivation was the greatest, the amount of alkali and alkaline earth metals in fuels and fly ashes and their accumulation were very significant. (author) (3 refs.)

  3. Incineration of animal by-products--The impact of selected parameters on the flux of flue gas enthalpy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Janusz; Sitarz, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents model analyses and tests of animal by-product waste thermal treatment plants. A schedule of tests was prepared, and 62,024 cases of system operation were analysed. A map/work field of the tested plant was drawn up on the basis thereof. Calculations were made following an algorithm described by Bujak (2015a) written in the VBA (Visual Basic for Application) language. The tests showed that when incinerating animal waste, the flux of physical enthalpy of the flue gas from the afterburner chamber depends on numerous design and operating parameters. The most important include the following: humidity and flux of the waste, concentration of oxygen in the flue gas in the afterburner chamber and loss of heat flux to the atmosphere through the external surfaces of the plant. Individual design and operating parameters can be selected so that the process of incineration is ensured without additional fuel. The performed analyses were verified against the actual object at the industrial scale using a meat plant that manufactures ham and processes beef, pork and poultry with a capacity of 150 tonnes/day. The production process waste included mainly bones and - in much smaller quantities - meat and bone meal, at 17 tonnes/day. The performed tests and analyses can be used to optimise the operation of the waste thermal treatment plant at the stages of design and operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolution and perspectives in waste incineration emissions and flue gas cleaning systems in the last 20 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giugliano, M.; Cernuschi, S.; Grosso, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the technology of waste combustion, energy recovery and flue gas treatment allows to redefine the role of the incineration plant as a basic component of integrated waste management systems. Starting with an overview of the evaluation of emission limits and of the new Best Available Techniques (BAT) approach, strongly recommended by the European Union, the paper reports an overview of the stack emission concentrations measured in recent plants in Italy compared to older ones, with special attention to the dioxin issue. Concerning this topic, it is demonstrated that BAT-equipped plants can act as actual dioxin destroyer rather than producers, even when all the fluxes released in the environment (gaseous, solid and liquid residues) are taken into account. The second part of the paper deals with the evolution of the flue gas control technologies of the last 20 years, pointing out the major trends and the future perspectives for further increases of the removal monitoring of conventional and trace pollutants are briefly described [it

  5. Online measurements of non-organic components in flue gas; Online-maetning av oorganiska komponenter i roekgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Fredrik; Claesson, Frida; Haraldsson, Conny

    2010-03-15

    In combined heat and power plants firing biomass and waste, the power efficiency is generally limited by the steam temperature, which in turn is restricted by the fouling and corrosion caused by alkali chlorides. Such alkali induced problems usually increase with both temperature and concentrations of alkali chlorides. This work investigates the prospect of reducing the concentrations of alkali and zinc chlorides in the flue gas by the addition of SO{sub 2} in a fluidized bed (FB). Addition of HCl to the bed was also investigated in order to simulate high chlorine content in the fuel. The aim with the project is to determine the changes in the release of alkali and zinc compounds when adding HCl and SO{sub 2} in the combustion of waste pellets and straw pellets. The results are intended for plant owners as well as boiler manufacturers. The experiments were carried out in a FB-reactor fluidized with a gas mixture of air and nitrogen at 850 deg C. Single fuel pellets were added to the reactor after which the concentrations of various substances (mainly zinc and alkali metals) in the flue gas were measured using ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry). The waste fuel used was from Boraas (BEM). The results show that the addition of HCl into the reactor significantly increases the release of alkali and zinc compounds when burning a single waste pellets. Addition of solely SO{sub 2} to the combustion air shows no effect. When adding both HCl and SO{sub 2} there is a clear reduction of alkali and zinc release compared to when only HCl is added. This shows that the addition of SO{sub 2} decreases the release of alkali and zinc at high Cl-concentrations. However, the ICP-MS instrument only shows the total amount of alkali and zinc, not considering whether they are associated with chlorine or sulfur, thus the experiments do not provide all information on possible changes of the chemical composition of the fly ash. Within the present project, it is shown that

  6. Re-acclimation performance and microbial characteristics of a thermophilic biofilter for NOx removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Han; Xia, Yinfeng; Zhao, Jingkai; Liu, Nan; Li, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Currently, a novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing Fe(II)EDTA as a solvent, is being under development to reduce the cost of NOx removal from flue gas. In this work, the NO removal profile, re-acclimation performance, and microbial characteristics in a thermophilic biofilter were investigated at the conditions typical to CABR process. The biofilter comprised of four layers of packing material with a surface area of 1200 m(2) m(-3). Experimental results revealed that the biofilter could remove 95 % of the fed NO at typical flue gas conditions. As the gas residence time varied from 90 to 15 s, the NO removal efficiency decreased from 100 to 56.5 % due to the NO mass transfer limitation. The longer period of the biofilter shutdown required more time for its re-acclimation. For example, after 8-day shutdown, the biofilter was re-acclimated in 32 h. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified product showed that Pseudomonas, a group of denitrifier, was dominant in the biofilter. Because the Pseudomonas was abundant at the bottom layer of packed-bed, the bottom layer contributed to 60-70 % of the total NO removal. In addition, Pseudomonas gradually faded away along the gas flow path from the bottom to the top of biofilter, resulting in a significant decrease in NO removal at the other three packed-bed layers. These observed results will provide the process engineering and scale-up data with respect to the biofilter operations to help advance the CABR process to pilot-scale testing.

  7. Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

  8. Simultaneous particulates, NO sub x , SO sub x removal from flue gas by all solid-state electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, W.J.; Cornell, L.P.; Keyvani, M.; Neyman, M. (Helipump Corp., Cleveland, OH (USA)); Helfritch, D.J. (Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (USA). Environmental Services and Technologies Div.)

    1990-04-17

    The process control SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and particulate emission from coal combustion flue gases. It is based on a solid-state, electrochemical reactor which converts NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} to nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen. Sulfur is condensed downstream at a lower temperature. Particulates are removed with a filter or electrostatic precipitator. The process utilizes no other material input (flue gas is the only fluid), has no moving parts, and produces no sludge(s). The reactor consists of an electrochemical cell where the electrolyte is a solid oxygen ion conducting ceramic such as stabilized ceria or zirconia and the electrodes are electronically conductive material(s). Porous metal such as silver or gold were used as electrodes in the experimental work. Acceptable reduction rates and electric power requirements for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide removal were obtained in up to 1% oxygen with ruthenium and strontium ruthenate electrocatalysts. Electrocatalytic improvements are needed for higher oxygen concentrations, with the NO reduction rates and efficiencies being most sensitive to oxygen concentration. The best electrocatalysts were ruthenium and the perovskite strontium ruthenate. 37 refs., 23 figs., 26 tabs.

  9. Decomposition of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial off-gas by electron beams: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paur, H.R.

    1998-01-01

    The electron beam induced decomposition of volatile organic compounds (e.g. aromatic compounds, esters, chlorinated hydrocarbons) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g. chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins) in industrial off gas has been investigated by several research groups in Germany and Japan. The method was shown to be effective for cleaning the waste gas of a paint factory, the waste air discharged from an automobile tunnel, the off gas cleaning from a groundwater remediation plant and the flue gas of a waste incinerator. The electron beam process achieves high removal efficiencies for volatile organic compounds. Reaction models have been developed, which suggest that the organic compounds are oxidized by hydroxyl radicals. The electron beam process may treat very large off-gas volumes at ambient temperatures and has a low energy consumption. The production of secondary wastes can be avoided or minimized. Compared to conventional methods the investment and operation costs of the process seem to be attractive for selected applications

  10. Study on the decomposition of trace benzene over V2O5-WO3/TiO2-based catalysts in simulated flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial and laboratory-prepared V2O5–WO3/TiO2-based catalysts with different compositions were tested for catalytic decomposition of chlorobenzene (ClBz) in simulated flue gas. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) was employe...

  11. Advanced air/flue gas staging based on CFD modelling for enhanced combustion and burnout in a waste-wood fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the impacts of the jet momentum, position and orientation of air and Recycled Flue Gas (RFG) streams on the performance of a grate-fired boiler burning waste wood via a comprehensive CFD-based parametric study. It is found that the air and RFG jets can be optimized to enhance m...

  12. The combined effect of thermodynamic promoters tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane on the kinetics of flue gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ) hydrate formation using a rocking cell apparatus. Hydrate formation and decomposition kinetics were investigated by constant cooling (hydrate nucleation temperature) and isothermal (hydrate nucleation time) methods. Improved (synergistic) hydrate formation kinetics (hydrate nucleation and growth) were......Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture through hydrate crystallization is a promising method among the new approaches for mitigating carbon emissions into the atmosphere. In this work, we investigate a combination of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and cyclopentane (CP) on the kinetics of flue gas (CO2:20 mol %/N2...... observed when THF and CP were present together compared to the individual THF and CP systems. Moreover, the complete hydrate decomposition temperature of CO2/N2/CP/THF hydrate was found to be slightly higher compared to the individual promoter (CO2/N2/CP and CO2/N2/THF) systems. The combined use...

  13. ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Jean Bustard

    2003-12-01

    ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) has successfully completed a research and development program granted by the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to develop a family of non-toxic flue gas conditioning agents to provide utilities and industries with a cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations on particulate emissions and opacity. An extensive laboratory screening of potential additives was completed followed by full-scale trials at four utility power plants. The developed cohesivity additives have been demonstrated on a 175 MW utility boiler that exhibited poor collection of unburned carbon in the electrostatic precipitator. With cohesivity conditioning, opacity spiking caused by rapping reentrainment was reduced and total particulate emissions were reduced by more than 30%. Ammonia conditioning was also successful in reducing reentrainment on the same unit. Conditioned fly ash from the process is expected to be suitable for dry or wet disposal and for concrete admixture.

  14. Simultaneous particulates, NO sub x , SO sub x removal from flue gas by all solid-state electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, W.J.; Cornell, L.P.; Keyvani, M.; Neyman, M.

    1989-11-09

    The objective is to develop an all solid-state electrochemical technology to control SOx, NOx, and particulate emissions from coal combustion flue gases. It is based on a solid-state, electrochemical reactor which reduces NOx and SO{sub 2} to nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen. Work was performed in the area of electrocatalyst preparation and testing. Transition metal oxides (Ru, Cr, V, W, Co, Mo), mixtures of transition metal oxides and transition metal oxide perovskites were tested as electrocatalysts. The electrocatalyst along with gold electrodes were coated and fired on a yittria stabilized ceria solid electrolyte disk. The reduction of NO and SO{sub 2} in gas mixtures containing 0 to 4% oxygen was measured while a voltage was applied to the disk. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum-rich byproduct of flue gas desulfurization - A prefeasibility cost estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Achorn, F.P.

    1996-01-01

    Costs for constructing and operating a conceptual plant based on a proposed process that converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer has been calculated and used to estimate a market price for the product. The average market price of granular ammonium sulfate ($138/ton) exceeds the rough estimated cost of ammonium sulfate from the proposed process ($111/ ton), by 25 percent, if granular size ammonium sulfate crystals of 1.2 to 3.3 millimeters in diameters can be produced by the proposed process. However, there was at least ??30% margin in the cost estimate calculations. The additional costs for compaction, if needed to create granules of the required size, would make the process uneconomical unless considerable efficiency gains are achieved to balance the additional costs. This study suggests the need both to refine the crystallization process and to find potential markets for the calcium carbonate produced by the process.

  16. Mutation of Spirulina sp. by nuclear irradiation to improve growth rate under 15% carbon dioxide in flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Lu, Hongxiang; He, Xin; Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    Spirulina sp. was mutated by γ-rays from 60 Co nuclear irradiation to improve growth and CO 2 fixation rate under 15vol.% CO 2 (in flue gas from a power plant). Mutants with enhanced growth phenotype were obtained, with the best strain exhibiting 310% increment in biomass yield on day 4. The mutant was then domesticated with elevated CO 2 concentration, and the biomass yield increased by 500% after domestication under 15vol.% CO 2 , with stable inheritance. Ultrastructure of Spirulina sp. shows that the fractal dimension of Spirulina cells decreased by 23% after mutation. Pore size in the cell wall of Spirulina mutant increased by 33% after 15vol.% CO 2 domestication. This characteristic facilitated the direct penetration of CO 2 into cells, thus improving CO 2 biofixation rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Robust C–C bonded porous networks with chemically designed functionalities for improved CO2 capture from flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Thirion

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective carbon dioxide (CO2 capture requires solid, porous sorbents with chemically and thermally stable frameworks. Herein, we report two new carbon–carbon bonded porous networks that were synthesized through metal-free Knoevenagel nitrile–aldol condensation, namely the covalent organic polymer, COP-156 and 157. COP-156, due to high specific surface area (650 m2/g and easily interchangeable nitrile groups, was modified post-synthetically into free amine- or amidoxime-containing networks. The modified COP-156-amine showed fast and increased CO2 uptake under simulated moist flue gas conditions compared to the starting network and usual industrial CO2 solvents, reaching up to 7.8 wt % uptake at 40 °C.

  18. Integrated removal of NO and mercury from coal combustion flue gas using manganese oxides supported on TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shibo; Zhao, Yongchun; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Lulu; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-03-01

    A catalyst composed of manganese oxides supported on titania (MnO x /TiO 2 ) synthesized by a sol-gel method was selected to remove nitric oxide and mercury jointly at a relatively low temperature in simulated flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The physico-chemical characteristics of catalysts were investigated by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, etc. The effects of Mn loading, reaction temperature and individual flue gas components on denitration and Hg 0 removal were examined. The results indicated that the optimal Mn/Ti molar ratio was 0.8 and the best working temperature was 240°C for NO conversion. O 2 and a proper ratio of [NH 3 ]/[NO] are essential for the denitration reaction. Both NO conversion and Hg 0 removal efficiency could reach more than 80% when NO and Hg 0 were removed simultaneously using Mn0.8Ti at 240°C. Hg 0 removal efficiency slightly declined as the Mn content increased in the catalysts. The reaction temperature had no significant effect on Hg 0 removal efficiency. O 2 and HCl had a promotional effect on Hg 0 removal. SO 2 and NH 3 were observed to weaken Hg 0 removal because of competitive adsorption. NO first facilitated Hg 0 removal and then had an inhibiting effect as NO concentration increased without O 2 , and it exhibited weak inhibition of Hg 0 removal efficiency in the presence of O 2 . The oxidation of Hg 0 on MnO x /TiO 2 follows the Mars-Maessen and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Mercury distribution in seawater discharged from a coal-fired power plant equipped with a seawater flue gas desulfurization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiyao; Sun, Lumin; Yuan, Dongxing; Yin, Liqian; Chen, Jinsheng; Liu, Yaoxing; Liu, Chengyu; Liang, Ying; Lin, Fangfang

    2011-09-01

    More and more coal-fired power plants equipped with seawater flue gas desulfurization systems have been built in coastal areas. They release large amount of mercury (Hg)-containing waste seawater into the adjacent seas. However, very limited impact studies have been carried out. Our research targeted the distribution of Hg in the seawater, sediment, biota, and atmosphere, and its environmental transportation. Seawater samples were collected from five sites: 1, sea areas adjacent to the power plant; 2, near discharge outlets; 3, the aeration pool of the power plant; and 4 and 5, two reference sites. The total gaseous Hg was determined in situ with a Tekran 2537B. Analyses of total Hg (TM) followed the USEPA methods. In most part of the study area, TM concentrations were close to the reference values and Hg transfer from the seawater into the sediment and biota was not obvious. However, in the aeration pool and near the waste discharge outlets, atmospheric and surface seawater concentrations of TM were much higher, compared with those at a reference site. The concentration ranges of total gaseous Hg and TM in seawater were 3.83-8.60 ng/m(3) and 79.0-198 ng/L near the discharge outlets, 7.23-13.5 ng/m(3) and 186-616 ng/L in the aeration pool, and 2.98-4.06 ng/m(3) and 0.47-1.87 ng/L at a reference point. This study suggested that the Hg in the flue gas desulfurization waste seawater was not only transported and diluted with sea currents, but also could possibly be transferred into the atmosphere from the aeration pool and from the discharge outlets.

  20. A GIS based national assessment of algal bio-oil production potential through flue gas and wastewater co-utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orfield, Nolan D.; Keoleian, Gregory A.; Love, Nancy G.

    2014-01-01

    The high theoretical productivity of microalgae makes it a promising energy crop, but economically viable large-scale production facilities have yet to emerge. Coupling algae cultivation ponds with flue gas emissions from power utilities to provide carbon dioxide and municipal wastewater to provide nutrients has been recommended as a solution. This flue gas and wastewater co-utilization (FWC) strategy not only reduces the upstream impacts and costs associated with providing inputs, but also provides a credit for wastewater treatment, a service currently required to reduce production costs to a viable level. This study provides the first national assessment of the potential for producing algal bio-oil in the United States using FWC. Spatial-temporal algae growth was simulated using solar radiation and temperature data to calculate the average annual algae yield for any location, which significantly impacts feasibility. The results of this model were integrated into a geospatial analysis which establishes the economically viable bio-oil production potential of FWC by accounting for the relative abundance of the input resources and their proximity. At most, 1.7 billion liters of bio-oil could be produced annually in a manner economically competitive with crude oil prices of $80 per barrel. The amount of nutrients in wastewater limits yields to 20.5 L of bio-oil per capita annually, and climatic constraints further reduce this potential by nearly 60%. Carbon dioxide constraints play a negligible role. Although the bio-oil production potential of FWC is relatively small, it does provide an opportunity to increase national biofuel output while providing a needed service. - Highlights: • Spatial-temporal algae growth was simulated using historical climate data. • A geospatial overlay analysis was used to assess national production potential. • Nutrient availability in wastewater is most limiting. • At most, 1.7 billion liters of algal biofuel per year could be

  1. Mixed microalgae consortia growth under higher concentration of CO2 from unfiltered coal fired flue gas: Fatty acid profiling and biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Ambreen; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Manzoor, Maleeha; Jabeen, Faiza; Iqbal, Munawar; Uz Zaman, Qamar; Schenk, Peer M; Asif Tahir, M

    2018-02-01

    Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oleaginous microalgae feedstock. Biodiesel fuel properties were studied and compared with biodiesel standards. Qualitative analysis of FAME was done while cultivating mixed microalgae consortia under three concentrations of coal fired flue gas (1%, 3.0% and 5.5% CO 2 ). Under 1% CO 2 concentration (flue gas), the FAME content was 280.3 μg/mL, whereas the lipid content was 14.03 μg/mL/D (day). Both FAMEs and lipid contents were low at other CO 2 concentrations (3.0 and 5.5%). However, mixed consortia in the presence of phosphate buffer and flue gas (PB + FG) showed higher saturated fatty acids (SFA) (36.28%) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) (63.72%) versus 5.5% CO 2 concentration, which might be responsible for oxidative stability of biodiesel. Subsequently, higher cetane number (52) and low iodine value (136.3 gI 2 /100 g) biodiesel produced from mixed consortia (PB + FG) under 5.5% CO 2 along with 50 mM phosphate buffer were found in accordance with European (EN 14214) standard. Results revealed that phosphate buffer significantly enhanced the biodiesel quality, but reduced the FAME yield. This study intended to develop an integrated approach for significant improvement in biodiesel quality under surplus phosphorus by utilizing waste flue gas (as CO 2 source) using microalgae. The CO 2 sequestration from industrial flue gas not only reduced greenhouse gases, but may also ensure the sustainable and eco-benign production of biodiesel. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Beam-gas Background Observations at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00214737; The ATLAS collaboration; Alici, Andrea; Lazic, Dragoslav-Laza; Alemany Fernandez, Reyes; Alessio, Federico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Burkhardt, Helmut; Corti, Gloria; Guthoff, Moritz; Manousos, Athanasios; Sjoebaek, Kyrre; D'Auria, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    Observations of beam-induced background at LHC during 2015 and 2016 are presented in this paper. The four LHC experiments use the non-colliding bunches present in the physics-filling pattern of the accelerator to trigger on beam-gas interactions. During luminosity production the LHC experiments record the beam-gas interactions using dedicated background monitors. These data are sent to the LHC control system and are used to monitor the background levels at the experiments during accelerator operation. This is a very important measurement, since poor beam-induced background conditions can seriously affect the performance of the detectors. A summary of the evolution of the background levels during 2015 and 2016 is given in these proceedings.

  3. Modeling and simulation of flue gas desulfurization using CaO/CaSO{sub 4}/Coal fly ash sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher-Chia, K.C.; Lee, K.T.; Fernando, W.J.N.; Bhatia, S.; Mohamed, A.R. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, George Town (Malaysia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2005-06-01

    Modeling and simulation of flue gas desulfurization over sorbent synthesized from CaO/CaSO{sub 4}/coal fly ash in a fixed-bed reactor has been studied. A mathematical model was proposed based on the material balance for the gaseous and solid phase using partial differential equations to describe the adsorption of SO{sub 2} from a moving gas stream to the sorbent-bed of changing composition. The kinetic parameters of the mathematical model were obtained from a series of experimental desulfurization reactions carried out under isothermal conditions at various operating parameters; initial concentration of SO{sub 2} (500 ppm {le} Co {le} 2000 ppm), reaction temperature (333 K {le} T {le} 373 K) and relative humidity (40% {le} RH {le} 70%). The partial differential equations were solved using a finite difference method. The model was found to give a very good description of the experimental data with an error less than 10%. The validated model was then used to predict the reactor performance under different modes of operation. It was found that higher relative humidity in the feed gas and higher reaction temperature increases the desulfurization activity of the sorbent. On the other hand, higher initial concentrations of SO{sub 2} reduce the desulfurization activity of the sorbent.

  4. PCDDs/PCDFs, dl-PCBs and HCB in the flue gas from coal fired CFB boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowalski, Adam; Konieczyński, Jan

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the project was to measure the actual emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from four selected power plants in Poland in order to update the national inventory of PCDDs/PCDFs emission. Relatively low PCDDs/PCDFs as well as dl-PCBs concentrations in flue gas obtained in measurements in this study for four different circulated fluidized bed (CFB) boilers indicate practical absence of any hazards caused by PCDDs/PCDFs emission from these units. The results of PCDDs/PCDFs determination obtained in this study indicate that hard coal combustion in large CFB in the four central heating plants (CHP) is not a significant source of PCDDs/PCDFs emission to the environment even if operated by co-firing of waste coal. PCDDs/PCDFs concentration in flue gases as well as emission factors were recorded in the range of 0.012-0.060 ng I-TEQ/m(n)(3) and 7.51-46.4 microg I-TEQ/TJ, respectively. Dl-PCBs concentration was practically below the LOQ=0.006 ng WHO-PCB TEQ/m(n)(3) in all experiments. HCB concentration as well as emission factors were recorded in the range of 11.5-42.0 ng/m(n)(3) and 6.19-26.7 mg/TJ, respectively, where the highest value was obtained for co-firing of waste coal, however. Obtained in this work emission factors will be used for national emission inventory purposes instead of the factors proposed by Toolkit or taken from previous measurements. However, consideration should be given to the fact that the measurements in most cases are related to single installations. Therefore, the need for further development of national factors for the power generation industry in Poland is desired.

  5. PCDDs/PCDFs, dl-PCBs and HCB in the flue gas from coal fired CFB boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grochowalski, A.; Konieczynski, J. [Krakow Technical University, Krakow (Poland). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    The aim of the project was to measure the actual emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from four selected power plants in Poland in order to update the national inventory of PCDDs/PCDFs emission. Relatively low PCDDs/PCDFs as well as dl-PCBs concentrations in flue gas obtained in measurements in this study for four different circulated fluidized bed (CFB) boilers indicate practical absence of any hazards caused by PCDDs/PCDFs emission from these units. The results of PCDDs/PCDFs determination obtained in this study indicate that hard coal combustion in large CFB in the four central heating plants (CHP) is not a significant source of PCDDs/PCDFs emission to the environment even if operated by co-firing of waste coal. PCDDs/PCDFs concentration in flue gases as well as emission factors were recorded in the range of 0.012-0.060 ng I-TEQ/m{sup 3} and 7.51-46.4 {mu}g 1-TEQ/TJ, respectively. DI-PCBs concentration was practically below the LOQ= 0.006 ng WHO-PCB TEQ/m{sup 3} in plant experiments. HCB concentration as well as emission factors were recorded in the range of 11.5-42.0 ng/m{sup 3} and 6.19-26.7 mg/TJ, respectively, where the highest value was obtained for co-firing of waste coal, however. Obtained in this work emission factors will be used for national emission inventory purposes instead of the factors proposed by Toolkit or taken from previous measurements. However, consideration should be given to the fact that the measurements in most cases are related to single installations. Therefore, the need for further development of national factors for the power generation industry in Poland is desired.

  6. Beam heating of the neutralizer gas of neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.

    1989-02-01

    It was shown by Pamela that the target thickness of the neutralizer gas in neutral beam injectors is smaller than to be expected from gas flow calculations. He explained his findings by direct and indirect beam heating of the gas and a consequent flow acceleration. The role of the neutralizer plasma electrons in the gas heating scenario is reconsidered here. To this end the particle and energy balances of the electrons are solved with allowance for ionization and dissociation of the gas by the electrons. It is shown that the direct contribution of the electrons to heating is not dominant. Their indirect contribution via ion acceleration in the space charge sheath in front of the walls is usually stronger. Methods to increase the neutralizer target thickness are investigated. They are essentially (1) structuring the neutralizer surface in order to reduce the reflection of medium energy particles and to increase the gas accommodation, (2) cooling down the neutralizer to LN 2 -temperature. The scaling of the target thickness with various parameters is investigated and compared with 'cold' flow. Initially it was assumed that the neutralizer plasma electrons are hot and able to excite Balmer alpha radiation in collisions with H 2 molecules. The investigation shows that the electrons must be cold instead (T e + 2 and H + 3 ions leading to excited hydrogen atoms. (orig.)

  7. Nitrogen oxides reduction by carbonaceous materials and carbon dioxide separation using regenerative metal oxides from fossil fuel based flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himanshu

    The ever-growing energy demands due to rising global population and continuing lifestyle improvements has placed indispensable emphasis on fossil fuels. Combustion of fossil fuels leads to the emission of harmful gaseous pollutants such as oxides of sulfur (SOx) and nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2), mercury, particulate matter, etc. Documented evidence has proved that this air pollution leads to adverse environmental health. This dissertation focuses on the development of technologies for the control of NOx and CO2 emissions. The first part of the thesis (Chapters 2--6) deals with the development of carbon based post combustion NOx reduction technology called CARBONOX process. High temperature combustion oxidizes both atmospheric nitrogen and organic nitrogen in coal to nitric oxide (NO). The reaction rate between graphite and NO is slow and requires high temperature (>900°C). The presence of metallic species in coal char catalyzes the reaction. The reaction temperature is lowered in the presence of oxygen to about 600--850°C. Chemical impregnation, specifically sodium compounds, further lowers the reaction temperature to 350--600°C. Activated high sodium lignite char (HSLC) provided the best performance for NO reduction. The requirement of char for NOx reduction is about 8--12 g carbon/g NO reduced in the presence of 2% oxygen in the inlet gas. The second part of this dissertation (chapter 7--8) focuses on the development of a reaction-based process for the separation of CO2 from combustion flue gas. Certain metal oxides react with CO2 forming metal carbonates under flue gas conditions. They can be calcined separately to yield CO2. Calcium oxide (CaO) has been identified as a viable metal oxide for the carbonation-calcination reaction (CCR) scheme. CaO synthesized from naturally occurring precursors (limestone and dolomite) attained 45--55% of their stoichiometric conversion due to the susceptibility of their microporous structure. High surface area

  8. High temperature fluidized bed zero valent iron process for flue gas nitrogen monoxide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Y.; Chen, S.S.; Tang, C.H.; Chang, Y.M.; Cheng, H.H.; Liu, H.L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO x ) are generated from a variety of sources, and are critical components of photochemical smog. Zero valent iron (ZVI) has been used to remove NO x in a number of studies. The ZVI process requires no extra chemicals or catalysts. In this study, a fluidized ZVI process for removing NO x from flue gases was proposed. The study examined the effects of temperature, ZVI dosage and influent NO concentrations, and observed the kinetic effects between the fluidized ZVI and NO x . A life cycle analysis of the process was also provided. The parametric analysis was conducted in a series of column studies using a continuous emissions monitoring system. Minimum fluidization velocity equations were provided, and the drag coefficient was determined. Capacities of ZVI for NO removal at different temperatures were calculated. Results of the study suggested that temperature, influent concentrations, and flow rates all influenced kinetic coefficients. Different temperatures resulted in different rates of NO removal. It was concluded that between 673 K and 773 K, almost complete NO removals were achieved. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs

  9. Characterisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flue gas and residues of a full scale fluidized bed combustor combusting non-hazardous industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the fate of PAHs in full scale incinerators by analysing the concentration of the 16 EPA-PAHs in both the input waste and all the outputs of a full scale Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Of the analysed waste inputs i.e. Waste Water Treatment (WWT) sludge, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), RDF and ASR were the main PAH sources, with phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene being the most important PAHs. In the flue gas sampled at the stack, naphthalene was the only predominant PAH, indicating that the PAHs in FBC's combustion gas were newly formed and did not remain from the input waste. Of the other outputs, the boiler and fly ash contained no detectable levels of PAHs, whereas the flue gas cleaning residue contained only low concentrations of naphthalene, probably adsorbed from the flue gas. The PAH fingerprint of the bottom ash corresponded rather well to the PAH fingerprint of the RDF and ASR, indicating that the PAHs in this output, in contrast to the other outputs, were mainly remainders from the PAHs in the waste inputs. A PAH mass balance showed that the total PAH input/output ratio of the FBC ranged from about 100 to about 2600 depending on the waste input composition and the obtained combustion conditions. In all cases, the FBC was clearly a net PAH sink. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Large-scale biodiesel production using flue gas from coal-fired power plants with Nannochloropsis microalgal biomass in open raceway ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baohua; Sun, Faqiang; Yang, Miao; Lu, Lin; Yang, Guanpin; Pan, Kehou

    2014-12-01

    The potential use of microalgal biomass as a biofuel source has raised broad interest. Highly effective and economically feasible biomass generating techniques are essential to realize such potential. Flue gas from coal-fired power plants may serve as an inexpensive carbon source for microalgal culture, and it may also facilitate improvement of the environment once the gas is fixed in biomass. In this study, three strains of the genus Nannochloropsis (4-38, KA2 and 75B1) survived this type of culture and bloomed using flue gas from coal-fired power plants in 8000-L open raceway ponds. Lower temperatures and solar irradiation reduced the biomass yield and lipid productivities of these strains. Strain 4-38 performed better than the other two as it contained higher amounts of triacylglycerols and fatty acids, which are used for biodiesel production. Further optimization of the application of flue gas to microalgal culture should be undertaken. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ecological comparison between hydrated lime and sodium bicarbonate when used for dry flue gas purification; Oekologischer Vergleich von Kalkhydrat und Natriumbicarbonat beim Einsatz in der trockenen Rauchgasreinigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wecker, Andreas [Federal German Association of the Lime Industry, Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Lime plays an important role in environmental protection. Not only due to its properties but also due to its natural occurrence, it is suitable and accepted for universal application in the environment sector. Lime and its refined products can be used in various processes to remove the acid gases, the gaseous metal compounds and organic trace constituents from the flue gas of waste incineration plants. The choice of the suitable process depends on the raw gas load, the separation efficiency to be achieved and the way of recovery of the reaction product obtained as a result of flue gas cleaning. The dry sorption processes have been established for many years and have been continuously further developed, in which lime is injected into the flue gas flow and the reaction product is retained via a filtering separator. As an alternative to lime products, it is also possible, under certain boundary conditions, to use sodium hydrogen-carbonate NaHCO{sub 3} (below called sodium bicarbonate) as a basic reaction component in the dry sorption process. As opposed to calcium hydroxide, there are differences, for example as regards the reaction temperature required and the necessary amount of sorbent to achieve the desired purification effect. (orig.)

  12. Simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas by ·OH radicals produced from O2+ and water vapor in a duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mindi; Zhang, Zhitao; Bai, Mindong

    2012-09-18

    In the present study, simultaneous flue gas desulfurization and denitrification are achieved with ·OH radicals generated from O(2)(+) reacting with water vapor in a duct. The O(2)(+) ions are generated by a strong ionization dielectric barrier discharge and then injected into the duct. Compared with conventional gas discharge treatment, the present method does not need a plasma reaction reactor, additional catalysts, reductants, or oxidants. The main recovered products are the liquids H(2)SO(4) and HNO(3), which can be used in many processes. Removal rates of 97% for NO and 82% for SO(2) are obtained under the following optimal experimental conditions: molar ratio of reactive oxygen species (O(2)(+), O(3)) to SO(2) and NO, 5; inlet flue gas temperature, 65 °C; reaction time, 0.94 s; and H(2)O volume fraction, 8%. Production of O(2)(+) and the plasma reaction mechanisms are discussed, and the recovered acid is characterized. The experimental results show that the present method performs better for denitrification than for desulfurization. Compared with conventional air discharge flue gas treatments, the present method has lower initial investment and operating costs, and the equipment is more compact.

  13. Highly Stable Porous Covalent Triazine-Piperazine Linked Nanoflower as a Feasible Adsorbent for Flue Gas CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2016-02-11

    Here, we report a porous covalent triazine-piperazine linked polymer (CTPP) featuring 3D nanoflower morphology and enhanced capture/removal of CO2, CH4 from air (N2), essential to control greenhouse gas emission and natural gas upgrading. 13C solid-state NMR and FTIR analyses and CHN and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) elemental analyses confirmed the integration of triazine and piperazine components in the network. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses revealed a relatively uniform particle size of approximately 400 to 500 nm with 3D nanoflower microstructure, which was formed by the self-assembly of interwoven and slight bent nanoflake components. The material exhibited outstanding chemical robustness under acidic and basic medium and high thermal stability up to 773 K. The CTPP possess high surface area (779 m2/g) and single-component gas adsorption study exhibited enhanced CO2 and CH4 uptake of 3.48 mmol/g, 1.09 mmol/g, respectively at 273 K, 1 bar; coupled with high sorption selectivities for CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 of 128 and 17, respectively. The enriched Lewis basicity of the CTPP favors the interaction with CO2, which results in an enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity and high CO2/N2 selectivity. The binary mixture breakthrough study for the flue gas composition at 298 K showed a high CO2/N2 selectivity of 82. CO2 heats of adsorption for the CTPP (34 kJ mol−1) were realized at the borderline between strong physisorption and weak chemisorption (QstCO2; 25−50 kJ mol−1) and low Qst value for N2 (22.09 kJ mol−1), providing the ultimate validation for the high selectivity of CO2 over N2.

  14. Demonstration of CO{sub 2} Conversion to Synthetic Transport Fuel at Flue Gas Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowson, George R. M. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Styring, Peter, E-mail: p.styring@sheffield.ac.uk [Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); UK Centre for Carbon Dioxide Utilisation, Department of Chemistry, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-12

    A mixture of 1- and 2-butanol was produced using a stepwise synthesis starting with a methyl halide. The process included a carbon dioxide utilization step to produce an acetate salt which was then converted to the butanol isomers by Claisen condensation of the esterified acetate followed by hydrogenation of the resulting ethyl acetoacetate. Importantly, the CO{sub 2} utilization step uses dry, dilute carbon dioxide (12% CO{sub 2} in nitrogen) similar to those found in post-combustion flue gases. The work has shown that the Grignard reagent has a slow rate of reaction with oxygen in comparison to carbon dioxide, meaning that the costly purification step usually associated with carbon capture technologies can be omitted using this direct capture-conversion technique. Butanol isomers are useful as direct drop-in replacement fuels for gasoline due to their high octane number, higher energy density, hydrophobicity, and low corrosivity in existing petrol engines. An energy analysis shows the process to be exothermic from methanol to butanol; however, energy is required to regenerate the active magnesium metal from the halide by-product. The methodology is important as it allows electrical energy, which is difficult to store using batteries over long periods of time, to be stored as a liquid fuel that fits entirely with the current liquid fuels infrastructure. This means that renewable, weather-dependent energy can be stored across seasons, for example, production in summer with consumption in winter. It also helps to avoid new fossil carbon entering the supply chain through the utilization of carbon dioxide that would otherwise be emitted. As methanol has also been shown to be commercially produced from CO{sub 2}, this adds to the prospect of the general decarbonization of the transport fuels sector. Furthermore, as the conversion of CO{sub 2} to butanol requires significantly less hydrogen than CO{sub 2} to octanes, there is a potentially reduced burden on the so

  15. Demonstration of CO2 Conversion to Synthetic Transport Fuel at Flue Gas Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R. M. Dowson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of 1- and 2-butanol was produced using a stepwise synthesis starting with a methyl halide. The process included a carbon dioxide utilization step to produce an acetate salt which was then converted to the butanol isomers by Claisen condensation of the esterified acetate followed by hydrogenation of the resulting ethyl acetoacetate. Importantly, the CO2 utilization step uses dry, dilute carbon dioxide (12% CO2 in nitrogen similar to those found in post-combustion flue gases. The work has shown that the Grignard reagent has a slow rate of reaction with oxygen in comparison to carbon dioxide, meaning that the costly purification step usually associated with carbon capture technologies can be omitted using this direct capture-conversion technique. Butanol isomers are useful as direct drop-in replacement fuels for gasoline due to their high octane number, higher energy density, hydrophobicity, and low corrosivity in existing petrol engines. An energy analysis shows the process to be exothermic from methanol to butanol; however, energy is required to regenerate the active magnesium metal from the halide by-product. The methodology is important as it allows electrical energy, which is difficult to store using batteries over long periods of time, to be stored as a liquid fuel that fits entirely with the current liquid fuels infrastructure. This means that renewable, weather-dependent energy can be stored across seasons, for example, production in summer with consumption in winter. It also helps to avoid new fossil carbon entering the supply chain through the utilization of carbon dioxide that would otherwise be emitted. As methanol has also been shown to be commercially produced from CO2, this adds to the prospect of the general decarbonization of the transport fuels sector. Furthermore, as the conversion of CO2 to butanol requires significantly less hydrogen than CO2 to octanes, there is a potentially reduced burden on the so-called hydrogen

  16. Demonstration of CO2 Conversion to Synthetic Transport Fuel at Flue Gas Concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowson, George R. M.; Styring, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A mixture of 1- and 2-butanol was produced using a stepwise synthesis starting with a methyl halide. The process included a carbon dioxide utilization step to produce an acetate salt which was then converted to the butanol isomers by Claisen condensation of the esterified acetate followed by hydrogenation of the resulting ethyl acetoacetate. Importantly, the CO 2 utilization step uses dry, dilute carbon dioxide (12% CO 2 in nitrogen) similar to those found in post-combustion flue gases. The work has shown that the Grignard reagent has a slow rate of reaction with oxygen in comparison to carbon dioxide, meaning that the costly purification step usually associated with carbon capture technologies can be omitted using this direct capture-conversion technique. Butanol isomers are useful as direct drop-in replacement fuels for gasoline due to their high octane number, higher energy density, hydrophobicity, and low corrosivity in existing petrol engines. An energy analysis shows the process to be exothermic from methanol to butanol; however, energy is required to regenerate the active magnesium metal from the halide by-product. The methodology is important as it allows electrical energy, which is difficult to store using batteries over long periods of time, to be stored as a liquid fuel that fits entirely with the current liquid fuels infrastructure. This means that renewable, weather-dependent energy can be stored across seasons, for example, production in summer with consumption in winter. It also helps to avoid new fossil carbon entering the supply chain through the utilization of carbon dioxide that would otherwise be emitted. As methanol has also been shown to be commercially produced from CO 2 , this adds to the prospect of the general decarbonization of the transport fuels sector. Furthermore, as the conversion of CO 2 to butanol requires significantly less hydrogen than CO 2 to octanes, there is a potentially reduced burden on the so-called hydrogen economy.

  17. Preliminary Examination of the System Fly Ash-Bottom Ash-Flue Gas Desulphurization Gypsum-Portland Cement-Water for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tokalic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an investigation into the use of three power plant wastes: fly ash, flue gas desulphurization gypsum, and bottom ash for subbase layers in road construction. Two kinds of mixtures of these wastes with Portland cement and water were made: first with fly ash consisting of coarser particles (<1.651 mm and second with fly ash consisting of smaller particles (<0.42 mm. The mass ratio of fly ash-Portland cement-flue gas desulphurization gypsum-bottom ash was the same (3 : 1 : 1 : 5 in both mixtures. For both mixtures, the compressive strength, the mineralogical composition, and the leaching characteristics were determined at different times, 7 and 28 days, after preparation. The obtained results showed that both mixtures could find a potential use for subbase layers in road construction.

  18. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part I: Exposures in oxidizing and chlorinating atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    only in an oxidizing-chlorinating atmosphere, otherwise corrosionresults in formation of a duplex oxide. Corrosion attack on deposit-coatedsamples was higher than on deposit-free samples irrespective of the gaseousatmosphere. Specifically, severe volatilization of alloying elements occurred ondeposit......In biomass fired power plants, deposition of alkali chlorides on superheaters, aswell as the presence of corrosive flue gas species, give rise to fast corrosion ofsuperheaters. In order to understand the corrosion mechanism under thiscomplex condition, the influence of the flue gas composition...... on hightemperature corrosion of an austenitic superheater material under laboratoryconditions mimicking biomass firing is investigated in this work. Exposuresinvolving deposit (KCl)-coated and deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP347H FG) samples were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, under...

  19. Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning. Topical report No. 1, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and FGD sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  20. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Topical report No. 2, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and conditioning agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  1. Exhaust gas treatment by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamura, Yokichi; Suda, Shoichi; Kobayashi, Toshiki

    1991-01-01

    Among global environmental problems, atmospheric pollution has been discussed since relatively old days, and various countermeasures have been taken, but recently in connection with acid rain, the efficient and economical treatment technology is demanded. As the denitration and desulfurization technology for the exhaust gas from the combustion of fossil fuel, the incineration of city trash and internal combustion engines, three is the treatment method by electron beam irradiation. By irradiating electron beam to exhaust gas, nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides are oxidized to nitric acid and sulfuric acid, and by promoting the neutralization of these acids with injected alkali, harmless salts are recovered. This method has the merit that nitrogen oxides and surfur oxides can be removed efficiently with a single system. In this report, as for the exhaust gas treatment by electron beam irradiation, its principle, features, and the present status of research and development are described, and in particular, the research on the recent exhaust gas treatment in city trash incineration is introduced. This treatment method is a dry process, accordingly, waste water disposal is unnecessary. The reaction products are utilized as fertilizer, and waste is not produced. (K.I.)

  2. Study of flue gas condensers with reference to corrosion risks, biofuel quality, techniques and choice of material; Kartlaeggning av roekgaskondenseringsanlaeggningar med avseende paa korrosionsrisker, biobraenslekvaliteter, teknik och materialval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenqvist, Per-Aake

    2012-02-15

    Corrosion in flue gas appliances installed in small and medium sized biomass fired boiler plants has become a problem in an increasing number of sites around Sweden. A trend seems to be that the problems are greater in those plants that use so called terminal chips than those that utilize more homogeneous fuels. In pace with the increasing number of biomass power plants in the country, the demand for cheaper fuel is increased. Through the increasing number of fuel terminals the market is provided even with biofuel mixes in the form of traditional wood chips mixed with bark, forest residue, sawdust, willow, returned wood, etc. Both users and suppliers of boiler and flue gas systems, and fuel suppliers have currently no clear rules or guidelines for relationships between different chemical properties of fuels, technologies, operating data and material. In this report has experience in the form of questionnaires completed by field visits, interviews of operational personnel and literature studies been compiled from a number of plants using different types of flue gas condensers for increased energy output from various types of bio fuels. The purpose of this assignment is to survey the flue gas condensation plant in biomass fired boiler plants for the presence of corrosion damage made in relation to the use of technologies and fuel qualities. A milestone is that the report will be able to be used to support the selection of materials and appropriate techniques for both new facilities and for the repair and improvement of existing ones. Another objective is to compile existing experience and assessment criteria which are reported in the literature. This report describes some typical construction techniques, whenever applicable harmful images and links to various substances present in fuels, ash and condensate

  3. Efek Kegagalan Alat Flue Gas Desulphur terhadap Tegangan Lewat Denyar Isolator di Gardu Induk Pembangkitan Tanjung Jati B Jepara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedy Juliandhy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flashover is a disorder condition that occurs in the form of sparks appearing between insulators or electrical component of high voltage. This can occur due to insulation failure of the high voltage system. Failure of insulation in high voltage insulators in Tanjung Jati B Jepara Substation is one of the causes of acid rain due to the condensation of smoke from the Tanjung Jati B power plant chimney. Acid rain arises due to failure Flue Gas Desulphur ( FGD devices were installed in the plant to reduce gas emissions as a condition of eco-friendly power plant that is planned by the government through the department of Environment. The real action is taken to dismiss the notion that Coal Fired Power Plant (CFPP is one of the industries that emit SOx and NOx emissions are high on operational processes. The effects of gas emissions is one of the causes of acid rain on the environment. The amount of acidity of acid rain that occurred in the industrial area will always affect the high voltage power lines that distribute power in operation. Sometimes the equipment functions as an insulator in high voltage substations that distribute power at 500 kV network SUTET JAMALI network on the island of Java in a system of operation is interrupted because of pollutants attached to the insulator. Rain with a pH between 4-5 categorized as acid rain and the test affects the time of the flashover voltage drop of 145.5 kV – 142.5 kV of the working voltage , this causes an insulator as insulation materials can be minimized distance insulator surface so that termites can affect the resistance of an insulator in its function as a tool to restrain the occurrence of flashover voltage from voltage parts.

  4. Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaoping; Jin Baosheng; Huang Yaji; Zhou Hongcang; Lan Jixiang

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m 3 /h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10 -13 kg/Nm 3 and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries

  5. An informatics-based analysis of developments to date and prospects for the application of microalgae in the biological sequestration of industrial flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Hu, Wensheng; Wang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The excessive emission of flue gas contributes to air pollution, abnormal climate change, global warming, and sea level rises associated with glacial melting. With the ability to utilize NOx as a nitrogen source and to convert solar energy into chemical energy via CO2 fixation, microalgae can potentially reduce air pollution and relax global warming, while also enhancing biomass and biofuel production as well as the production of high-value-added products. This informatics-based review analyzes the trends in the related literature and in patent activity to draw conclusions and to offer a prospective view on the developments of microalgae for industrial flue gas biosequestration. It is revealed that in recent years, microalgal research for industrial flue gas biosequestration has started to attract increasing attention and has now developed into a hot research topic, although it is still at a relatively early stage, and needs more financial and policy support in order to better understand microalgae and to develop an economically viable process. In comparison with onsite microalgal CO2 capture, microalgae-based biological DeNOx appears to be a more realistic and attractive alternative that could be applied to NOx treatment.

  6. Adsorption and reaction mechanism of arsenic vapors over γ-Al2O3 in the simulated flue gas containing acid gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongyun; Chen, Dunkui; Liu, Huan; Yang, Yuhan; Cai, Hexun; Shen, Junhao; Yao, Hong

    2017-08-01

    Arsenic emission from fuel combustion and metal smelting flue gas causes serious pollution. Addition of sorbents is a promising way for the arsenic capture from high temperature flue gas. However, it is difficult to remove arsenic from SO 2 /HCl-rich flue gas due to the competitive reaction of the sorbents with arsenic and these acid gases. To solve this problem, arsenic adsorption over γ-Al 2 O 3 was studied in this work to evaluate its adsorption mechanism, resistance to acid gases as well as regeneration behavior. The results show that γ-Al 2 O 3 had good resistance to acid gases and the arsenic adsorption by γ-Al 2 O 3 could be effectively carried out at a wide temperature range between 573 and 1023 K. Nevertheless, adsorption at higher-temperature (like 1173 K) leaded to the decrease of surface area and the rearrangement of crystal structure of γ-Al 2 O 3 , reducing the active sites for arsenic adsorption. The adsorption of arsenic was confirmed to occur at different active sites in γ-Al 2 O 3 by forming various adsorbed species. Increasing temperature facilitated arsenic transformation into more stable chemisorbed As 3+ and As 5+ which were difficult to remove through thermal treatment regeneration. Fortunately, the regeneration of spent γ-Al 2 O 3 could be well performed using NaOH solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microalgal technology for remediation of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas: A techno-economic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, K.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Power plants burning fossil fuels are a major source of CO{sub 2} which is implicated in global warming. Microalgal systems which photosynthetically assimilate carbon dioxide can be used for mitigation of this major greenhouse gas. A techno-economic model was developed for trapping carbon dioxide from flue gases by microalgae in outdoor ponds. The model also shows that algal lipid content and growth rate are both important for an economical process, but a trade-off exists between the two, i.e., a high lipid content and low growth rate combination can be as effective as a low lipid content and high growth rate combination. Hence, these two parameters may be treated as a composite parameter to be optimized to yield the least CO{sub 2} mitigation cost. Model predictions were also used to compare the microalgal technology with alternative technologies in terms of CO{sub 2} mitigation costs. Incorporating advances anticipated in the future into the design basis, the model yields a CO{sub 2} mitigation cost that is competitive with other CO{sub 2} remediation technologies currently being proposed. Furthermore, this technology also provides a lipid feedstock for producing a renewable fuel such as biodiesel. Deployment of this technology for CO{sub 2} mitigation looks attractive if research goals put forth by the model are achieved.

  8. Impact of leaching conditions on constituents release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-soil mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralegedara, N H; Al-Abed, S R; Arambewela, M K J; Dionysiou, D D

    2017-02-15

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) for land applications has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using recently approved EPA leaching methods (1313-1316). These methods employ various pH and liquid-solid (LS) ratios under batch leaching, column percolation and diffusion controlled release scenarios. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Protocol (TCLP) and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Protocol (SPLP) were used for comparison. The data obtained from new EPA methods provide broad insight into constituent release from FGDG and SF when compared to TCLP and SPLP. The release of toxic elements such as Hg, As, Pb, Co, Cd and Cr from SF was negligible. High release of B from FGDG was observed under all tested conditions; however, its release from SF was low. Both FGDG and SF released Se under all pH conditions (2-13) and LS ratios (1-10) in low concentrations (0.02-0.2mg/L). The data from this study could be used to investigate potential use of "modern" FGDG for new beneficial land applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Remediation of saline-sodic soil with flue gas desulfurization gypsum in a reclaimed tidal flat of southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yumei; Li, Xiaping; Dick, Warren A; Chen, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Salinization and sodicity are obstacles for vegetation reconstruction of coastal tidal flat soils. A study was conducted with flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum applied at rates of 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60Mg/ha to remediate tidal flat soils of the Yangtze River estuary. Exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), exchangeable sodium (ExNa), pH, soluble salt concentration, and composition of soluble salts were measured in 10cm increments from the surface to 30cm depth after 6 and 18months. The results indicated that the effect of FGD-gypsum is greatest in the 0-10cm mixing soil layer and 60Mg/ha was the optimal rate that can reduce the ESP to below 6% and decrease soil pH to neutral (7.0). The improvement effect was reached after 6months, and remained after 18months. The composition of soluble salts was transformed from sodic salt ions mainly containing Na(+), HCO3(-)+CO3(2-) and Cl(-) to neutral salt ions mainly containing Ca(2+) and SO4(2-). Non-halophyte plants were survived at 90%. The study demonstrates that the use of FGD-gypsum for remediating tidal flat soils is promising. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Application of Evaporative Cooling for the Condensation of Water Vapors from a Flue Gas Waste Heat Boilers CCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galashov Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study are boilers that burn organic fuel and the recovery boilers (RB of the combined cycle plant (CCP, which are al-so working on the products of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The purpose of research is to find technologies that increase efficiency of the thermal power plant (TPP and technologies that reduce the environmental impact on the environment by burning fossil fuels. The paper deals with the technology of the boilers burning hydrocarbon fuel with condensation of water vapor from the exhaust flue gases. Considered the problems caused by using of this technology. Research shows that the main problem of this technology in the boilers is the lack of reliable methods of calculation of heat exchangers, condensers. Particular attention is paid to the application of this technology in the recovery boilers combined-cycle plants, which are currently gaining increasing use in the generation of electricity from the combustion of gas in power plants. It is shown that the application of technology of condensation of water vapor in RB CCP, the temperature decreases of exhaust gases from 100 to 40 °С, allows increasing the effi-ciency of the RB with 86.2 % to 99.5 %, i.e. at 12.3 %, and increase the ef-ficiency of the CCP at 2.8 %.

  11. Metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Jian-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this research was to use metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) to remove 16 species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incineration flue gas. We tested three different metal loadings (0.11 wt%, 0.29 wt%, and 0.34 wt%) and metals (Pt, Pd, and Cu), and two different pretreatment solutions (HNO(3) and NaOH). The results demonstrated that the ACF-supported metal catalysts removed the PAHs through adsorption and catalysis. Among the three metals, Pt was most easily adsorbed on the ACFs and was the most active in oxidation of PAHs. The mesopore volumes and density of new functional groups increased significantly after the ACFs were pretreated with either solutions, and this increased the measured metal loading in HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. These data confirm that improved PAH removal can be achieved with HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Simultaneous particulates, NO sub x , SO sub x removal from flue gas by all solid-state electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, W.J.; Hossain, M.S.; Keyvani, M.; Neyman, M. (Helipump Corp., Cleveland, OH (USA)); Gordon, A.Z. (IGR Enterprises, Beachwood, OH (USA))

    1989-04-14

    The IGR emission control technology controls SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}, and particulate emissions from coal combustion flue gases. The technology uses an electrochemical solid-state reactor which converts SO{sub 2} and NO{sub X} to S, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. The cell electrolyte is a solid electrolyte, namely a high surface area ceramic oxide-ion conductor. Three tasks were active during this quarter: Task (1), Procurement, Construction and Debugging of the Electrochemical Reactors and Particulate Removal System, Tasks, (2) Reactor Operation on SO{sub 2}/NO{sub X} Spiked Gas Streams, and Task (3) Electrocatalysts Preparation and Screening Studies. In Task (1) the particulate control apparatus has been completely installed and its operation is being examined with respect to filtration materials and solid electrolyte. In Task (2) electrochemical measurements were made with oxide ion conducting ceramic disks in gases containing NO and SO{sub 2}. In Task (3) the electrochemical measurements are being made using a series of electrocatalysts in gases containing NO, SO{sub 2}, and oxygen. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Simultaneous particulates, NO sub x , SO sub x removal from flue gas by all solid-state electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, W.J.; Cornell, L.P.; Keyvani, M.; Neyman, M.

    1989-07-21

    The objective is to develop an all solid-state electrochemical technology to control SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and particulate emissions from coal combustion flue gases. It is based on a solid-state, electrochemical reactor which reduces NOx and SO{sub 2} to nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen. The solid electrolyte is a high surface area ceramic oxide-ion conductor such as a stabilized zirconia or ceria. The cell electrodes may be of various electronically conductive materials such as porous, high surface area nickel, silver, or gold. Work was performed in two areas, electrocatalyst preparation and testing and particulate control tests. Transition metal oxide electrocatalysts were tested by applying the electrocatalyst along with gold electrodes to a stabilized ceria solid electrolyte disk and measuring the reduction of NO and SO{sub 2} in gas mixtures containing 0 to 4% oxygen while a voltage was applied to the disk. The high temperature particulate control test apparatus was installed and flyash tests were done. The efficiency of high temperature particulate filters was also tested. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Simultaneous particulates, NO sub x , SO sub x removal from flue gas by all solid-state electrochemcial technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, W.J.; Keyvani, M.; Neyman, M. (Helipump Corp., Cleveland, OH (USA)); Gordon, A.Z. (IGR Enterprises, Beachwood, OH (USA))

    1989-05-22

    The IGR Process emission control technology controls SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}, and particulate emissions from coal combustion flue gases. The technology uses an electrochemical solid-state reactor which converts SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to S, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. The cell electrolyte is a solid electrolyte, namely a high surface area ceramic oxide-ion conductor. Tasks this quarter include: (1) Procurement, Construction and Debugging of the Electrochemical Reactors and Particulate Removal System; (2) Reactor Operation on SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} Spiked Gas Streams; and (3) Electrocatalysts Preparation and Screening Studies. In Task (1) the particulate control test apparatus has been completely installed and flyash tests have begun. During the tests a voltage is applied across the solid electrolyte and the current is monitored while flyash passes through the cell. In Task (1) electrochemical measurements were made with oxide ion conducting ceramic disks in gases containing NO and SO{sub 2}. In Task (3) the electrochemical measurements are being made using four electrocatalysts in gases containing NO, SO{sub 2}, and oxygen. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Preparation of Active Absorbent for Flue Gas Desulfurization From Coal Bottom Ash: Effect of Absorbent Preparation Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chin Li, Lee Keat Teong, Subhash Bhatia and Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An active absorbent for flue gas desulfurization was prepared from coal bottom ash, calcium oxide (CaO and calcium sulfate by hydro-thermal process. The absorbent was examined for its micro-structural properties. The experiments conducted were based on Design Of Experiments (DOE according to 23 factorial design. The effect of various absorbent preparation variables such as ratio of CaO to bottom ash (A, hydration temperature (B and hydration period (C towards the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of the absorbent were studied. At a CaO to bottom ash ratio = 2, hydration temperature = 200 ?C and hydration period = 10 hrs, absorbent with a surface area of 90.1 m2/g was obtained. Based on the analysis of the factorial design, it was concluded that factor A and C as well as the interaction of factors ABC and BC are the significant factors that effect the BET surface area of the absorbent. A linear mathematical model that describes the relation between the independent variables and interaction between variables towards the BET specific surface area of the absorbent was also developed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that the model was significant at 1% level.Key Words: Absorbent, Bottom Ash, Design Of Experiments, Desulfurization, Surface Area.

  16. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    On September 30, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Souther Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines``. Under the agreement SIUC will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a ``paste`` mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a surface demonstration-test of both technologies. During the current quarter the main thrust was to develop the equipment necessary for the program. Shop drawings were completed for the pneumatic placement equipment, and purchase orders issued for many of the component parts. The final pneumatic placement system will be assembled in the SIUC Carterville facility.

  17. Purifying flue gas scrubber washings by means of membranes; Membranunterstuetztes Verfahren zur Reinigung von Waschwasser aus Rauchgasreinigungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenwinkel, K.H.; Nagy, J. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik; Mueller, H.; Baumgarten, G. [Amafilter Deutschland, Langenhagen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A process was developed to purify the wastewater of a flue gas purification process of a wood combustion plant. The water treatment process consists of a filtration with saw-dust and a reverse-osmosis process. A pilot plant has been developed and the performance has been tested. (SR) [Deutsch] Im Auftrag der Firma Wilhelm Mende GmbH, Gittelde/Harz, fuehrt das Institut fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik der Universitaet Hannover im Fruehjahr 1996 am Waschwasser der dortigen Rauchgasreinigungsanlage eine Bestandsaufnahme durch, um die Ursachen fuer die Betriebsstoerungen herauszufinden. Bei den Untersuchungen wurde festgestellt, dass die Waschwasserreinigung nur unzureichend funktionierte und einige konzeptionelle Fehler aufwies. Aufbauend auf den Voruntersuchungen wurde ein kombiniertes Verfahren aus herkoemmlicher Filtration und einer Umkehrosmose entwickelt, mit dem es moeglich sein sollte, die Belastung des Waschwassers auf einem fuer die Systemstabilitaet ausreichenden Niveau zu halten. Das Konzept wurde in Pilotversuchen im Fruehherbst 1996 erfolgreich geprueft. Die grosstechnische Anlage wird derzeit von der Fa. Amafilter installiert und getestet. Betriebsergebnisse liegen z.Zt. noch nicht vor. Die wissenschaftliche Inbetriebnahmebegleitung erfolgt durch das Institut und wird von der Deutschen Bundesstiftung Umwelt gefoerdert. (orig.)

  18. Flue-gas desulfurization gypsum effects on urea-degrading bacteria and ammonia volatilization from broiler litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Christopher D; Cabrera, Miguel L; Rothrock, Michael J; Kissel, D E

    2017-08-01

    A major concern of the broiler industry is the volatilization of ammonia (NH3) from the mixture of bedding material and broiler excretion that covers the floor of broiler houses. Gypsum has been proposed as a litter amendment to reduce NH3 volatilization, but reports of NH3 abatement vary among studies and the mechanism responsible for decreasing NH3 volatilization is not well understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding 20 or 40% flue-gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) to broiler litter on pH, electrical conductivity (EC), water potential, urea-degrading bacteria abundance, NH3 and carbon dioxide (CO2) evolution, and nitrogen (N) mineralization in several 21-d experiments. The addition of FGDG to broiler litter increased EC by 24 to 33% (P mineralization by 10 to 11% (P = 0.0001) as compared to litters not amended with FGDG. Furthermore, the addition of FGDG to broiler litter decreased NH3 volatilization by 18 to 28% (P litter pH values compared to un-amended litter (P litter with 20% FGDG can decrease NH3 volatilization and increase the fertlizer value of broiler litter. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Beam tests with microstrip gas counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, M.R.; Birchall, J.; Crow, K.; Davis, C.A.; Faszer, W.; Gan, L.; Lee, L.; van Oers, W.T.H.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We have measured the efficiency, timing and pulse heights in several types of microstrip Gas Chambers with plastic substrates passivated with a thin Nickel layer. We used as active gas mixtures Argon/Isobutane and CF 4 /Isobutane. We placed the detectors in a secondary beam at TRIUMF tuned to a momentum of 100 MeV/c of pions, muons and electrons. Preliminary results indicate good efficiency for minimum ionizing particles in Argon/Isobutane mixtures but lesser efficiency in CF 4 based gases indicating the importance of high quality preamplifiers to increase the signal to noise ratio. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs

  20. Radiation processing of flue gases: Guidelines for feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this publication is to facilitate the performance of feasibility studies for Electron Beam flue gas cleanup projects by providing guidelines to conduct these studies and compiling information on the state of the art. This document summarizes the contents of a feasibility study; discusses the main items in plant construction, measurement and control systems, radiation safety and building construction; and lists the required economic data for internationally funded projects

  1. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO₂ Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    A novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process has been developed by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc., Nexant Inc., and Western Kentucky University in this bench-scale project. The GPS-based process presents a unique approach that uses a gas pressurized technology for CO₂ stripping at an elevated pressure to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over the MEA process. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental work, process simulation, and technical and economic analysis studies were applied. The project conducted individual unit lab-scale tests for major process components, including a first absorption column, a GPS column, a second absorption column, and a flasher. Computer simulations were carried out to study the GPS column behavior under different operating conditions, to optimize the column design and operation, and to optimize the GPS process for an existing and a new power plant. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data under high loading and high temperature for the selected amines were also measured. The thermal and oxidative stability of the selected solvents were also tested experimentally and presented. A bench-scale column-based unit capable of achieving at least 90% CO₂ capture from a nominal 500 SLPM coal-derived flue gas slipstream was designed and built. This integrated, continuous, skid-mounted GPS system was tested using real flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The technical challenges of the GPS technology in stability, corrosion, and foaming of selected solvents, and environmental, health and

  2. Experimental and numerical study on combustion of baled biomass in cigar burners and effects of flue gas re-circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erić Aleksandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experimental and numerical investigation addressing combustion of baled agricultural biomass in a 50 kW experimental furnace equipped with cigar burners. Experiments performed included measurements of all parameters deemed important for mass and energy balance, as well as parameters defining quality of the combustion process. Experimental results were compared with results of numerical simulations performed with previously developed CFD model. The model takes into account complex thermo mechanical combustion processes occurring in a porous layer of biomass bales and the surrounding fluid. The combustion process and the corresponding model were deemed stationary. Comparison of experimental and numerical results obtained through research presented in this paper showed satisfactory correspondence, leading to the conclusion that the model developed could be used for analysis of different effects associated with variations in process parameters and/or structural modifications in industrial biomass facilities. Mathematical model developed was also utilized to examine the impact of flue gas recirculation on maximum temperatures in the combustion chamber. Gas recirculation was found to have positive effect on the reduction of maximum temperature in the combustion chamber, as well as on the reduction of maximum temperature zone in the chamber. The conclusions made provided valuable inputs towards prevention of biomass ash sintering, which occurs at higher temperatures and negatively affects biomass combustion process. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42011: Development and improvement of technologies for energy efficient and environmentally sound use of several types of agricultural and forest biomass and possible utilization for cogeneration i br. TR33042: Fluidized bed combustion facility improvements as a step forward in developing energy efficient and environmentally sound waste combustion

  3. Principle component analysis of flue gas exhaust and health risk estimates for the population around a functional incinerator in the vicinity of Rawalpindi Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, a long term monitoring of flue gas (FG was performed, which was emerging from a point incinerator, situated in the vicinity of Rawalpindi city of Pakistan. It was aimed to analyze and correlate the spread of particulate matter, and that of exhaust gases in the surrounding residential areas. The study spanned three consecutive years of investigation. The principal component (PCA and cluster analysis revealed two distinct groups of gasses from the exhaust i.e., CxHx, H2S, SO2 and CO and NOx, NO, NO2, and CO2 in PC 1 and 2, respectively. The distribution of Particulate matter 10 (PM10 remained constant over the period of three years. The concentration of PM10 remained higher than USEPA safe limits on all the sampling sites. PM10 on most of the sites correlated with the flue gasses emerging from the point source. The results indicate the influence of the flue gas exhaust on the surrounding environment, and a probable association with the public health.

  4. Development of the dynamic plant simulation in CO{sub 2}-recovery type pulverized-coal fired power plant applied oxygen/recycled flue gas combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, T.; Kiga, T.; Fujita, N.; Inoue, T.; Murata, Y.; Arai, K.; Okawa, M.; Seo, Y.

    1999-07-01

    Based on the basic designing of 1,000 MW power plant, the dynamic plant simulation was conducted in order to confirm the realization of the oxygen/recycled flue gas (O{sub 2}/RFG) combustion system to recover CO{sub 2} from pulverized-coal fired power plants. First of all, the basic designing of 1,000 MWe pulverized-coal fired power plant applied O{sub 2}/RFG combustion was performed. In the system, the greater part of the flue gas from the boiler was recycled and used as combustion gas after mixing with oxygen and transported gas for pulverized-coal. Five air separation units (ASUs) were installed and they supplied the product oxygen controlled in oxygen flow rate and oxygen concentration to the boiler. During load change, start up and shut down of the plant, therefore it was supposed to be difficult to control the flue gas oxygen concentration, the wind box oxygen concentration, the steam condition and so on in the system. So as to make clear the operation ability of the plant, the dynamic simulation was conducted based on the results of the basic designing on engineering work stations (EWS) for plant load change and start up. The program of the dynamic characteristics analysis simulator was developed as a functional expansion of advanced power plant simulation system (APSS) which had been developed by IHI for energy power plants. As the results, it was found that the steam condition at the outlet of the boiler and the draft and the gas concentration at each point could be successfully controlled, though it took a long time to change the combustion mode from air combustion to O{sub 2}/RFG combustion. Finally, it was confirmed that pulverized-coal fired power plant applied O{sub 2}/RFG combustion was a practical system for CO{sub 2} recovery.

  5. Physics of gas breakdown for ion beam transport in gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Rose, D.V.; Hubbard, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.; Welch, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed analysis, experiments, and computer simulations are producing a new understanding of gas breakdown during intense ion beam transport in neutral gas. Charge neutralization of beam micro clumps is shown to limit the net clump potentials to a non-zero value π min , which can lead to divergence growth and axial energy spreading. At pressures approx-gt 1 Torr, plasma shielding should substantially reduce this effect Current neutralization has been studied in experiments on the GAMBLE II accelerator. The importance of fast electrons (knockons and runaways) has been established in IPROP simulations, which are in agreement with the experiments. For light ion fusion parameters with pressures approx-gt 1 Torr, very small net current fractions (much-lt 1%) appear feasible, permitting ballistic transport in gas. Self-pinched requires higher net current fractions (≥ 2%) and preliminary IPROP code results indicate that this appears achievable for small-radius intense beams in lower pressure gases (approx-gt Torr). Several self-pinched transport concepts look promising. The importance of these results for both light ion fusion and heavy ion fusion is discussed

  6. The Role of Pore-Formers on Grain Interior and Grain Boundary Conductivity in Tape-Cast Porous Sheets for Electrochemical Flue Gas Purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Cristine Grings; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Stamate, Eugen

    2018-01-01

    Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) electrolytes for electrochemical flue gas purification were fabricated by means of tape casting with different types, shapes and sizes of pore-formers. The sintered bodies were characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, to investigate the role of the different...... pore-formers on the electrochemical properties of the cast tapes. A strong effect of the different pore-formers on the conductivity (both grain interior and grain boundary conductivities) was observed. In addition, the conductivity data were also correlated with previously obtained gas permeability...

  7. Microalgal technology for remediation of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas: A technoeconomic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, K.L.; Sheehan, J.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Biotechnology Center for Fuels and Chemicals

    1996-12-01

    Power plants burning fossil fuels are a major source of CO{sub 2}, which is implicated in global warming. Microalgal systems, which photosynthetically assimilate CO{sub 2}, can be used to mitigate this major greenhouse gas. A technoeconomic model was developed for trapping CO{sub 2} from flue gases by microalgae in outdoor ponds. The model allows the authors to make some notable observations about the microalgal process. For example, although it was known that the delivered CO{sub 2} cost is an important parameter, this model demonstrates in quantitative terms that the targeted improvements for productivity and lipid content double the relative impact of CO{sub 2} resource cost on total annualized cost of the technology. The model also shows that both algal lipid content and growth rate are important for an economical process, but a trade-off exists between the two, i.e., a high lipid content and low growth rate combination can be as effective as a low lipid content and high growth rate combination. Model predictions were also used to compare the microalgal technology with alternative technologies in terms of CO{sub 2} mitigation costs. The mid-term process, which can be implemented in the near future, is competitive with other CO{sub 2} remediation technologies currently being proposed. Incorporating anticipated advances into the design basis, a CO{sub 2} mitigation cost of $30/t (CO{sub 2} avoided basis) is obtained for the long-term process, which is very promising. Deployment of this technology for CO{sub 2} mitigation looks attractive if research goals put forth by the model are achieved.

  8. Effect of byproducts of flue gas desulfurization on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    Full Text Available The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD are a useful external source of Ca(2+ for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using two different sodic soils (sodic soil I and sodic soil II and two BFGD rates. After the application of BFGD and leaching, the soil soluble salts were transformed from sodic salts containing Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 to neutral salts containing NaCl and Na2SO4. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, pH and electrical conductivity (EC decreased at all soil depths, and more significantly in the top soil depth. At a depth of 0-40 cm in both sodic soil I and sodic soil II, the SAR, EC and pH were less than 13, 4 dS m(-1 and 8.5, respectively. The changes in the chemical properties of the sodic soils reflected the changes in the ion composition of soluble salts. Leaching played a key role in the reclamation process and the reclamation effect was positively associated with the amount of leaching. The soil salts did not accumulate in the top soil layer, but there was a slight increase in the middle and bottom soil depths. The results demonstrate that the reclamation of sodic soils using BFGD is promising.

  9. Factors affecting the precipitation of pure calcium carbonate during the direct aqueous carbonation of flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyungsun; Jang, Young-Nam; Kim, Wonbaek; Lee, Myung Gyu; Shin, Dongbok; Bang, Jun-Hwan; Jeon, Chi Wan; Chae, Soo Chun

    2014-01-01

    The mineral carbonation of FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum was carried out through CO 2 sorption into ammonia solution containing FGD gypsum. High-purity calcium carbonate was precipitated from DCC (dissolved calcium carbonate) solution which was extracted during the induction period. The factors affecting the preparation of pure calcium carbonate were examined under the following conditions: CO 2 flow rate (1–3 L/min), ammonia content (4–12%), and S/L (solid-to-liquid) ratio (5–300 g/L). X-Ray diffraction study revealed that the PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate) was round-shaped vaterite. The induction time for PCC decreased as the CO 2 flow rate increased. The maximum formation efficiency for pure PCC was seen to increase linearly with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure PCC was the highest (90%) for S/L ratio of 5 g/L but it decreased as S/L ratio increased. On the other hand, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of DCC. It is believed that the pure PCC would add an economic value to the FGD gypsum carbonation for industrial CO 2 sequestration. - Highlights: • Pure and white CaCO 3 was synthesized using induction period during direct carbonation of FGD gypsum. • Its formation efficiency was increased with ammonia content but decreased with solid-to-liquid ratio. • This method is expected to extend to other industrial CO 2 sequestration for the enhanced economic value of precipitated CaCO 3

  10. Biogeochemical oxidation of calcium sulfite hemihydrate to gypsum in flue gas desulfurization byproduct using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Duane; Smith, Jacques J; Chen, Linxi; Kreinberg, Allison; Wallace, Brianna; White, Robby

    2017-10-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a well-established air treatment technology for coal and oil combustion gases that commonly uses lime or pulverized limestone aqueous slurries to precipitate sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) as crystalline calcium salts. Under forced oxidation (excess oxygen) conditions, FGD byproduct contains almost entirely (>92%) gypsum (CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O), a useful and marketable commodity. In contrast, FGD byproduct formed in oxygen deficient oxidation systems contains a high percentage of hannebachite (CaSO 3 ·0.5H 2 O) to yield a material with no commercial value, poor dewatering characteristics, and that is typically disposed in landfills. Hannebachite in FGD byproduct can be chemically converted to gypsum; however, the conditions that support rapid formation of gypsum require large quantities of acids or oxidizers. This work describes a novel, patent pending application of microbial physiology where a natural consortium of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was used to convert hannebachite-enriched FGD byproduct into a commercially valuable, gypsum-enriched product (US Patent Assignment 503373611). To optimize the conversion of hannebachite into gypsum, physiological studies on the SOB were performed to define their growth characteristics. The SOB were found to be aerobic, mesophilic, neutrophilic, and dependent on a ready supply of ammonia. They were capable of converting hannebachite to gypsum at a rate of approximately five percent per day when the culture was applied to a 20 percent FGD byproduct slurry and SOB growth medium. 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the SOB consortium contained a variety of different bacterial genera including both SOB and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Halothiobacillus, Thiovirga and Thiomonas were the dominant sulfur-oxidizing genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum on Reducing Soluble Phosphorus in Successive Runoff Events from a Coastal Plain Bermudagrass Pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dexter B; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the threat that pastures intensively managed with poultry litter (PL) pose to accelerating eutrophication is a major issue in the southeastern United States. Gypsum (CaSO) has been identified as a promising management tool for ameliorating litter P losses to runoff. Thus, research was conducted to elucidate gypsum's residual effects on P losses from a bermudagrass ( L.) pasture. Runoff events (60 min) were created using rainfall simulations. Treatments consisted of applying four flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum rates (0, 2.2, 4.4, and 8.9 Mg ha) to bermudagrass fertilized with 13.4 Mg ha PL plus a nonfertilized check (no litter or gypsum) and 8.9 Mg ha FGD gypsum only as controls. Rainfall simulations (∼ 85 mm h) were conducted immediately, 5 wk, and 6 mo (i.e., at the end of growing season) after PL application to determine gypsum's effectiveness at controlling P loss over successive runoff events. The greatest dissolved P (DP) in runoff occurred immediately after PL application. Gypsum effectively reduced cumulative DP concentration losses (54%) compared with PL alone in initial runoff events. Gypsum reduced DP concentrations in succeeding runoff events also regardless of timing, suggesting that its effect is persistent and will not diminish over a growing season. Generally, maximum DP reductions were achieved with 8.9 Mg ha. However, it was surmised from this study that optimal P reduction in a bermudagrass pasture can be achieved with 4.4 Mg ha. Information ascertained from this study may be useful in aiding land managers making prescriptions for management practices that reduce DP losses from agricultural fields. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, March 11, 1993--June 11, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    There are two basic approaches to addressing the problem of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions: (1) desulfurize (and denitrogenate) the feedstock prior to or during combustion; or (2) scrub the resultant SO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen from the boiler flue gases. The flue gas processing alternative has been addressed in this project via microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} by sulfate-reducing bacteria

  13. Study on the mechanism of a manganese-based catalyst for catalytic NOX flue gas denitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wen, Xin; Lei, Zhang; Gao, Long; Sha, Xiangling; Ma, Zhenhua; He, Huibin; Wang, Yusu; Jia, Yang; Li, Yonghui

    2018-04-01

    Manganese-based bimetallic catalysts were prepared with self-made pyrolysis coke as carrier and its denitration performance of low-temperature SCR (selective catalyst reduction) was studied. The effects of different metal species, calcination temperature, calcination time and the metal load quantity on the denitration performance of the catalyst were studied by orthogonal test. The denitration mechanism of the catalyst was analyzed by XRD (X-ray diffraction), SEM (scanning electron microscope), BET test and transient test. The experiments show that: * The denitration efficiency of Mn-based bimetallic catalysts mainly relates to the metal type, the metal load quantity and the catalyst adjuvant type. * The optimal catalyst preparation conditions are as follows: the load quantity of monometallic MnO2 is 10%, calcined at 300°C for 4h, and then loaded with 8% CeO2, calcined at 350°Cfor 3h. * The denitration mechanism of manganese-based bimetallic oxide catalysts is stated as: NH3 is firstly adsorbed by B acid center Mn-OH which nears Mn4+==O to form NH4+, NH4+ was then attacked by the gas phase NO to form N2, H2O and Mn3+-OH. Finally, Mn3+-OH was oxidized by O2 to regenerate Mn4+.

  14. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part II: Exposures in SO2 containing atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    In biomass fired power plants, the fast corrosion of superheaters is facilitatedby the presence of corrosive flue gas species, for example, SO2, which arereleased during combustion. To understand the role of the gas species on thecorrosion process, comparative laboratory exposures of deposit (KCl......)-coatedand deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG) samples to gas mixturescontaining SO2 was carried out, under conditions relevant to biomass-firing.Exposures were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, in oxidizingsulphidizing,and oxidizing-sulphidizing-chlorinating gas mixtures containing60 ppmv...... SO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-rayspectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques werecomplimentarily applied to characterize the resulting corrosion products. Apartially molten K2SO4-layer formed on KCl coated specimens, and corrosionresulted in localized...

  15. In-Field Experimental Verification of Cultivation of Microalgae Chlorella sp. Using the Flue Gas from a Cogeneration Unit as a Source of Carbon Dioxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštánek, František; Šabata, Stanislav; Šolcová, Olga; Maléterová, Ywetta; Kaštánek, P.; Brányiková, I.; Kuthan, K.; Zachleder, Vilém

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 11 (2010), s. 961-966 ISSN 0734-242X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/1270; GA MŠk OE09025 Grant - others:CEZ(CZ) 2009.S079.02 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : carbon dioxide recovery * flat-prism photobioreactor * flue gas Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.222, year: 2010

  16. The impact of co-firing sunflower husk pellets with coal in a boiler on the chemical composition of flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajemska Monika

    2017-01-01

    The calculations showed that the most important influence on the composition of the flue gas from the co-firing process of coal with sunflower husk has a composition of biomass. It should be emphasized that the results of computer simulations obtained by the authors have an useful aspect and can be applied in practice, especially to the analysis of the mechanism of chloride corrosion which is possible to occur due to the chlorine content in the biomass. They may also be useful for evaluating the unburned hydrocarbons produced by combustion of rich mixtures (λ < 1.0.

  17. Full-scale utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) system adipic acid demonstration program. Volume 2. Continuous emissions monitoring results. Final report Jun 80-Nov 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Owen, M.L.

    1983-06-01

    The report culminates a series of projects sponsored by the EPA, investigating the use of adipic acid as an additive to enhance SO/sub 2/ removal in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, using limestone reagent. A 9-month program at the 194-MW Southwest Power Plant (SWPP) of City Utilities, Springfield, MO, demonstrated the effectiveness of adipic acid and dibasic acids (the latter, by-products of the production of adipic acid). The program examined the effect of adipic acid addition on a limestone FGD system under natural and forced-oxidation modes of operation.

  18. Full-scale utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) system adipic acid demonstration program. Volume 1. Process results. Final report Jun 80-Nov 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, O.W. Jr; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Owen, M.L.

    1983-06-01

    The report culminates a series of projects sponsored by the EPA, investigating the use of adipic acid as an additive to enhance SO/sub 2/ removal in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, using limestone reagent. A 9-month program at the 194-MW Southwest Power Plant (SWPP) of City Utilities, Springfield, MO, demonstrated the effectiveness of adipic acid and dibasic acids (the latter, by-products of the production of adipic acid). The program examined the effect of adipic acid addition on a limestone FGD system under natural and forced-oxidation modes of operation.

  19. A Highly Stable Microporous Covalent Imine Network Adsorbent for Natural Gas Upgrading and Flue Gas CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2016-06-06

    The feasible capture and separation of CO2 and N2 from CH4 is an important task for natural gas upgrading and the control of greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we studied the microporous covalent imine networks (CIN) material prepared through Schiff base condensation and exhibited superior chemical robustness under both acidic and basic conditions and high thermal stability. The material possesses a relatively uniform nanoparticle size of approximately 70 to 100 nm. This network featured permanent porosity with a high surface area (722 m2g-1) and micropores. A single-component gas adsorption study showed enhanced CO2 and CH4 uptakes of 3.32 mmol/g and 1.14 mmol/g, respectively, at 273 K and 1 bar, coupled with high separation selectivities for CO2/CH4, CH4/N2, and CO2/N2 of 23, 11.8 and 211, respectively. The enriched Lewis basicity in the porous skeletons favours the interaction of quadrupolar CO2 and polarizable CH4, resulting in enhanced CH4 and CO2 uptake and high CH4/N2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 selectivities. Breakthrough experiments showed high CO2/CH4, CH4/N2 and CO2/N2 selectivities of 7.29, 40 and 125, respectively, at 298 K and 1 bar. High heats of adsorption for CH4 and CO2 (QstCH4; 32.61 kJ mol-1 and QstCO2; 42.42 kJ mol-1) provide the ultimate validation for the high selectivity. To the best of our knowledge, such a versatile adsorbent material that displays both enhanced uptake and selectivity for a variety of binary gas mixtures, including CO2/ CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2, has not been extensively explored.

  20. Determination of Polychlorinated Diben-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans in Flue Gas by High Resolution Gas Chromatography Coupled with High Resolution Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.; Yan, J. H.; Li, X. D.; Cen, K. F.

    2007-01-01

    In 1988 the first municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator plant was built in Shenzhen, China. Since then Beijing, Shanghai and other big cities have built a few MSW incineration plants. MSW incineration has gradually been used in some cities of China due to its advantages such as significant volume reduction (about 90%), mass reduction (about 70%), and toxicity reduction of the waste and energy recovery. However, MSW incineration is sometimes considered to the general public as the secondary pollution source, because of concerns about is toxic combustion byproducts (TCBs). Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are the most toxic compounds among the TCBs. In this paper, PCDD/Fs in flue gas produced from a MSW incinerator were isokinetically withdrawn and collected in a multi component sampling train. Then the PCDD/Fs samples were extracted, concentrated and cleaned up step by step. Finally, the determination of PCDD/Fs was carried out by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). The two PCDD/Fs emission levels were the similar, which was 0.115 and 0.096ng TEQ/Nm3 although different sampling time. The PCDD/Fs emission levels were lower than the PCDD/Fs emission regulation in China (1.0 ng TEQ / Nm3) and close to the developed countries' regulations, i.e., 0.1ng TEQ/Nm3. 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF) was the dominant congener of the total TEQ

  1. Determination of Polychlorinated Diben-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans in Flue Gas by High Resolution Gas Chromatography Coupled with High Resolution Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Yan, J. H.; Li, X. D.; Cen, K. F.

    2007-06-01

    In 1988 the first municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator plant was built in Shenzhen, China. Since then Beijing, Shanghai and other big cities have built a few MSW incineration plants. MSW incineration has gradually been used in some cities of China due to its advantages such as significant volume reduction (about 90%), mass reduction (about 70%), and toxicity reduction of the waste and energy recovery. However, MSW incineration is sometimes considered to the general public as the secondary pollution source, because of concerns about is toxic combustion byproducts (TCBs). Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are the most toxic compounds among the TCBs. In this paper, PCDD/Fs in flue gas produced from a MSW incinerator were isokinetically withdrawn and collected in a multi component sampling train. Then the PCDD/Fs samples were extracted, concentrated and cleaned up step by step. Finally, the determination of PCDD/Fs was carried out by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). The two PCDD/Fs emission levels were the similar, which was 0.115 and 0.096ng TEQ/Nm3 although different sampling time. The PCDD/Fs emission levels were lower than the PCDD/Fs emission regulation in China (1.0 ng TEQ / Nm3) and close to the developed countries' regulations, i.e., 0.1ng TEQ/Nm3. 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF) was the dominant congener of the total TEQ.

  2. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tin dioxide gas sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Electron beam; irradiation; gas sensor; tin dioxide. 1. Introduction. The theory, fabrication and application of semiconducting gas sensors, has been well developed in the last thirty years. However, their limited selectivity and sensitivity are still problematic. The usual methods to improve gas sensing properties of SnO2 gas ...

  3. Simultaneous purifying of Hg0, SO2, and NOx from flue gas by Fe3+/H2O2: the performance and purifying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yi; Li, Liuliu; Lu, Pei; Cui, Jiansheng; Li, Qianli; Yan, Bojun; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Mengsi

    2018-03-01

    Hg 0 , SO 2 , and NOx result in heavily global environmental pollution and serious health hazards. Up to now, how to efficiently remove mercury with SO 2 and NOx from flue gas is still a tough task. In this study, series of high oxidizing Fenton systems were employed to purify the pollutants. The experimental results showed that Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 was more suitable to purify Hg 0 than Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 and Cu 2+ /H 2 O 2. The optimal condition includes Fe 3+ concentration of 0.008 mol/L, Hg 0 inlet concentration of 40 μg/m 3 , solution temperature of 50 °C, pH of 3, H 2 O 2 concentration of 0.7 mol/L, and O 2 percentage of 6%. When SO 2 and NOx were taken into account under the optimal condition, Hg 0 removal efficiency could be enhanced to 91.11% while the removal efficiency of both NOx and SO 2 was slightly declined, which was consistent to the analysis of purifying mechanism. The removal efficiency of Hg 0 was stimulated by accelerating the conversion of Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ , which resulted from the existence of SO 2 and NOx. The results of this study suggested that simultaneously purifying Hg 0 , SO 2 , and NOx from flue gas is feasible.

  4. A Green Desulfurization Technique: Utilization of Flue Gas SO2 to Produce H2 via a Photoelectrochemical Process Based on Mo-Doped BiVO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A green photoelectrochemical (PEC process with simultaneous SO2 removal and H2 production has attracted an increasing attention. The proposed process uses flue gas SO2 to improve H2 production. The improvement of the efficiency of this process is necessary before it can become industrial viable. Herein, we reported a Mo modified BiVO4 photocatalysts for a simultaneous SO2 removal and H2 production. And the PEC performance could be significantly improved with doping and flue gas removal. The evolution rate of H2 and removal of SO2 could be enhanced by almost three times after Mo doping as compared with pristine BiVO4. The enhanced H2 production and SO2 removal is attributed to the improved bulk charge carrier transportation after Mo doping, and greatly enhanced oxidation reaction kinetics on the photoanode due to the formation of SO32− after SO2 absorption by the electrolyte. Due to the utilization of SO2 to improve the production of H2, the proposed PEC process may become a profitable desulfurization technique.

  5. Photooxidative removal of Hg0 from simulated flue gas using UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process: Influence of operational parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Ding, Kuan; Yu, Lulu

    2014-01-01

    Element mercury (Hg 0 ) from flue gas is difficult to remove because of its low solubility in water and high volatility. A new technology for photooxidative removal of Hg 0 with an ultraviolet (UV)/H 2 O 2 advanced oxidation process is studied in an efficient laboratory-scale bubble column reactor. Influence of several key operational parameters on Hg 0 removal efficiency is investigated. The results show that an increase in the UV light power, H 2 O 2 initial concentration or H 2 O 2 solution volume will enhance Hg 0 removal. The Hg 0 removal is inhibited by an increase of the Hg 0 initial concentration. The solution initial pH and pH conditioning agent have a remarkable synergistic effect. The highest Hg 0 removal efficiencies are achieved at the UV light power of 36W, H 2 O 2 initial concentration of 0.125 mol/L, Hg 0 initial concentration of 25.3 - g/Nm 3 , solution initial pH of 5, H 2 O 2 solution volume of 600 ml, respectively. In addition, the O 2 percentage has little effect on the Hg 0 removal efficiency. This study is beneficial for the potential practical application of Hg 0 removal from coal-fired flue gas with UV/H 2 O 2 advanced oxidation process

  6. Fuzzy intelligence for investigating the correlation between growth performance and metabolic yields of a Chlorella sp. exposed to various flue gas schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Virthie; Swalaha, Feroz Mahomed; Nasr, Mahmoud; Bux, Faizal

    2017-11-01

    A Chlorella sp. was cultivated in a photobioreactor under different experimental conditions to investigate its acclimation to high-CO 2 exposures. When the microalgae was grown under controlled flue gas sparging and optimised nutrients, the biomass concentration increased to 3.415±0.145gL -1 and the maximum protein yield was obtained (57.500±0.351% ww -1 ). However, when the culture was exposed to continuous flue gas, the lowest biomass growth (1.665±0.129gL -1 ) was noted. Under these conditions, high carbohydrate and lipid values were recorded (38.600±1.320% ww -1 and 30.200±0.150% ww -1 ), respectively. A Sugeno-type fuzzy model was employed to understand the correlation between peak biomass concentration (B max ), CO 2 uptake rate (qCO 2 ), and maximum relative electron transport rate (rETR max ) as inputs and carbohydrate, protein, and lipid yields as outputs. Results of the model were in agreement with the experimental data (r 2 -value >0.985). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The first experience with LHC beam gas ionization monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Dehning, B; Guerrero, A; Patecki, M; Versteegen, R

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Gas Ionization Monitors (BGI) are used to measure beam emittance on LHC. This paper describes the detectors and their operation and discusses the issues met during the commissioning. It also discusses the various calibration procedures used to correct for non-uniformity of Multi-Channel plates and to correct the beam size for effects affecting the electron trajectory after ionization.

  8. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tin dioxide gas sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the gas sensing performance of tin dioxide thin films toward H2 are studied. The tin dioxide thin films were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The results show that the sensitivity increased after electron beam irradiation. The electron beam irradiation effects on tin ...

  9. Transport of a relativistic electron beam through hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, P. de.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the transport properties of an electron beam through vacuum and through hydrogen gas with pressure ranging from 25 to 1000 Pa. Maximum beam energy and current are 0.8 MeV and 6 kA, respectively. The pulse length is around 150 ns. A description is given of the experimental device. Also the diagnostics for probing the beam and the plasma, produced by the beam, are discussed, as well as the data acquisition system. The interaction between the beam and hydrogen gas with a pressure around 200 Pa is considered. A plasma with density around 10 19 m -3 is produced within a few nanoseconds. Measurements yield the atomic hydrogen temperature, electron density, beam energy loss, and induced plasma current and these are compared with the results of a model combining gas ionization and dissociation, and turbulent plasma heating. The angular distribution of the beam electrons about the magnetic field axis is discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Exploiting the Undesired: Beam-Gas Interactions in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Baglin, V; Mereghetti, A

    2012-01-01

    The vacuum inside the LHC pipes has a key role in correct operation of the accelerator. The interaction of the beam with residual gas in the pipes can lead to the loss of the beam itself and damage accelerator components. Nevertheless, beam-gas interactions can be exploited to indirectly measure the gas pressure inside the beam pipe, detecting the secondaries produced. The showers generated are detected by Beam Loss Monitors, whose signals depend on the gas pressure. This technique would also allow to punctually measure the gas pressure in sections of the accelerator where vacuum gauges are not frequent, such as the arcs. The problem has been addressed by means of FLUKA simulations and the results have been benchmarked with direct measurements performed in the LHC in 2011.

  11. Improving the efficiency of the flue gas desulphurization plant at the Matra lignite-fired power plant by using adipic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Fielenbach; H. Bank; M. Schuetz; G. Ludanyi [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    At the Matra power plant in Hungary, changes in the operating mode of the power plant units as well as changes in legal framework conditions have made it necessary to increase the capacity of the flue gas desulphurization system which uses the limestone wet scrubbing process and was completed in the year 2000. The envisaged concept provides for adipic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}) to be used as an additive to the scrubbing liquid. The addition of adipic acid enhances SO{sub 2} removal by forming a buffer system together with the limestone in the falling droplets of the scrubber liquid and improves the solubility of the limestone in the slurry. Over the last few years, successful tests have been carried out in the power plants of the Rhenish lignite mining district on improving the efficiency of flue gas desulphurization systems by adding adipic acid. As the sulphur content of the lignite is low, the SO{sub 2} levels in the raw gas of these power plants show isolated peaks of max. 4,000 mg/m{sup 3} (N, dry; 6 vol.% O{sub 2}). Under these frame-work conditions, it could be demonstrated that the use of adipic acid enhances SO{sub 2} removal by up to 6 percentage points. As the sulphur content in the lignite used at the Matra power plant is much higher, resulting in SO{sub 2} levels in the raw gas ranging between 7,000 and 10,000 mg/m{sup 3} (N, dry; 6 vol.% O{sub 2}), previous studies and operating experience cannot be securely transferred. For this reason, tests were carried out at the Matra power plant in the autumn of 2004 to investigate the influence of adipic acid addition on the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal. The results were used to make recommendations on how to optimally operate the flue gas desulphurization systems at the Matra power plant from an economic point of view.

  12. Microbial reduction of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] as a means of by- product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Based on the work described simultaneous SO[sub 2]/No[sub x] removal from flue gas based on direct contact of the gas with SRB and T. denitrificans co-cultures or cultures-in-series has been eliminated as a viable process concept at this time. The technical reasons are as follows: (1) NO inhibition of SO[sub 2] reduction by D. desulfuricans - Although the NO concentrations used in the experiments described above are somewhat higher than that found in a typical flue gas, it is quite possible that at lower NO concentrations (or partial pressures) the inhibiting effects will simply take longer to become apparent. (2) Nitrate suppression of NO removal - As noted previously, the cultivation of T. denitrificans in a microbial flue gas treatment system (either one or two stages) would require sulfide-limiting conditions. Therefore, the electron acceptor must be in excess, requiring nitrate in the T. denitrificans process culture. As shown in experiments described above, nitrate significantly suppresses the removal of NO from a feed gas making simultaneous SO[sub 2]/NO[sub x] removal impractical by microbial means. (3) O[sub 2] inhibition of SO[sub 2] and NO reduction - It has been demonstrated that D. desulfuricans working cultures are tolerant of up to 1.7% O[sub 2] in the feed gas. However, further increases in the O[sub 2] partial pressure in the feed gas resulted in O[sub 2] inhibition of SO[sub 2] reduction. These inhibiting levels of O[sub 2] are comparable to those concentrations found in flue gases (3). Therefore, in any process in which raw flue gas contacts a D. desulfuricans culture marginal stability at best can be expected.

  13. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by- product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, June 11, 1992--September 11, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1992-12-31

    Based on the work described simultaneous SO{sub 2}/No{sub x} removal from flue gas based on direct contact of the gas with SRB and T. denitrificans co-cultures or cultures-in-series has been eliminated as a viable process concept at this time. The technical reasons are as follows: (1) NO inhibition of SO{sub 2} reduction by D. desulfuricans - Although the NO concentrations used in the experiments described above are somewhat higher than that found in a typical flue gas, it is quite possible that at lower NO concentrations (or partial pressures) the inhibiting effects will simply take longer to become apparent. (2) Nitrate suppression of NO removal - As noted previously, the cultivation of T. denitrificans in a microbial flue gas treatment system (either one or two stages) would require sulfide-limiting conditions. Therefore, the electron acceptor must be in excess, requiring nitrate in the T. denitrificans process culture. As shown in experiments described above, nitrate significantly suppresses the removal of NO from a feed gas making simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal impractical by microbial means. (3) O{sub 2} inhibition of SO{sub 2} and NO reduction - It has been demonstrated that D. desulfuricans working cultures are tolerant of up to 1.7% O{sub 2} in the feed gas. However, further increases in the O{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas resulted in O{sub 2} inhibition of SO{sub 2} reduction. These inhibiting levels of O{sub 2} are comparable to those concentrations found in flue gases (3). Therefore, in any process in which raw flue gas contacts a D. desulfuricans culture marginal stability at best can be expected.

  14. A novel oxidative method for the absorption of Hg0 from flue gas of coal fired power plants using task specific ionic liquid scrubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnea, Zach; Sachs, Tatyana; Chidambaram, Mandan; Sasson, Yoel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ionic liquid used as absorption media due to negligible vapor pressure. ► Formation of a stable complex between the oxidation agent and the absorption liquid prevents its sublimation. ► Remarkable concentration factor of six orders of magnitude of mercury/IL unlike active carbon injection that absorb ppb of Hg from flue. ► Reduced metallic mercury swiftly precipitated from the solution and could be quantitatively separated and collected. -- Abstract: A simple continuous process is described for the removal of mercury from gas streams (such as flue gas of a coal fired power stations) using imidazolium based Task Specific Ionic Liquids [TSILs] with the general structure ([RMIM][XI 2 − ]) where X = Cl, Br or I. The latter are formed by blending dialkylimidazolium halide salts with iodine. When applied in a gas/liquid scrubber, these salts were shown to absorb >99% of elemental mercury originally present in a gas stream in concentration of 75–400 ppb. The mercury abatement is attained by oxidating the mercury to HgI 2 which is bound as a stable IL complex ([RMIM + ][XHgI 2 − ]. The novel absorption system exhibits a remarkable mercury concentration factor of seven orders of magnitude. The final solution obtained contains up to 50% (w/w) mercury in the IL. Upon exposure to sodium formate, directly added to the saturated IL at 45 °C, reduced metallic mercury swiftly precipitated from the solution and could be quantitatively separated and collected. The free IL could be fully recycled

  15. Relationships between congener distribution patterns of PCDDs, PCDFs, PCNs, PCBs, PCBzs and PCPhs formed during flue gas cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Stina, E-mail: stina.jansson@chem.umu.se [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry, SE-901 83 Umea (Sweden); Andersson, Patrik L., E-mail: patrik.andersson@chem.umu.se [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2012-02-01

    The congener patterns of mono- to octa-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PC{sub 1-8}DD), dibenzofurans (PC{sub 1-8}DF), naphthalenes (PC{sub 1-8}N), mono- to deca-chlorinated biphenyls (PC{sub 1-10}B), di- to hexa-chlorinated benzenes (PC{sub 2-6}Bz) and mono- to penta-chlorinated phenols (PC{sub 1-5}Ph) in flue gas samples collected simultaneously at 450 Degree-Sign C, 300 Degree-Sign C and 200 Degree-Sign C in the post-combustion zone during waste incineration in a laboratory-scale reactor in a previous study, were in this study evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA). To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive chemical and multivariate analysis to date of the thermal formation of dioxins. The PCA indicated that different formation pathways occur in the temperature regions 450-300 Degree-Sign C and 300-200 Degree-Sign C, and reflected a chlorination effect of PCDF and PCDD between 450 Degree-Sign C and 200 Degree-Sign C which could not be discerned or was less pronounced for the other compound groups. Toxic equivalents (TEQs) of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs, as well as total TEQ values (TEQ{sub Total}) were also calculated, and correlations between changes in levels of specific congeners and the TEQs were explored in the PCA. Levels of four HxCDF congeners and 1,2,3,4,8-, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF showed the strongest correlations with TEQ{sub Total} (R{sup 2} {>=} 0.9). In addition, levels of 1,2,4-TriCBz correlated strongly with TEQ{sub Total} (R{sup 2} > 0.7), supporting previous reports that it may be a potential indicator of the TEQ. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different pathways dominating between 450-300 Degree-Sign C and 300-200 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorination of PCDD/Fs between 450 Degree-Sign C and 200 Degree-Sign C but not for the other chloroaromatics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best TEQ{sub Total} correlations for four HxCDFs, and 1,2,3,4,8-/1,2,3,7,8- and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF. Black

  16. Slipstream pilot-scale demonstration of a novel amine-based post-combustion technology for carbon dioxide capture from coal-fired power plant flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, Krish R. [Linde LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-03

    Post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) technology offers flexibility to treat the flue gas from both existing and new coal-fired power plants and can be applied to treat all or a portion of the flue gas. Solvent-based technologies are today the leading option for PCC from commercial coal-fired power plants as they have been applied in large-scale in other applications. Linde and BASF have been working together to develop and further improve a PCC process incorporating BASF’s novel aqueous amine-based solvent technology. This technology offers significant benefits compared to other solvent-based processes as it aims to reduce the regeneration energy requirements using novel solvents that are very stable under the coal-fired power plant feed gas conditions. BASF has developed the desired solvent based on the evaluation of a large number of candidates. In addition, long-term small pilot-scale testing of the BASF solvent has been performed on a lignite-fired flue gas. In coordination with BASF, Linde has evaluated a number of options for capital cost reduction in large engineered systems for solvent-based PCC technology. This report provides a summary of the work performed and results from a project supported by the US DOE (DE-FE0007453) for the pilot-scale demonstration of a Linde-BASF PCC technology using coal-fired power plant flue gas at a 1-1.5 MWe scale in Wilsonville, AL at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). Following a project kick-off meeting in November 2011 and the conclusion of pilot plant design and engineering in February 2013, mechanical completion of the pilot plant was achieved in July 2014, and final commissioning activities were completed to enable start-up of operations in January 2015. Parametric tests were performed from January to December 2015 to determine optimal test conditions and evaluate process performance over a variety of operation parameters. A long-duration 1500-hour continuous test campaign was performed from May to

  17. SO x /NO x Removal from Flue Gas Streams by Solid Adsorbents: A Review of Current Challenges and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Fateme; Rownaghi, Ali A.; Monjezi, Saman; Lively, Ryan P.; Jones, Christopher W.

    2015-09-17

    One of the main challenges in the power and chemical industries is to remove generated toxic or environmentally harmful gases before atmospheric emission. To comply with stringent environmental and pollutant emissions control regulations, coal-fired power plants must be equipped with new technologies that are efficient and less energy-intensive than status quo technologies for flue gas cleanup. While conventional sulfur oxide (SOx) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) removal technologies benefit from their large-scale implementation and maturity, they are quite energy-intensive. In view of this, the development of lower-cost, less energy-intensive technologies could offer an advantage. Significant energy and cost savings can potentially be realized by using advanced adsorbent materials. One of the major barriers to the development of such technologies remains the development of materials that are efficient and productive in removing flue gas contaminants. In this review, adsorption-based removal of SOx/NOx impurities from flue gas is discussed, with a focus on important attributes of the solid adsorbent materials as well as implementation of the materials in conventional and emerging acid gas removal technologies. The requirements for effective adsorbents are noted with respect to their performance, key limitations, and suggested future research directions. The final section includes some key areas for future research and provides a possible roadmap for the development of technologies for the removal of flue gas impurities that are more efficient and cost-effective than status quo approaches.

  18. Improved biomass and lipid production in a mixotrophic culture of Chlorella sp. KR-1 with addition of coal-fired flue-gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Kyubock; Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jin-Suk; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2014-11-01

    Industrial CO2-rich flue-gases, owing to their eco-toxicity, have yet to be practically exploited for microalgal biomass and lipid production. In this study, various autotrophic and mixotrophic culture modes for an oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1 were compared for the use in actual coal-fired flue-gas. Among the mixotrophic conditions tested, the fed-batch feedings of glucose and the supply of air in dark cycles showed the highest biomass (561 mg/L d) and fatty-acid methyl-ester (168 mg/L d) productivities. This growth condition also resulted in the maximal population of microalgae and the minimal population and types of KR-1-associated-bacterial species as confirmed by particle-volume-distribution and denaturing-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses. Furthermore, microalgal lipid produced was assessed, based on its fatty acid profile, to meet key biodiesel standards such as saponification, iodine, and cetane numbers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reclamation of acid, toxic coal spoils using wet flue gas desulfurization by-product, fly ash and sewage sludge. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, D.A.; Vimmerstedt, J.P.; Stehouwer, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    Establishment of vegetation on acid abandoned minelands requires modification of soil physical and chemical conditions. Covering the acid minesoil with topsoil or borrow soil is a common practice but this method may be restricted by availability of borrow soil and cause damage to the borrow site. An alternative approach is to use waste materials as soil amendments. There is a long history of using sewage sludge and fly ash as amendments for acid minesoils. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are newer materials that are also promising amendments. Most flue gas sludges are mixtures of Calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}), calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}), calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}], and fly ash. Some scrubbing processes produce almost pure gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O). The primary purpose of the project is to evaluate two wet FGD by-products for effects on vegetation establishment and surface and ground water quality on an acid minesoil. One by-product from the Conesville, OH power plant (American Electric Power Service Corporation) contains primarily calcium sulfite and fly ash. The other by-product (Mg-gypsum FGD) from an experimental scrubber at the Zimmer power plant (Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company) is primarily gypsum with 4% magnesium hydroxide. These materials were compared with borrow soil and sewage sludge as minesoil amendments. Combinations of each FGD sludge with sewage sludge were also tested. This report summarizes two years of measurements of chemical composition of runoff water, ground water at two depths in the subsoil, soil chemical properties, elemental composition and yield of herbaceous ground cover, and elemental composition, survival and height of trees planted on plots treated with the various amendments. The borrow soil is the control for comparison with the other treatments.

  20. Reclamation of acid, toxic coal spoils using wet flue gas desulfurization by-product, fly ash and sewage sludge. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kost, D.A.; Vimmerstedt, J.P.; Stehouwer, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    Establishment of vegetation on acid abandoned minelands requires modification of soil physical and chemical conditions. Covering the acid minesoil with topsoil or borrow soil is a common practice but this method may be restricted by availability of borrow soil and cause damage to the borrow site. An alternative approach is to use waste materials as soil amendments. There is a long history of using sewage sludge and fly ash as amendments for acid minesoils. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are newer materials that are also promising amendments. Most flue gas sludges are mixtures of Calcium sulfate (CaSO 4 ), calcium sulfite (CaSO 3 ), calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ), calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH) 2 ], and fly ash. Some scrubbing processes produce almost pure gypsum (CaSO 4 2H 2 O). The primary purpose of the project is to evaluate two wet FGD by-products for effects on vegetation establishment and surface and ground water quality on an acid minesoil. One by-product from the Conesville, OH power plant (American Electric Power Service Corporation) contains primarily calcium sulfite and fly ash. The other by-product (Mg-gypsum FGD) from an experimental scrubber at the Zimmer power plant (Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company) is primarily gypsum with 4% magnesium hydroxide. These materials were compared with borrow soil and sewage sludge as minesoil amendments. Combinations of each FGD sludge with sewage sludge were also tested. This report summarizes two years of measurements of chemical composition of runoff water, ground water at two depths in the subsoil, soil chemical properties, elemental composition and yield of herbaceous ground cover, and elemental composition, survival and height of trees planted on plots treated with the various amendments. The borrow soil is the control for comparison with the other treatments

  1. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  2. A Diaminopropane-Appended Metal–Organic Framework Enabling Efficient CO 2 Capture from Coal Flue Gas via a Mixed Adsorption Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, Phillip J.; Siegelman, Rebecca L.; Forse, Alexander C.; Gonzalez, Miguel I.; Runčevski, Tomče [Materials; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Long, Jeffrey R. [Materials

    2017-09-14

    A new diamine-functionalized metal–organic framework comprised of 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (dmpn) appended to the Mg2+ sites lining the channels of Mg2(dobpdc) (dobpdc4– = 4,4'-dioxidobiphenyl-3,3'-dicarboxylate) is characterized for the removal of CO2 from the flue gas emissions of coal-fired power plants. Unique to members of this promising class of adsorbents, dmpn–Mg2(dobpdc) displays facile step-shaped adsorption of CO2 from coal flue gas at 40 °C and near complete CO2 desorption upon heating to 100 °C, enabling a high CO2 working capacity (2.42 mmol/g, 9.1 wt %) with a modest 60 °C temperature swing. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters of adsorption for dmpn–Mg2(dobpdc) suggests that the narrow temperature swing of its CO2 adsorption steps is due to the high magnitude of its differential enthalpy of adsorption (Δhads = -73 ± 1 kJ/mol), with a larger than expected entropic penalty for CO2 adsorption (Δsads = -204 ± 4 J/mol·K) positioning the step in the optimal range for carbon capture from coal flue gas. In addition, thermogravimetric analysis and breakthrough experiments indicate that, in contrast to many adsorbents, dmpn–Mg2(dobpdc) captures CO2 effectively in the presence of water and can be subjected to 1000 humid adsorption/desorption cycles with minimal degradation. Solid-state 13C NMR spectra and single-crystal X-ray diffraction structures of the Zn analogue reveal that this material adsorbs CO2 via formation of both ammonium carbamates and carbamic acid pairs, the latter of which are crystallographically verified for the first time in a porous material. Taken together, these properties render dmpn–Mg2(dobpdc) one of the most promising adsorbents for carbon capture applications.

  3. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 3: SOx/NOx/Hg Removal for Low Sulfur Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanfir, Monica; Solunke, Rahul; Shah, Minish

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxycombustion technology. The objective of Task 3 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning low sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was to conduct an experimental investigation and to develop a novel process for simultaneously removal of SOx and NOx from power plants that would operate on low sulfur coal without the need for wet-FGD & SCRs. A novel purification process operating at high pressures and ambient temperatures was developed. Activated carbon's catalytic and adsorbent capabilities are used to oxidize the sulfur and nitrous oxides to SO{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} species, which are adsorbed on the activated carbon and removed from the gas phase. Activated carbon is regenerated by water wash followed by drying. The development effort commenced with the screening of commercially available activated carbon materials for their capability to remove SO{sub 2}. A bench-unit operating in batch mode was constructed to conduct an experimental investigation of simultaneous SOx and NOx removal from a simulated oxyfuel flue gas mixture. Optimal operating conditions and the capacity of the activated carbon to remove the contaminants were identified. The process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx. In the longevity tests performed on a batch unit, the retention capacity could be maintained at high level over 20 cycles. This process was able to effectively remove up to 4000 ppm SOx from the simulated feeds corresponding to oxyfuel flue gas from high sulfur coal plants. A dual bed continuous unit with five times the capacity of the batch unit was constructed to test continuous operation and longevity. Full

  4. IAEA final research co-ordination meeting on radiation processing of combustion flue gases. Poland, Zakopane, 24-28 May, 1993. Pts. 1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The symposium materials contain 19 articles being the actual review on worldwide development in radiation processing of combustion flue gases. The use of electron beams has to be very profitable in SO 2 and NO x removal. The application of electron accelerators in off-gas systems is very advanced now in Japan, Germany and Poland as well as pilot plants have been constructed there. Their technical details, control equipment, working parameters and obtained results have been presented at the symposium. The list of electron accelerators available on the world market, their beams parameters and new constructions designed for flue gas radiation treatment have been presented, too. Technical possibilities of electric discharges application for flue gas processing has been shown as well. Theoretical models of radiation-chemical reactions initiated by electrons, their mechanism and kinetics (also in heterogenous systems) has been proposed and discussed. 9 refs, 21 figs, 1 tab

  5. Commercial demonstration of the NOXSO SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal flue gas cleanup system. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, June 1--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The NOXSO process is a dry, post-combustion flue gas treatment technology which uses a regenerable sorbent to simultaneously adsorb sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from the flue gas of a coal-fired utility boiler. In the process, the SO{sub 2} is reduced to sulfur by-product (elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid, or liquid SO{sub 2}) and the NO{sub x} is reduced to nitrogen and oxygen. It is predicted that the process can economically remove 90% of the acid rain precursor gases from the flue gas stream in a retrofit or new facility. The objective of the NOXSO Demonstration Project is to design, construct, and operate a flue gas treatment system utilizing the NOXSO process at Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit {number_sign}1. The effectiveness of the process will be demonstrated by achieving significant reductions in emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. In addition, sufficient operating data will be obtained to confirm the process economics and provide a basis to guarantee performance on a commercial scale. The project is presently in the project definition and preliminary design phase. Data obtained during pilot plant testing which was completed on July 30, 1993 is being incorporated in the design of the commercial size plant. A suitable host site to demonstrate the NOXSO process on a commercial scale is presently being sought.

  6. Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature Range During Coal Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2007-06-30

    In chapter 1, the studies focused on the development of novel sorbents for reducing the carbon dioxide emissions at high temperatures. Our studies focused on cesium doped CaO sorbents with respect to other major flue gas compounds in a wide temperature range. The thermo-gravimetric analysis of sorbents with loadings of CaO doped on 20 wt% cesium demonstrated high CO{sub 2} sorption uptakes (up to 66 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent). It is remarkable to note that zero adsorption affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and NO at temperatures as high as 600 C was observed. For water vapor and nitrogen oxide we observed a positive effect for CO{sub 2} adsorption. In the presence of steam, the CO{sub 2} adsorption increased to the highest adsorption capacity of 77 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent. In the presence of nitrogen oxide, the final CO{sub 2} uptake remained same, but the rate of adsorption was higher at the initial stages (10%) than the case where no nitrogen oxide was fed. In chapter 2, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O, CaO, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, and Ca(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O were used as precursors for synthesis of CaO sorbents on this work. The sorbents prepared from calcium acetate (CaAc{sub 2}-CaO) resulted in the best uptake characteristics for CO{sub 2}. It possessed higher BET surface area and higher pore volume than the other sorbents. According to SEM images, this sorbent shows 'fluffy' structure, which probably contributes to its high surface area and pore volume. When temperatures were between 550 and 800 C, this sorbent could be carbonated almost completely. Moreover, the carbonation progressed dominantly at the initial short period. Under numerous adsorption-desorption cycles, the CaAc{sub 2}-CaO demonstrated the best reversibility, even under the existence of 10 vol % water vapor. In a 27 cyclic running, the sorbent sustained fairly high carbonation conversion of 62%. Pore size distributions indicate that their

  7. SNCR - Improved control utilising modern gas analysis systems, ammonia slip retention and formation of ammonium salts in flue gas processes; SNCR - Foerbaettrad reglering genom modern gasanalysteknik, infaangning och saltbildning av ammoniakoeverskott vid roekgasrening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer; Holmberg, P.; Soederbom, J.

    1996-10-01

    A key and fundamental feature of all regulating systems, including SNCR, is the collection of representative measurement parameters which reflect the changes in the process, preferably with the shortest response time possible. Effective regulating equipment, the injection system in the SNCR process, is required which must offer sufficient flexibility so that the reducing agent dosage is suited to flue gas flow, geometry of the channel, and can accommodate variations of the combustion process. The link between the injection system and the parameter signals is provided by a suitable computer algorithm which steers the process to achieve optimum performance within economic and environmental constraints. This project represents the first stage towards investigating the possibilities of improving the steering system of existing SNCR installations. The work focuses on the technical aspects associated with the measurement parameters, especially on how continual gas analysis techniques can be applied and used to regulate the process. In certain cases, gas measurements including ammonia, NH{sub 3}, are necessary in particle laden, raw flue gases (in situ measurements). The optical DOAS technique has been shown to be a suitable option for this application. A system for on-line speciation measurements of both gaseous and particle bound NH{sub 3} has been developed and proven in the field. An additional part of the project was to identify the most influential parameters affecting the process at two SNCR installations. Furthermore the degree of NH{sub 3} retention for three different types of flue gas cleaning systems has been studied. 32 refs, 39 figs, 6 tabs

  8. MOFs for CO2 capture and separation from flue gas mixtures: the effect of multifunctional sites on their adsorption capacity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijuan; Zhao, Yonggang; Gong, Qihan; Li, Zhong; Li, Jing

    2013-01-25

    Microporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted tremendous attention because of their versatile structures and tunable porosity that allow almost unlimited ways to improve their properties and optimize their functionality, making them very promising for a variety of important applications, especially in the adsorption and separation of small gases and hydrocarbons. Numerous studies have demonstrated that MOFs with multifunctional groups, such as open metal sites (OMSs) and Lewis basic sites (LBSs), interact strongly with carbon dioxide and are particularly effective in its capture and separation from binary mixtures of CO(2) and N(2). In this feature article, we briefly review the current state of MOF development in this area, with an emphasis on the effect of multifunctional groups on the selectivity and capacity of MOFs for the CO(2) capture from flue gas mixtures.

  9. Synechococcus nidulans from a thermoelectric coal power plant as a potential CO2 mitigation in culture medium containing flue gas wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jessica Hartwig; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the intermittent addition of coal flue gas wastes (CO 2 , SO 2 , NO and ash) into a Synechococcus nidulans LEB 115 cultivation in terms of growth parameters, CO 2 biofixation and biomass characterization. The microalga from a coal thermoelectric plant showed tolerance up to 200ppm SO 2 and NO, with a maximum specific growth rate of 0.18±0.03d - 1 . The addition of thermal coal ash to the cultivation increased the Synechococcus nidulans LEB 115 maximum cell growth by approximately 1.3 times. The best CO 2 biofixation efficiency was obtained with 10% CO 2 , 60ppm SO 2 , 100ppm NO and 40ppm ash (55.0±3.1%). The biomass compositions in the assays were similar, with approximately 9.8% carbohydrates, 13.5% lipids and 62.7% proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE CHEMICAL FORMS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TARGET POLLUTANTS IN COAL-FIRED BOILER FLUE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terence J. McManus, Ph.D.

    1999-06-30

    Since approximately 55% of the electrical power produced in the U. S. is generated by coal-based power utility plants, there is serious concern about the massive amounts of coal combustion products emitted into the atmosphere annually. Furthermore, Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) requires the measurement and inventory of a possible 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from any stationary source producing more than 10 tons per year of any one pollutant or more than 25 tons per year of total pollutants. Although power utilities are not presently included on the list of source categories, the CAAA requires the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to carry out a study of emissions from electricity generation using fossil fuels. Since many of these HAPs are known to be present in coal derived flue gas, coal-fired electric power utilities may be subject to regulation following these studies if Congress considers it necessary. In a cooperative effort with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) initiated such a study in 1991. DOE-FETC commissioned five primary contractors to conduct emission studies at eight different coal-fired electric utilities. The eight sites represented a cross section of feed coal type, boiler designs, and particulate and gaseous pollutant control technologies. The major goal of these studies was to determine the sampling and analytical methodologies that could be used efficiently to perform these emission tests while producing representative and reliable emission data. The successful methodology could then be recommended to the EPA for use in compliance testing in the event the regulation of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants is implemented. A secondary purpose of the testing was to determine the effectiveness of the control technologies in reducing target hazardous air pollutants. Advanced Technology Systems, Inc

  11. The adipic acid enhanced flue gas desulfurization process for industrial boilers. Volume 2. Technical assessment. Final report Feb 81-Feb 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, G.P.; Hargrove, O.W. Jr

    1982-11-01

    The report gives results of an evaluation of an adipic acid enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on industrial boilers at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base. The SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency with the adipic acid averaged 94.3% over a 30-day period. This represents a significant improvement in the performance of the system using only limestone. Economic calculations for an industrial boiler adipic acid enhanced limestone FGD system indicate a slight reduction in both capital and operating expenses relative to a limestone-only system designed for 90% SO2 control of 3.5% sulfur coal. The costs are competitive with those of the dual alkali system. The successful demonstration of the adipic acid enhanced limestone system increases the number of demonstrated technologies available to a potential user.

  12. Conversion of actual flue gas CO 2 via cycloaddition to propylene oxide catalyzed by a single-site, recyclable zirconium catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2017-06-12

    A reusable zirconium-based catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 to propylene oxide (PO) was prepared by the surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) methodology. Accordingly, well-defined amounts of the ZrCl4·(OEt2)2 precursor were grafted on the surface of silica dehydroxylated at 700°C (SiO2-700) and at 200°C (SiO2-200) in order to afford surface coordination compounds with different podality and chemical environment. The identity of the surface complexes was thoroughly investigated by FT-IR, elemental microanalysis and solid state NMR and applied as a recoverable and reusable heterogeneous catalyst for the title reaction using pure CO2 and flue gas samples from a cement factory. The observed catalytic activity for the isolated zirconium complexes is rationalized by means of systematic DFT calculations.

  13. A windowless gas target for secondary beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Kishida, T; Shibata, M; Watanabe, H; Tsutsumi, T; Motomura, S; Ideguchi, E; Zhou, X H; Morikawa, T; Kubo, T; Ishihara, M

    1999-01-01

    A windowless gas target was developed for the production of secondary high-spin isomer beams (HSIB). An sup 1 sup 6 O target in the compound form of CO sub 2 gas was used to produce a sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 sup m Sm beam by using an sup 1 sup 6 O( sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 Xe, 7n) sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 sup m Sm reaction. The target gas pressure was kept constant at 50 Torr. A target thickness of about 1 mg/cm sup 2 was achieved with a 10 cm target length. Gas was recirculated and the consumption was very little.

  14. Mercury isotope signatures of seawater discharged from a coal-fired power plant equipped with a seawater flue gas desulfurization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haiying; Peng, Jingji; Yuan, Dongxing; Lu, Bingyan; Lin, Kunning; Huang, Shuyuan

    2016-07-01

    Seawater flue gas desulfurization (SFGD) systems are commonly used to remove acidic SO2 from the flue gas with alkaline seawater in many coastal coal-fired power plants in China. However, large amount of mercury (Hg) originated from coal is also transferred into seawater during the desulfurization (De-SO2) process. This research investigated Hg isotopes in seawater discharged from a coastal plant equipped with a SFGD system for the first time. Suspended particles of inorganic minerals, carbon residuals and sulfides are enriched in heavy Hg isotopes during the De-SO2 process. δ(202)Hg of particulate mercury (PHg) gradually decreased from -0.30‰ to -1.53‰ in study sea area as the distance from the point of discharge increased. The results revealed that physical mixing of contaminated De-SO2 seawater and uncontaminated fresh seawater caused a change in isotopic composition of PHg isotopes in the discharging area; and suggested that both De-SO2 seawater and local background contributed to PHg. The impacted sea area predicted with isotopic tracing technique was much larger than that resulted from a simple comparison of pollutant concentration. It was the first attempt to apply mercury isotopic composition signatures with two-component mixing model to trace the mercury pollution and its influence in seawater. The results could be beneficial to the coal-fired plants with SFGD systems to assess and control Hg pollution in sea area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface coal mine land reclamation using a dry flue gas desulfurization product: Short-term and long-term water responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Stehouwer, Richard; Tong, Xiaogang; Kost, Dave; Bigham, Jerry M; Dick, Warren A

    2015-09-01

    Abandoned coal-mined lands are a worldwide concern due to their potential negative environmental impacts, including erosion and development of acid mine drainage. A field study investigated the use of a dry flue gas desulfurization product for reclamation of abandoned coal mined land in USA. Treatments included flue gas desulfurization product at a rate of 280 Mg ha(-1) (FGD), FGD at the same rate plus 112 Mg ha(-1) yard waste compost (FGD/C), and conventional reclamation that included 20 cm of re-soil material plus 157 Mg ha(-1) of agricultural limestone (SOIL). A grass-legume sward was planted after treatment applications. Chemical properties of surface runoff and tile water (collected from a depth of 1.2m below the ground surface) were measured over both short-term (1-4 yr) and long-term (14-20 yr) periods following reclamation. The pH of surface runoff water was increased from approximately 3, and then sustained at 7 or higher by all treatments for up to 20 yr, and the pH of tile flow water was also increased and sustained above 5 for 20 yr. Compared with SOIL, concentrations of Ca, S and B in surface runoff and tile flow water were generally increased by the treatments with FGD product in both short- and long-term measurements and concentrations of the trace elements were generally not statistically increased in surface runoff and tile flow water over the 20-yr period. However, concentrations of As, Ba, Cr and Hg were occasionally elevated. These results suggest the use of FGD product for remediating acidic surface coal mined sites can provide effective, long-term reclamation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The synthetic evaluation of CuO-MnOx-modified pinecone biochar for simultaneous removal formaldehyde and elemental mercury from simulated flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yaoyao; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Du, Xueyu; Gao, Lei; Chen, Jiaqiang; Zhai, Yunbo; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-02-01

    A series of low-cost Cu-Mn-mixed oxides supported on biochar (CuMn/HBC) synthesized by an impregnation method were applied to study the simultaneous removal of formaldehyde (HCHO) and elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) at 100-300° C from simulated flue gas. The metal loading value, Cu/Mn molar ratio, flue gas components, reaction mechanism, and interrelationship between HCHO removal and Hg 0 removal were also investigated. Results suggested that 12%CuMn/HBC showed the highest removal efficiency of HCHO and Hg 0 at 175° C corresponding to 89%and 83%, respectively. The addition of NO and SO 2 exhibited inhibitive influence on HCHO removal. For the removal of Hg 0 , NO showed slightly positive influence and SO 2 had an inhibitive effect. Meanwhile, O 2 had positive impact on the removal of HCHO and Hg 0 . The samples were characterized by SEM, XRD, BET, XPS, ICP-AES, FTIR, and H 2 -TPR. The sample characterization illustrated that CuMn/HBC possessed the high pore volume and specific surface area. The chemisorbed oxygen (O β ) and the lattice oxygen (O α ) which took part in the removal reaction largely existed in CuMn/HBC. What is more, MnO 2 and CuO (or Cu 2 O) were highly dispersed on the CuMn/HBC surface. The strong synergistic effect between Cu-Mn mixed oxides was critical to the removal reaction of HCHO and Hg 0 via the redox equilibrium of Mn 4+ + Cu + ↔ Mn 3+ + Cu 2+ .

  17. Beam-foil-gas spectroscopy - A technique for studying steady-state non-equilibrium processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, W. S.; Veje, E.; Carriveau, G.; Anderson, N.

    1971-01-01

    When a thin foil is inserted in the beam of a beam-gas experiment, the beam particle state populations are driven far from their beam-gas equilibrium values. Downstream from the foil, the 'new beam' and gas species interact to produce a new equilibrium, usually different from the beam-gas equilibrium. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate this effect and to show how relative cross-section measurements can be used to study the beam-foil interaction.

  18. Gas flow parameter determination by molecular beam method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarvin, A.E.; Sharafutdinov, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a molecular-beam system intended for studying nonequilibrium processes in supersonic rarefied gas flows. The system represented is a small molecular beam source placed inside the low intensity wind tunnel of the Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences. The time-of-flight method is used for measuring molecular velocity distribution functions on molecular beam axis. (Auth.)

  19. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the ...

  20. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding pro- cesses to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively ...

  1. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  2. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal: 1977 technology status report. Appendix G. State-of-the-art review for simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, J.D.; Faucett, H.L.; Burnett, T.A.

    1977-12-01

    A state-of-the-art review of the processes currently being developed for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/) from flue gases, and which may be applicable to coal-fired flue gas, was executed. A list of 21 promising flue gas treatment processes was assembled using information available during the first half of 1977. A detailed technical assessment of 18 of these NO/sub x/-SO/sub x/ removal processes resulted from communications with the process developers. Each detailed technical evaluation contained a process description and simplified block flow diagram, the history and status of development, the published economics, the raw material and utility requirements, the technical and environmental considerations, and the favorable and adverse characteristics for the process. The NO/sub x/-SO/sub x/ removal processes were classified based on the type of NO/sub x/ removal employed. The most advanced types of FGT for NO/sub x/-SO/sub x/ removal are now dry selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and wet oxidation-absorption-reduction. However, all of the processes require further development on larger scale tests and with coal-fired flue gas. Also, the economics included in this report are subject to revision as the processes are examined at larger facilities in the future.

  3. Absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam-Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used *van der Meer scan* method (VDM). The technique has been used in 10 LHC fills during 2012 including and also provided a first luminosity measurement for proton-lead collisions. This talk presents the principles of the gas injection and the improvements reached with the increased pressure. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch. Those uncertainties are becoming the dominating factor because the uncertainty on the total beam current have been reduced.

  4. Optimization and reconstruction technology of SCR flue gas denitrification ultra low emission in coal fired power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhao

    2017-09-01

    In recent decades, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from thermal power plant increased year by year in China. A large number of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions caused by the growing environmental problems have been widely attached importance to people. SCR denitrification technology has the advantages of cleanliness and high efficiency. At present, it has been the major technology to control NOx emission because of its high denitrification efficiency, reliable operation, no by-products and simple structure of the device. The denitrification efficiency can be stabilized at 70%. In this paper, three different denitrification methods are compared. The factors influencing the denitrification efficiency, the system arrangement and the key factors of the denitrification system are discussed in detail. And the numerical simulation of how to use this calculation software in the SCR reactor flue, baffle, reactor, spray ammonia grille and spray ammonia, mixer, etc. are reviewed, as well as the effect of system operation control on the deoxidation performance.

  5. Impact of kiln thermal energy demand and false air on cement kiln flue gas CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arachchige, Udara S.P.R.; Kawan, Dinesh; Tokheim, Lars-Andre [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Melaaen, Morten C. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); (Tel-Tek, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The present study is focused on the effect of the specific thermal energy demand and the false air factor on carbon capture applied to cement kiln exhaust gases. The carbon capture process model was developed and implemented in Aspen Plus. The model was developed for flue gases from a typical cement clinker manufacturing plant. The specific thermal energy demand as well as the false air factor of the kiln system were varied in order to determine the effect on CO2 capture plant performance, such as the solvent regeneration energy demand. In general, an increase in the mentioned kiln system factors increases the regeneration energy demand. The reboiler energy demand is calculated as 3270, 3428 and 3589 kJ/kg clinker for a specific thermal energy of 3000, 3400 and 3800 kJ/kg clinker, respectively. Setting the false air factor to 25, 50 or 70% gives a reboiler energy demand of 3428, 3476, 3568 kJ/kg clinker, respectively.

  6. Alkali resistant Cu/zeolite deNOx catalysts for flue gas cleaning in biomass fired applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Cu/zeolite catalysts have been prepared by wet impregnation and characterized by N2 physisorption, EPR, H2-TPR and NH3-TPD methods. The Cu content was varied to optimize the loading as well as surface acidity. Optimized Cu/zeolite catalysts showed high surface acidity and excellent activity...... in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. Furthermore, Cu/zeolite catalysts showed high SCR activity even after doping with potassium (0–500μmol/g) compared to a commercial vanadium catalyst which deactivated at lower potassium content. Fresh and deactivated catalysts were further examined...... to investigate the redox and acidic properties of the catalysts. The poisoning resistivity seems to be due to a combination of high surface area and strong acidity of the Cu/zeolite catalysts. The catalysts might be attractive alternatives to conventional catalysts for deNOx of flue gases from biomass fired...

  7. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N2). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  8. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  9. Advanced surface polishing using gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Norem, J.; Swenson, D. R.

    2007-08-01

    The gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) treatment can be an important treatment for mitigation of the Q-slope in superconducting cavities. The existing surface smoothening methods were analyzed and a new surface polishing method was proposed based on employing extra-large gas cluster ions (X-GCIB).

  10. Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2012-04-24

    An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

  11. Employing Beam-Gas Interaction Vertices for Transverse Profile Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, Mariana; Baglin, Vincent; Barschel, Colin; Bay, Aurelio; Blanc, Frederic; Bravin, Enrico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Chritin, Nicolas; Dehning, Bernd; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Gaspar, Clara; Gianì, Sebastiana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Greim, Roman; Haefeli, Guido; Hopchev, Plamen; Jacobsson, Richard; Jensen, Lars; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Jurado, Nicolas; Kain, Verena; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kirn, Thomas; Kuhn, Maria; Luthi, Berengere; Magagnin, Paolo; Matev, Rosen; Nakada, Tatsuya; Neufeld, Niko; Panman, Jaap; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Salvant, Benoit; Schael, Stefan; Schneider, Olivier; Schwering, Georg; Tobin, Mark; Veness, Raymond; Veyrat, Quentin; Vlachos, Sotiris; Wlochal, Michael; Xu, Zhirui; von Dratzig, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of high-energy beam particles with residual gas offer a unique opportunity to measure the beam profile in a non-intrusive fashion. Such a method was successfully pioneered* at the LHCb experiment using a silicon microstrip vertex detector. During the recent Large Hadron Collider shutdown at CERN, a demonstrator Beam-Gas Vertexing system based on eight scintillating-fibre modules was designed**, constructed and installed on Ring 2 to be operated as a pure beam diagnostics device. The detector signals are read out and collected with LHCb-type front-end electronics and a DAQ system consisting of a CPU farm. Tracks and vertices will be reconstructed to obtain a beam profile in real time. Here, first commissioning results are reported. The advantages and potential for future applications of this technique are discussed.

  12. Ion beam characteristics of a gas filled accelerator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, R.S.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Boers, J.E.; Shope, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas filled tube used to produce a pulsed neutron flux with the D(T, 4 He)n reaction is described. Deuterium and tritium ions generated in a reflex discharge are extracted and accelerated to 100 keV by means of an accelerator electrode onto a deutero-tritide target electrode. The electrodes are designed to focus the ion beam onto the target. Total tube currents consisting of extracted ions, unsuppressed secondary electrons, and ions generated by interactions with the background gas are typically 100mA. Characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. Accelerating voltages greater than 50kV are required to focus the beam through the accelerator aperture for configurations that give beams with the proper energy density at the target. The perveance of the beam is defined. Maximum perveance values are 2 to 10 nanopervs. Tube focussing and neutron production characteristics are described

  13. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschel, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy √(s)=8 TeV and √(s)=2.76 TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. Therefore, a new method has been developed using all reconstructed vertices in order to improve the understanding of the vertex resolution. In addition to the overlap integral, the knowledge of the colliding bunch populations is required to measure the luminosity. The determination of the bunch populations relies on LHC instruments to measure the bunch population fractions and the total beam intensity. Studies performed as part of this work resulted in a reduction of the bunch current normalization uncertainty from ±2.7% to ±0.2% and making it possible to achieve precision luminosity measurements at all LHC experiments. Furthermore, information on beam-gas interactions not originating from nominally filled bunches was analyzed to determine the charge fraction not participating in bunch collisions. The knowledge of this fraction is required to correct the total beam intensity. The reference cross-section of pp interactions with at least two tracks in the vertex detector

  14. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  15. Numerical investigation of beam halo from beam gas scattering in KEK-ATF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Okugi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Zhou, D.

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the final focus schemes of the Future Linear Collider (FLC), the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) at KEK is devoted to focus the beam to a RMS size of a few tens of nanometers (nm) vertically and to provide stability at the nm level at the virtual Interaction Point (IP). However, the loss of halo particles upstream will introduce background to the diagnostic instrument measuring the ultra-small beam, using a laser interferometer monitor. To help the realization of the above goals and beam operation, understanding and mitigation of beam halo are crucial. In this paper, we present the systematical simulation of beam halo formation from beam gas Coulomb scattering (BGS) in the ATF damping ring. The behavior of beam halo with various machine parameters is also discussed.

  16. The adipic acid enhanced flue gas desulfurization process for industrial boilers. Volume 1. Field test results. Final report Feb 81-Feb 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, P.A.; Gerstle, R.W.; Henzel, D.S.; Mason, K.W.; Sabatini, S.R.

    1982-11-01

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the effect of adding adipic acid on the SO/sub 2/ removal of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on a coal-fired industrial boiler at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base near Columbus, OH. Emission data were collected in accordance with the regulations for SO/sub 2/ compliance data specified in the Federal Register. The test results show that adding adipic acid to the limestone slurry significantly improved the SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency of the FGD system. Limited baseline data on operations with limestone only indicated a performance level of 55% SO/sub 2/ removal. With the addition of about 2200 ppm of adipic acid to the limestone scrubbing system, the unit's level of performance increased to an average of 94.3% SO/sub 2/ removal (within a standard deviation of 2.2%) during which boiler load was 70-130 million Btu/hr and gas throughput varied 300%.

  17. Pumping requirements and options for molecular beam epitaxy and gas source molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCollum, M.J.; Plano, M.A.; Haase, M.A.; Robbins, V.M.; Jackson, S.L.; Cheng, K.Y.; Stillman, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of gas sources in growth by MBE as a result of current interest in growth of InP/InGaAsP/InGaAs lattice matched to InP. For gas flows greater than a few sccm, pumping speed requirements dictate the use of turbomolecular or diffusion pumps. GaAs samples with high p-type mobilities have been grown with diffusion pumped molecular beam epitaxial system. According to the authors, this demonstration of the inherent cleanliness of a properly designed diffusion pumping system indicates that a diffusion pump is an excellent inexpensive and reliable choice for growth by molecular beam epitaxy and gas source molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy

  18. Fuel saving, carbon dioxide emission avoidance, and syngas production by tri-reforming of flue gases from coal- and gas-fired power stations, and by the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halmann, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2006-01-01

    Flue gases from coal, gas, or oil-fired power stations, as well as from several heavy industries, such as the production of iron, lime and cement, are major anthropogenic sources of global CO 2 emissions. The newly proposed process for syngas production based on the tri-reforming of such flue gases with natural gas could be an important route for CO 2 emission avoidance. In addition, by combining the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide with the partial oxidation of the carbon source, an overall thermoneutral process can be designed for the co-production of iron and syngas rich in CO. Water-gas shift (WGS) of CO to H 2 enables the production of useful syngas. The reaction process heat, or the conditions for thermoneutrality, are derived by thermochemical equilibrium calculations. The thermodynamic constraints are determined for the production of syngas suitable for methanol, hydrogen, or ammonia synthesis. The environmental and economic consequences are assessed for large-scale commercial production of these chemical commodities. Preliminary evaluations with natural gas, coke, or coal as carbon source indicate that such combined processes should be economically competitive, as well as promising significant fuel saving and CO 2 emission avoidance. The production of ammonia in the above processes seems particularly attractive, as it consumes the nitrogen in the flue gases

  19. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  20. Separation of submicron particles from biofuel combustion with flue gas condensation or wet condensing electrostatic precipitator. Analysis of possibilities; Avskiljning av submikrona partiklar vid biobraenslefoerbraenning med roekgaskondensering eller kondenserande vaata elfilter. Analys av moejligheterna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennbaeck, Marie; Gustavsson, Lennart [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    Dust particles in flue gas larger than 1 {mu}m are well separated by conventional techniques, while submicron particles are poorly separated. As the use of biofuels with high ash content is increasing, as well as knowledge about negative health effects from inhalation of submicron particles, the interest for reduction of emissions of submicron particles will probably increase. The aim of this project is to investigate possible techniques for separation of submicron particles during flue gas condensation through modification of conventional technique, or with available techniques not usually used with combustion of biofuels, e.g. a wet electrostatic precipitator. Mechanisms for separation of dust particles are briefly described. Cyclones separates particles larger than about 1 {mu}m. Fabric filters separates all particles sizes, but the efficiency reduces as the size reduces. In flue gas condensers and scrubbers the speed and size of water droplets are important for the reduction efficiency. Dry electrostatic precipitators work for all particle sizes, but with reduced efficiency for sizes between 0.1 and 3 {mu}m. Wet electrostatic precipitators separates submicron particles much better. One reason for this is that the potential between the electrodes can be higher. Among conventional flue gas condensers and scrubbers there are two types that, properly designed, can separate submicron particles, namely 'type venturi scrubbers', i.e. a scrubber where a high flue gas velocity is used to form many, small water droplets by friction forces in a nozzle, and 'type scrubber with nozzles', i.e. a scrubber where nozzles supply droplets to the flue gas. For a scrubber with nozzles, the falling velocity of the droplets must be lower and the size smaller than is common today. Also the wet electrostatic precipitator separates submicron particles with high efficiency. They are used today mainly for problematic particles, e.g. sticky or corrosive ones, or for

  1. Dynamics and adsorption of gas molecules using proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.; Lee, M. S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    MgO powders and Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were irradiated by proton beams with high energy (10-35 MeV) for various exposure times, and Ar gas adsorption experiments were carried. A careful investigation measured by TEM studies revealed significant differences in morphological evolution before and after irradiating the proton beams. After irradiating the proton beams, adsorption properties of Ar measured below 80K on MgO powders having only (100) surface exposure exhibited an additional isotherm steps suggesting the creation of the local surface defects presumably due to the bombardments of the protons. Interestingly, CNTs that were radiated by proton beams with energy 35 MeV at the Bragg peak position contain much less Fe, Ni catalysts compare to the ones that were not irradiated by the proton beams. This experiment was re-performed at the same condition to confirm the reproducibility of the result, and the same outcomes were produced.

  2. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, December 11, 1992--March 11, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    This report describes the potential of sulfate reducing bacteria to fix sulfur derived from flue gas desulfurization. The first section reviews the problem, the second section reviews progress of this study to use desulfovibrio desulfuricans for this purpose. The final section related progress during the current reporting period. This latter section describes studies to immobilize the bacteria in co-culture with floc-forming anaerobes, use of sewage sludges in the culture media, and sulfate production from sulfur dioxide.

  3. Demonstration of Advanced CO2 Capture Process Improvements for Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, John [Southern Company Services, Inc., Wilsonville, AL (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This document summarizes the activities of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0026590, “Demonstration of Advanced CO2 Capture Process Improvements for Coal-Fired Flue Gas” during the performance period of October 1, 2015 through May 31, 2017. This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) was the prime contractor and co-funder of the project. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America (MHIA) and AECOM were project team members. The overall project objective was to improve costs, energy requirements, and performance of an existing amine-based CO2 capture process. This will occur via improvements in three areas: 1. Reboiler design – The first objective of the program was to demonstrate performance of an integrated stripper/reboiler (termed Built-in Reboiler, or BIR) to reduce footprint, capital costs, and integration issues of the current technology. 2. Particulate management – The second objective was to carry out a Particulate Matter Management (PMM) test. This has the potential to reduce operating costs and capital costs due to the reduced or eliminated need for mechanical filtration. 3. Solvent – The third objective was to carry out a new solvent test plan (referred to as NSL) to demonstrate a new solvent (termed New Solvent A), which is expected to reduce regeneration steam. The bulk price is also expected to be lower than KS-1, which is the current solvent used in this process. NSL testing would include baseline testing, optimization, long term testing, solvent reclamation testing, and final inspection. These combine to form the Advanced Carbon Capture (ACC) technology. Much of this work will be applicable to generic solvent processes, especially in regards to improved reboiler design, and focused to meet or exceed the DOE’s overall carbon capture performance goals of 90% CO2 capture rate with 95% CO2 purity at a cost of

  4. Biological effects of a flue gas desulfurization gypsum produced by the limestone process. Die biologische Wirkung eines Rauchgasentschwefelungsgipses nach dem Kalksteinverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartmann, C.

    1986-06-26

    'Flue gas gypsum', which will be produced in large amounts in the future, high-efficiency desulfurisation processes must be investigated with a view to its effects on human health, especially the potentially toxic effect on the lungs. All animals in the experiment were given a single intratracheal dose of 25 mg dust in 0.5 ml isotonic sodium chloride solution. The animals were examined at intervals of one day or one to 18 months. No dust was discovered in the light microscope after 24 h, and no clearly pathological reaction was found within a period of 18 months. None of the histological preparations showed signs of incipient gramuloma of fibrosis of the lungs. A chemical analysis using flameless atomic absorption spectrometry showed no increased concentrations of Al, Cr, and Ni in the parenchymatons organs (lungs, kidneys, livers). Lead was rapidly accumulated in the fermur at the onset of the experiments and was eliminated in the course of 18 months. A mutagenicity test according to Ames proved the applied dust to be clearly non-metagenic. The dust used in the experiment can thus be assumed to be largely inert. Still, it should not be considered completely safe, as the risk of permanent or intermittent exposure was left out of account in the experiment. (orig./MG)

  5. Oxidation of elemental mercury by modified spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalysts in simulated coal-fired flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingkui; Li, Caiting; Zhang, Xunan; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Yin'e

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the costs, the recycle of spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalysts were employed as a potential catalytic support material for elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in simulated coal-fired flue gas. The catalytic mechanism for simultaneous removal of Hg(0) and NO was also investigated. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. Results indicated that spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalyst supported Ce-Mn mixed oxides catalyst (CeMn/SCR1) was highly active for Hg(0) oxidation at low temperatures. The Ce1.00Mn/SCR1 performed the best catalytic activities, and approximately 92.80% mercury oxidation efficiency was obtained at 150 °C. The inhibition effect of NH3 on Hg(0) oxidation was confirmed in that NH3 consumed the surface oxygen. Moreover, H2O inhibited Hg(0) oxidation while SO2 had a promotional effect with the aid of O2. The XPS results illustrated that the surface oxygen was responsible for Hg(0) oxidation and NO conversion. Besides, the Hg(0) oxidation and NO conversion were thought to be aided by synergistic effect between the manganese and cerium oxides.

  6. Influence of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) installations on emission characteristics of PM2.5 from coal-fired power plants equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Ma, Zizhen; Fajardo, Oscar A; Deng, Jianguo; Duan, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technologies have been widely used to control the emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO X ) from coal-fired power plants (CFPPs). Field measurements of emission characteristics of four conventional CFPPs indicated a significant increase in particulate ionic species, increasing PM 2.5 emission with FGD and SCR installations. The mean concentrations of PM 2.5 from all CFPPs tested were 3.79 ± 1.37 mg/m 3 and 5.02 ± 1.73 mg/m 3 at the FGD inlet and outlet, respectively, and the corresponding contributions of ionic species were 19.1 ± 7.7% and 38.2 ± 7.8%, respectively. The FGD was found to enhance the conversion of NH 3 slip from the SCR to NH 4 + in the PM 2.5 , together with the conversion of SO 2 to SO 4 2- , and increased the primary NH 4 + and SO 4 2- aerosol emissions by approximately 18.9 and 4.2 times, respectively. This adverse effect should be considered when updating the emission inventory of CFPPs and should draw the attention of policy-makers for future air pollution control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of MnO2/CeO2-MnO2hierarchical binary oxides for elemental mercury removal from coal-fired flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongpeng; Mu, Bailong; Yuan, Dongli; Zhang, Hongzhong; Xu, Haomiao

    2017-07-05

    MnO 2 /CeO 2 -MnO 2 hierarchical binary oxide was synthesized for elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) removal from coal-fired flue gas. CeO 2 in-situ grow on the surface of carbon spheres, and that CeO 2 @CSs acted as precursor for porous MnO 2 /CeO 2 -MnO 2 . XRD, Raman, XPS, FT-IR, and H 2 -TPR were selected for the physical structural and chemical surface analysis. The results indicated that the composite has sufficient surface oxygen and hierarchical porous structure. The Hg 0 removal experiments results indicated that MnO 2 /CeO 2 -MnO 2 exhibited excellent Hg 0 removal performance, with an 89% removal efficiency of total 300min at 150°C under 4% O 2 . MnO 2 was the primary active site for Hg 0 catalytic oxidation. The porous structure was beneficial for gaseous mercury physically adsorption. In addition, CeO 2 enhanced the oxygen capture performance of the composite and the oxidation performance for MnO 2 . Moreover, the effects of O 2 , SO 2 and H 2 O were also tested in this study. O 2 promoted the Hg 0 removal reaction. While SO 2 and H 2 O can poison the MnO 2 active site, resulted in a low Hg 0 removal efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A comparison of fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczuk, Artur; Krzywański, Jarosław

    2017-03-01

    The interrelation between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) has been established based on a local furnace data. The furnace data have been measured in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation. In the present study, the bed temperature and suspension density were treated as experimental variables along the furnace height. The measured bed temperature and suspension density were varied in the range of 1131-1156 K and 1.93-6.32 kg/m3, respectively. Using the heat transfer coefficient for commercial CFB combustor, two empirical heat transfer correlation were developed in terms of important operating parameters including bed temperature and also suspension density. The fuzzy logic results were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental heat transfer data obtained based on cluster renewal approach. The predicted bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient covered a range of 109-241 W/(m2K) and 111-240 W/(m2K), for fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach respectively. The divergence in calculated heat flux recovery along the furnace height between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach did not exceeded ±2%.

  9. Simultaneous removal of Ni(II and fluoride from a real flue gas desulfurization wastewater by electrocoagulation using Fe/C/Al electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinian Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of anions and heavy metals coexist in flue gas desulfurization (FGD wastewater originating from coal-fired power plants, which cause serious environmental pollution. Electrocoagulation (EC with Fe/C/Al hybrid electrodes was investigated for the separation of fluoride and nickel ions from a FGD wastewater. The study mainly focused on the technology parameters including anode electrode type, time, inter-electrode distance (5–40 mm, current density (1.88–6.25 mA/cm2 and initial pH (4–10. The results showed that favorable nickel and fluoride removal were obtained by increasing the time and current density, but this led to an increase in energy consumption. Eighty-six percent of fluoride and 98% of Ni(II were removed by conducting the Fe/C/Al EC with a current density of 5.00 mA/cm2 and inter-electrode distance of 5 mm at pH 4 for 25 min and energy consumption was 1.33 kWh/m3. Concomitant pollutants also achieved excellent treatment efficiency. The Hg, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, SS and chemical oxygen demand were reduced by 90%, 89%, 92%, 88%, 98%, 99.9% and 89%, respectively, which met stringent environmental regulations.

  10. Effect of Co addition on the performance and structure of V/ZrCe catalyst for simultaneous removal of NO and Hg0 in simulated flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingkui; Li, Caiting; Du, Xueyu; Zeng, Guangming; Gao, Lei; Zhai, Yunbo; Wang, Teng; Zhang, Junyi

    2018-04-01

    The effect of CoOx addition on the performance and structure of V2O5/ZrO2-CeO2 catalyst for simultaneous removal of NO and Hg0 in simulated flue gas was investigated by various methods including SEM, BET, XRD, XPS, H2-TPR and FT-IR. It was found that the introduction of CoOx not only greatly enhanced the redox properties of catalysts, but also increased the catalytic performance for simultaneous removal of NO and Hg0. The CoOx-modified V2O5/ZrO2-CeO2 catalyst displayed excellent catalytic activity for NO conversion (89.6%) and Hg0 oxidation (88.9%) at 250 °C under SCR atmosphere. The synergistic effect among vanadium, cobalt, and the ZrCe support could induce oxygen vacancies formation and promote oxygen mobility via charge transfer. Besides, CoOx could assist vanadium species in rapidly changing the valence by the redox cycle of V5+ + Co2+ ↔ V4+ + Co3+. All the above features contribute to the excellent catalytic performance through CoOx addition.

  11. A comparison of fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interrelation between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB has been established based on a local furnace data. The furnace data have been measured in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation. In the present study, the bed temperature and suspension density were treated as experimental variables along the furnace height. The measured bed temperature and suspension density were varied in the range of 1131-1156 K and 1.93-6.32 kg/m3, respectively. Using the heat transfer coefficient for commercial CFB combustor, two empirical heat transfer correlation were developed in terms of important operating parameters including bed temperature and also suspension density. The fuzzy logic results were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental heat transfer data obtained based on cluster renewal approach. The predicted bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient covered a range of 109-241 W/(m2K and 111-240 W/(m2K, for fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach respectively. The divergence in calculated heat flux recovery along the furnace height between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach did not exceeded ±2%.

  12. Off-gas dust in an experimental blast furnace:Part 1: Characterization of flue dust, sludge and shaft fines

    OpenAIRE

    Leimalm, Ulrika; Lundgren, Maria; Sundqvist Ökvist, Lena; Björkman, Bo

    2010-01-01

    In blast furnace (BF) ironmaking, efforts are made to decrease coke consumption, which can be done by increasing the pulverized coal injection rate (PCR). This will cause changes in in-furnace reduction conditions, burden distribution, demands on raw material strength, etc. In order to maintain stable operation, but also to obtain low amounts of material losses through the off-gas, it is important to understand fines generation and behaviour in the BF. Off-gas dust and shaft fines generated i...

  13. Modeling beam-front dynamics at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.; Yu, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of space charge neutralization at the front of an intense self-focused electron beam pulse exhibits important differences in different gas pressure regimes. At very low pressures, the beam front is in the so-called ion-focused regime (IFR) where all secondary electrons are expelled from the beam region by the radial electric field without causing significant additional ionization. We estimate the upper pressure boundary of this regime by considering the distance scale length for cascade (avalanche) ionization. Data from the FX-25 diode experiments indicate a critical transition pressure (P/sub c/) that agrees with this estimate and with its scaling among various gas types. Normal mobility-limited treatments (local conductivity models) of the secondary electrons at the beam front are not justified until the gas pressure is 10 to 50 times higher than P/sub c/, due to runaway of these secondary electrons in the strong space-charge electric field at the lower pressures. The main conclusion of this study is that a non-local phase space (Boltzmann) treatment of the secondary electrons is required to accurately describe these different beam front regimes and the transitions between them; such a code model is currently under development

  14. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  15. Antiproton beam profile measurements using Gas Electron Multipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge; Spanggaard, Jens; Tranquille, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~0.4% X_0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEgIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  16. Power and gas flow models for monoenergetic neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasolo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Large, ignition tokamak reactors (ITR, EPR, and beyond will require supplemental heating to achieve ignition. In the earlier machines, at least, this heating will probably be provided by monoenergetic neutral beams. These beams, with energies greater than or equal to 150 keV, will most likely be derived from D + or D - ions produced by direct extraction ion sources. A positive ion source will be followed by a bending magnet, a neutralizer, and a second bending magnet. The first magnet will remove molecular ions, and the second one atomic ions. Direct convertors will be used to recover energy from unused molecular and atomic ions. The first bending magnet may be omitted if D - ion sources are used. Models have been developed for power and gas flow in injectors which employ direct extraction D + or D - ion sources. The power flow model accounts explicitly for all beam losses in terms of line densities of gas along paths traversed by ions and neutrals and cross sections for dissociation and charge-changing collisions. The gas flow model uses the results of power flow calculations and known gas flows from sources and neutralizers to determine gas loads and pumping requirements in various parts of the injector

  17. Interfacial Tension and Contact Angle Determination in Water-sandstone Systems with Injection of Flue Gas and CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shojaikaveh, N.; Rudolph, E.S.J.; Rossen, W.R.; Van Hemert, P.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has the potential for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. This option includes storage strategies such as CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams. This process is largely controlled by the interactions

  18. Adipic acid enhanced flue gas desulfurization process for industrial boilers: Volume 1. Field test results. Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, P.A.; Gerstle, R.W.; Henzel, D.S.; Mason, K.W.; Sabatini, S.R.

    1983-03-01

    Test results show that adding adipic acid to the limestone slurry significantly improved the SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency of the FGD system. Limited baseline data on operations with limestone only indicated a performance level of 55% SO/sub 2/ removal. Adding about 2200 ppM of adipic acid to the limestone scrubbing systems, the unit's level of performance increased to an average of 94.3% SO/sub 2/ removal which was maintained within a standard deviation of 2.2% over a 30-day test period during which boiler load was 70 to 130 million Btu/hr and gas throughput varied 300%.

  19. Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

    2006-05-01

    This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and

  20. Electron beam irradiation technology for environmental conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Okihiro; Arai, Hidehiko; Hashimoto, Shoji

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews research and development of application of electron beam (EB) irradiation technology for treatment of flue gas and waste water, and for disinfection of sewage sludge. Feasibility studies on EB purification of flue gases have been performed with pilot-scale experiments in Japan, the USA and Germany, and is being carried out in Poland for flue gases from iron-sintering furnaces or coal burning boilers. Based on results obtained by experiments using simulated flue gas, pilot scale test for treatment of flue gas of low-sulfur containing coal combustion has recently started in Japan. Organic pollutants in waste water and ground water have been found to be decomposed by EB irradiation. Synergetic effect of EB irradiation and ozone addition was found to improve the decomposition efficiency. Electron beam irradiation technology for disinfection of water effluent from water treatment plants was found to avoid formation of chlorinated organic compounds which are formed in using chlorine. Efficient process for composting of sewage sludge disinfected by EB irradiation has been developed by small scale and pilot scale experiments. In the new process, disinfection by EB irradiation and composing can be done separately and optimum temperature for composting can be, therefore, selected to minimize period of composting. (author)

  1. New rht-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks Decorated with Acylamide Groups for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Fixation from Raw Power Plant Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyang; Zhou, Zhen; Chen, Cong; Bai, Junfeng; He, Cheng; Duan, Chunying

    2016-11-23

    The combination of carbon dioxide capture and chemical fixation in a one-pot process is attractive for both chemists and governments. The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide with epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is an atomic economical reaction without any side products. By incorporating acylamide to enhance the binding affinity toward CO 2 , new rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with (3, 28) and (3, 24) connected units were constructed. Zn-NTTA with two types of dinuclear paddlewheel building blocks-{Zn 2 (OOC - ) 4 } and {Zn 2 (OOC - ) 3 }. The high uptake of CO 2 (115.6 cm 3 ·g -1 ) and selectivity over N 2 (30:1) at 273 K indicated that these MOFs are excellent candidates for postcombustion CO 2 isolation and capture. The MOFs feature high catalytic activity, rapid dynamics of transformation and excellent stability with turnover number (TON) values up to 110 000 per paddlewheel unit after 5 × 6 rounds of recyclability, demonstrating that they are promising heterogeneous catalysts for CO 2 cyclo-addition to value-added cyclic carbonates. The cycloaddition of epoxides with wet gases demonstrated that the catalyst activity was not affected by moisture, and the indices of the PXRD patterns of the bulk samples filtered from the catalytic reaction revealed that the crystallinities were maintained. The combination of the selective capture and catalytic transformation in one-pot enables the use of a negative-cost feedstock-raw power plant flue gas without any separation and purification-revealing the broad prospects of such MOFs for practical CO 2 fixation in industry.

  2. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-08-13

    ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

  3. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE WASTE FROM INSTALLATION OF SEMI-DRY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL CHP PLANT IN JANIKOWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Plaskacz-Dziuba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the analysis of waste from semi-dry flue gas desulphurisation installation called Integrated Novel Desulphurisation (NID. A comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties was conducted, including analyzes of the content of ions SO32- and SO42- (relating to 2CaSO3·H2O i CaSO4·2H2O, moisture, SiO2 and R2O3 and SEM-EDX analysis. The original method for the determination of sulphates (IV using a potentiometric titrator was designed. Determined that the main component of both studied wastes was 2CaSO3·H2O, and its content is for NID 1 – 41,24±0,63%, for NID 2 – 45,53±0,33%. The content of CaSO4·2H2O, which was determined by gravimetric method amounted for the NID 1 – 8,92±0,12%, for the NID 2 – 8,27±0,08%. The moisture content for both tested materials was about 4%, the content of SiO2 was in the range of 8–10%, and R2O3 content was about 1%. It was also shown that the test material is not homogenous. Images from scanning electron microscope showed that in the waste occured irregularly agglomerates with a diameter between 30 and 100 microns. EDX analysis revealed that elements constituted NID wastes are oxygen, sulfur, calcium, chlorine, silicon, aluminum, copper and carbon.

  4. Important roles of enthalpic and entropic contributions to CO2 capture from simulated flue gas and ambient air using mesoporous silica grafted amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhabbaz, Mustafa A; Bollini, Praveen; Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-09-24

    The measurement of isosteric heats of adsorption of silica supported amine materials in the low pressure range (0-0.1 bar) is critical for understanding the interactions between CO2 and amine sites at low coverage and hence to the development of efficient amine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas and ambient air. Heats of adsorption for an array of silica-supported amine materials are experimentally measured at low coverage using a Calvet calorimeter equipped with a customized dosing manifold. In a series of 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica materials, higher amine densities resulted in higher isosteric heats of adsorption, clearly showing that the density/proximity of amine sites can influence the amine efficiency of adsorbents. In a series of materials with fixed amine loading but different amine types, strongly basic primary and secondary amine materials are shown to have essentially identical heats of adsorption near 90 kJ/mol. However, the adsorption uptakes vary substantially as a function of CO2 partial pressure for different primary and secondary amines, demonstrating that entropic contributions to adsorption may play a key role in adsorption at secondary amine sites, making adsorption at these sites less efficient at the low coverages that are important to the direct capture of CO2 from ambient air. Thus, while primary amines are confirmed to be the most effective amine types for CO2 capture from ambient air, this is not due to enhanced enthalpic contributions associated with primary amines over secondary amines, but may be due to unfavorable entropic factors associated with organization of the second alkyl chain on the secondary amine during CO2 adsorption. Given this hypothesis, favorable entropic factors may be the main reason primary amine based adsorbents are more effective under air capture conditions.

  5. Important Roles of Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to CO 2 Capture from Simulated Flue Gas and Ambient Air Using Mesoporous Silica Grafted Amines

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhabbaz, Mustafa A.

    2014-09-24

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The measurement of isosteric heats of adsorption of silica supported amine materials in the low pressure range (0- 0.1 bar) is critical for understanding the interactions between CO2 and amine sites at low coverage and hence to the development of efficient amine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas and ambient air. Heats of adsorption for an array of silica-supported amine materials are experimentally measured at low coverage using a Calvet calorimeter equipped with a customized dosing manifold. In a series of 3-aminopropylfunctionalized silica materials, higher amine densities resulted in higher isosteric heats of adsorption, clearly showing that the density/proximity of amine sites can influence the amine efficiency of adsorbents. In a series of materials with fixed amine loading but different amine types, strongly basic primary and secondary amine materials are shown to have essentially identical heats of adsorption near 90 kJ/mol. However, the adsorption uptakes vary substantially as a function of CO2 partial pressure for different primary and secondary amines, demonstrating that entropic contributions to adsorption may play a key role in adsorption at secondary amine sites, making adsorption at these sites less effi cient at the low coverages that are important to the direct capture of CO2 from ambient air. Thus, while primary amines are confirmed to be the most effective amine types for CO2 capture from ambient air, this is not due to enhanced enthalpic contributions associated with primary amines over secondary amines, but may be due to unfavorable entropic factors associated with organization of the second alkyl chain on the secondary amine during CO2 adsorption. Given this hypothesis, favorable entropic factors may be the main reason primary amine based adsorbents are more effective under air capture conditions.

  6. A high-flux polyimide hollow fiber membrane to minimize footprint and energy penalty for CO2 recovery from flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2012-12-01

    Using a process-guided approach, a new 6FDA-based polyimide - 6FDA-DAM:DABA(4:1) - has been developed in the form of hollow fiber membranes for CO 2 recovery from post-combustion flue gas streams. Dense film studies on this polymer reveal a CO 2 permeability of 224 Barrers at 40°C at a CO 2 feed pressure of 10psia. The dense films exhibit an ideal CO 2/N 2 permselectivity of 20 at 40°C, which permits their use in a two-step counter-flow/sweep membrane process. Dry-jet, wet-quench, non-solvent-induced phase inversion spinning was used to create defect-free hollow fibers from 6FDA-DAM:DABA(4:1). Membranes with defect-free skin layers, approximately 415nm thick, were obtained with a pure CO 2 permeance of 520GPU at 30°C and an ideal CO 2/N 2 permselectivity of 24. Mixed gas permeation and wet gas permeation are presented for the fibers. The CO 2 permeance in the fibers was reduced by approximately a factor of 2 in feeds with 80% humidity. As a proof-of-concept path forward to increase CO 2 flux, we incorporated microporous ZIF-8 fillers into 6FDA-DAM:DABA(4:1) dense films. Our 6FDA-DAM:DABA(4:1)/ZIF-8 dense film composites (20wt% ZIF-8) had a CO 2 permeability of 550 Barrers and a CO 2/N 2 selectivity of 19 at 35°C. Good adhesion between the ZIF and the 6FDA-DAM:DABA(4:1) matrix was observed. CO 2 capture costs of $27/ton of CO 2 using the current, "non-optimized" membrane are estimated using a custom counterflow membrane model. Hollow fiber membrane modules were estimated to have order-of-magnitude reductions in system footprint relative to spiral-wound modules, thereby making them attractive in current space-constrained coal-fired power stations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Gas flow and related beam losses in the ITER neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, A.; Hemsworth, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    The gas flow in the ITER neutral beam injectors has been studied using a 3D Monte-Carlo code to define a number of key parameters affecting the design and operation of the injector. This paper presents the results of calculations of the gas density in the two accelerator concepts presently considered as options for the ITER injectors, and the resultant stripping losses of the negative ions during their acceleration to 1 MeV. The sensitivity of the model to various parameters has been studied, including the gas temperature in the ion source and the subsequent accommodation by collisions with the accelerator structure, and the degree of dissociation of the D 2 or H 2 in the ion source, and subsequent recombination during collisions with the accelerator structure. Additionally the sensitivity of the losses to details of the beam source design and operating parameters are examined for the both accelerator concepts. (author)

  8. RESIDUAL-GAS-IONIZATION BEAM PROFILE MONITORS IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNOLLY, R.; MICHNOFF, R.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) in RHIC measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last three years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.